LA Times Crossword Answers 29 Aug 16, Monday




LA Times Crossword Solution 29 Aug 16







Constructed by: Jerry Edelstein

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

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Theme: Common Front

Today’s themed answers start with a word that often follows “COMMON”, giving phrases with COMMON at the FRONT:

  • 63A…United stand … and what the first part of the answers to starred clues literally can have..COMMON FRONT
  • 17A…*Cost of shares on the exchange..MARKET PRICE (giving “Common Market”)
  • 41A…*U.S./USSR conflict..COLD WAR (giving “common cold”)
  • 11D…*Element in an executive compensation package..STOCK OPTION (giving “common stock”)
  • 25D…*Drive to do the responsible thing..SENSE OF DUTY (giving “common sense”)
  • 27D…*”So long”..GOOD DAY (giving “common good”)

Bill’s time: 5m 37s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

6…Muslim leaders..IMAMS

An imam is a Muslim leader, often the person in charge of a mosque or perhaps a Muslim community.

11…Place for a massage..SPA

The word “spa” migrated into English from Belgium, as Spa is the name of a municipality in the east of the country that is famous for its healing hot springs. The name “Spa” comes from the Walloon word “espa” meaning “spring, fountain”.

15…French Revolution radical..MARAT

Jean-Paul Marat was a prominent figure in the French Revolution. Marat was famously murdered in his bath by a young woman named Charlotte Corday who was a Royalist. The gruesome event was immortalized in a celebrated painting by Jacques-Louis David called “The Death of Marat”.

17…*Cost of shares on the exchange..MARKET PRICE (giving “Common Market”)

The European Economic Community (EEC) was also called “the Common Market”. The EEC was a NAFTA-like structure that was eventually absorbed into today’s European Union (EU).

20…Miffed..SORE

“To miff” is “to put out, to tee off”, a word that has been around since the early 1600s. Interestingly, in 1824 Sir Walter Scott described the word “miffed” as “a women’s phrase”. That would get him a slap, I’d say …

21…Gizmos..DEVICES

The word “gizmo” (also “gismo”) was originally slang used by both the US Navy and the Marine Corps, but the exact origin seems unknown.

23…__ buco: veal dish..OSSO

“Osso” is the Italian word for bone as in the name of the dish Osso Buco: braised veal shanks.

26…Director Lee..ANG

Taiwanese director Ang Lee sure has directed a mixed bag of films, mixed in terms of genre but not in terms of quality. He was at the helm for such classics as “Sense & Sensibility” (my personal favorite), “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”, “Hulk”, “Brokeback Mountain” and “Life of Pi”.

36…Nobel Peace Prize city..OSLO

The Peace Prize is the most famous of the five prizes bequeathed by Alfred Nobel. The others are for Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, and Literature. There is also a Nobel Prize in Economics that is awarded along with the original five, but it is funded separately and is awarded “in memory of Alfred Nobel”. Four of the prizes are awarded by Swedish organizations (Alfred Nobel was a Swede) and so the award ceremonies take place in Stockholm. The Peace Prize is awarded by the Norwegian Nobel Committee, and that award is presented in Oslo.

38…Jack-in-the-box sound..POP

A Jack-in-the-box is child’s toy. It’s a box with a crank handle at the side. Turning the crank causes a tune to play (usually “Pop Goes the Weasel”), and at the right moment the lid pops open and a spring loaded clown character jumps up out of the box.

40…Drips in the ICU..IVS

One might see intravenous drips (IVs) in an intensive care unit (ICU).

41…*U.S./USSR conflict..COLD WAR (giving “common cold”)

The term “Cold War” was first used by the novelist George Orwell in a 1945 essay about the atomic bomb. Orwell described a world under threat of nuclear war as having a “peace that is no peace”, in a permanent state of “cold war”. The specific use of “cold war” to describe the tension between the Eastern bloc and the Western allies is attributed to a 1947 speech by Bernard Baruch.

45…Yankee slugger, to fans..A-ROD

Baseball player Alex Rodriguez, nicknamed “A-Rod”, has broken a lot of records in his career, albeit under a shroud of controversy due to his use of illegal performance-enhancing drugs. When he signed a 10-year contract with the Texas Rangers for $252 million in 2000, it was the most lucrative contract in sports history. In 2007, Rodriguez signed an even more lucrative 10-year contract with the New York Yankees, worth $275 million.

46…Area of expertise..METIER

“Métier” is the French for “trade, profession”.

53…World Cup soccer org…FIFA

The International Federation of Association Football (FIFA, standing for “Fédération Internationale de Football Association”) is the governing body of the game of soccer.

