LA Times Crossword Answers 7 Jun 15, Sunday

Frequently Asked Question: Why isn’t the puzzle in my paper the same as the one shown on your blog?
If the puzzle in your paper doesn’t match the one that I solved, it is probably a Sunday crossword. On Sundays, the “LA Times” chooses to publish Merl Reagle’s excellent crossword, and not their own “LA Times” Crossword. The “LA Times” puzzle is still sent out in syndication, and is also published in the “LA Times” online. I’ve been asked to blog about Merl Reagle’s crossword, but frankly I don’t have the time. Sunday puzzles have lots of clues!

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CROSSWORD SETTER: C.C. Burnikel
THEME: Computer Glossary … all of our themed answers are terms from the world of computing However, the clues refer to an alternative meaning of each term:

23A. HOT SPOT TRENDY BAR
25A. CACHE HIDDEN TROVE
38A. SPAM CANNED MEAT
59A. VIRUS FLU CAUSE
74A. HACKER AMATEUR GOLFER
91A. TWEET BIRD CALL
103A. TABLET SCRATCH PAD
123A. STREAM FISHING SPOT
126A. MOUSE LAB ANIMAL

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 56s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Glacier Bay phenomenon BERG
An iceberg is a large piece of freshwater ice that is floating freely after having broken off from a glacier or ice shelf. Out use of “iceberg” comes from the Dutch word for the same phenomenon “ijsberg”, which translates literally as “ice mountain”.

Glacier Bay in southeastern Alaska was declared a National Monument in 1925, and a National Park in 1980. UNESCO then declared the bay and surrounding area the largest UNESCO-protected biosphere in the world.

9. Cake often laced with rum BABKA
Babka is a sweet yeast cake that can also be called Bobka or baba. Babka originated in Eastern Europe and is served traditionally in Easter Sunday.

14. Short space-saver ET AL
Et alii (et al.) is the equivalent of et cetera (etc.), with et cetera being used in place of a list of objects, and et alii used for a list of names. In fact “et al.” can stand for et alii (for a group of males, or males and females), aliae (for a group of women) and et alia (for a group of neuter nouns, or for a group of people where the intent is to retain gender-neutrality).

18. Wet’n’Wild Hawaii locale OAHU
Wet’n’Wild Hawaii in Kapolei, Oahu is the only water park in the state of Hawaii.

23. HOT SPOT TRENDY BAR
A Wi-Fi hotspot is a “spot” where one can connect wirelessly with a Wi-Fi connection to a router at the center of the hotspot. From there, one can access the Internet via a modem connected to that router.

25. CACHE HIDDEN TROVE
A “cache” is a secret supply. We imported the term into English from French Canadian trappers in the 17th century. Back then, “cache” was as slang term for a “hiding place for stores”, derived from the French verb “cacher” meaning “to hide”.

In the world of computers a “cache” is a component that stores data locally so that there is no need to go get that original data all over again after the first usage. Applications that use a cache move along more quickly. A good example is a web browser that will store some information from a website in a cache on one’s computer. When you ask your browser to visit a website that you’ve used before, while the browser is waiting for the latest information from the website it will display the old data (the stuff that doesn’t change, that was retained from the last visit) from its cache, so that you don’t have to wait so long to view a web page.

28. Two-time Masters champ Watson BUBBA
Bubba Watson is a golfer on the PGA Tour from Bagdad, Florida. Watson is known as a big driver of the ball. He can hit a golf ball over 350 yards.

31. Christmas delivery NOEL
“Noël” is the French word for the Christmas season, ultimately coming from the Latin word for “birth” (natalis). Noel has come to be used as an alternative name for a Christmas carol.

34. 24-part epic ILIAD
“Iliad” is an epic poem by the Greek poet Homer, which tells the story of the siege of Ilium (also known as Troy) during the Trojan war.

36. Eur. landmark under which Zeus trapped Typhon MT ETNA
Typhon was known as the “father of all monsters” in Greek mythology, and he was married to the “mother of all monster”, Echidna. Typhon had a huge human torso with a hundred dragon heads. His lower body was made up of gigantic viper coils. Although all the gods feared Typhon, Zeus finally defeated him and trapped him underneath Mount Etna.

