LA Times Crossword Answers 17 Mar 13, Sunday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Alan Arbesfeld
THEME: Disorderly Conduct … each of today’s themed answers is taken from a common 3-word phrase, with the sound of the first syllable in the first and third words swapped:

23A. Avoid caviar? : SHUN THE ROE (from “run the show“)
28A. Rouse a duck? : WAKE THE TEAL from “take the wheel“)
34A. Back beachgoers? : STAKE THE TANNED (from “take the stand“)
51A. Strongly desire daredevils? : CRAVE THE BOLD (from “brave the cold“)
61A. Respond to a face-licking? : KISS THE MUTT (from “miss the cut“)
77A. Work for nothing? : WAIVE THE PAY (from “pave the way“)
88A. Forgo long stories? : SKIP THE TALES (from “tip the scales“)
102A. Select one’s jousting weapon? : CHOOSE THE LANCE (from “lose the chance“)
111A. Apportion a side dish? : DOLE THE RICE (from “roll the dice“)
121A. Bench a cab company softball team player? : SIT THE HACK (from “hit the sack“)

COMPLETION TIME: 45m 33s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. 1994 Nobel Peace Prize sharer : RABIN
Yitzhak Rabin was the fifth Prime Minister of Israel, and the first Prime Minister to have been born in the relatively young state of Israel. Rabin was a signatory of the Oslo Accords in 1993, along with PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat, and US President Bill Clinton. Sadly, this led to his death as he was assassinated two years later by a right-wing radical who opposed the Accords.

10. Biblical king of Israel and a captain : AHABS
Ahab was a King of Israel, but the power behind his throne was his wife Jezebel, a Phoenician princess. Jezebel’s god was Ba’al, and she used her influence to get temples of Ba’al build in Israel. Jezebel’s name is still associated with the worship of false prophets.

Captain Ahab is the obsessed and far from friendly Captain of the Pequod in Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick”.

21. Amazon tributary : NEGRO
The Rio Negro (Spanish for “black river”) is a tributary of the Amazon in South America. The Rio Negro is the largest blackwater river in the world. A blackwater river is a slow-moving waterway that flows through forestation, collecting decaying vegetable matter that turns the water to a dark coffee color.

28. Rouse a duck? : WAKE THE TEAL from “take the wheel”)
The beautiful color of teal takes it name from the duck called a “teal”, which has dark greenish-blue (teal) markings on its head and wings.

29. Stella __: cookie brand meaning “star of gold” : D’ORO
Stella D’Oro is a brand of cookies and breadsticks, originally manufactured in the Bronx, New York City but now made in New Jersey.

39. 2000 title role for Renée : IRENE
“Me, Myself & Irene” is a 2000 comedy film starring Jim Carrey (“Me” and “Myself”) and Renée Zellweger (Irene). The movie is a perfect vehicle for Carrey as his character is a state trooper who develops a second personality after a psychotic breakdown. You can just imagine how Jim Carrey plays that extra, unrepressed persona!

43. Marx observation : QUIP
The five Marx Brothers were born to “Minnie” and “Frenchy” Marx in New York City. The more famous older boys were Chico, Harpo and Groucho. Zeppo was the youngest brother, and he appeared in the early Marx Brothers movies. The fifth son was called Gummo, and he decided to pursue a different career off the stage.

45. Düsseldorf direction : OST
“Ost” is German for “east”.

Düsseldorf lies in the west of Germany, fairly close to the border with France, and sits on the River Rhine.

48. Saharan : ARID
The name “Sahara” means “greatest desert” in Arabic and it is just that, a great desert covering almost 4 million square miles of Northern Africa. That’s almost the size of the United States.

59. Academy founder : PLATO
The Greek philosopher Plato founded his school called “the Academy” circa 387 BC in Athens. The site Plato chose for his school was a walled-off grove of olive trees that lay just outside the city. The grove was sacred, dedicated to the goddess Athena, but named “Akademia” after a mythological hero called Akademos. So, it is the mythical Akademos who ultimately gives us our word “academy”.

