LA Times Crossword Answers 16 Jun 13, Sunday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Gail Grabowski & Bruce Venzke
THEME: In a Fog … the letters FOG split up to form the beginning and end of today’s themed answers:

23A. Sport on horseback FO(X HUNTIN)G
28A. United States Army Infantry School site FO(RT BENNIN)G
42A. Enjoying one’s Jeep Wrangler, say FO(UR-WHEELIN)G
65A. Compactly built canine F(RENCH BULLD)OG
86A. Procrastinator’s problem FO(OT-DRAGGIN)G
101A. Clotheshorse’s net reading F(ASHION BL)OG
107A. Amphibian that glides F(LYING FR)OG
32D. Mail order shipment insert F(REE CATAL)OG
47D. 1964 Detroit debut FO(RD MUSTAN)G

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 23s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
14. Arcade no-nos TILTS
In a game of pinball, some players get an irresistible urge to “nudge” the machine . Such a nudge, a movement of the machine designed to influence the path taken by the ball, is called a “tilt”. Most pinball machines have sensors designed to detect a tilt, and when activated a “tilt” warning light comes on and the player’s controls are temporarily disabled.

21. Country singer Jackson ALAN
Alan Jackson is a country music singer, and a bit of an author too. Jackson married his high school sweetheart in 1979, but they had a parting of the ways about twenty years later due to the pressures on the marriage from Jackson’s career. The pair reconciled, and Jackson wrote a book describing the relationship he has with his wife and his commitment to Christianity. The book is called “It’s All About Him: Finding the Love of My Life”, and it topped the New York Times Bestseller List.

22. Three-time Wimbledon champ EVERT
Chris Evert is a former professional tennis player from Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Evert has the best winning percentage in professional tennis, man or woman worldwide, losing less than 10% of all her matches.

25. Half of 10? ZERO
The numeral “10” comprises a “one” and a “zero”.

26. First name in Olympics perfection NADIA
Nadia Comaneci won three golds in the 1976 Summer Olympics and was the first gymnast to be awarded a perfect score of a ten in the gymnastics competition. Comaneci published a book called “Letters to a Young Gymnast” in 2003, and now lives in the United States.

28. United States Army Infantry School site FORT BENNING
Fort Benning is US Army facility located outside Columbus, Georgia that has been home to the Army Infantry since 1918.

38. Group that meets in the Palais du Luxembourg SENAT
The French Senate (“Sénat”) meets in the beautiful Luxembourg Palace (“Palais du Luxembourg”) in Paris.

42. Enjoying one’s Jeep Wrangler, say FOUR-WHEELING
Chrysler’s Jeep Wrangler is a direct descendent of the military “Jeep” vehicle that was heavily relied on during WWII.

50. Infomercial antitheft device THE CLUB
The the automotive world, “the Club” is a steering wheel lock. The device was invented by a Korean War veteran who had been used to securing vehicles by passing chains through the steering wheels and padlocking them.

53. Tropical rainforest, e.g. BIOME
I tend to think of “biome” is another word for ecosystem.

57. Comedian __ the Entertainer CEDRIC
Cedric the Entertainer is the stage name of actor and comedian Cedric Kyles from Jefferson City, MIssouri. Cedric is known as a co-star of “The Steve Harvey Show” sitcom and as a comedian showcased in the Spike Lee film “The Original Kings of Comedy” released in 2000.

58. Inamorato BEAU
“Inamorata” is an Italian term that we’ve imported into English. It describes a female lover. An “innamorato” is a male lover.

63. Longtime ABC News chairman ARLEDGE
Roone Arledge was an executive at ABC. Arledge made a name for himself in sports broadcasting and then took over ABC News in 1977, a position he held until his death in 2002.

64. Defer ending -ENT
To be deferent is to show courteous respect, to defer to someone.

72. Outback sprinter EMU
The emu has had a tough time in Australia since man settled there. There was even an “Emu War” in Western Australia in 1932 when migrating emus competed with livestock for water and food. Soldiers were sent in and used machine guns in an unsuccessful attempt to drive off the “invading force”. The emus were clever, breaking their usual formations and adopting guerrilla tactics, operating as smaller units. After 50 days of “war”, the military withdrew. Subsequent requests for military help for the farmers were ignored. The emus had emerged victorious …

74. Bolster, e.g. PILLOW
I don’t think I have heard the term used here in the US, but that might be just me. Back in Ireland I often slept in beds that had a “bolster” as well as pillows. The bolster was usually a long, bed-wide, stuffed cushion, harder than a pillow. It served the purpose of raising the pillows, perhaps as an aid for sitting up in bed. Our modern usage of the verb “bolster”, meaning to give a metaphoric shot in the arm, derives from this “bolster” that we used to sit up against.