38. SPAM CANNED MEAT
Spam is a precooked meat product that is sold in cans. It was introduced by Hormel Foods in 1937. The main meat ingredients are pork shoulder meat and ham. The name “Spam” was chosen as the result of a competition at Hormel, with the winner earning himself a hundred dollars. According to the company, the derivation of the name “Spam” is a secret known by only a few former executives, but the speculation is that it stands for “spiced ham” or “shoulders of pork and ham”.

Apparently the term “SPAM”, used for unwanted email, is taken from a “Monty Python” sketch. In the sketch (which I’ve seen) the dialog is taken over by the word SPAM, a play on the glut of canned meat in the markets of Britain after WWII. So “SPAM” is used for the glut of emails that takes over online communication. I can just imagine nerdy Internet types (like me) adopting something from a “Monty Python” sketch to describe an online phenomenon …

43. “All Is Lost” star REDFORD
“All Is Lost” is a 2013 film starring Robert Redford, and only Robert Redford. Redford is the only cast member in the whole movie, playing a man whose name we never learn. He is lost at sea after his sailboat collides with a shipping container floating in the Indian Ocean.

47. “‘__ Death”: 2000s Fox sitcom TIL
Fox’s sitcom “‘Til Death” stars Brad Garrett alongside Joely Fisher, and is a pretty good show in my humble opinion. It ran for four seasons, and was cancelled early in 2010.

48. Kapalua Airport site MAUI
The airport code for the small Kapalua Airport on the island of Maui is JHM. JHM stands for “John Henry Morgan”. Morgan was president of Hawaiian Airlines at the time the airport was developed.

53. Kosher food brand SABRA
Sabra is a company headquartered in White Plains, New York that produces Middle Eastern-style foods that all kosher and vegetarian.

59. VIRUS FLU CAUSE
Influenza (flu) is an ailment that is caused by a virus. The virus is readily inactivated by the use of soap, so washing hands and surfaces is especially helpful in containing flu outbreaks.

A computer virus has characteristics very similar to a virus found in nature. It is a small computer program that can copy itself and can infect another host (computer).

62. Like lambs OVINE
The Latin word for “sheep” is “ovis”, giving us the adjective “ovine”, meaning “like a sheep”.

65. Butch Cassidy or the Sundance Kid ALIAS
When the great movie “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” was in development, Paul Newman was always the first choice to play one of the leads, although the initial casting had him in the role of Sundance. Steve McQueen actually accepted the co-starring role, but left over a dispute about the billing (the film was entitled “The Sundance Kid and Butch Cassidy” at that point). The role of Sundance was then offered to Jack Lemmon, but he turned it down. Warren Beatty and Marlon Brando were considered next, before opting for the relatively unknown Robert Redford. What a great choice …

70. Preacher’s perch PULPIT
A pulpit is a platform in a church from which a sermon is delivered by a preacher. The term comes from the Latin “pulpitum” meaning “scaffold, stage, platform for actors”.

77. Winning threesome? ENS
There are three letters N (en) in the word “winning”.

78. View from Alaska’s Wonder Lake DENALI
Denali means “the high one” in the native Athabaskan language, and is now the name used for Mount McKinley. I was surprised to learn that there is a Denali State Park, as well as the Denali National Park. The two are located adjacent to each other (which makes sense!). The State Park is undeveloped for all practical purposes, with just a few campgrounds and trailheads.

Wonder Lake is a lake located within the bounds of Denali National Park.

80. Its prime minister historically visited Cyprus in 2012 ISRAEL
Cyprus is an island nation in the Mediterranean Sea, a member of the European Union. Cyprus is a divided island, with the Republic of Cyprus controlling about 60% of its area. The remaining 40% calls itself the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus, and is occupied by Turkish forces.

81. High dudgeon ANGER
“Dudgeon” is a noun describing a state of sullen, ill humor.

86. Fishing basket CREEL
A creel is a basket used for catching sea creatures (lobsters, for example). Creel is also the name given to the small wicker basket used to hold fish that have been caught by an angler. “Creel” is originally a Scottish word.

