LA Times Crossword Answers 28 Apr 13, Sunday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Julian Lim
THEME: It’ll Have to Do … each of the themed answers is a well known phrase , but with a -TLE suffix added:

22A. Container for mystery meat? SPAM BOTTLE (from “spambot”)
31A. Action scene in “True Blood”? VAMPIRE BATTLE (from “vampire bat”)
49A. Courage of Manhattanites? NEW YORK METTLE (from “New York Met”)
71A. Cloak for a road trip? HIGHWAY MANTLE (from “highwayman”)
92A. Reaction to an alarm? RISING STARTLE (from “rising star”)
102A. Baby’s pre-vacation note to self? PACK RATTLE (from “packrat”)

COMPLETION TIME: 33m 17s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
5. Jotting on a Post-it MEMO
The Post-it note was invented at 3M following the accidental discovery of a low-tack, reusable adhesive. The actual intent of the development program was the discovery of a super-strong adhesive.

9. Lowest of the low NADIR
The nadir is the direction pointing immediately below a particular location (through to the other side of the Earth for example). The opposite direction, that pointing immediately above, is called the zenith.

14. Artist who was an admirer of Freud DALI
The famous surrealist painter Salvador Dalí was born in Figueres, Spain. I had the privilege of visiting the Dalí Museum in Figueres some years ago, just north of Barcelona. If you ever get the chance, it’s a “must see” as it really is a quite magnificent building with a fascinating collection.

20. “Invisible Cities” author Calvino ITALO
As well as being an author, Italo Calvino was a famous Italian journalist. He was a supporter of communism and so wasn’t very popular in the US nor in Britain.

22. Container for mystery meat? SPAM BOTTLE (from “spambot”)
Apparently the term “SPAM”, used for unwanted email, is taken from a “Monty Python” sketch. In the sketch (which I’ve seen) the dialog is taken over by the word SPAM, a play on the glut of canned meat in the markets of Britain after WWII. So “SPAM” is used for the glut of emails that takes over online communication. I can just imagine nerdy Internet types (like me) adopting something from a “Monty Python” sketch to describe an online phenomenon …

Spambots are nasty little computer programs that send out spam emails and messages, often from fake accounts. This blog gets about 300 spam comments a day that I have to delete, almost all of which are written by spambots.

25. Nanny __: security devices CAMS
From what I just read, it is legal to record video with a hidden camera, at least to monitor the behavior of a caregiver in your home. Apparently there is also a law that prohibits the recording of audio. So, “nanny cams” are sold without audio capability. But (disclaimer) that’s just what I read, so don’t take my word for it!

27. Word repeated after “que,” in song SERA
As Doris Day told us, “que sera sera” is Spanish for “whatever will be, will be”.

31. Action scene in “True Blood”? VAMPIRE BATTLE (from “vampire bat”)
“True Blood” is a television drama made by HBO. The series is based on novels written by Charlaine Harris.

Vampire bats feed mostly in the blood of mammals, including humans. When they find a suitable “victim”, often one that is asleep, the bat usually lands close by and approaches its “meal” on the ground. It makes a small cut with its razor-sharp teeth and laps up the blood. The blood tends to flow freely as the bat’s saliva contains anti-coagulants. Reports of bats biting the neck of humans are very rare in the real world, but the neck is the preferred location of attack in the fantasy world of vampires.

34. Pakistani city LAHORE
Lahore is a large city in Pakistan, second in size only to Karachi. It is known as the Garden of the Mughals (or in English, Moguls) because of its association with the Mughal Empire. The Mughals ruled much of India from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries.

35. Order to pounce SIC ‘EM
Sic ’em is an attack order given to a dog, instructing the animal to growl, bark or even bite. The term dates back to the 1830s, with “sic” being a variation of “seek”.

44. Like NES video games RETRO
The Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) was sold in North America from 1985 to to 1995. The NES was the biggest selling gaming console of the era.

45. Pulitzer winner Walker ALICE
Alice Walker is an author and poet. Walker’s best known work is the novel “The Color Purple”, which earned her the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. “The Color Purple” was of course adapted into a very successful film of the same name, directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Whoopi Goldberg.

48. Hamilton’s prov. ONT
Hamilton, Ontario is a port city on the western end of Lake Ontario. It is a popular location for film shoots, and has been used for mainstream movies such as “Gone in 60 Seconds”, “X-Men”, “Hairspray” and “The Incredible Hulk”.