60. Word on a dollar : ORDO
The Latin phrase “novus ordo seclorum” means “new order of the ages”. These words appear on the reverse of the Great Seal of the United States, a device used to authenticate some US federal documents. “Novus ordo seclorum” also appears on the back of one-dollar bills. The phrase itself is lifted from one of the works of the ancient Roman poet Virgil.

65. Thor’s father : ODIN
In Norse mythology, Odin was the chief of the gods. Odin’s wife Frigg was the queen of Asgard whose name gave us our English term “Friday” (via Anglo-Saxon). Odin’s son was Thor, and his name gave us the term “Thursday”.

66. Python in “The Jungle Book” : KAA
Kaa is the python character in Rudyard Kipling’s “The Jungle Book”.

“The Jungle Book” by Rudyard Kipling was originally published in 1894, and is a collection of adventure stories or fables featuring the animals of the jungle and a young boy called Mowgli. Baloo is a sloth bear who teaches the cubs of a wolf pack the Law of the Jungle. His most challenging pupil however is no lupine, but the man-cub Mowgli.

74. Golfer Jay : HAAS
Jay Haas is a former PGA golfer from St. Louis, Missouri who now plays on the Champions Tour. Haas was named Champions Tour Player of the Year for 2006.

83. Iams competitor : ALPO
Alpo is a brand of dog food first produced by Allen Products in 1936, with “Alpo” being an abbreviation for “Allen Products”. Lorne Greene used to push Alpo in television spots, as did Ed McMahon and Garfield the Cat, would you believe?

84. Title role for Michael and Jude : ALFIE
There have been two versions of the movie “Alfie”. The original, and for my money the best, was made in 1966 with Michael Caine. The remake came out in 2004 and stars Jude Law in the title role. The theme song was performed by Cher in the 1966 movie, but it was Dionne Warwick’s cover version from 1967 that was the most successful in the charts.

87. V-formation fliers : GEESE
Apparently geese fly in a V-formation for a couple of reasons. One is that it makes for efficient flight and conserves energy. The leading bird gets no advantage, but every following bird gets to “slipstream” a little. It has been noted that the lead bird drops to the back of the formation when he/she gets fatigued. It’s also thought that the flock can stick together more easily when in formation, so it is more difficult to lose someone along the way.

91. __ Fáil: Irish coronation stone : LIA
The “Lia Fáil” is the coronation stone that is found on the Hill of Tara, the traditional seat of the High Kings of Ireland. “Lia Fáil” translates from Irish as “stone of destiny”.

Happy St. Paddy’s Day!

93. Mmes., across the Pyrenees : SRAS
According to Greek mythology, Pyrene was a lover of Hercules. Out of the relationship she bore a serpent, which understandably terrified her so she fled into the woods and there died. Hercules made a tomb for her that he covered with a huge pile of rocks, creating the Pyrenees mountain range that separates Spain from France. So, the Pyrenees are named after Pyrene.

96. Inside look, briefly? : MRI
A CT (or “CAT”) scan produces (via computer manipulation) a three dimensional image of the inside of an object, usually the human body. It does so by taking a series of two dimensional x-ray images while rotating the camera around the patient. The issue with CT scans is that they use x-rays, and high doses of radiation can be harmful causing damage that is cumulative over time. An MRI on the other hand (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), uses powerful magnetic fields to generate its images so there is no exposure to ionizing radiation (such as X-rays). We used MRI equipment in our chemistry labs at school, way back in the days when the technology was still called Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI). Apparently the marketing folks didn’t like the term “nuclear” because of its association with atomic bombs, so now it’s just called MRI.