88. Run the show EMCEE
The term “emcee” comes from “MC”, an acronym standing for Master or Mistress of Ceremonies.

91. TWEET BIRD CALL
I have never tweeted in my life, and maybe one day I’ll have to do so. Twitter is a microblogging service that limits any post sent to just 140 characters. In a sense, it is similar to this blog. Here I send out a post once a day containing information that I think might be useful to folks (thank you for reading!). I don’t think I could send out much of interest using just 140 characters.

93. 182 Skylane maker CESSNA
The Cessna Aircraft manufacturing company was founded in 1911 by Clyde Cessna, a farmer from Kansas. Cessna is headquartered in Wichita and today has over 8,000 employees.

96. Tiny amount IOTA
Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet. We use the word “iota” to portray something very small as it is the smallest of all Greek letters.

98. Disney doe ENA
Ena is Bambi’s aunt in the 1942 Disney film “Bambi”. The movie is based on the novel “Bambi, A Life in the Woods” written by Austrian author Felix Salten and first published in 1923. There is a documented phenomenon known as the Bambi Effect, whereby people become more interested in animal rights after having watched the scene where Bambi’s mother is shot by hunters.

100. Apple, for one POME
The Latin word for “fruit” is “pomum”, which gives us the botanical term “pome” that is used for a group of fleshy fruits, including apples and pears.

106. LP Field team TITANS
The Tennessee Titans are a football team based in Nashville. The team relocated to Nashville from Houston in 1997, and was called the Tennessee Oilers for two seasons, before adopting the “Titans” moniker.

111. One of football’s Mannings ELI
Eli Manning plays as quarterback for the New York Giants. Eli’s brother Peyton Manning is quarterback for the Denver Broncos. Eli and Peyton’s father is Archie Manning, who was also a successful NFL quarterback.

113. Uno y dos y tres SEIS
In Spanish, one plus two plus three (uno y dos y tres) makes six (seis).

123. STREAM FISHING SPOT
In the world of computing, “streaming” is a way of listening or viewing audio and video files in real time. This methodology compares with the less immediate process of downloading whole files before accessing them.

126. MOUSE LAB ANIMAL
The first computer mouse was invented at the Stanford Research Institute in 1963, by one Douglas Engelbart. Sadly for him, his patent ran out before mice became standard equipment on computers, so he never made any money from his amazing invention.

128. Hawk’s weapon TALON
A “talon” is a claw of a bird of prey. The term ultimately derives from “talus”, the Latin word for “ankle”.

130. Savings choices, briefly IRAS
Individual Retirement Account (IRA)

131. Major road PIKE
Back in the 15th century a “turnpike” was a defensive barrier across a road. By the 17th century the term was used for a barrier that stopped travellers until a toll was paid. By the 18th century a turnpike (sometimes “pike”) was the name given to a road with a toll.

135. Locale in Dante’s fifth circle of Hell STYX
In Dante’s “Inferno”, Hell is represented as nine circles of suffering. The nine circles of Hell are:

– Limbo
– Lust
– Gluttony
– Greed
– Anger
– Heresy
– Violence
– Fraud
– Treachery

Down
1. Web crawlers, e.g. BOTS
A bot is computer program that is designed to imitate human behavior. It might “crawl” around the Web doing searches for example, or it might participate in discussions in chat rooms by giving pre-programmed responses. It might also act as a competitor in a computer game.

2. Tombstone legend EARP
Wyatt Earp is famous as one of the participants in the gunfight at the O.K. Corral. Earp was a city policeman in Wichita, Kansas and also in Dodge City, Kansas. Earp was also deputy sheriff in Tombstone, Arizona where the O.K. Corral gunfight took place. Years later, Earp joined the Alaska Gold Rush and with a partner built and operated the Dexter Saloon in Nome.

3. Bird hunted by gauchos RHEA
The rhea is a flightless bird native to South America. The rhea takes its name from the Greek titan Rhea, an apt name for a flightless bird as “rhea” comes from the Greek word meaning “ground”.