75. “Jeopardy!” record-setter Jennings KEN
Ken Jennings is a remarkable man, the person who had the longest winning streak on television’s “Jeopardy”. Jennings has also won more game show money than any other person. He was defeated after 75 appearances on the show, after racking up over $2.5 million in the prior episodes.

78. Where to learn une leçon ECOLE
In French, one might learn a lesson (une leçon) in a school (école).

79. Pinkish rash ROSEOLA
Roseola is a common name for the infant disease exanthema subitum.

82. “The Death of Ivan Ilyich” author TOLSTOY
The Russian author Leo Tolstoy is best known for his novels “War and Peace” and “Anna Karenina”. He also wrote the celebrated novellas “Hadji Murad” and “The Death of Ivan Ilyich”.

88. Classic Steely Dan album AJA
Steely Dan’s heyday was in the seventies when they toured for a couple of years, although the group mainly focused on studio work. The band was formed in 1972 and broke up in 1981. The core of the band reunited in 1993 and they are still going strong today.

90. Score after deuce AD OUT
In tennis, if the score reaches “deuce” (i.e. when both players have scored three points), then the first player to win two points in a row wins the game. The player who wins the point immediately after deuce is said to have the “advantage”. If the player with the advantage wins the next point then that’s two in a row and that player wins the game. If the person with the advantage loses the next point, then advantage is lost and the players return to deuce and try again. If the one of the players is calling out the score then if he/she has the advantage then that player announces “ad in” or more formally “advantage in”. If the score announcer’s opponent has the advantage, then the announcement is “ad out” or “advantage out”. Follow all of that …?

101. Clotheshorse’s net reading FASHION BLOG
A “clotheshorse” is a frame on which clothes are hung after washing so that they dry. The term is also used for a person who is really interested in his or her dress.

103. Oktoberfest keepsake STEIN
Oktoberfest is a 16-day beer festival in Munich that actually starts in September. About six million people attend every year, making it the largest fair in the world. I’ve been there twice, and it really is a great party …

105. U.S. Army O-5 LT COL
The rank of Lieutenant Colonel ranks above a major and below a colonel, in many armed services around the world.

107. Amphibian that glides FLYING FROG
The term “flying frog” is applied to species of frogs that can achieve gliding flight when leaping. This ability is facilitated by webbing between the fingers and toes.

113. Dark-skinned fruit SLOE
The sloe is the fruit of the blackthorn bush.

115. “A Short Treatise on the Game of Whist” author HOYLE
Edmond Hoyle was a writer, most famous for documenting the rules and play of card games. In particular, Hoyle first wrote a book on the game of whist that was very popular. Such was the success of Hoyle’s treatises that we use the phrase “according to Hoyle” to mean “according to some respected authority”.

117. Lunches with mayo BLTS
The BLT (bacon, lettuce and tomato) is the second most popular sandwich in the US, after the plain old ham sandwich.

Down
1. Basker’s letters SPF
In theory, the sun protection factor (SPF) is a calibrated measure of the effectiveness of a sunscreen in protecting the skin from harmful UV rays. The idea is that if you wear a lotion with say SPF 20, then it takes 20 times as much UV radiation to cause the skin to burn than it would take without protection. I say just stay out of the sun …

2. Zagreb’s country, to the IOC CRO
Zagreb is the capital city of the European Republic of Croatia. Zagreb became the capital of Croatia after the dissolution of Yugoslavia.

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) was founded in 1894, and has its headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland.

3. __-en-Provence AIX
Aix-en-Provence is a beautiful city in the South of France, located just 30 miles north of Marseille. I had the remarkable privilege of living in Aix for two years, definitely two of the happiest years for our family …

4. Result of a batter “taking the collar” in a game NO HITS
I think that the term “to take the collar” in baseball comes from the concept of “choking”, not getting any hits.

9. Doc’s readout EEG
An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a record of electrical activity caused by the firing of neurons within the brain. The EEG might be used to diagnose epilepsy, or perhaps to determine if a patient is “brain dead”.

13. One often looking down SNOB
Back in the 1780s, a “snob” was a shoemaker or a shoemaker’s apprentice. By the end of the 18th century the word was being used by students at Cambridge University in England to refer to all local merchants and people of the town. The term evolved to mean one who copies those who are his or her social superior (and not in a good way). From there it wasn’t a big leap for “snob” to include anyone who emphasized their superior social standing and not just those who aspired to rank. Nowadays a snob is anyone who looks down on those considered to be of inferior standing.