49. Courage of Manhattanites? NEW YORK METTLE (from “New York Met”)
The New York Mets baseball team was founded in 1962, a replacement for two teams that the city had lost, namely the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants. For several years the Mets played very poorly, finishing no better than second-to-last in their division. Then of course along came the “Miracle Mets” who beat the Baltimore Orioles in 1969 to claim the World Series in a huge upset.

52. Crew member TAR
A Jack Tar, or just “tar”, was a seaman in the days of the British Empire. The term probably arose due to a sailor’s various uses of tar back then, including waterproofing of clothes and using tar in the hair to slick down a ponytail.

56. Mil. decoration DSM
The Distinguished Service Medal is the highest (non-valorous) decoration awarded for services to the US military.

58. Wrote with limited characters TWEETED
I have never tweeted in my life, and have no plans to do so. Twitter is a micro-blogging service that limits any post sent to just 140 characters. In a sense, it is similar to this blog. Here I send out a post once a day containing information that I think might be useful to folks (thank you for reading!). I don’t think I could send out much of interest using just 140 characters. I believe that many people who do tweet tend to send out messages like “I’m at dinner now. I am having sushi” and “There’s nothing on TV. I’m bored”. Nope, I don’t think so!

59. Vineyard grape PINOT
The Pinot noir wine grape variety takes its name from the French for “pine” and “black”. The grapes grow in tight clusters shaped like pine cones, and are very dark in color. The Pinot noir grape is most closely associated with Burgundy wines in France, although in recent years the popularity (and price) of California Pinot noir wine has soared after it featured so prominently in the wonderful, wonderful 2004 movie “Sideways”. Grab a bottle of Pinot, and go rent the DVD…

67. Panaceas CURE ALLS
Panacea was the Greek goddess of healing. She lent her name to the term “panacea” that was used by alchemists to describe the beguiling remedy that could cure all diseases and prolong life indefinitely.

75. __ Fáil: Irish “stone of destiny” LIA
The “Lia Fáil” is the coronation stone that is found on the Hill of Tara, the traditional seat of the High Kings of Ireland. “Lia Fáil” translates from Irish as “stone of destiny”.

78. Architect Saarinen ELIEL
Eliel Saarinen was a Finnish architect who designed entire city districts in Helsinki. He immigrated to the United States where he became famous for his art nouveau designs. He was the father of Eero Saarinen, who was to become even more renowned in America for his designs, including the Dulles International Airport terminal, and the TWA building at JFK.

79. High-ranked Atlanta school EMORY
Emory is a private school in Atlanta, Georgia with a focus on graduate research. The school was named after a Methodist Episcopal bishop called John Emory, who was very popular at the time of the school’s founding in 1836.

80. Bane for bugs DEET
DEET is short for N,N-Diethyl-meta-toluamide, an active ingredient in insect repellents. DEET is most often used to repel mosquitoes by applying it to the skin and/or clothing. It is also used to protect against tick bites.

83. Windy City airport code ORD
O’Hare International is the fourth busiest airport in the world. The original airport was constructed on the site between 1942 and 1943, and was used by the Douglas Aircraft Company for the manufacture of planes during WWII. Before the factory and airport were built, there was a community in the area called Orchard Place, so the airport was called Orchard Place Airport/Douglas Field. This name is the derivation of the airport’s current location identifier: ORD (OR-chard D-ouglas). Orchard Place Airport was renamed to O’Hare International in 1949 in honor of Lieutenant Commander Edward O’Hare who grew up in Chicago. O’Hare was the US Navy’s first flying ace and a Medal of Honor recipient in WWII. As an aside, Edward O’Hare’s father was a lawyer for Al Capone who helped get the famous gangster convicted on tax evasion.

It seems that the derivation of Chicago’s nickname as the “Windy City” isn’t as obvious as I would have thought. There are two viable theories. First that the weather can be breezy, with wind blowing in off Lake Michigan. The effect of the wind is exaggerated by the grid-layout adopted by city planners after the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. The second theory is that “windy” means “being full of bluster”. Sportswriters from the rival city of Cincinnati were fond of calling Chicago supporters “windy” in the 1860s and 1870s, meaning that they were full of hot air in their claims that the Chicago White Stockings were superior to the Cincinnati Red Stockings.

84. Water filter brand BRITA
Brita is a German company that specializes in water filtration products. Brita products do a great job of filtering tap water, but they don’t “purify” it, they don’t remove microbes. That job is usually done by a municipality before the water gets to the faucet.

