LA Times Crossword Answers 24 Jun 15, Wednesday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Gareth Bain
THEME: Party Time … each of the themed answers ends with a synonym of PARTY:

61A. Wayne’s World catchphrase, and a hint to the end of the answers to starred clues PARTY TIME!

17A. *Lightweight kitchen appliance HAND MIXER
24A. *”Let me help” WHAT CAN I DO?
37A. *Not doing one’s job DROPPING THE BALL
50A. *Romance LOVE AFFAIR

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 50s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. “__ to Be Square”: Huey Lewis & the News hit HIP
Huey Lewis and the News are a local band out here in the Bay Area, based in San Francisco. When the movie “Ghostbusters” came out in 1984, the band sued Ray Parker, Jr. who wrote the film’s theme song, claiming that it was very similar to their own song “I Want a New Drug”. The case was settled out of court, and the following year “Huey Lewis and the News” made the most of an opportunity to write a movie theme themselves. Their smash hit “The Power of Love” was written for “Back to the Future”, and propelled the band into stardom.

13. “David Copperfield” blackmailer URIAH HEEP
Uriah Heep is a sniveling insincere character in the novel “David Copperfield” by Charles Dickens. The character is such a “yes man” that today, if we know someone who behaves the same way, then we might call that person a “Uriah Heep”.

18. Himalayan region TIBET
Tibet is a plateau region that is part of China, and is located northeast of the Himalayas. Tibet declared its independence from China in 1913, but fell back under Chinese control after the Invasion of Tibet in 1951. The Tibetan leader, the 14th Dalai Lama, fled the country during the 1959 Tibetan Rebellion. Since then, he has led the Tibetan government-in-exile in Dharamsala, India.

The magnificent Himalaya range of mountains in Asia takes its name from the Sanskrit for “abode of snow”. Geographically, the Himalayas separate the Indian subcontinent from the Tibetan Plateau to the north.

29. “The Simpsons” shop owner APU
The fictional Kwik-E-Mart store is operated by Apu Nahasapeemapetilon on “The Simpsons” TV show. Apu is married to Manjula, and the couple have eight children. The convenience store owner doesn’t seem to be making much use of his Ph.D in computer science that he earned in the US. Apu’s undergraduate degree is from Caltech (the Calcutta Technical Institute), where he graduated top of his class of seven million students …

33. Brits’ raincoats MACS
When I was growing up in Ireland, we had to take our “macs” to school in case it rained (and it usually did!). “Mac” is short for “Macintosh”, a waterproof raincoat made of rubberized fabric. The coat was named after its inventor, Scotsman Charles Macintosh.

42. Since, in a seasonal song SYNE
The song “Auld Lang Syne” is a staple at New Year’s Eve, the words of which were written by Scottish poet Robbie Burns. The literal translation of “Auld Lang Syne” is “old long since”, but is better translated as “old times”. The sentiment of the song is “for old time’s sake”.

43. Nerd GEEK
The original “geek” was a sideshow performer, perhaps at a circus. We use the term today for someone regarded as foolish or clumsy, but also for someone who is technically driven and expert, but socially inept.

44. When repeated, a Kenyan rebel MAU
The Mau Mau Uprising was a revolt against British rule in Kenya that took place in the fifties. The group staging the revolt called themselves the Kenya Land and Freedom Army. Apparently for some long forgotten reason, the rebels became known as the Mau Mau.

45. Play about Capote TRU
“Tru” was written by Jay Presson Allen and is a play about Truman Capote that premiered in 1989. There is a classic anachronism in the piece. It is set in Capote’s New York City apartment at Christmas 1975. At one point the Capote character talks about suicide, saying that he has enough pills to stage his own Jonestown Massacre. The Jonestown Massacre didn’t happen until three years later, in 1978.

48. De __: strictly proper RIGUEUR
We use the French term “de rigueur” to refer to a rigorous style of manner.

55. Game console letters NES
The Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) was sold in North America from 1985 to to 1995. The NES was the biggest selling gaming console of the era.

59. Capital of Belarus MINSK
Minsk is the capital of Belarus, formerly known as the Belorussian Soviet Socialist Republic. One of Minsk’s more infamous residents was Lee Harvey Oswald who lived there from 1960 to 1962.

61. Wayne’s World catchphrase, and a hint to the end of the answers to starred clues PARTY TIME!
“Wayne’s World” was originally a Saturday Night Live sketch starring Mike Myers (as Wayne) and Dana Carvey. The sketch was so successful that it was parlayed into two hit movies, released in 1992 and 1993. Not my cup of tea though …

69. Bordeaux belief IDEE
In French, one’s head (tête) might produce an idea (idée).

Bordeaux is perhaps the wine-production capital of the world. Wine has been produced in the area since the eighth century. Bordeaux has an administrative history too. During WWII, the French government relocated from Paris to the port city of Bordeaux when it became clear that Paris was soon to fall to the Germans. After the German’s took France, the capital was famously moved to Vichy.