97. LAX postings : ETDS
Estimated Time of Departure (ETD).

Los Angeles International Airport is the sixth busiest airport in the world in terms of passenger traffic, and the busiest here on the West Coast of the US. The airport was opened in 1930 as Mines Field and was renamed to Los Angeles Airport in 1941. On the airport property is the iconic white structure that resembles a flying saucer. This is called the Theme Building and I believe it is mainly used as a restaurant and observation deck for the public. The airport used to be identified by the letters “LA”, but when the aviation industry went to a three-letter standard for airport identification, this was changed to “LAX”. Apparently the “X” has no significant meaning.

99. “Charlotte’s Web” monogram : EBW
Elwyn Brooks (E. B.) White was an American writer. His most famous creations were the children’s stories “Charlotte’s Web” and “Stuart Little”, but he also co-authored the writing guide “The Elements of Style” (usually referred to as “Strunk & White”).

109. N.L. Central team : STL
The St. Louis Cardinals were originally called the “Brown Stockings”, changing their name to the “Perfectos” in 1899. The new name obviously didn’t go down well with the locals, as the owners changed it one year later to the Cardinals.

110. Massachusetts Bay city : LYNN
Lynn is a Massachusetts city located just ten miles north of downtown Boston. The city was named for the port town of King’s Lynn in Norfolk, on the east coast of England.

114. Jeté, say : LEAP
A jeté is a leap in ballet, coming from the French word “jeter” meaning “to throw”. A jeté en avant is a “leap to the front”, towards the audience.

117. Familia members : TIAS
“Tia” is the Spanish word for “aunt” (and “tio” means “uncle”).

120. With “The,” Frederick Forsyth thriller : ODESSA FILE
“The Odessa File” is a 1972 novel by English author Frederick Forsyth. The novel is a real thriller, set in the sixties, involving the hunt for a former SS concentration camp commander. There is a 1974 movie adaption that has the same title, starring Jon Voight and Maximilian Schell.

125. Pasta that doesn’t sound very appetizing : VERMICELLI
Vermicelli is a pasta that is similar to spaghetti, except that it is thicker. “Vermicelli” translates from Italian as “little worms”.

126. Hardy heroine : TESS
The full name of Thomas Hardy’s 1891 novel is “Tess of the d’Urbervilles: A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented”. When it was originally published, “Tess …” received very mixed reviews, largely because it addresses some difficult sexual themes including rape, and sexual double standards (society’s attitude towards men vs women). I suppose the most celebrated screen adaptation is Roman Polanski’s “Tess” released in 1979. Polanski apparently made “Tess” because his wife, Sharon Tate, gave him Hardy’s novel as her last act before she was murdered by the Manson family. There is a dedication at the beginning of the movie that simply reads “To Sharon”.

129. Bear, to Brutus : URSUS
The Latin word for a bear is “ursus”.

The most famous man with the name “Brutus” in Ancient Rome was Marcus Junius Brutus the Younger. It was this Brutus that Julius Caesar turned to when he was assassinated on the steps of the Senate. William Shakespeare immortalized Brutus by featuring him in his play, “Julius Caesar”, and giving his victim the line “Et tu, Brute?”

Down
5. News initials since 1851 : NYT
“The New York Times” has been published since 1851. These days a viable alternative to buying the paper is to read the news online. NYTimes.com is the most popular online newspaper website in the country, and I’m proud to be one of the 30 million visitors to the site each month.

7. Parent to Philippe : PERE
“Père” is the French for “father”.

9. “The Waste Land” monogram : TSE
T. S. Eliot was born in New England but grew up in St. Louis, Missouri. Much of Eliot’s college education was at Oxford, and clearly he became comfortable with life in England. In 1927 he became a British citizen and lived the rest of life in the UK.

Eliot wrote his poem called “The Waste Land” in 1922. “The Waste Land” opens with the famous line, “April is the cruelest month …”.

10. Looped handle : ANSA
Ansa is the Latin word for handle. The term is also used to describe anatomical structures that are shaped like a handle, forming a loop or an arc.