56…1946 N.L. RBI leader Slaughter..ENOS

Enos Slaughter has a remarkable playing record in Major League Baseball over a 19-year career. Slaughter’s record is particularly remarkable given that he left baseball for three years to serve in the military during WWII.

60…”__ the mornin’!”..TOP O’

“Top o’ the mornin’” is a greeting usually associated with the Irish, although I’ve never heard it used except in jest …

62…Sch. run by Mormons..BYU

Brigham Young University (BYU) in Provo, Utah has about 34.000 students on campus making it the largest religious university in the country. The school was founded in 1875 by Brigham Young, then President of the Mormon Church.

69…Wabbit-hunting Fudd..ELMER

Elmer Fudd is one of the most famous of all the Looney Tunes cartoon characters, the hapless nemesis of Bugs Bunny. If you have never seen it, check out Elmer and Bugs in the marvelous “Rabbit of Seville”, a short cartoon that parodies Rossini’s “Barber of Seville”. Wonderful stuff …

70…Fragrant wood..CEDAR

Cedar is used for the manufacture of some wardrobes and chests as it has long been believed that the fragrant oil in the wood is a moth-repellent. However, whether or not cedar oil is actually effective at keeping moths away seems to be in doubt.

Down

1…Leo is its logo..MGM

There has been a lion in the logo of the MGM studio since 1924. The original was an Irishman (!), a lion named Slats who was born in Dublin Zoo in 1919. However, it wasn’t until Jackie took over from Slats in 1928 that the roar was heard, as the era of silent movies was coming to an end. The current lion is called Leo, and he has been around since 1957.

2…California’s Santa __ River..ANA

The Santa Ana River rises in the San Bernardino Mountains and empties into the Pacific Ocean 96 miles downstream. The Santa Ana is the largest river in Southern California.

3…Long-jawed fish..GAR

The fish known as a gar is very unusual in that it is often found in very brackish water. What is interesting about gar is that their swim bladders are vascularized so that they can actually function as lungs. Many species of gar can actually be seen coming to the surface and taking a gulp of air. This adaptation makes it possible for them to live in conditions highly unsuitable for other fish that rely on their gills to get oxygen out of the water. Indeed, quite interesting …

5…Egyptian queen, familiarly..CLEO

Cleopatra was the last pharaoh to rule Egypt. After Cleopatra died, Egypt became a province in the Roman Empire.

7…St. Patrick’s mo…MAR

There is a fair amount known about St. Patrick, some of which comes from two letters written in his own hand. St. Patrick lived in the fifth century, but was not born in Ireland. He was first brought to Ireland at about 16 years of age from his native Britain, by Irish raiders who made him a slave for six years. Patrick managed to escape and returned to his homeland where he studied and entered the Church. He went back to Ireland as a bishop and a missionary and there lived out the rest of his life. There seems to be good evidence that he died on March 17th (now celebrated annually as St. Patrick’s Day), although the year is less clear. The stories about shamrock and snakes, I am afraid they are the stuff of legend.

9…Sprayed in defense..MACED

“Mace” is actually a brand name, originally introduced by Lake Erie Chemical when they started to manufacture “Chemical Mace”, with the name being a play on the club-like weapon from days of old. Mace was originally a form of tear gas, but Mace today uses a formula that is actually a pepper spray, a different formulation.

10…Longshoreman..STEVEDORE

A stevedore, or longshoreman, is someone employed in the loading and unloading of ships at a port. The word “stevedore” comes from the Spanish “estibador”, meaning “one who loads cargo”. The word “longshoreman”, is simply from “a man who works alongshore”.

11…*Element in an executive compensation package..STOCK OPTION (giving “common stock”)

In the world of commerce, an option is an exclusive right to purchase something within a specified time at a specified price. One often hears about stock options, that employees can have. Such employees have the right to purchase company stock at a certain pre-determined price, within a certain time frame.

There are two main types of stock that one can own in company: common and preferred. Holders of preferred stock have the advantage of being paid dividends first, with holders of common stock only receiving dividends after preferred stockholders have been paid in full. Preferred stockholders are also paid off first in the event of a bankruptcy, with holders of common stock often receiving nothing or very little when assets are sold off. Trust me, I know …

13…Lumberjacks’ tools..AXES

A “lumberjack” is a logger, one harvesting and transporting trees to mills. As one might perhaps imagine, “lumberjack” was originally a Canadian term.

22…Prefix with metric and bar..ISO-

The word “isometric” comes from Greek, and means “having equal measurement”. Isometric exercise is a resistance exercise in which the muscle does not change in length (and the joint angle stays the same). The alternative would be dynamic exercises, ones using the joint’s full range of motion.