70. African antelope GNU
A gnu is also known as a wildebeest, and is an antelope native to Africa. “Wildebeest” is actually the Dutch word for “wild beast”.

Down
2. Portfolio element, for short IRA
Individual retirement account (IRA)

3. Eponymous detective agency founder PINKERTON
The Pinkerton National Detective Agency was founded in 1850 by Scottish American detective and spy Allan Pinkerton. Apparently, in the late 19th century, Pinkerton had more agents than the US Army had soldiers.

5. Sashimi tuna AHI
“Sashimi” is thinly sliced raw fish, although it can also be raw meat. The word “sashimi” translates literally as “pierced body”, which may be a reference to the practice of sticking the tail and fin to sliced fish to identify it.

6. T. __ REX
The Tyrannosaurus rex (usually written T. rex) was a spectacular looking dinosaur. “Tyrannosaurus” comes from the Greek words “tyrannos” (tyrant) and “sauros” (lizard), and the “rex” is of course Latin for “king”. They were big boys, measuring 42 feet long and 13 feet tall at the hips, and weighing 7.5 tons.

7. “Ciao!” SEE YA!
“Ciao” is the Italian for “‘bye”. “Arrivederci” is more formal, and translates as “goodbye”.

8. Forty winks CATNAP
Back in the early 1800s, folks took “nine winks” when getting a few minutes of sleep during the day. Dr. William Kitchiner extended this concept in his 1821 self-help book “The Art of Invigorating and Prolonging Life”. He suggested “A Forty Winks Nap”, which we seem to have been taking ever since. Mind you, I’m up to about eighty winks most days …

9. Geisha circler OBI
The sash worn as part of traditional Japanese dress is known as an obi. The obi can be tied in what is called a butterfly knot.

The Japanese term “geisha” best translates as “artist” or “performing artist”.

10. Torah teacher RABBI
The word “Torah” best translates as “teaching”, I am told.

11. False: Pref. PSEUD-
The prefix “pseudo-” (or “pseud-”) means false, deceptive.

15. Backside, slangily PRAT
“Prat” is a relatively new word for me, a slang term for the buttocks apparently. A “prat-fall” is when someone falls and lands on the buttocks.

21. “In the Year 2525” record label RCA
“In the Year 2525” is a hit song that was released in 1969 by Zager and Evans. Evans wrote the song, five years earlier. Regardless of how successful “In the Year 2525” was, Zager and Evans proved to be a one-hit-wonder.

24. Battle of the Bulge conflict, briefly WWII
The Ardennes Offensive of WWII is better known as the Battle of the Bulge. The “Bulge” name was coined by the American press, citing the “bulge” in the Allied front lines where the battle took place. US forces suffered more casualties in this engagement than in they did any other battle in the whole war.

25. French __ HORN
The brass instrument known as a horn is sometimes informally called a “French horn”. But, the French horn isn’t French at all, and originated in Germany. Very confusing …

28. Chef’s meas. TSP
Teaspoon (tsp.)

34. First-name-only gathering AA MEETING
Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) was founded in 1935, by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith in Akron, Ohio. As the organization grew, the guiding principles established by the founders were formatted into a 12-step program that was in place by the forties.

35. Santa __ CLAUS
Saint Nicholas of Myra is the inspiration for Santa Claus. Nicholas was the Bishop of Myra (now in modern-day Turkey) during the 4th century AD, and was known for being generous to the poor. Centuries after he died, his remains were desecrated by Italian sailors and moved to Bari in Italy. One legend has it that the relics were moved again centuries later and reburied in the grounds of Jerpoint Abbey in Co. Kilkenny in Ireland, where you can visit the grave today. I choose to believe that Santa Claus’s relics are indeed buried in Ireland …

38. Tennis great Sampras PETE
Pete Sampras is a retired Greek-American tennis professional. Sampras was rated number one in the world rankings for six years in a row in the nineties.

39. Actress Hatcher TERI
Teri Hatcher’s most famous role these days is the Susan Mayer character in “Desperate Housewives”. I’ve never seen more than a few minutes of “Housewives” but I do know Teri Hatcher as a Bond girl, as she appeared in “Tomorrow Never Dies”.

40. Will beneficiary HEIR
“Will” is an Old English word meaning “wish, desire, determination”. In the 14th century, we started using “will” for a written document laying out a person’s “wishes” for the disposition of property after death.