14. Campus group : SOPHS
The term “sophomore” has been used for a student in the second year of university since the 1680’s. The original meaning of the word was “arguer”. The term has Greek roots, from two Greek words that have been artificially combined in English. The Greek “sophos” means “wise”, and “moros” means “foolish”.

15. 2009 James Cameron epic : AVATAR
James Cameron’s 2009 epic “Avatar” is the highest-grossing film of all time. The second highest-grossing film is 1997’s “Titanic”, also from James Cameron. However, if you adjust for inflation, then 1939’s “Gone with the Wind” edges out “Avatar” for the top spot.

17. Most fit to serve : ONE-A
The US government maintains information on all males who are potentially subject to military conscription, using what is called the Selective Service System(SS). In the event that a draft was held, men registered would be classified into groups to determine eligibility for service. Class 1-A registrants are those available for unrestricted military service. Other classes are 1-A-O (conscientious objector available for noncombatant service), 4-A (registrant who has completed military service) and 4-D (Minister of religion).

18. Jazz keyboardist Saunders : MERL
Merl Saunders was a piano and keyboard musician. Saunders was good friends with Jerry Garcia and often played with the Grateful Dead.

28. Baseball Hall of Famer Paul or Lloyd : WANER
Paul and Lloyd Waner were two brothers who played Major League Baseball. The brothers played together in the 1920s and 1930s for the Pittsburgh Pirates. Paul earned himself the nickname “Big Poison”, while Lloyd had the moniker “Little Poison”.

32. “The Burning Bed” star : FAWCETT
“The Burning Bed” is a 1984 TV movie starring Farrah Fawcett that made quite an impact when it first aired. The movie is an adaptation of a non-fiction book of the same name written by Faith McNulty. Both film and book tell the true story of a battered housewife called Francine Hughes who, after 13 years of abuse, was driven to kill her husband by setting fire to the bed in which he was sleeping.

35. Country singer Clark : TERRI
Terri Clark is a country music artist from Montreal in Canada who has had success right across North America, and who now resides in Nashville, Tennessee.

37. __ Downs : EPSOM
The Surrey town of Epsom in England is most famous for its racecourse (Epsom Downs), at which is run the Epsom Derby every year, one of the three races that make up the English Triple Crown. You might also have heard of Epsom salt. Epsom salt is magnesium sulfate, originally prepared by boiling down mineral waters. Epsom was indeed a spa town at one time.

38. Tide table term : NEAP
Tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon on the oceans. At neap tide, the smaller gravitational effect of the sun cancels out some of the moon’s effect. At spring tide, the sun and the moon’s gravitational forces act in concert causing more extreme movement of the oceans.

40. Nita of silents : NALDI
Nita Naldi was an American silent film actress who usually played a “femme fatale” type of role.

45. “Beetle Bailey” dog : OTTO
Sgt. Snorkel (“Sarge”) is Beetle Bailey’s nemesis in the cartoon strip that bears his name. Snorkel has a dog called Otto that he dresses up to look just like himself. Otto started off as a regular dog, but artist Mort Walker decide to draw him more like his owner, and soon Otto became a big hit.

52. Big name in pickles : VLASIC
Apparently Vlasic invented the glass-packed, shelf-stable pickle. The company adopted the stork mascot in the late sixties, with the stork originally carrying a baby. The mascot was a play on the perception that pregnant women have a higher than average appetite for pickles.

56. Educ. fundraiser : PTA
Parent-Teacher Association (PTA).

58. Georgia neighbor : RUSSIA
The former Soviet Socialist Republic of Georgia is now an independent country. Supposedly, the Georgian people were given their name because they especially revered St. George. The flag of Georgia does indeed feature five St. George’s crosses.