86. Paleness causes ANEMIAS
The term “anemia” (or “anaemia” as we write it back in Ireland) comes from a Greek word meaning “lack of blood”. Anemia is a lack of iron in the blood, or a low red blood cell count. Tiredness is a symptom of the condition.

88. __ Manor: “Batman” setting WAYNE
Wayne Manor is where Bruce Wayne lives, the alter-ego of Batman. It is a huge manor that lies just outside Gotham City. Looking after the house is the Wayne family servant, Alfred. Beneath the grounds of the manor is an extensive cave system where Bruce Wayne put together his Batcave. Access is to the cave is via a staircase behind a hidden door. The door is opened by moving the hands of a non-functioning grandfather clock to 10:47, the time at which Wayne’s parents were murdered. It is the murder of his parents that sets Bruce off on his journey of crime fighting.

95. Two guys out to dinner, say MAN DATE
A man date: two heterosexual males hanging out together.

96. Noted lawmaker NEWTON
Sir Isaac Newton was of course one of the most influential people in history, the man who laid the groundwork for all of classical mechanics. The story about an apple falling on his head, inspiring him to formulate his theories about gravity, well that’s not quite true. Newton often told the story about observing an apple falling in his mother’s garden and how this made him acutely aware of the Earth’s gravitational pull. However, he made no mention of the apple hitting him on the head.

107. Earthenware pot OLLA
An olla is a traditional clay pot used for the making of stews.

108. Turned right GEED
“Haw!” is a command given to a trained animal that is hauling something (like a horse or an ox). “Haw!” is used to instruct the animal to turn to the left. The equivalent command for a right turn is “Gee!” Just to confuse things, the same commands are used in the British Isles but with the opposite meanings. That must be pretty unsettling for jet-setting plow horses …

110. Hardy’s “Pure Woman” TESS
The full name of Thomas Hardy’s 1891 novel is “Tess of the d’Urbervilles: A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented”. When it was originally published, “Tess …” received very mixed reviews, largely because it addresses some difficult sexual themes including rape, and sexual double standards (society’s attitude towards men vs women). I suppose the most celebrated screen adaptation is Roman Polanski’s “Tess” released in 1979. Polanski apparently made “Tess” because his wife, Sharon Tate, gave him Hardy’s novel as her last act before she was murdered by the Manson family. There is a dedication at the beginning of the movie that simply reads “To Sharon”.

111. Drudge PEON
A peon is a lowly worker with no real control over his/her working conditions. The word comes into English from Spanish where it has the same meaning.

Down
2. Andean herd member ALPACA
Alpacas are like small llamas, but unlike llamas were never beasts of burden. Alpacas were bred specifically for the fleece. As such, there are no known wild alpacas these days, even in their native Peru.

3. Venue for poetry readings in space? SLAM SHUTTLE (from “slam shut”)
A poetry slam is a competition in which poets read their own work (usually), with winners being chosen by members of audience. Apparently the first poetry slam took place in Chicago in 1984. Now there is a Nation Poetry Slam that takes place each year, with representatives from the US, Canada and France.

7. Part of a GI’s URL MIL
Like www.army.mil

10. __ 2600: old video game console ATARI
The kids today probably don’t realize that we had a video game console back in the seventies, and it wasn’t a Nintendo nor was it a PlayStation. The Atari 2600 game system introduced the idea of separating out computing hardware (the console) from the game code (a cartridge). The same concept persists to this day, although cartridges have been displaced by discs and downloads.

11. Capital NW of Monrovia DAKAR
The Republic of Senegal is a country on the far western coast of Africa. For many years Senegal was a French colony, gaining independence in 1960. The capital of Senegal is Dakar, a city located on the Cap-Vert Peninsula that juts out into the Atlantic Ocean.

12. Loire land ILE
In French, an island (île) is a piece of ground (terre) surrounded by water (eau).

The Loire River is so long that it drains a full one-fifth of France’s land mass. It rises in the southeast, in the Cevennes mountain range, then it heads north and then due east, emptying into the Bay of Biscay at the city of Nantes.

16. California city name meaning “pretty knoll” LOMA LINDA
Loma Linda is a city in California located not far from Los Angeles. The name Loma Linda translates from Spanish as “Beautiful Hill”.

17. Yard worker? INSPECTOR
London’s Metropolitan Police Service was originally headquartered at 4 Whitehall Place, and the rear entrance to the building was in a street called Great Scotland Yard. As the public entrance to the headquarters became that rear entrance, the headquarters and the force itself became known as “Scotland Yard”. The current headquarters is nowhere near that first building, and hasn’t been so since 1890, and the new facility is called New Scotland Yard.

