LA Times Crossword Answers 28 Jun 15, Sunday

Frequently Asked Question: Why isn’t the puzzle in my paper the same as the one shown on your blog?
If the puzzle in your paper doesn’t match the one that I solved, it is probably a Sunday crossword. On Sundays, the “LA Times” chooses to publish Merl Reagle’s excellent crossword, and not their own “LA Times” Crossword. The “LA Times” puzzle is still sent out in syndication, and is also published in the “LA Times” online. I’ve been asked to blog about Merl Reagle’s crossword, but frankly I don’t have the time. Sunday puzzles have lots of clues!

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jim Quinlan
THEME: Slightly-off Broadway … each of today’s themed answers is a Broadway show, but with a letter missing:

24A. Show about shoeless Shem? BAREFOOT IN THE ARK (from “Barefoot in the Park”)
39A. Show about auto club service? ON THE TOW (from “On the Town”)
57A. Show about an unusual car? THE ODD COUPE (from “The Odd Couple”)
71A. Show about sorry predators? THE PIRATES OF PENANCE (from “The Pirates of Penzance”)
90A. Show about inventions in the military? PRIVATE LIES (from “Private Lives”)
104A. Show about baseball’s Hodges as the life of the party? FUNNY GIL (from “Funny Girl”)
122A. Show about a pageant contestant with rhythm? BEAUTY AND THE BEAT (from “Beauty and the Beast”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 17m 57s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Performs like Drake RAPS
Drake is the stage name of rapper Aubrey Graham from Toronto. Drake is a basketball fan and is a “global ambassador” for the Toronto Raptors.

5. Holy struggle JIHAD
In the Islamic tradition “jihad” is a duty, either an inner spiritual struggle to fulfill religious obligations or an outward physical struggle to defend the faith. Someone engaged in jihad is called a “mujahid” with the plural being “mujahideen”.

14. Start of a waste line? HASTE
Haste makes waste …

24. Show about shoeless Shem? BAREFOOT IN THE ARK (from “Barefoot in the Park”)
According to the Book of Genesis, Noah lived to a ripe old age. Noah fathered his three sons Shem, Ham and Japheth when he was 500 years old, and the Great Flood took place when he was 600.

“Barefoot in the Park” is a Neil Simon romantic comedy that premiered on Broadway in 1963. Robert Redford played the male lead on stage, and then reprised the role in the 1967 film adaptation.

27. Indigenous Alaskans ALEUTS
The Aleuts live on the Aleutian Islands of the North Pacific, and on the Commander Islands at the western end of the same island chain. The Aleutian Islands are part of the United States, and the Commander Islands are in Russia.

29. Tropicana option PULP
The Tropicana company is most famous for its orange juice. The company is headquartered in Chicago, where not many oranges are grown …

30. Baked __ ZITI
Cylindrical pasta is known in general as “penne”, and there are many variants. For example, ziti is a particularly large and long tube with square-cut ends. “Penne” is the plural of “penna”, the Italian for “feather, quill”.

31. Ruler divs. CMS
Centimeters (cms.)

34. Sound often prohibited? PEEP
Don’t make a peep …

36. “A Delicate Balance” playwright ALBEE
Playwright Edward Albee’s most famous play is “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” Albee won three Pulitzer Prizes for Drama:

-1967: “A Delicate Balance”
-1975: “Seascape”
-1994: “Three Tall Women”

Albee also won three Tony Awards:

-1963: “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” (Best Play)
-2002: “The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia?”
-2005: Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement

39. Show about auto club service? ON THE TOW (from “On the Town”)
“On the Town” is a Leonard Bernstein musical that premiered in 1944 on Broadway. The show is about three American sailors on shore leave in New York City during WWII. The most famous song from “On the Town” is the classic “New York, New York”. The stage show was made into a musical film in 1949 starring Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra.

41. Hoarse condition CROUP
Croup is a respiratory condition characterized by a hoarse “barking” cough often accomplished by a difficulty in breathing. Croup is usually caused by a viral infection.