41. Pre-op test EKG
An EKG measures electrical activity in the heart. Back in my homeland of Ireland, an EKG is known as an ECG (for electrocardiogram). We use the German name in the US, Elektrokardiogramm, giving us EKG. Apparently the abbreviation EKG is preferred as ECG might be confused (if poorly handwritten, I guess) with EEG, the abbreviation for an electroencephalogram.

47. What a weather balloon may be mistaken for, briefly UFO
The Roswell UFO Incident took place in 1947. Some people believe that an extraterrestrial spacecraft crashed, with aliens aboard. After the initial reports the public accepted the US Military’s explanation of the crash, that the debris recovered belonged to an experimental high-altitude surveillance balloon. The whole incident was dug up again over 30 years later when a claim was made that there was a cover-up in 1947, and that the armed forces had recovered an alien craft and brought it to Roswell Army Air Field. “The National Enquirer” ran the story, and it has been running ever since.

52. Stingray secretion VENOM
Stingrays rarely cause the death of a human with their venomous sting. One famous exception is the fatal sting inflicted on Australian wildlife expert Steve Irwin. That stingray stuck Irwin several hundred time in just a few seconds using its tail spine. Death was a result of a piercing of the heart.

54. Beer brand from Tokyo ASAHI
Asahi is a beer, and the name of the brewery that produces it. “Asahi” is Japanese for “morning sun”. Asahi introduced a “dry beer” in 1987, igniting a craze that rocketed the brewery to the number one spot in terms of beer production in Japan, with Sapporo close behind.

60. Deal with moguls SKI
Moguls are the series of bumps in the surface of snow that arise naturally as a succession of skiers make turns on a slope.

63. Afternoon ora TRE
In Italian, an afternoon hour (ora) is three (tre).

65. Kin of gov EDU
The .edu domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:

– .com (commercial enterprise)
– .net (entity involved in network infrastructure e.g. an ISP)
– .mil (US military)
– .org (not-for-profit organization)
– .gov (US federal government entity)
– .edu (college-level educational institution)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. “__ to Be Square”: Huey Lewis & the News hit HIP
4. Pair on a rowing club wall OARS
8. Press __ CORPS
13. “David Copperfield” blackmailer URIAH HEEP
16. Humble ABASE
17. *Lightweight kitchen appliance HAND MIXER
18. Himalayan region TIBET
19. Thing on a ring KEY
20. Story YARN
22. Nevertheless BUT
23. Energy PEP
24. *”Let me help” WHAT CAN I DO?
27. “To be continued” installment PART TWO
29. “The Simpsons” shop owner APU
30. Works in a museum ART
31. Father SIRE
33. Brits’ raincoats MACS
37. *Not doing one’s job DROPPING THE BALL
42. Since, in a seasonal song SYNE
43. Nerd GEEK
44. When repeated, a Kenyan rebel MAU
45. Play about Capote TRU
48. De __: strictly proper RIGUEUR
50. *Romance LOVE AFFAIR
55. Game console letters NES
56. Saloon order ALE
57. Says lovingly COOS
58. Flop opposite HIT
59. Capital of Belarus MINSK
61. Wayne’s World catchphrase, and a hint to the end of the answers to starred clues PARTY TIME!
66. Bring to mind EVOKE
67. Made a point of? SHARPENED
68. Mail in, as payment REMIT
69. Bordeaux belief IDEE
70. African antelope GNU

Down
1. “Say what?” HUH?
2. Portfolio element, for short IRA
3. Eponymous detective agency founder PINKERTON
4. “Yowza!” OH MY!
5. Sashimi tuna AHI
6. T. __ REX
7. “Ciao!” SEE YA!
8. Forty winks CATNAP
9. Geisha circler OBI
10. Torah teacher RABBI
11. False: Pref. PSEUD-
12. Little fight SET TO
14. Masterful ADEPT
15. Backside, slangily PRAT
21. “In the Year 2525” record label RCA
23. Fencing deflection PARRY
24. Battle of the Bulge conflict, briefly WWII
25. French __ HORN
26. Feeling nothing NUMB
27. Paw parts PADS
28. Chef’s meas. TSP
32. Bird-to-be EGG
34. First-name-only gathering AA MEETING
35. Santa __ CLAUS
36. Put-down SLUR
38. Tennis great Sampras PETE
39. Actress Hatcher TERI
40. Will beneficiary HEIR
41. Pre-op test EKG
46. Clamor RACKET
47. What a weather balloon may be mistaken for, briefly UFO
49. Make one UNITE
50. Less credible, excuse-wise LAMER
51. Greenish color OLIVE
52. Stingray secretion VENOM
53. Fancy dressers FOPS
54. Beer brand from Tokyo ASAHI
58. Promote aggressively HYPE
60. Deal with moguls SKI
62. “Far out!” RAD!
63. Afternoon ora TRE
64. Patriarchy rulers MEN
65. Kin of gov EDU

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14 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 24 Jun 15, Wednesday”

  1. Took me longer than most Wednesdays, but I prevailed. Tricky in a few spots. But 5 min 50 secs?? I couldn't have copied a completely filled in replica of this puzzle in that time. I DOFF my cap to you, Bill.