63. Fancy marble : TAW
In the game of marbles, the “taw” is the shooting marble, and is shot at the “ducks”.

68. Grateful Dead’s Phil Lesh, e.g. : BASSIST
Phil Lesh is a bass guitar player and is one of the founding members of the rock band, the Grateful Dead. The band’s first names was “the Warlocks”, a name that had to be changed as there was already a band called the Warlocks (although the other Warlocks band had in fact changed its name too, to Velvet Underground). “The Grateful Dead” was suggested by Jerry Garcia, and was chosen from a dictionary.

70. Use MC or Amex : CHG
Charge (chg.).

71. Roy Rogers prop : LASSO
Cowboy actor and singer Roy Rogers’ real name was Leonard Franklin Slye, and his nickname was “King of the Cowboys”. Roy Rogers married Dale Evans in 1947. Evans’ nickname was “Queen of the West”.

72. “The Magic Kingdom” novelist Stanley : ELKIN
Stanley Elkin was a novelist from Brooklyn, New York who grew up in Chicago. Elkin lived most of his life in St. Louis, where he was a member of the faculty at Washington University. He published ten novels, mostly dealing with pop culture of the fifties and sixties.

75. “Potent Potables for $200, __” : ALEX
The word is that Alex Trebek will step down as host of the game show “Jeopardy” in 2016, when his current contract expires. The list of names mentioned to replace Trebek includes Brian Williams, Dan Patrick, Matt Lauer and Anderson Cooper. I vote for Cooper, but I can’t see him taking the job …

79. Head of Hollywood : EDITH
Edith Head was a Hollywood costume designer. Head won eight Academy Awards for Best Costume Design for her work on movies including 1951’s “All About Eve”, 1954’s “Roman Holiday” and 1955’s “Sabrina”. She ended up winning more Oscars than any other woman in history, in any category.

82. With 47-Across, 2008 campaign slogan : YES WE
(47A. See 82-Down : CAN)
Actually, the slogan used by the Obama campaign in 2008 was “Change we can believe in”, and the famous “Yes We Can” was used more as a chant at campaign rallies. Well, that’s how I remember it anyway …

85. Sesame Street giggler : ELMO
The toy called Tickle Me Elmo was a sensational fad in the late nineties, with stores raising prices dramatically above the recommended retail price to take advantage of demand. Reportedly, prices as high as $1500 were paid at the height of the craze. The toy’s manufacturer, Tyco, originally planned to market the “tickle” toy as Tickle Me Tasmanian Devil (after the “Looney Tunes” character), but then went with “Elmo” after they bought the rights to use “Sesame Street” names.

89. Brief online updates : TWEETS
I have never tweeted in my life, and have no plans to do so. Twitter is a micro-blogging service that limits any post sent to just 140 characters. In a sense, it is similar to this blog. Here I send out a post once a day containing information that I think might be useful to folks (thank you for reading!). I don’t think I could send out much of interest using just 140 characters. I believe that many people who do tweet tend to send out messages like “I’m at dinner now. I am having sushi” and “There’s nothing on TV. I’m bored”. Nope, I don’t think so!

90. Uneven : EROSE
An edge that is “erose” is irregularly notched or indented.

92. Long Island university : ADELPHI
Adelphi University is located in Garden City, New York on Long Island. The university started out as Adelphi Academy in Brooklyn in 1863. By 1929, the academy had moved to Garden City and was a woman’s college. Adelphi reverted to co-education after WWII when it admitted many students under the GI Bill.

103. Arm raiser on the street, often : HAILER
A hailer might be hailing a cab.

104. Magazine awards : ELLIES
The National Magazine Awards are familiarly known as “the Ellies”. The term “Ellie” is short for “elephant”, as the award itself is a copper-colored statue resembling an abstract elephant.

105. Stamen part : ANTHER
The stamen is the male reproductive organ of a flower. The part of the stamen known as the anther carries the pollen, which is picked up by the bee and transferred from flower to flower. The pistil is the female reproductive organ, and it accepts the pollen.

107. “If __ Hammer” : I HAD A
“If I Had a Hammer” is a song written in 1949 by Pete Seeger and Lee Hays. The song has been released by many artists, but my guess would be that the most famous recording was by Peter, Paul and Mary in 1962.