19. Silver in movies HORSE
Silver was the Lone Ranger’s horse.

“The Lone Ranger” was both a radio and television show, dating back to its first radio performance in 1933 on a Detroit station. The line “Hi-yo, Silver! Away!” was a device used in the storyline to signal that a riding sequence was starting, so cue the music!

27. Hook underling SMEE
In J. M. Barrie’s play and novel about Peter Pan, Smee is one of Captain Hook’s pirates and is Hook’s right-hand man. Smee is described by Barrie as being “Irish” and “a man who stabbed without offence”. Nice guy!

31. In __ fertilization VITRO
In vitro fertilization is the process in which egg cells are fertilized by sperm cells outside of the body “in vitro”, meaning “in glass”, usually in a culture dish.

35. Dionysian reveler SATYR
The satyrs of Greek mythology came with a very high sex drive. They are the “rude” male subjects drawn on the side of old Greek vases. The nubile maidens known as nymphs were often an object of attention for the satyrs.

Dionysus was the party animal of Greek mythology. Dionysus was the god of the wine, ritual madness and ecstasy! His Roman equivalent was Bacchus.

43. Eat like a chinchilla GNAW
A chinchilla is a rodent found in the Andes in South America. The chinchilla is a little larger than a squirrel, and has velvet-like fur. It takes its name from the local Chincha people who made clothing out of the fur. Chinchillas are quite rare in the wild now as they been hunted almost out of existence, but there are plenty of farm-raised chinchillas around supporting the fur industry, sad to say …

45. Supplies for Rambo AMMO
“First Blood” was the original of the four “Rambo” films starring Sylvester Stallone as John Rambo, a troubled Vietnam War veteran. I thought “First Blood” was a pretty good film actually, but the sequels were terrible, and way too violent for me. But action all the way …

51. First name in makeup ESTEE
Estée Lauder was quite the successful businesswoman, with a reputation as a great salesperson. Lauder introduced her own line of fragrances in 1953, a bath oil called “Youth Dew”. “Youth Dew” was marketed as a perfume, but it was added to bathwater. All of a sudden women were pouring whole bottles of Ms. Lauder’s “perfume” into their baths while using only a drop or two of French perfumes behind their ears. That’s quite a difference in sales volume …

57. Wharton Sch. conferral MBA
The world’s first MBA degree was offered by Harvard’s Graduate School of Business Administration, in 1908.

Wharton is the business school of the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia.

61. Kama __ SUTRA
Kama is the Hindu god of love. He is portrayed as a youth bearing a bow and arrows, much like Eros and Cupid.

The word “sutra” is used in Hinduism for a learned text, one usually meant to be studied by students.

The Kama Sutra is renowned for its descriptions of positions that can be used for sexual intercourse, but the sutra includes many other texts that deal with various matters of a sexual nature including how to woo a woman, the conduct of a “chief wife”, the conduct of “other” wives, how to make money as a courtesan and much, much more, as if that isn’t enough …

63. Rival of Bjorn ILIE
I think that Ilie Nastase was the most entertaining tennis player of the 1970s, the days of Jimmy Connors, Bjorn Borg and John McEnroe. No matter how much pressure there was in a match, Nastase always had time to give the crowd a laugh.

64. Some srs.’ source of stress LSAT
The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) has been around since 1948.

68. Webinars, e.g. E-LEARNING
Webinar is short for “Web-based seminar”, a presentation, lecture or similar event held online. In a Webinar there is two-way interaction, with the audience able to ask questions of the presenter.

69. Mortgage acronym FANNIE MAE
The Federal National Mortgage Association is commonly called Fannie Mae, a play on the acronym FNMA.

73. Sophie player MERYL
Meryl Streep has had more nominations for an academy award than any other actor, a tribute to her talent and the respect she has earned in the industry. I am not a huge fan of her earlier works but some of her recent movies are now on my list of all-time favorites. I recommend “Mama Mia” (you’ll either love it or hate it!), “Julie & Julia”, “It’s Complicated” and ”Hope Springs”.

“Sophie’s Choice” is a novel by William Styron. The title character is a Polish survivor of Nazi concentration camps. The tragic “choice” which Sophie had to make was forced on her by a sadistic German doctor during the war. Sophie had to decide which of her two young children would be immediately gassed, and which would be allowed to live in a camp. Famously, Sophie was played on the big screen by actress Meryl Streep.