52. One of 256 in a gal. TBSP
There are 256 tablespoons in a US gallon.

57. Show about an unusual car? THE ODD COUPE (from “The Odd Couple”)
The type of car known as a “coupe” or “coupé” is a closed automobile with two doors. The name comes from the French word “couper” meaning “to cut”. In most parts of the English-speaking world the pronunciation adheres to the original French, but here in most of North America we go with “coop”. The original coupé was a horse-drawn carriage that was cut (coupé) to eliminate the rear-facing passenger seats. That left just a driver and two front-facing passengers. If the driver was left without a roof and out in the open, then the carriage was known as a “coupé de-ville”.

“The Odd Couple” is a play by the wonderfully talented Neil Simon first performed on Broadway, in 1965. This great play was adapted for the big screen in 1968, famously starring Jack Lemmon (as Felix Unger, the neat-freak) and Walter Matthau (as Oscar Madison, the slob). The success of the play and the film gave rise to an excellent television sitcom that ran from 1970-1975, starring Tony Randall and Jack Klugman. Now there’s another TV adaptation starring Matthew Perry and Thomas Lennon. In 1985, Neil Simon went so far as to adapt the play for an all-female cast, renaming it “The Female Odd Couple”. I’d like to see that one …

63. Camper’s utensil SPORK
“Spork” is the more common name for the utensil that is a hybrid between a spoon and a fork. It is less commonly referred to as a “foon”.

64. “Falling Skies” airer TNT
“Falling Skies” is a sci-fi television series about life in Boston after an alien invasion.

71. Show about sorry predators? THE PIRATES OF PENANCE (from “The Pirates of Penzance”)
“The Pirates of Penzance; or, The Slave of Duty” is an operetta by Gilbert & Sullivan. “Pirates” is still performed regularly today, and even though I’ve seen a lot of Gilbert & Sullivan over the decades, somehow I’ve missed this one …

86. Bronze place THIRD
In the Ancient Olympic Games, the winner of an event was awarded an olive wreath. When the games were revived in 1896, the winners were originally given a silver medal and an olive branch, with runners-up receiving a bronze medal and a laurel branch. The tradition of giving gold, silver and bronze medals began at the 1904 Summer Olympic Games held in St. Louis, Missouri.

90. Show about inventions in the military? PRIVATE LIES (from “Private Lives”)
“Private Lives” is a wonderful 1930 play by Noel Coward about two newlywed couples in adjacent hotel rooms on their honeymoons. The twist is that one member of each couple used to be married to each other.

93. Mustard weapon, possibly ROPE
Colonel Mustard is one of the suspects in the board game “Clue”.

Clue is another board game that we knew under a different name growing up in Ireland. Outside of North America, Clue is marketed as “Cluedo”. Cluedo was the original name of the game, introduced in 1949 by the famous British board game manufacturer Waddingtons. There are cute differences between the US and UK versions. For example, the man who is murdered is called Dr. Black (Mr. Boddy in the US), one of the suspects is the Reverend Green (Mr. Green in the US), and the suspect weapons include a dagger (a knife in the US), a lead pipe (lead piping in the US) and a spanner (a wrench in the US). I think it’s a fabulous game, a must during the holidays …

95. Good name for a Whirlpool spokesman? EDDY
Whirlpool is a manufacturer of home appliances that was founded as the Upton Machine Company in 1911. Whirlpool is now the largest manufacturer of home appliances in the world.

100. Man cave setup STEREO
“Man cave” is a slang term for a male sanctuary with home, often a spare bedroom (as it is in our house) or a converted garage.

102. Close in films GLENN
Glenn Close a wonderful actress who has played many varied roles, but is well known for her portrayals of less than wholesome characters. She play the crazy Alex Forrest in “Fatal Attraction”, and Cruella de Vil in “101 Dalmatians”. More recently, Close had a regular role on a TV show called “Damages”. Glenn Close is an avid fan of the New York Mets and regularly sings the national anthem before games.

104. Show about baseball’s Hodges as the life of the party? FUNNY GIL (from “Funny Girl”)
Gil Hodges was a professional baseball player and manager. Perhaps Hodges’ most celebrated achievement was managing the New York Mets team (the “Miracle Mets”) that won the 1969 World Series. Hodges died from a heart attack just a few years later in 1972, when he was only 48 years old.