A “gaucho” is someone who lives in the South American pampas, the fertile lowlands in the southeast of South America. The term “gaucho” is also used as the equivalent of our “cowboy”.

6. 1936 Cooperstown inductee COBB
Ty Cobb was one of the richest baseball players of all times. When he retired, Cobb was a major stockholder of the Coca-Cola Corporation. By the time he passed away in 1961, Cobb had an even bigger investment in General Electric. He left an estate after his death worth about $86m (in 2008 dollars).

Cooperstown is a village in New York that is famous as the home to the Baseball Hall of Fame. The village was named for Judge William Cooper, Cooperstown’s founder, and the father of the noted writer James Fenimore Cooper.

7. Isaac’s older son ESAU
Esau, was the grandson of Abraham and the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When Esau was born to Isaac and Rebekah, the event was described, “Now the first came forth, red all over like a hairy garment”. Esau is portrayed later in life as being very different from his brother, as a hunter and someone who loves the outdoor life.

9. Faith with a 19-month calendar BAHA’I
The Baha’i Faith is relatively new in the grand scheme of things, and was founded in Persia in the 1800s. One of the tenets of the religion is that messengers have come from God over time, including Abraham, the Buddha, Jesus, Muhammad, and most recently Bahá’u’lláh who founded the Baha’i Faith.

10. Prefix with fauna AVI-
Avifauna is the collective name for birds of a specific region. An older term for the same thing is “ornis”, which has the same root as “ornithology”.

13. Downwind ALEE
“Alee” is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing “aweather”.

14. Fla. setting EST
Eastern Standard Time (EST)

22. Ward of “The Fugitive” SELA
The actress Sela Ward turns up in crosswords a lot. Ward played Teddy Reed in the TV show “Sisters” in the nineties, and was in “Once and Again” from 1999-2002. I don’t know either show, but I do know Ward from the medical drama “House” in which she played the hospital’s lawyer and Greg House’s ex-partner. That was a fun role, I thought. More recently Ward played a lead role on “CSI: NY” and was a very welcome and much-needed addition to the cast …

“The Fugitive”is a 1993 film based on on the incredibly successful TV series from the sixties. Harrison Ford plays the title character, with Tommy Lee Jones playing the colorful US Marshal in pursuit. Jones won a Best Supporting Oscar for his performance.

24. Take out DELE
“Dele” is the editorial instruction to delete something from a document, and is often written in red.

26. Captain who said, “I have done with society entirely” NEMO
In the 1954 movie version of “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea”, Captain Nemo goes down with his ship. In the novel by Jules Verne the fate of Nemo and his crew isn’t quite so cut and dry, although the inference is perhaps that they did indeed head for Davy Jones’ Locker.

33. “Silent Spring” subj. DDT
DDT is dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (don’t forget now!). DDT was used with great success to control disease-carrying insects during WWII, and when made available for use after the war it became by far the most popular pesticide. And then Rachel Carson published her famous book “Silent Spring”, suggesting there was a link between DDT and diminishing populations of certain wildlife. It was the public outcry sparked by the book, and reports of links between DDT and cancer, that led to the ban on the use of the chemical in 1972. That ban is touted as the main reason that the bald eagle was rescued from near extinction.

37. __ II razor TRAC
Gillette introduced the Trac II in 1971. It was the world’s first twin-blade razor.

39. Banned orchard spray ALAR
The chemical name for Alar, a plant growth regulator and color enhancer, is daminozide. Alar was primarily used on apples but was withdrawn from the market when it was linked to cancer.