82. “The Flintstones” answer to Fido DINO
In the Hanna-Barbera cartoon “The Flintstones”, Dino the pet dinosaur was voiced by the famous Mel Blanc, until Blanc passed away in 1989.

85. Maasai Mara game reserve locale KENYA
The Maasai Mara National Reserve in Kenya sits right beside the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania.

87. ’60s-’70s veep and family AGNEWS
Spiro Agnew served as Vice-President under Richard Nixon, before becoming the only VP in American history to resign because of criminal charges (there was a bribery scandal). Agnew was also the first Greek-American to serve as US Vice-President as he was the son of a Greek immigrant who had shortened the family name from Anagnostopoulos.

89. City about 300 miles from Baghdad BASRA
It’s quite a coincidence that the Iraqi city of Basra has a name that is an anagram of “Arabs”, isn’t it? Basra also features in the H. G. Wells science-fiction tale “The Shape of Things to Come”. Written in 1933, the storyline predicts a global conflict (WWII) that breaks out in 1940 lasting for ten years, after which chaos reigns as no victor emerges. Following worldwide plague, a benevolent dictatorship takes charge and the world moves towards a serene utopia. In time, the dictators are overthrown and peacefully retired, and the people of the Earth live happily ever after, all citizens of one global state with its capital in Basra in the Middle East.

90. 1887 La Scala premiere OTELLO
Giuseppe Verdi’s opera “Otello” was first performed in 1887 at La Scala Theater in Milan. The opera is based on Shakespeare’s play “Othello” and is considered by many to be Verdi’s greatest work.

The La Scala Opera House opened in 1778. It was built on the site of the church of Santa Maria della Scala, which gave the theater the name “Teatro alla Scala”.

91. Like the lion slain by Hercules NEMEAN
The Twelve Labors of Hercules is actually a Greek myth, although Hercules is the Roman name for the hero that the Greeks called Heracles. The first of these labors was to slay the Nemean Lion, a monster that lived in a cave near Nemea. Hercules had a tough job as the lion’s golden fur was impenetrable to normal weapons. One version of the story is that Hercules killed the lion by shooting an arrow into its mouth. Another version says that Hercules stunned the monster with a club and then strangled him with his bare hands.

101. It may be seen opposite VI XII
XII is at the top of many a clockface, and VI at the bottom.

102. Nursery container POT
Many a pot is found in a plant nursery.

103. “The Kids __ All Right”: 2010 Best Picture nominee ARE
“The Kids Are All Right” is an entertaining 2010 movie with a fabulous cast that includes Annette Bening, Julianne Moore, Mark Ruffalo and Mia Wasikowska. Bening and Moore play a lesbian couple, with each of them having given birth to a child using the same sperm donor. Ruffalo plays the sperm donor, and Wasikowska plays the elder of the two children.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Skip it PASS
5. Jotting on a Post-it MEMO
9. Lowest of the low NADIR
14. Artist who was an admirer of Freud DALI
18. Partner ALLY
19. Invites over HAS IN
20. “Invisible Cities” author Calvino ITALO
21. Well-versed in UP ON
22. Container for mystery meat? SPAM BOTTLE (from “spambot”)
24. How some sleep NAKED
25. Nanny __: security devices CAMS
26. Fiddled (with) TAMPERED
27. Word repeated after “que,” in song SERA
28. Lure into crime ENTRAP
30. Rapture ECSTASY
31. Action scene in “True Blood”? VAMPIRE BATTLE (from “vampire bat”)
34. Pakistani city LAHORE
35. Order to pounce SIC ‘EM
36. Like some personalities DYNAMIC
37. Fluent speakers avoid them UMS
38. Dull finish MATTE
39. Runner on snow SKI
41. Out of breath SPENT
42. Ones giving marching orders: Abbr. SGTS
44. Like NES video games RETRO
45. Pulitzer winner Walker ALICE
47. Opposite of exo- ENDO-
48. Hamilton’s prov. ONT
49. Courage of Manhattanites? NEW YORK METTLE (from “New York Met”)
52. Crew member TAR
53. Topple FALL OVER
55. Satan’s little helpers IMPS
56. Mil. decoration DSM
58. Wrote with limited characters TWEETED
59. Vineyard grape PINOT
61. Assess flight risk, in a way SET BAIL
65. Crossword heading: Abbr. ACR
66. Weirdo WACK
67. Panaceas CURE ALLS
68. Report card calamities EFS
71. Cloak for a road trip? HIGHWAY MANTLE (from “highwayman”)
75. __ Fáil: Irish “stone of destiny” LIA
76. Villain’s base LAIR
78. Architect Saarinen ELIEL
79. High-ranked Atlanta school EMORY
80. Bane for bugs DEET
81. Wrapped up ENDED
83. Windy City airport code ORD
84. Water filter brand BRITA
85. Pivotal KEY
86. Paleness causes ANEMIAS
88. __ Manor: “Batman” setting WAYNE
89. High light? BEACON
92. Reaction to an alarm? RISING STARTLE (from “rising star”)
95. Two guys out to dinner, say MAN DATE
96. Noted lawmaker NEWTON
97. MLB credits RBIS
98. Concert setup, briefly PA SYSTEM
99. “Look no further than me” I’M IT
100. Require EXACT
102. Baby’s pre-vacation note to self? PACK RATTLE (from “packrat”)
104. What a ponytail covers NAPE
105. River measure WIDTH
106. “Coffee __?” OR TEA
107. Earthenware pot OLLA
108. Turned right GEED
109. Puréeing aid SIEVE
110. Hardy’s “Pure Woman” TESS
111. Drudge PEON