“Funny Girl” is a musical by Jule Styne and Bob Merrill that is based on the life of movie star and comedian Fanny Brice. The show opened on Broadway in 1964 with Barbra Streisand in the title role. Streisand reprised the role in the 1968 film adaptation, and won a Best Actress Oscar for her performance.

111. Bee’s knees MOST
Something excellent can be described as the “bee’s knees”, although other animals and their anatomy can be used in the same sense e.g the cat’s whiskers and the flea’s eyebrows. More “rude” anatomical references are common too …

113. Elton John’s “__ Saved My Life Tonight” SOMEONE
“Someone Saved My Life Tonight” is a 1975 song by Elton John. The song is autobiographical and tells of a time when John was contemplating marriage in the late sixties to his girlfriend Linda Woodrow. The doubts about marriage led John to consider suicide, but he confided in his friend, fellow singer Long John Baldry. Baldry convinced John to abandon his marriage plans and to focus on his musical career. So, Baldry was the “someone” who saved John’s life that night.

114. National Humor Mo. APR
National Humor Month was launched in 1976, and is observed in April of each year. The idea came from author and humorist Larry Wilde. His intent was to highlight the therapeutic value of laughter and joy.

116. Idina Menzel voiced her in “Frozen” ELSA
“Let It Go” is an incredibly successful song from the Disney animated film “Frozen” released in 2013. It was performed in the movie by Idina Menzel, who also was the voice actor for the character Elsa. “Let It Go” is one of the very few Disney songs to make it into the Billboard Top Ten.

122. Show about a pageant contestant with rhythm? BEAUTY AND THE BEAT (from “Beauty and the Beast”)
“Beauty and the Beast” is a fairy tale was that was written by novelist Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont. Titled “La belle et la bête” in French, the story was first published in 1756.

127. Exam for jrs. PSAT
Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT)

128. Fab BOFFO
“Boffo” is show biz slang for “very successful”, a term that dates back to the early sixties.

130. Enterprise competitor ALAMO
The third largest car rental company right now is Alamo, a relative newcomer founded in 1974. Alamo made inroads (pun intended!) into the market by popularizing the idea of “unlimited mileage”.

Enterprise Rent-A-Car was established in 1957 by Jack. C. Taylor in St. Louis, Missouri, where the company is still headquartered today. The company was originally called Executive Leasing Company. The name was changed in 1962 in honor of the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise on which Taylor served during WWII.

131. Rock follower? -ETTE
The famous Rockettes can be seen in Radio City Music Hall. They have an amazing schedule during the Christmas season when they perform five high-kicking shows every day, seven days a week. The troupe has been doing this every Christmas for 77 years.

132. Composer Bruckner ANTON
Anton Bruckner was an Austrian composer, not a favorite of mine as he embraces the use of dissonances (I’m a sober traditionalist!). Bruckner’s Symphony No. 7 is perhaps his most popular work. He created a slow and mournful movement for the work in recognition of the impending death of Richard Wagner, whom he greatly admired.

133. Went 76 on Route 66, say SPED
“Route 66” is a classic television show from the early sixties about two young men traveling across the US in a Corvette. The original lead characters were Tod Stiles and Buz Murdock, with Murdock being replaced by a character called Lincoln Case in the third season.

Down
1. Pizzeria shaker contents ROMANO
“Romano” is actually an American term, and is used for a selection of hard and salty cheeses that are typically grated. One of these cheeses is the Italian Pecorino Romano, from which we get the more generic term “Romano”.

2. Arthurian isle AVALON
Avalon is a legendary island featured in the Arthurian legends. The name Avalon probably comes from the word “afal”, the Welsh word for “apple”, reflecting the fact that the island was noted for its beautiful apples. Avalon is where King Arthur’s famous sword (Excalibur) was forged, and supposedly where Arthur was buried.

3. Most susceptible to burning PALEST
That would be me. Pale, Irish skin tends to burn under the sun …

4. Clue seeker SLEUTH
The word “sleuth” came into English from Old Norse as far back as 1200 when it meant the “track or trail of a person”. In the mid-1800s, a sleuthhound described a keen investigator, a hound close on the trail of the suspect. Sleuthhound was shortened to “sleuth” and was used for a detective in general.