14. Brit’s sawbuck TENNER
“Sawbuck” is slang for a ten dollar bill. The term was applied to the bill as the Roman numeral X (ten) resembles the end of sawhorse.

15. Donald Jr.’s mom IVANA
Ivana Winklmayr was born in Czechoslovakia. Winklmayr was an excellent skier, and was named as an alternate for the 1982 Czech Olympic Team. She was promoting the Montreal Olympics in New York in 1976 when she met Donald Trump. Ivana and Donald’s marriage was very public and well-covered by the media, but not nearly so well as their very litigious divorce in 1990.

17. Singer Lopez TRINI
Trini Lopez is a noted singer and guitarist from Dallas, Texas. He is perhaps best known for his international hit “If I Had a Hammer” from 1963, as well as “Lemon Tree” from 1965.

35. Porsche path BAHN
“Bahn” is the German for “track, way”.

Porsche was founded in 1931 in Stuttgart, Germany by Professor Ferdinand Porsche. The company didn’t produce cars at first, but worked on design and development. The first big job awarded to the company was from the German government, to design a car for the people. The result was the Volkswagen Beetle. Yep, the Beetle is a Porsche design.

40. Photo lab prod. ENL
Enlargement (enl.)

42. Mel’s Diner waitress FLO
Florence Jean “Flo” Castleberry was a waitress in the sitcom “Alice” which aired on CBS in the 70s and 80s. Flo got her own sitcom (called “Flo”) which had a brief run in the early 80s. I saw a few episodes of “Alice”, but that’s about it. Oh, and Flo was played by Polly Holliday.

47. 1964 Detroit debut FORD MUSTANG
The Ford Mustang car was introduced in 1964. Back then the Mustang wasn’t a brand new design, but was based on the Ford Falcon. The Mustang was the first of the “pony cars”, American models that are compact and affordable, as well as sporty in image and performance.

48. Baja buddies AMIGOS
Baja California is both the most northern, and the most western of the Mexican states.

51. Gulager of “The Virginian” CLU
Clu Gulager is a television and film actor. He is most remembered for playing Billy the Kid in the TV show “The Tall Man” in the early sixties, and then as Emmett Ryker in “The Virginian” in the late sixties.

53. Waffle source?: Abbr. BELG
You can’t get a Belgian waffle in Belgium, and the nearest thing is probably a Brussels waffle. Brussels waffles were introduced to the world in 1958, and arrived in the US in 1962 at the Century 21 Exposition in Seattle. The name “Brussels” was changed to “Bel-Gem” for the US market, which evolved into “Belgian”.

57. Caesar salad ingredient CROUTON
The Caesar Salad was created by restaurateur Caesar Cardini at the Hotel Caesar’s in Tijuana, Mexico. The original recipe called for whole lettuce leaves that were to be lifted up by the stem and eaten with the fingers.

62. Blood typing system ABO
The most important grouping of blood types is the ABO system. Blood is classified as either A, B, AB or O, depending on the type of antigens on the surface of the red blood cells. A secondary designation of blood is the Rh factor, in which other antigens are labelled as either positive or negative. When a patient receives a blood transfusion, ideally the donor blood should be the same type as that of the recipient, as incompatible blood cells can be rejected. However, blood type O-neg can be accepted by recipients with all blood types, A, B, AB or O, and positive or negative. Hence someone with O-neg blood type is called a “universal donor”.

65. Arctic formation FLOE
An ice floe is a sheet of ice that has separated from an ice field and is floating freely on the ocean.

73. Dash at the market? MRS
Mrs. Dash is a brand name of seasoning mixes.

75. Squishy Hasbro toy used with a launcher KOOSH BALL
A Koosh ball is made up of about 2,000 rubber filaments that are attached to a rubber core. The Koosh ball was invented in 1986 and was one of those toys at Christmas that sell out for ridiculous prices.

76. Old Nigerian capital LAGOS
Lagos is a port and the biggest city in Nigeria. Lagos used to be the country’s capital, until it was replaced in that role in 1991 by Abuja, a city built for just for this purpose.

77. Taina of “Les Girls” ELG
Taina Elg is an American actress who was born in Helsinki, Finland. Elg co-starred with Kay Kendall and Mitzi Gaynor, and opposite Gene Kelly, in the 1957 musical film “Les Girls”.