112. “Garfield” pooch : ODIE
Odie is the best friend of “Garfield” and is a slobbery beagle, a character in Jim Davis’s comic strip.

113. British tax : CESS
“Cess” is an outdated term for “tax” or “rate” that was used for many years, mainly in Britain and Ireland. “Cess” comes from a shortening of “assess”.

115. To be, to Brigitte : ETRE
The French for “to be” is “être”.

118. Rights gp. : ACLU
The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has its roots in the First World War when it was founded to provide legal advice and support to conscientious objectors.

119. They’re worn on moguls : SKIS
Moguls are the series of bumps in the surface of snow that arise naturally as a succession of skiers make turns on a slope.

121. “Law & Order: __” : SVU
“Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” is a spin off the TV crime drama “Law & Order”. “SVU” has been on the air since 1999, and is set in New York City. Interestingly, since 2007 there has been a very successful Russian adaptation of the show that is set in Moscow.

122. Bygone French coin : ECU
The ecu was an Old French coin. When introduced in 1640, the ecu was worth three livres (an older coin, called a “pound” in English). The word “ecu” comes from the Latin “scutum” meaning “shield”. The original ecu had a coat of arms on it, a shield.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. 1994 Nobel Peace Prize sharer : RABIN
6. Campfire rod : SPIT
26. Camp sight : TENT
10. Biblical king of Israel and a captain : AHABS
15. Small matter? : ATOM
19. Coral reefs, e.g. : ECOSYSTEMS
21. Amazon tributary : NEGRO
22. Roof pointer : VANE
23. Avoid caviar? : SHUN THE ROE (from “run the show”)
24. Sheets for jotting : SCRAP PAPER
27. Sign : OMEN
28. Rouse a duck? : WAKE THE TEAL from “take the wheel”)
29. Stella __: cookie brand meaning “star of gold” : D’ORO
31. “__ tree falls …” : IF A
33. Cigarette ad phrase : LESS TAR
34. Back beachgoers? : STAKE THE TANNED (from “take the stand”)
39. 2000 title role for Renée : IRENE
42. HMS component : HER
43. Marx observation : QUIP
44. Tiny : WEE
45. Düsseldorf direction : OST
47. See 82-Down : CAN
48. Saharan : ARID
50. NBA scoreboard item : PTS
51. Strongly desire daredevils? : CRAVE THE BOLD (from “brave the cold”)
55. Weirdo : CREEP
57. What an applauding audience may want : MORE
59. Academy founder : PLATO
60. Word on a dollar : ORDO
61. Respond to a face-licking? : KISS THE MUTT (from “miss the cut”)
64. Over : ATOP
65. Thor’s father : ODIN
66. Python in “The Jungle Book” : KAA
67. Guesses : STABS
69. Routine : ACT
71. For fear that : LEST
74. Golfer Jay : HAAS
77. Work for nothing? : WAIVE THE PAY (from “pave the way”)
83. Iams competitor : ALPO
84. Title role for Michael and Jude : ALFIE
86. Whole bunch : SCAD
87. V-formation fliers : GEESE
88. Forgo long stories? : SKIP THE TALES (from “tip the scales”)
91. __ Fáil: Irish coronation stone : LIA
93. Mmes., across the Pyrenees : SRAS
94. Polite title : SIR
95. Put a coat on? : WAX
96. Inside look, briefly? : MRI
97. LAX postings : ETDS
99. “Charlotte’s Web” monogram : EBW
100. In reserve : ON ICE
102. Select one’s jousting weapon? : CHOOSE THE LANCE (from “lose the chance”)
106. “Can you imagine?!” : THE IDEA
109. N.L. Central team : STL
110. Massachusetts Bay city : LYNN
111. Apportion a side dish? : DOLE THE RICE (from “roll the dice”)
114. Jeté, say : LEAP
117. Familia members : TIAS
120. With “The,” Frederick Forsyth thriller : ODESSA FILE
121. Bench a cab company softball team player? : SIT THE HACK (from “hit the sack”)
123. Menu : LIST
124. Doctor’s orders : DOSES
125. Pasta that doesn’t sound very appetizing : VERMICELLI
126. Hardy heroine : TESS
127. New followers? : AGERS
128. Roles : USES
129. Bear, to Brutus : URSUS