6. “This American Life” host Glass IRA
“This American Life” is a radio show that is broadcast weekly on National Public Radio (NPR). Host of the show is the much-respected Ira Glass. I was interested to learn that one of my favorite composers, Philip Glass, is Ira’s first cousin.

7. Only nonvocal instrument in Britten’s “A Ceremony of Carols” HARP
The Christmas work “A Ceremony of Carols” was written by English composer Benjamin Britten during WWII, in 1942. Britten was actually traveling by ship from the US to England when he composed the piece.

11. Cracker with a scalloped edge RITZ
I’ve always liked Ritz crackers. They’ve been around since 1934 when they were introduced by Nabisco. The name Ritz was chosen because the marketing folks felt that the association with Ritz-Carlton would evoke images of wealth and the highlife.

12. Et __ ALII
Et alii (et al.) is the equivalent of et cetera (etc.), with et cetera being used in place of a list of objects, and et alii used for a list of names. In fact “et al.” can stand for et alii (for a group of males, or males and females), aliae (for a group of women) and et alia (for a group of neuter nouns, or for a group of people where the intent is to retain gender-neutrality).

13. Gossip YENTA
Yenta (also “Yente”) is actually a female Yiddish name. In Yiddish theater “yenta” came to mean a busybody.

16. In la-la land SPACED OUT
La-la land is a euphemism for a state of unconsciousness.

18. Chicago-based order ELKS
The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks (BPOE) was founded in 1868, and is a social club that has about a million members today. It started out as a group of men getting together in a “club” in order to get around the legal opening hours of taverns in New York City. The club took on a new role as it started to look out for poor families of members who passed away. The club now accepts African Americans as members (since the seventies) and women (since the nineties), but atheists still aren’t welcome.

25. TUV neighbor on some phones OPER
Dial “0” for operator (OPER) assistance.

28. “__ chic!” TRES
“Très chic” is a French term meaning “very stylish”.

35. “Hunny” lover POOH
Winnie-the-Pooh’s favorite food is “hunny”.

Alan Alexander (A.A.) Milne was an English author, best known for his delightful “Winnie-the-Pooh” series of books. He had only one son, Christopher Robin Milne, born in 1920. The young Milne was the inspiration for the Christopher Robin character in the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. Winnie-the-Pooh was named after Christopher Robin’s real teddy bear, one he called Winnie, who in turn was named after a Canadian black bear called Winnie that the Milnes would visit in London Zoo. The original Winnie teddy bear is on display at the main branch of the New York Public Library in New York.

37. Golden relatives? BLACK LABS
The Labrador (Lab) breed of dog has been around at least since 1814, and the chocolate Labrador appeared over a century later in the 1930s.

The breed of dog called the Golden Retriever originated in Scotland in the mid-1700s. The breed was developed to retrieve game that had been down by hunters, whether the game was to be found in water or on land. Existing retrievers (which worked well on land) were crossed with water spaniels (which worked well in water) to come up with the Golden Retriever breed.

38. Cannes coin EURO
Cannes is a city on the French Riviera, noted as host of the Cannes Film Festival. The idea of the annual film festival was adopted by the city just before WWII. However, the festival had to wait for the end of the war for its launch in 1946.

40. Legal document WRIT
A writ is an order issued by some formal body (these days, usually a court) with the order being in written form. Warrants and subpoenas are examples of writs.

42. Lute family members UKES
The ukulele (“uke”) originated in the 1800s and mimicked a small guitar brought to the Hawaiian Islands by Portuguese immigrants.

45. British Open network ESPN
The golf tournament that we usually refer to as “the British Open” here in North America, is more correctly known as “the Open Championship”. The tournament has earned its somewhat Haughty title as it is the oldest of the four major championships in professional golf. The Open was first played in 1860, at Scotland’s Prestwick Golf Club. That first tournament attracted a grand field of eight professional golfers, with Scotsman Willie Park, Sr. emerging victorious.

46. Anti-bug compound DEET
DEET is short for N,N-Diethyl-meta-toluamide, an active ingredient in insect repellents. DEET is most often used to repel mosquitoes by applying it to the skin and/or clothing. It is also used to protect against tick bites.