41. Mid-morning drink MIMOSA
Where I come from, the cocktail known in North America as a mimosa is called a Buck’s Fizz, named after the club where it was introduced in 1921. The mimosa came along a few years later, apparently first being served in the Paris Ritz. If you want to make a mimosa, it’s a 50-50 mix of champagne and orange juice, and it is very tasty …

42. K2’s 28,251 ft. ELEV
K2 is the second highest mountain on the planet (at 28, 251 ft), with Mount Everest being higher by over 700 feet. K2 is known the “Savage Mountain” as it is relatively difficult to climb, having claimed 1 in 4 mountaineers who have attempted to reach the summit. It has never been climbed in winter. The name K2 dates back to what was called the Great Trigonometric Survey, a British survey of the geography of India carried out during the 19th century. Included in this survey were the heights of many of the Himalayan peaks, including Everest. The original surveyor, a Thomas Montgomerie, included two peaks he first called K1 and K2. He discovered later that the locals called K1 Masherbrum (the 22nd highest mountain in the world), but the remote K2 had no local name that he could find, so it was christened Mount Godwin-Austen. This name was rejected by the Royal Geographic Society although it does still appear on some maps. So, the most common name used is K2, that original notation in a surveyor’s notebook.

44. __ bag DUFFEL
A duffel bag is cylindrical tote bag with a drawstring top, often used by military personnel. The bag is made of this cloth, a cloth that originally came from the town of Duffel in Belgium, hence the name.

45. Reebok competitor FILA
Fila was originally an Italian company, founded in 1911, but is now based in South Korea. Fila was started in Piedmont by the Fila brothers, primarily to make underwear that they sold to people living in the Italian Alps. The company started to focus on sportswear in the seventies, using tennis-great Bjorn Borg as their major endorser.

The brand name Reebok was adopted as the new company name for Foster Shoes of the UK in 1960. The name Reebok (more commonly “Rhebok”) is an Afrikaans word for an antelope, and comes from the term “roe buck”.

51. Defense secretary after Cheney ASPIN
Les Aspin was Secretary of Defense in the Clinton administration, just for a year. He had a turbulent year in office, and during this time oversaw the introduction of the “don’t’ ask, don’t tell” policy for the military. But it was the loss of US lives in Somalia that brought his year to an end, causing him to resign for personal reasons at the end of 1993.

In 2000, Dick Cheney was called upon by then-Governor George W. Bush to head up the search for a running mate for Bush in the presidential election. After a few months search, Bush turned things on their head by asking Cheney to join him on the ticket.

54. Sans serif typeface ARIAL
Serifs are details on the ends of characters in some typefaces. Typefaces without serifs are known as sans-serif (using the French word “sans” meaning “without”). Some people say that serif fonts are easier to read on paper, whereas sans-serif fonts work better on a computer screen. I’m not so sure though …

66. Guadalajara gal pal AMIGA
Guadalajara is a populous city in the Mexican state of Jalisco. The Mexican city is named after the city of the same name in the center of Spain.

72. Sun-dried brick ADOBE
The building material known as adobe has been around a long time, and has been used in dry climates all over the world. The original form of the word “adobe” dates back to Middle Egyptian times, about 2000 BC. The original spelling is “dj-b-t”, and translates as mud (sun-dried) brick.

73. Cuttlefish pigment SEPIA
Sepia is that lovely rich, brown-grey color so common in old photographs. “Sepia” is the Latinized version of the Greek word for cuttlefish, as sepia pigment is derived from the ink sac of the cuttlefish.The “sepia tone” of old photographs is not the result of deterioration over time. Rather, it is the result of a deliberate preservation process which converts the metallic silver in the photographic image to a more stable silver sulfide. Prints that have been sepia-toned can last in excess of 150 years.

75. Jungle hybrid TIGLON
A “liger” is a cross between a male lion and a female tiger. A “tigon”, sometimes “tiglon”, is a cross between a male tiger and a female lion.

76. Lola of “The Liberation of L.B. Jones” FALANA
Lola Falana is a singer, dancer and actress who grew up in Philadelphia. In the sixties Falana had an affair with, and later became good friends with, Sammy Davis Jr. Davis helped get her act into Las Vegas where she was very successful, eventually earning Falana the nickname “Queen of Las Vegas”. With her success came money, and so she became the highest paid female performer in Vegas at that time. Sadly, Falana suffers from multiple sclerosis, a disease that forced her to cut short her career as an entertainer.

“The Liberation of L.B. Jones” is a 1970 film that is based on the 1965 novel “The Liberation of Lord Byron Jones” by Jesse Hill Ford. In turn, the novel is based on real events in Ford’s hometown of Humboldt, Tennessee.