Down
1. Washed-out shade PASTEL
2. Andean herd member ALPACA
3. Venue for poetry readings in space? SLAM SHUTTLE (from “slam shut”)
4. Diagnostician’s clues SYMPTOMS
5. Brit’s bro MATEY
6. Abbr. before a year ESTD
7. Part of a GI’s URL MIL
8. Late lunch hour ONE
9. Late dinner hr. NINE PM
10. __ 2600: old video game console ATARI
11. Capital NW of Monrovia DAKAR
12. Loire land ILE
13. Passed on a 19-Down RODE BY
14. Versatile roll DUCT TAPE
15. Common rental APARTMENT
16. California city name meaning “pretty knoll” LOMA LINDA
17. Yard worker? INSPECTOR
19. Silver in movies HORSE
23. Is worthy of, as repeating BEARS
27. Hook underling SMEE
29. Persian breads NANS
31. In __ fertilization VITRO
32. One may be supporting ACTOR
33. Queen’s decree EDICT
35. Dionysian reveler SATYR
38. Asked to be stroked, perhaps MEWED
39. Pursued one’s dreams? SLEPT
40. Press packets KITS
42. Out of shape SOFT
43. Eat like a chinchilla GNAW
44. Stargazer’s state REVERIE
45. Supplies for Rambo AMMO
46. Geriatrician’s concern, with “the” ELDERLY
49. V-shaped mark NOTCH
50. Twisted KINKY
51. First name in makeup ESTEE
54. Cow patch LEA
57. Wharton Sch. conferral MBA
59. Played with, cat-style PAWED
60. Alphabet addition? -ICAL
61. Kama __ SUTRA
62. Livestock kept between buildings? ALLEY CATTLE (from “alley cat”)
63. Rival of Bjorn ILIE
64. Some srs.’ source of stress LSAT
66. Propeller noise WHIR
67. Thou tenth C-NOTE
68. Webinars, e.g. E-LEARNING
69. Mortgage acronym FANNIE MAE
70. Glancing blow SIDESWIPE
72. Bright finish GLOSS
73. Sophie player MERYL
74. Nitrogen compound AMINE
77. Sent payment REMITTED
80. What bad traffic sometimes comes to, with “a” DEAD STOP
82. “The Flintstones” answer to Fido DINO
84. Swings at home BATS
85. Maasai Mara game reserve locale KENYA
87. ’60s-’70s veep and family AGNEWS
88. Twist in agony WRITHE
89. City about 300 miles from Baghdad BASRA
90. 1887 La Scala premiere OTELLO
91. Like the lion slain by Hercules NEMEAN
93. __ union TRADE
94. “Suburgatory” airer ABC TV
95. Nets MAKES
98. Statistician’s figs. PCTS
101. It may be seen opposite VI XII
102. Nursery container POT
103. “The Kids __ All Right”: 2010 Best Picture nominee ARE


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2 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 28 Apr 13, Sunday”

  1. I had an Atari 2600 also.
    Justified it by saying "look at all the quarters we're saving!" Anyone remember Space Invaders, Centipede, Asteroids, Missile Command?

  2. Hi there, Addict.

    Oh, I remember all of those arcade games, and loved them. The first one that really got me "hooked" was "Space Invaders". However, my favorite was "Centipede". Addictive stuff …

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