    If tyrannasaurus Rex means "tyrant-lizard-king"….. isn't the "rex" part redundant?….

    Best

  2. @Jeff – You ask:
    If tyrannasaurus Rex means "tyrant-lizard-king"….. isn't the "rex" part redundant?

    Maybe he had a cousin or uncle that was a benevolent lizard king? (g)

  3. This one blew up on me towards the end, and had to start looking up things to finish it (7 errors total).

    1-Across: This band was the last one I had the pleasure to see in person. While I agree with an assessment made once that they don't do anything musically interesting, what they do is play a tight performance. What you get is what you expect, about every time you listen to them on any media.

    29-Across: This clue is actually quite wrong, as it is made clear in a number of episodes that he's merely an employee of a multi-national conglomerate (with its corporate headquarters high in the mountains of Asia) that just manages the store.

    48-Across: One of the struggles of this one. Knew it, just didn't know the first U belonged there.

    61-Across: While a fun couple of movies (if you're into things where you can leave your brain at the door and just have fun), this is only part of one catch phrase that has many variants (out of many catch phrases), most notably "Wayne's World, Wayne's World, Party Time, Excellent, whooowwho!" I had to look up all the catch phrases and guess just to figure out what the word could have been after "party" (which was obvious by the theme).

    39-Down: Teri Hatcher is famous more for television than movies. She is much like Bryan Cranston of a few puzzles ago in her career path. She got known for Seinfeld ("They're real and they're spectacular!"), and found fame as Lois Lane on Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman opposite Dean Cain's Man of Steel before she finally landed at Desperate Housewives.

    54-Down: Can't say I know anything about beer brands, so had to look this one up (as most foreign clues I haven't already in the past like OBI).

    Onward to see what tomorrow brings…

  4. @Pookie As the clue says, MAU is repeated, it's a Kenyan rebel in the uprising there in the 50's. NES is an acronym for Nintendo Entertainment System, the game console introduced into the US market about 3 years or so after the Atari 2600 crashed and burned. A "do", evidently is of the same origin as "Macs". It's a more British term to denote a formal social gathering where one might be expected to dress up and act more refined than the average so-called "party" (wedding receptions, formal dinners, etc).

  5. @Tony – Hmm. Possible but you'd have to be able to imagine a reasoned and intelligent lizard king. Tyrannasaurus wasn't like that. The only really intelligent dinosaur was the thesaurus…… 🙂

  6. Pretty standard Wed. for me. The film version of this SNL skit only uses "party time" a few times. Much more common is the dialog between Mike Meyers & Dana Carvey:

    Garth: Party on, Wayne!
    Wayne: Party on, Garth!

    Strangely, no other SNL cast members were in the film.

  7. Had to Google for ASAHI and PARTY TIME – I'm no fun.

    Got hung up over the spelling of RIGUEUR. It's in that annoying language where half the letters aren't pronounced. Give me Italian or German any day.

    However, @Pookie – the DO may be a hairdo. Maybe.

  8. @Sfingi I really don't know. An up-do is a given. I'm guessing that someone said that they went to a big "DO" but it may be lost in translation.
    @ Glenn I just meant that MAU MAU was not familiar to me and I don't game, NES is an unfamiliar abbr. to me. Thanks for clarifying and a most hearty welcome to Bill's blog. I've been slacking off on my P.R. duties.
    :-)Sorry Bill!

  9. @Pookie Thank you. I decided to try to learn solving crossword puzzles (*), so started on that a few months ago, and been around Bill's blog about that long. I've been around for a little while now, showing up on the puzzles that I finish. I'm kind of in that in-between place where I'm crushing the non-NYT/LAT puzzles, doing early week for most part okay with minor errors, and DNFing late week stuff.

    * – and Rubik's Cube, but haven't started formally on that yet. You wouldn't believe how popular Mr. Rubik's invention is even now (nevermind the time it was the fad) – enough that it's not completely easy to get one.

  10. @Tony from yesterday, I just KNEW I had spelled Lew wrong! It was a flip of the coin. And out-lew: LOL!!

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