An isobar is a line on a weather map connecting points of equal barometric pressure.

23…Desert retreat..OASIS

An isolated area of vegetation in a desert is called an oasis. As water is needed for plant growth, an oasis might also include a spring, pond or small lake.

24…Norelco product..SHAVER

Norelco is a brand of shavers and personal care products made by Philips. The brand name was introduced as the company was barred from using “Philips” in the US in the early 1940s. The name Norelco was chosen as an acronym for “NOR-th American Philips EL-ectrical CO-mpany.

33…Rita with an Oscar, Emmy, Tony and Grammy..MORENO

The Puerto Rican singer, dancer and actress Rita Moreno is one of the few performers to have won an Oscar, Emmy, Grammy and Tony. Moreno got her big break, and won her Oscar, for playing Anita in the 1961 screen adaption of “West Side Story”.

35…Like Al Capone..SCAR-FACED

When Al Capone was a young man, he worked as a bouncer in nightclubs and saloons. He was working the door of a Brooklyn night spot one evening when he apparently insulted a woman, sparking off a fight with her brother. In the tussle, Capone’s face was slashed three times. Capone wasn’t too proud of the incident, nor the “Scarface” moniker that he was given as a result. He always hid the scars as best he could when being photographed, and was also fond of telling people that the scars were from old war wounds.

37…Ridicule satirically..LAMPOON

A “lampoon” is a parody, a spoof or send-up.

47…Geometry proposition..THEOREM

In the world of mathematics, a “theorem” is a statement that can be proven by using other theorems and/or axioms, generally accepted statements. The term “theorem” ultimately comes from the Greek “theorema” meaning “that which is looked at”.

49…Bailed-out insurance co…AIG

AIG is the American International Group, a giant insurance corporation. After repeated bailouts by American taxpayers starting in 2008, the company made some serious PR blunders by spending large amounts of money on executive entertainment and middle management rewards. These included a $444,000 California retreat, an $86,000 hunting trip in England, and a $343,000 getaway to a luxury resort in Phoenix. Poor judgment, I’d say …

51…Copter blades..ROTORS

Our term “helicopter” was absorbed from the French word “hélicoptère” that was coined by Gustave Ponton d’Amécourt in 1861. d’Amécourt envisioned aircraft that could fly vertically using rotating wings that “screwed” into the air. He combined the Greek terms “helix” meaning “spiral, whirl” and “pteron” meaning “wing” to give us “helicopter”.

54…Whac-__: arcade game..A-MOLE

The Whac-A-Mole arcade game was invented in 1976. Players use a mallet to force five plastic moles back into their holes. Whacking the moles can be so frustrating that we sometimes use the term “Whac-a-mole” to describe a repetitive and futile task.

58…Russian denial..NYET

“Nyet” is Russian for “no”, and “da” is Russian for “yes”.

59…Actress Stone of “Birdman”..EMMA

The actress Emma Stone is from Scottsdale, Arizona. Stone really came to prominence with her performance in the 2010 high school movie called “Easy A”. Now one of the most sought-after actresses in Hollywood, Stone values her privacy and works hard to maintain a low profile. Good for her, I say …

61…Low-ranking GIs..PFCS

Private First Class (PFC)

65…Prefix with meter..ODO-

An odometer measures distance traveled. “Odometer comes from the Greek “hodos” meaning “path” and “metron” meaning “measure”.

66…__ King Cole..NAT

Nat King Cole’s real name was Nathaniel Adams Coles. Cole made television history in 1956 when his own show debuted on NBC, a first for an African-American. Cole couldn’t pick up a national sponsor, so in order to save money and possibly save the show, many guest artists worked for no fee at all – the likes of Ella Fitzgerald, Harry Belafonte and Peggy Lee. The show survived for a year, but eventually Nat King Cole had to pull the plug on it himself.

67…Italian three..TRE

“One, two, three” in Italian is “uno, due, tre”.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1…Illusions in a stage act, collectively..MAGIC

6…Muslim leaders..IMAMS

11…Place for a massage..SPA

14…Twist..GNARL

15…French Revolution radical..MARAT

16…Put a strain on..TAX

17…*Cost of shares on the exchange..MARKET PRICE (giving “Common Market”)

19…Tip jar denomination..ONE

20…Miffed..SORE

21…Gizmos..DEVICES

23…__ buco: veal dish..OSSO

26…Director Lee..ANG

28…Student’s workplace..DESK

29…Guttural “Psst!”..AHEM!