50. PDF creator ADOBE
Portable Document Format (PDF) is a file format introduced by Adobe Systems in 1993. PDF documents can be shared between users and read using many different applications, making them more universally accessible than documents saved by one particular program.

52. PC key with two arrows TAB
Like most features on our computer keyboards, the tab key is a hangover from the days of typewriters. When using a typewriter, making entries into a table was very tedious, involving lots of tapping on the spacebar and backspace key. So, a lever was added to typewriters that allowed the operator to “jump” across the page to positions that could be set by hand. Later this was simplified to a tab key which could be depressed, causing the carriage to jump to the next tab stop in much the same way that the modern tab key works on a computer.

53. Brolly carrier BRIT
Our term “umbrella” ultimately derives from the Latin “umbra” meaning “shade, shadow”. Famously, British folks are likely to refer to the device as a “brolly”, a term that is just a shortening of “umbrella”.

55. Poked, puma-style PAWED
The mountain lion is found in much of the Americas from the Yukon in Canada right down to the southern Andes in South America. Because the mountain lion is found over such a vast area, it has many different names applied by local peoples, such as cougar and puma. In fact, the mountain lion holds the Guinness record for the animal with the most number of different names, with over 40 in English alone.

66. __ squid GIANT
Giant squids are among the largest living creatures on our planet. Females of the species are larger than males, and can reach lengths of over 40 feet.

68. First name in lexicography NOAH
Not only is Noah Webster’s name inextricably linked with his series of dictionaries, but he is also renowned as an advocate for English spelling reform. He argued that “traditional” English is hard to learn, and that it should be simplified and standardized (instead of “standardised”). He published spelling books that were used in schools, and from edition to edition he changed the spelling of words in order to simplify the language. Examples are the use of “s” over “c” in words like “defense” (in Ireland we have defence and defense depending on usage), “-re” became “-er” as in center instead of centre (reversing the influence of French), and he dropped one of the Ls in words like traveler (I learned “traveller”). Mind you, he also spelled “tongue” as “tung”, but he didn’t get very far with that one.

70. Govt. security T-NOTE
A Treasury note (T-Note) is a government debt that matures in 1-10 years. A T-Note has a coupon (interest) payment made every six months. The T-note is purchased at a discount to face value, and at the date of maturity can be redeemed at that face value. A T-Bill is a similar financial vehicle, but it matures in one year or less, and a T-Bond matures in 20-30 years.

72. Shotgun caller RIDER
The person riding alongside the driver of a vehicle is said to be “riding shotgun”. Even though the phrase is a reference to the armed guard who rode beside the driver of a stagecoach in the Old West, the term wasn’t coined until the early 20th century.

75. Like Vassar since 1969 COED
Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York is now a co-educational school after over a century as a women’s college since its founding in 1861. The school was officially declared co-ed in 1969, although it had accepted a handful of male students on the GI Bill after WWII.

76. Scratched (out) EKED
To “eke out” means to “make something go further or last longer”. For example, you could eke out your income by cutting back on expenses.

81. Flats, in the U.S. APTS
“Flat” is a word more commonly used in the British Isles than here. A flat is basically an apartment or condominium. The word “flat” is Scottish in origin, in which language it meant a “floor in a house”.

87. Massage deeply ROLF
Rolfing is a trademarked massage technique, developed by Ida Pauline Rolf in the fifties.

91. __ Bradley handbags VERA
Vera Bradley is a manufacturer of fashionable patterned bags. The company was founded in 1982 by Barbara Bradley Baekgaard and Patricia Miller. The pair noticed that there was a dearth of feminine-looking luggage, as they passed through Atlanta Airport. So, they started their company to fill that demand. The named the company for Vera Bradley, Baekgaard’s mother.

94. Sitcom sewer worker ED NORTON
Ralph Kramden and Ed Norton are two characters in “The Honeymooners”, played by Jackie Gleason and Art Carney. Kramden is a bus driver, and Norton works with the New York City sewer department.

The classic sitcom “The Honeymooners” only aired for 39 episodes, with the last being broadcast in September of 1956. However, the sitcom itself was based on a recurring sketch that appeared on “Cavalcade of Stars” and then “The Jackie Gleason Show” from 1951-1955.