Down
1. Leftovers : REST
2. Feel pain : ACHE
3. Parental settings : BOUNDARIES
4. Falls short of being acceptable : ISN’T OK
5. News initials since 1851 : NYT
6. Part of a goblet : STEM
7. Parent to Philippe : PERE
8. “Leave that to me” : I’M ON IT
9. “The Waste Land” monogram : TSE
10. Looped handle : ANSA
11. Give a hard time at the comedy club : HECKLE
12. “Deal!” : AGREED!
13. Nightmares for nana : BRATS
14. Campus group : SOPHS
15. 2009 James Cameron epic : AVATAR
16. Save for later playing : TAPE-RECORD
17. Most fit to serve : ONE-A
18. Jazz keyboardist Saunders : MERL
20. Grow dramatically : SHOOT UP
25. Dress designation : PETITE
28. Baseball Hall of Famer Paul or Lloyd : WANER
30. Like basic courses: Abbr. : REQ
32. “The Burning Bed” star : FAWCETT
34. Hovel : SHACK
35. Country singer Clark : TERRI
36. Casino request : HIT ME
37. __ Downs : EPSOM
38. Tide table term : NEAP
40. Nita of silents : NALDI
41. __ a sour note : END ON
45. “Beetle Bailey” dog : OTTO
46. Patronize : SHOP AT
49. Big Apple locale? : DESKTOP
52. Big name in pickles : VLASIC
53. Put away : EAT
54. Coverings for tiny toes : BOOTEES
56. Educ. fundraiser : PTA
58. Georgia neighbor : RUSSIA
62. Comedy club sounds : HA HA HA
63. Fancy marble : TAW
68. Grateful Dead’s Phil Lesh, e.g. : BASSIST
70. Use MC or Amex : CHG
71. Roy Rogers prop : LASSO
72. “The Magic Kingdom” novelist Stanley : ELKIN
73. Lethargic : SPIRITLESS
75. “Potent Potables for $200, __” : ALEX
76. Back on board : AFT
78. Parking lot runner, perhaps : VALET
79. Head of Hollywood : EDITH
80. Tulips and dahlias : PERENNIALS
81. Easy __ : AS ABC
82. With 47-Across, 2008 campaign slogan : YES WE
85. Sesame Street giggler : ELMO
89. Brief online updates : TWEETS
90. Uneven : EROSE
92. Long Island university : ADELPHI
98. Shifty : SLY
101. Storage units : CHESTS
102. Red shade : CERISE
103. Arm raiser on the street, often : HAILER
104. Magazine awards : ELLIES
105. Stamen part : ANTHER
107. “If __ Hammer” : I HAD A
108. Get the mist off : DEFOG
111. Knucklehead : DOLT
112. “Garfield” pooch : ODIE
113. British tax : CESS
115. To be, to Brigitte : ETRE
116. 20 holders, briefly : ATMS
118. Rights gp. : ACLU
119. They’re worn on moguls : SKIS
121. “Law & Order: __” : SVU
122. Bygone French coin : ECU


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2 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 17 Mar 13, Sunday”

  1. Thank you so much for this! I did this puzzle yesterday (our local paper has no Sunday edition, so they publish the puzzles on Saturday). I was pulling my hair out trying to figure out the theme, and failing miserably! It was making me crazy! This explained it well, and seeing it, it now makes sense!

  2. I am glad the post was of service, Les. I just aplogize for it being so late today.

    Those leprechauns are little divils, always getting in my way at this time of year 🙂

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