30…Wedding vows..I DOS

32…Condemn..DOOM

34…Most rational..SANEST

36…Nobel Peace Prize city..OSLO

38…Jack-in-the-box sound..POP

40…Drips in the ICU..IVS

41…*U.S./USSR conflict..COLD WAR (giving “common cold”)

43…Give it a go..TRY

44…Witness..SEE

45…Yankee slugger, to fans..A-ROD

46…Area of expertise..METIER

48…Sound from Leo..ROAR

50…Twist, as water-damaged floorboards..WARP

52…Sharpen..HONE

53…World Cup soccer org…FIFA

55…”__-hoo!”..YOO

56…1946 N.L. RBI leader Slaughter..ENOS

57…Part of a chess match when most of the pieces are off the board..END GAME

60…”__ the mornin’!”..TOP O’

62…Sch. run by Mormons..BYU

63…United stand … and what the first part of the answers to starred clues literally can have..COMMON FRONT

68…Track transaction..BET

69…Wabbit-hunting Fudd..ELMER

70…Fragrant wood..CEDAR

71…Pig’s home..STY

72…Officials who have their faculties..DEANS

73…Hit hard, biblically..SMOTE

Down

1…Leo is its logo..MGM

2…California’s Santa __ River..ANA

3…Long-jawed fish..GAR

4…Annoying..IRKSOME

5…Egyptian queen, familiarly..CLEO

6…Loom on the horizon..IMPEND

7…St. Patrick’s mo…MAR

8…Very dry..ARID

9…Sprayed in defense..MACED

10…Longshoreman..STEVEDORE

11…*Element in an executive compensation package..STOCK OPTION (giving “common stock”)

12…Window glass..PANE

13…Lumberjacks’ tools..AXES

18…Double agent..TRAITOR

22…Prefix with metric and bar..ISO-

23…Desert retreat..OASIS

24…Norelco product..SHAVER

25…*Drive to do the responsible thing..SENSE OF DUTY (giving “common sense”)

27…*”So long”..GOOD DAY (giving “common good”)

31…U-turn from NNE..SSW

33…Rita with an Oscar, Emmy, Tony and Grammy..MORENO

35…Like Al Capone..SCAR-FACED

37…Ridicule satirically..LAMPOON

39…Combustible funeral piles..PYRES

42…Under a quarter-tank, say..LOW

47…Geometry proposition..THEOREM

49…Bailed-out insurance co…AIG

51…Copter blades..ROTORS

54…Whac-__: arcade game..A-MOLE

57…Diminishes..EBBS

58…Russian denial..NYET

59…Actress Stone of “Birdman”..EMMA

61…Low-ranking GIs..PFCS

64…Guys..MEN

65…Prefix with meter..ODO-

66…__ King Cole..NAT

67…Italian three..TRE




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12 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 29 Aug 16, Monday”

  1. 6:20, no errors, iPad. My suspicions about “top o’ the mornin'” have now been confirmed … 🙂

    I grew up in northern Iowa around lots of Norwegians (including two of my grandparents). One of the phrases one often saw on items in gift shops in that part of the country was “Uff da!”, which was supposed to be characteristically Norwegian. Then, in 1969, I went to Norway, where I found that no one there uses the phrase; they told me, “Oh, that’s just an American thing!”

  2. Hi all, some comments (8/22-28):

    Had too many random errors throughout all of these this week to the point I was actually doing better with the NYT lineup until Friday (MAS of course) – haven’t tried Sat yet. A lot of trying too hard from the constructors, mainly. 67A-64D on Mon, 27A-24D on Wed. Then the usual Fri-Sat shenanigans I had to spend lots of time to interpret and then finally look up. 4 errors on Fri, 4 on Sat – always on something I never heard of before and probably will never hear of again. 1 strange error on Sun (77A-58D) guessing on a couple of things I never heard of before.
    At least I’m back on track with doing WSJ metas adequately (done and entered), now.

    1. @Bill
      Might be good to note in your notes that A-Rod retired (August 12, 4 shy of 700 HR) to the consternation of constructors everywhere. Though there’s always the possibility of unretirement as any player has.

      @Bobbi
      No shame in the “cheating sites”, especially if you’re learning and are stuck on something and need to fix your grid, instead of just leaning on them. (My habit is always to finish out a grid, even if I DNF it unaided.) A lot of things on grids do tend to get off the wall, especially if you are not used to them. Even worse when you get duplicate answers that work with the clue.