79. Sturgeon yield ROE
Several species of sturgeon are farmed for their roe, which is made into caviar.

80. Malaysian swinger ORANG
Orangutans are arboreal creatures, in fact the largest arboreal animals known to man. They are native to Indonesia and Malaysia, living in the rain forests. Like most species in rain forests these days, orangutans are endangered, with only two species surviving. The word “orangutan” is Malay, meaning “man of the forest”.

83. Ventura County resort OJAI
The city of Ojai, California is located just northwest of Los Angeles. One of the city’s claims to fame is that according to the TV shows “The Bionic Woman” and “The Six Million Dollar Man”, Jaime Sommers and Steve Austin grew up in Ojai and were childhood sweethearts!

87. Dress to the nines GUSSY UP
“To gussy up” is to dress showily, and is derived from the slang term “gussy” that was used for an overly dressed person.

The term “to the nines” means “to perfection”. The first person to use the term in literature was Robbie Burns. Apparently the idea behind the use of “nines” is figurative (pun!), with the number nine considered “ideal” as it is arrived at by multiplying three by three.

92. Key of Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 4 E-FLAT
Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 4 in E-flat major is nicknamed “the Grand Sonata”.

93. 1969 film con man RATSO
Ratso Rizzo is one of the characters in the groundbreaking 1969 movie “Midnight Cowboy”. Rizzo is a down-and-out con man, played by Dustin Hoffman.

94. Cravat relative ASCOT
An Ascot tie is that horrible-looking (I think!) wide tie that narrows at the neck, which these days is only really worn at weddings. The tie takes its name from the Royal Ascot horse race at which punters still turn up in formal wear at Ascot Racecourse in England.

The cravat originated in Croatia and was an accessory used with a military uniform. Cravats were introduced to the fashion-conscious French by Croatian mercenaries enlisted into a regiment of the French army. The English placed a lot of emphasis on the knot used for the cravat, and in the period after the Battle of Waterloo the cravat came to be known as a “tie”. What we now call a tie in English is still called a “cravate” in French.

95. Deserved an Oscar, say SHONE
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is the organization that gives the annual Academy Awards also known as the “Oscars”. The root of the name “Oscar” is hotly debated, but what is agreed is that the award was officially named “Oscar” in 1939. The first Academy Awards were presented at a brunch in 1929 with an audience of just 29 people. The Awards ceremony is a slightly bigger event these days …

102. Accident investigation agcy. NTSB
The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is responsible for the investigation of major accidents involving transportation. Included in this broad definition is the transportation of fluids in pipelines. The organization is independent in that it has no ties to other government agencies or departments so that its investigations can be viewed as “impartial”. The NTSB also earns a little money for the US as it hires out its investigation teams to countries who don’t have the necessary resources available on their own soil.

108. Ring of blooms LEI
“Lei” is the Hawaiian word for “garland, wreath”, although in more general terms a “lei” is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

110. Chihuahua cry OLE!
Chihuahua is a state in northern Mexico that shares a border with Texas and New Mexico. Chihuahua is the largest state in the country, so has the nickname “El Estado Grande”. The state takes its name from the Chihuahuan Desert which lies largely within its borders. And of course the Chihuahua breed of dog takes its name from the state.