79. Interview magazine co-founder ANDY WARHOL
Andy Warhol went through a period of painting iconic American products, including Coca-Cola bottles and Campbell’s tomato soup cans. In 1964 he participated in a gallery show called “The American Supermarket”. Along with other pop artists he contributed works including a painting of a can of Campbell’s tomato soup. He priced the painting at $1,500, and sold autographed cans of soup for $6 a piece.

“Interview” magazine was founded in 1969 by Andy Warhol (the artist) and John Wilcock (a British journalist).

82. Falsetto-voiced comedian EMO PHILIPS
Emo Philips is a stand-up comedian from Chicago. He’s had a long and successful career, and listed on his resume is a small acting part in the 1992 hit movie “Meet the Parents” starring Robert De Niro and Ben Stiller. Philips was also the executive producer for that very same film, so, I’d say he made a few pennies …

87. Dept. whose initials spell an animal name ENER
The US Department of Energy (DOE) came into being largely as a result of the 1973 oil crisis. The DOE was founded in 1977 by the Carter administration. The DOE is responsible for regulating the production of nuclear power, and it is also responsible for the nation’s nuclear weapons. The official DOE seal features symbols denoting five sources of energy: the sun, an atom, an oil derrick, a windmill and a dynamo.

The initials DOE spell out the animal name “doe”, a female deer.

89. Humorous Bombeck ERMA
Erma Bombeck wrote for newspapers for about 35 years, producing more than 4,000 witty and humorous columns describing her home life in suburbia.

92. “Oh, the weather outside is frightful” lyricist CAHN
“Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!” is a holiday song written by Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne. Perhaps a little ironically, the pair wrote the song in Hollywood, California in July 1945, on one of the hottest days of the year.

93. Sounds heard by the ears? CAWS
A caw is the harsh cry of a crow, and crows might be found in fields of corn …

97. English in tennis TOPSPIN
In my misspent youth, I’d play a little snooker. When deliberately placing side spin on the cue ball, we Irish (and British) players would simply say “I put some ‘side’ on that shot”. The term used over here in the US for the same shot is putting “english” on the ball. Ironically, the term “english” comes from the French “anglé” meaning “angled”. “Anglé” sounds exactly like the word “Anglais”, which is French for “English”. There you have it …

102. NRA member?: Abbr. ASSN
National Rifle Association (NRA)

103. NYU or MIT SCH
The main campus of the private New York University (NYU) is located right in Manhattan, in Washington Square in the heart of Greenwich Village. NYU has over 12,000 resident students, the largest number of residents in a private school in the whole country. NYU’s sports teams are known as the Violets, a reference to the violet and white colors that are worn in competition. Since the 1980s, the school’s mascot has been a bobcat. “Bobcat” had been the familiar name given to NYU’s Bobst Library computerized catalog.

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) was founded in 1861 and first offered classes in 1865, in the Mercantile building in Boston. Today’s magnificent campus on the banks of the Charles River in Cambridge opened in 1916.

104. “I want my baby back” chain CHILI’S
The first Chili’s restaurant was opening 1975 in Dallas, Texas. There are now more than 1400 Chili’s restaurants all over North America.

105. Tartan-clad group CLAN
Tartan is sometimes called “plaid” over here in the US, a word not used in the same sense outside of this country. In Scotland a “plaid” is a blanket or a tartan cloth slung over the shoulder.

107. NBA great Thomas ISIAH
Isiah Thomas played his whole professional basketball-playing career with the Detroit Pistons, and he is now the head coach with Florida International University’s Golden Panthers. When you’re out shopping for popcorn, keep an eye out for the Dale & Thomas brand, as it’s co-owned by Isiah Thomas.

108. Car at Supercharger stations TESLA
Tesla Motors is a manufacturer of electric vehicles based in Palo Alto, California. Tesla is noted for producing the first electric sports car, called the Tesla Roadster. The current base price of a roadster is about $100,000, should you be interested …

Tesla Motors starting building out a network of fast-charging stations to facilitate longer journeys of their vehicles. Known as Tesla Supercharger stations, there were almost 200 such locations in North America in April 2015. These network is arranged into “corridors”, in order to match potential traffic patterns. The first corridor was a route connecting San Francisco, Lake Tahoe, Los Angeles and Las Vegas.