103. Munch NOSH
Our word “nosh” has been around since the late fifties, when it was imported from the Yiddish word “nashn” meaning “to nibble”.

110. Poetry contests SLAMS
A poetry slam is a competition in which poets read their own work (usually), with winners being chosen by members of audience. Apparently the first poetry slam took place in Chicago in 1984. Now there is a Nation Poetry Slam that takes place each year, with representatives from the US, Canada and France.

112. Put aside TABLE
These “tabling” and “shelving” idioms drive me crazy, because they are often misused. If a topic is shelved, it is set aside. If a topic is tabled, it is brought “off the shelf” and put “on the table” for discussion. But, maybe it’s just me …

114. Palindromic pop group ABBA
I am an unapologetic fan of ABBA’s music. ABBA was the Swedish group who topped the charts in the seventies and eighties. The name ABBA is an acronym formed from the first letters of the given names of each of the band members, namely: Agnetha, Benny, Bjorn and Anni-Frid.

The three most famous palindromes in English have to be:

– Able was I ere I saw Elba
– A man, a plan, a canal, Panama!
– Madam, I’m Adam

One of my favorite words is “Aibohphobia”, although it doesn’t appear in the dictionary and is a joke term. “Aibohphobia” is a great way to describe a fear of palindromes, by creating a palindrome out of the suffix “-phobia”.

115. Lowly worker PEON
A peon is a lowly worker with no real control over his/her working conditions. The word comes into English from Spanish where it has the same meaning.

118. Carving tool ADZE
An adze (also adz) is similar to an axe, but is different in that the blade of an adze is set at right angles to the tool’s shaft. An axe’s blade is set in line with the shaft.

123. Supposed abduction vehicle UFO
In 1952, the USAF revived its studies of reported sightings of unidentified flying objects (UFOs) in a program called Project Blue Book. Project Blue Book ran from 1952 until it was shut down in 1969 with the conclusion that there was no threat to national security and that there were no sightings that could not be explained within the bounds of modern scientific knowledge.

125. Stevens of Alaska TED
Ted Stevens was a US Senator from Alaska. He first became a senator on Christmas Eve in 1968, and served continuously in that office until he was killed in a plane crash in 2009. Stevens was the longest-serving Republican US Senator in history.

126. “Yo te __”: Spanish lover’s words AMO
In Spanish, one might say “I love you” (yo te amo) with flowers (con flores).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Performs like Drake RAPS
5. Holy struggle JIHAD
10. Seek guidance, in a way PRAY
14. Start of a waste line? HASTE
19. Like zero OVAL
20. Speak ORATE
21. Madden RILE
22. Toss out EXPEL
23. Man, for instance MALE
24. Show about shoeless Shem? BAREFOOT IN THE ARK (from “Barefoot in the Park”)
27. Indigenous Alaskans ALEUTS
29. Tropicana option PULP
30. Baked __ ZITI
31. Ruler divs. CMS
32. Hole in the head NOSTRIL
34. Sound often prohibited? PEEP
36. “A Delicate Balance” playwright ALBEE
39. Show about auto club service? ON THE TOW (from “On the Town”)
41. Hoarse condition CROUP
44. Snuck by ELUDED
47. Word after top or trade SECRET
49. Southern stew thickener OKRA
51. Greeted the day AROSE
52. One of 256 in a gal. TBSP
56. Hide SKIN
57. Show about an unusual car? THE ODD COUPE (from “The Odd Couple”)
59. Common default font ARIAL
61. Speak STATE
63. Camper’s utensil SPORK
64. “Falling Skies” airer TNT
65. VIP BIGWIG
67. Chinese-born poker star Johnny CHAN
69. Curved fastener U-BOLT
71. Show about sorry predators? THE PIRATES OF PENANCE (from “The Pirates of Penzance”)
77. Sink hole DRAIN
78. One of three squares MEAL
79. Modern reading E-BOOKS
81. Place to check your balance ATM
84. Stop by END AT
86. Bronze place THIRD
89. Expensive STEEP
90. Show about inventions in the military? PRIVATE LIES (from “Private Lives”)
93. Mustard weapon, possibly ROPE
95. Good name for a Whirlpool spokesman? EDDY
96. Buff TONED
97. Turn at the tables ROLL
98. Satisfied comment IT’LL DO
100. Man cave setup STEREO
102. Close in films GLENN
104. Show about baseball’s Hodges as the life of the party? FUNNY GIL (from “Funny Girl”)
109. Weight watcher’s concerns CARBS
111. Bee’s knees MOST
113. Elton John’s “__ Saved My Life Tonight” SOMEONE
114. National Humor Mo. APR
116. Idina Menzel voiced her in “Frozen” ELSA
119. One may be taken in desperation STAB
121. Give in RELENT
122. Show about a pageant contestant with rhythm? BEAUTY AND THE BEAT (from “Beauty and the Beast”)
127. Exam for jrs. PSAT
128. Fab BOFFO
129. Hedge formation MAZE
130. Enterprise competitor ALAMO
131. Rock follower? -ETTE
132. Composer Bruckner ANTON
133. Went 76 on Route 66, say SPED
134. Possessive type? DEMON
135. Slacker’s opposite DOER