111. H.S. dropout’s goal GED
The General Education Diploma (GED) is a substitute for a high school diploma. The GED might be awarded to high school dropouts who later complete their education, or to students who are homeschooled.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Barely sufficient SCANT
6. It could be a plot ACRE
10. Strikes firmly RAPS
14. Arcade no-nos TILTS
19. Abbot’s underling PRIOR
20. “I can’t deny that” TRUE
21. Country singer Jackson ALAN
22. Three-time Wimbledon champ EVERT
23. Sport on horseback FOX HUNTING
25. Half of 10? ZERO
26. First name in Olympics perfection NADIA
27. Screen pictures ICONS
28. United States Army Infantry School site FORT BENNING
30. Give in a bit SOFTEN
33. “Raging hormones” period PUBERTY
36. Beast MEANIE
37. Forgets to mail the mail, say ERRS
38. Group that meets in the Palais du Luxembourg SENAT
39. Reverse, e.g. GEAR
41. Perfect serve ACE
42. Enjoying one’s Jeep Wrangler, say FOUR-WHEELING
46. Out yonder AFAR
50. Infomercial antitheft device THE CLUB
52. Tangle up ENSNARL
53. Tropical rainforest, e.g. BIOME
54. Formed a clump CLOTTED
56. Certain extra-base hit: Abbr. DBL
57. Comedian __ the Entertainer CEDRIC
58. Inamorato BEAU
60. Shine, in ads GLO
61. Rate of movement PACE
63. Longtime ABC News chairman ARLEDGE
64. Defer ending -ENT
65. Compactly built canine FRENCH BULLDOG
68. Stylish MOD
69. Online merchant ETAILER
71. Derisive cry HOOT
72. Outback sprinter EMU
73. Deliberate MUSE
74. Bolster, e.g. PILLOW
75. “Jeopardy!” record-setter Jennings KEN
76. Hangs around LOITERS
78. Where to learn une leçon ECOLE
79. Pinkish rash ROSEOLA
82. “The Death of Ivan Ilyich” author TOLSTOY
85. Bylaws, briefly REGS
86. Procrastinator’s problem FOOT-DRAGGING
88. Classic Steely Dan album AJA
89. Strives VIES
90. Score after deuce AD OUT
91. Erode GNAW
92. Backspaced, perhaps ERASED
96. Tack room gear HARNESS
99. Provide juice for PLUG IN
101. Clotheshorse’s net reading FASHION BLOG
103. Oktoberfest keepsake STEIN
105. U.S. Army O-5 LT COL
106. One way to stand TALL
107. Amphibian that glides FLYING FROG
112. Unified AS ONE
113. Dark-skinned fruit SLOE
114. Do another tour RE-UP
115. “A Short Treatise on the Game of Whist” author HOYLE
116. Hauled TOTED
117. Lunches with mayo BLTS
118. Pup squeaks YIPS
119. Out on a limb TREED

Down
1. Basker’s letters SPF
2. Zagreb’s country, to the IOC CRO
3. __-en-Provence AIX
4. Result of a batter “taking the collar” in a game NO HITS
5. Cease-fire TRUCE
6. Mail-routing abbr. ATTN
7. Fridge compartment CRISPER
8. Aim for an office RUN
9. Doc’s readout EEG
10. It gets into a lather RAZOR
11. On the ball ALERT
12. Spring break fun-lover PARTY GIRL
13. One often looking down SNOB
14. Brit’s sawbuck TENNER
15. Donald Jr.’s mom IVANA
16. Ushered LED IN
17. Singer Lopez TRINI
18. Phase STAGE
24. Violent opening? NON-
28. Bashes FETES
29. Collection of Web pages EMAG
30. Class assignment SEAT
31. Gp. with brass ORCH
32. Mail order shipment insert FREE CATALOG
34. Not hitched UNWED
35. Porsche path BAHN
38. More understated SUBTLER
40. Photo lab prod. ENL
42. Mel’s Diner waitress FLO
43. Left behind, in a way OUTGREW
44. Prime rib choice END CUT
45. Designer __ LABEL
46. Helping hand AIDE
47. 1964 Detroit debut FORD MUSTANG
48. Baja buddies AMIGOS
49. Fall back RECEDE
51. Gulager of “The Virginian” CLU
53. Waffle source?: Abbr. BELG
55. Lengthy time EON
57. Caesar salad ingredient CROUTON
58. Attention-getting device BEEPER
59. Lure ENTICE
61. Gave a ring PHONED
62. Blood typing system ABO
63. Interrogator’s demand ADMIT IT!
65. Arctic formation FLOE
66. Bedroom piece CHEST
67. Sign of summer LEO
70. Subjects of complaints ILLS
73. Dash at the market? MRS
75. Squishy Hasbro toy used with a launcher KOOSH BALL
76. Old Nigerian capital LAGOS
77. Taina of “Les Girls” ELG
79. Sturgeon yield ROE
80. Malaysian swinger ORANG
81. Put in the hold LADE
83. Ventura County resort OJAI
84. [I’m bored] YAWN
86. Name from the Latin for “I trust” FIDO
87. Dress to the nines GUSSY UP
89. Like some brides VEILED
91. Pursue with purpose GUN FOR
92. Key of Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 4 E-FLAT
93. 1969 film con man RATSO
94. Cravat relative ASCOT
95. Deserved an Oscar, say SHONE
97. Distribute ALLOT
98. Hollywood openings? ROLES
99. Farm house PEN
100. Far from strenuous LIGHT
102. Accident investigation agcy. NTSB
104. They may be in a jar TIPS
107. Fish may be served at one FRY
108. Ring of blooms LEI
109. Deli option RYE
110. Chihuahua cry OLE!
111. H.S. dropout’s goal GED

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