110. David who directed the last four Harry Potter films YATES
David Yates is an English film director, most famous now for having directed the last four of the “Harry Potter” movies. However, he was also responsible for the outstanding 2003 TV political thriller series “State of Play” and the excellent made-for-TV drama “The Girl in the Café”.

115. Emerald __ ISLE
Ireland is called the “Emerald Isle” (and described as “green”) because of all that green grass that grows due to the seemingly non-stop rain.

117. Former “Idol” judge DioGuardi KARA
Kara DioGuardi is a singer-songwriter from Ossining, New York. DioGuardi served as a judge for two seasons on the show “American Idol” .

118. StubHub owner EBAY
StubHub! is an online ticket exchange business that is owned by eBay. StubHub! acts as the middleman between buyers and seller of event tickets, whether those buyers and sellers are individuals or large organizations.

120. Hold, as the mayo OMIT
Mayonnaise originated in the town of Mahon in Menorca, a Mediterranean island belonging to Spain. The Spanish called the sauce “salsa mahonesa” after the town, and this morphed into the French word “mayonnaise” that we use in English today.

121. Like some cabs OAKY
The Cabernet Sauvignon grape has been around since the 17th century, and is the result of a chance crossing in southwestern France of the Cabernet franc and Sauvignon blanc grapes.

122. Show off, Mr. Universe-style FLEX
There are several bodybuilding competitions that have used or continue to use the title “Mr. Universe”. I think that the original dates back to 1953.

124. Like Beethoven’s Sixth IN F
Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6 is also known as the Pastoral Symphony.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Glacier Bay phenomenon BERG
5. Bullets, in Vegas ACES
9. Cake often laced with rum BABKA
14. Short space-saver ET AL
18. Wet’n’Wild Hawaii locale OAHU
19. Winter runner NOSE
20. To no __ AVAIL
21. Muslim mystics SUFIS
23. HOT SPOT TRENDY BAR
25. CACHE HIDDEN TROVE
27. Outer area? SPACE
28. Two-time Masters champ Watson BUBBA
30. “Gotcha!” I SEE!
31. Christmas delivery NOEL
32. Time-tested OLD
34. 24-part epic ILIAD
36. Eur. landmark under which Zeus trapped Typhon MT ETNA
38. SPAM CANNED MEAT
43. “All Is Lost” star REDFORD
46. Oodles A LOT
47. “‘__ Death”: 2000s Fox sitcom TIL
48. Kapalua Airport site MAUI
49. In the box AT BAT
53. Kosher food brand SABRA
55. Has coming MERITS
59. VIRUS FLU CAUSE
61. __ message ERROR
62. Like lambs OVINE
63. Follower FAN
64. Little devils IMPS
65. Butch Cassidy or the Sundance Kid ALIAS
67. Altercation SCRAPE
70. Preacher’s perch PULPIT
72. ”Just __ suspected!” AS I
74. HACKER AMATEUR GOLFER
77. Winning threesome? ENS
78. View from Alaska’s Wonder Lake DENALI
80. Its prime minister historically visited Cyprus in 2012 ISRAEL
81. High dudgeon ANGER
83. Start OPEN
84. Stand-up standard GAG
86. Fishing basket CREEL
88. Run the show EMCEE
91. TWEET BIRD CALL
93. 182 Skylane maker CESSNA
94. Regrettable SORRY
95. Unchallenging course EASY A
96. Tiny amount IOTA
98. Disney doe ENA
100. Apple, for one POME
101. Exasperated query WHAT NOW!
103. TABLET SCRATCH PAD
106. LP Field team TITANS
109. “Gotcha!” PSYCH!
111. One of football’s Mannings ELI
112. Google Groups regular USER
113. Uno y dos y tres SEIS
116. “Take __!” A HIKE
119. Unapproachable ALOOF
123. STREAM FISHING SPOT
126. MOUSE LAB ANIMAL
128. Hawk’s weapon TALON
129. Float GLIDE
130. Savings choices, briefly IRAS
131. Major road PIKE
132. Game division HALF
133. Fires off, say SENDS
134. States SAYS
135. Locale in Dante’s fifth circle of Hell STYX