Down
1. Pizzeria shaker contents ROMANO
2. Arthurian isle AVALON
3. Most susceptible to burning PALEST
4. Clue seeker SLEUTH
5. Contractors’ destinations JOB SITES
6. “This American Life” host Glass IRA
7. Only nonvocal instrument in Britten’s “A Ceremony of Carols” HARP
8. Really enjoyed ATE UP
9. Ricochet DEFLECT
10. Ace PRO
11. Cracker with a scalloped edge RITZ
12. Et __ ALII
13. Gossip YENTA
14. Laugh syllable HEH
15. 83-Down tool AXE
16. In la-la land SPACED OUT
17. Academic period TERM
18. Chicago-based order ELKS
25. TUV neighbor on some phones OPER
26. Game piece TILE
28. “__ chic!” TRES
33. Hair LOCKS
35. “Hunny” lover POOH
37. Golden relatives? BLACK LABS
38. Cannes coin EURO
40. Legal document WRIT
42. Lute family members UKES
43. Support PROP UP
45. British Open network ESPN
46. Anti-bug compound DEET
48. Pass ENACT
50. PDF creator ADOBE
52. PC key with two arrows TAB
53. Brolly carrier BRIT
54. [Ah, me!] SIGH
55. Poked, puma-style PAWED
57. Dollhouse staples TEA SETS
58. Remotely piloted craft DRONE
60. Many a deaf person LIPREADER
62. Foes of us THEM
66. __ squid GIANT
68. First name in lexicography NOAH
70. Govt. security T-NOTE
72. Shotgun caller RIDER
73. Two-handed, perhaps ANALOG
74. Try a new line, say FLIRT
75. Like Vassar since 1969 COED
76. Scratched (out) EKED
80. Binoculars user SPY
81. Flats, in the U.S. APTS
82. Home run pace TROT
83. Video game involving breaking and placing blocks MINECRAFT
85. Cash box TILL
87. Massage deeply ROLF
88. Mark above a “See me!” note D-PLUS
91. __ Bradley handbags VERA
92. Sch. level ELEM
94. Sitcom sewer worker ED NORTON
98. As an option INSTEAD
99. Complimentary words from a bartender ON ME
101. Get in line OBEY
103. Munch NOSH
105. Cried out, as in pain YELPED
106. Attends GOES TO
107. Not learned INNATE
108. Varsity athlete’s honor LETTER
110. Poetry contests SLAMS
112. Put aside TABLE
114. Palindromic pop group ABBA
115. Lowly worker PEON
117. [Just like that!] SNAP!
118. Carving tool ADZE
120. Show elation BEAM
123. Supposed abduction vehicle UFO
124. Whole bunch TON
125. Stevens of Alaska TED
126. “Yo te __”: Spanish lover’s words AMO

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2 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 28 Jun 15, Sunday”

  1. Pretty straightforward Sunday puzzle with a few good puns thrown in. I got the theme early and that filled in a lot of letters. Highlight of the puzzle for me was getting the "P" at the intersection of ROPE (Mustard weapon) and DPLUS (Mark above see me note). I didn't really get it. I just started going through the alphabet until something made sense to me. When I realized "P" for both answers I just about hit my head against the wall. Both good ones.

    Best –

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