    2. @Glenn … If you routinely do the WSJ metapuzzles on Friday, my hat is off to you. I managed to solve last week’s, but it’s only the third one I’ve been able to do in two months. I emailed my answer – ICE CREAM SUNDAE, (“a tasty treat”), found by looking at the letters just above all the horizontal occurrences of ME in the grid – and went to bed. Fifteen minutes later, a thought popped into my head, so I turned the light back on, re-examined the puzzle, and found what I suspected was there: two vertical occurrences of ME in the grid. Above the first was an A and above the second was an N, giving rise to the thought that the desired answer might be AN ICE CREAM SUNDAE. Do you think this was just a coincidence or did the setter throw it in as an additional stumbling block?

      1. I will note that the meta puzzles are rarely perfect, looking at all of them in hindsight. I think they recognize this and generally will accept any other answers that might be reasonable on a “show your work” kind of basis (variations in names and the like).

        Most of the missteps that people make (based on the editor posting them in the comments after each contest, along with stats – 1039 entries, 85% accurate last week) usually are from not finding a theme and following it out correctly, which is why I suggest that when talking about it.

  3. @Glenn, I also had it easier at the NYT last week – until today.

    One other thing – CLEO on both and practically the same clue.

  4. This puzzle was eminently do-able and hence a source of great pleasure for me. Thank goodness, for Mondays. …. er. ! The only problem I had was the ‘M’ in Marat and IMpend. I remember an ‘M’ who was the MI6 boss of James Bond. ( other than Miss Moneypenny ….who was his secretary).

    Reading about Marat in Bill’s blog, gave me a brainwave, on how to remember him. ‘Mar’ …. or more precisely, pronounced ‘mer’, in Iranian, urdu and hindi means death (to-), or ‘to die’. Thus one could concoct a slang word, ”marat’ to mean, one -who- is -dead, or one-who-is-going-to-die. Which fits into his claim for fame. I am fairly sure, that so such actual word exists.

    Anyway,
    Have a nice day,
    all.

  5. I erased a lot today.
    YAH-HOO instead of YOO-HOO,obviously stuck in my head from yesterday.
    LAUGH AT instead of LAMPOON.
    AHN instead of ANG.
    THEORuM.
    Sheesh, this was a little chewy for me. You all are a lot smarter than I am.

  6. Further to Jean Paul Marat, he-who-was murdered in his bathtub,

    by Ms. Charlotte Corday, a Royalist .

    I was quite sure that there was a salacious story behind all this. Actually, the story is far more noble, even illuminating, and prosaic.

    1. Marat was suffering from a skin infection, and hence was conducting all his business, whilst in his bathtub. ( His journalism suffered.)
    2. Mrs. Marat was very much in the house, and in fact, it was she, who let Ms. Corday in.
    3. Ms. Corday had strictly political intentions, and had come to murder him. She was a noblewoman in her own right, and intended to sacrifice herself, ‘for the common good, and the good of France’. She handed him a letter, and whilst he was reading it, stabbed him.
    4. The stab was on the right hand side of the chest, thus missing the heart altogether …. but severing enough blood vessels to cause his death. This appered to be the work of an amateur.
    5. She was, in short order, ( had to confess 3 times, ) tried, sentenced and guillotined. She also gave numerous speeches to the court. Required reading in french ecoles today.

    6. Her severed head was ‘slapped’ by the accompanying carpenter. Prior to this, she had requested and her portrait was painted for posterity.
    Post mortem, she was autopsied to determine, if she was in a ‘relationship’, for a possible co-conspirator. She was ‘found’ to be a ‘virgin’….

    All this in Wiki. I do not make this up. Really, the French can be so painfully thorough…

    7. She is considered to be, more or less, a heroine, in France, today.

    Excuse please, the lenght of this article.

  7. Agreed that this was a little more difficult than most Mondays. STEVEDORE intersecting both MARAT and METIER seems a little cruel.

    Yes AROD is no longer a Yankee. He was let go from the Yankees. He didn’t actually retire thus he’ll receive about $27 million next year for NOT playing. Heck I’ll not play for half that…

    Best

    1. @Jeff
      Actually, all the media stories say “retire”. I think it is as you say though, he’s just taking his salary to be a “consultant” in order to get the money for next year. The Yankees are okay with that, so I guess they have another use for him somewhere.

  8. @ Jeff:. I’ll not play for one-twentyseventh of that!!!
    Good puzzle. A few stumbles. Didn’t remember MARAT but got it on crosses. @Vidwan, thanks for that info on Charlotte Corday! Très interesante.
    I love Ang Lee, especially the Ice Storm and certainly Brokeback Mountain.
    I’d SAY MÉTIER is a pretty hifalutin word for a Monday.
    Didn’t know Whac-AMOLE, tho I recognized the game from Bill’s description. When I wrote it I thought the name was a play on “guacamole!”
    Be well~~™???

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