Down
1. Web crawlers, e.g. BOTS
2. Tombstone legend EARP
3. Bird hunted by gauchos RHEA
4. Controversial public safety issue GUN CONTROL
5. “__ news?” ANY
6. 1936 Cooperstown inductee COBB
7. Isaac’s older son ESAU
8. Hungary neighbor SERBIA
9. Faith with a 19-month calendar BAHA’I
10. Prefix with fauna AVI-
11. “I wouldn’t advise it!” BAD IDEA!
12. Rides KIDS
13. Downwind ALEE
14. Fla. setting EST
15. Beat a hasty retreat TURNED TAIL
16. In progress AFOOT
17. Spice (up) LIVEN
22. Ward of “The Fugitive” SELA
24. Take out DELE
26. Captain who said, “I have done with society entirely” NEMO
29. Crunchy sandwich BLT
33. “Silent Spring” subj. DDT
35. Pitchers, to a manager ARMS
37. __ II razor TRAC
38. Legal work CASE
39. Banned orchard spray ALAR
40. Obvious choices NO-BRAINERS
41. Mid-morning drink MIMOSA
42. K2’s 28,251 ft. ELEV
44. __ bag DUFFEL
45. Reebok competitor FILA
50. Farm abundance BUMPER CROP
51. Defense secretary after Cheney ASPIN
52. Battery components TESTS
54. Sans serif typeface ARIAL
56. Heads for the top RISES
57. Provoke INCUR
58. Barbecue spot TERRACE
60. Let out, as hogs UNPEN
66. Guadalajara gal pal AMIGA
68. Teen follower? -AGERS
69. Flag bearers POLES
71. They’re hard to ignore URGES
72. Sun-dried brick ADOBE
73. Cuttlefish pigment SEPIA
75. Jungle hybrid TIGLON
76. Lola of “The Liberation of L.B. Jones” FALANA
79. Interview magazine co-founder ANDY WARHOL
82. Falsetto-voiced comedian EMO PHILIPS
85. Came down ALIT
87. Dept. whose initials spell an animal name ENER
89. Humorous Bombeck ERMA
90. Checked out EYED
92. “Oh, the weather outside is frightful” lyricist CAHN
93. Sounds heard by the ears? CAWS
97. English in tennis TOPSPIN
99. Downed ATE
102. NRA member?: Abbr. ASSN
103. NYU or MIT SCH
104. “I want my baby back” chain CHILI’S
105. Tartan-clad group CLAN
106. Hair clump TUFT
107. NBA great Thomas ISIAH
108. Car at Supercharger stations TESLA
110. David who directed the last four Harry Potter films YATES
114. Fried rice ingredients EGGS
115. Emerald __ ISLE
117. Former “Idol” judge DioGuardi KARA
118. StubHub owner EBAY
120. Hold, as the mayo OMIT
121. Like some cabs OAKY
122. Show off, Mr. Universe-style FLEX
124. Like Beethoven’s Sixth IN F
125. Unexpected ODD
127. Long-eared carrier ASS

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5 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 7 Jun 15, Sunday”

  1. I did most of this puzzle rather quickly except for the little NE corner which gave me fits for the longest time.

    Interesting bit on Steve McQueen. I remember him having the same issue with Paul Newman and who gets top billing in The Towering Inferno. I wonder if his issue was with Paul Newman or simply with his own ego?

    I think it's a kid's thing to do using PSYCH for "gotcha". For example, a kid can extend his hand to shake another's hand and when the other person attempts to shake the first kid's hand the first kid pulls his hand back and yells "PSYCH!" That's a gotcha in kid language.

    Best –

  2. As far as a feud, refer to McQueen and Yul Brenner in the Magnificient Seven. Or after Bullit, Warner Bros cancelled the rest of a seven pic deal with McQueen, citing irreconcilable differences.

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