LA Times Crossword Answers 11 Oct 16, Tuesday




la-times-crossword-solution-11-oct-16







Constructed by: Janice Luttrell

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: The Tube

Today’s themed answers each comprise two words, the first ending with T and the second starting with V. As such, we have THE TUBE (TV) hidden inside all of the themed answers:

  • 40A…Set in a den, slangily … or, initially, what can be found in each answer to a starred clue..THE TUBE
  • 20A…*Artsy Lower Manhattan neighborhood..EAST VILLAGE
  • 58A…*Drug bust calculation..STREET VALUE
  • 11D…*Panel decision that’s not unanimous..SPLIT VOTE
  • 35D…*Became a YouTube sensation..WENT VIRAL

Bill’s time: 5m 00s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

9…__ Rica..COSTA

Costa Rica is a country in Central America, bordered by Nicaragua in the north, and Panama to the South. Costa Rica is remarkable in my opinion, a leader on the world stage in many areas. It has been referred to as the “greenest” country in the world, the “happiest” country in the world, and has a highly educated populace. In 1949, the country unilaterally abolished its own army … permanently!

14…Pitcher’s goof..BALK

To balk is to stop and refuse to go on. It’s not just a baseball term!

15…Inflatable mattress prefix with Bed..AERO-

AeroBed is an air mattress made by the Coleman Company.

16…Colorado ski mecca..ASPEN

Aspen, Colorado used to be known as Ute City, with the name change taking place in 1880. Like many communities in the area, Aspen was a mining town, and in 1891 and 1892 it was at the center of the highest production of silver in the US. Nowadays, it’s all about skiing and movie stars.

17…Muslim denomination..SHIA

The Islamic sects of Sunni and Shia Muslims differ in the belief of who should have taken over leadership of the Muslim faithful after the death of the Prophet Muhammad. Followers of the Sunni tradition agree with the decision that the Prophet Muhammad’s confidante Abu Bakr was the right choice to become the first Caliph of the Islamic nation. Followers of the Shia tradition believe that leadership should have stayed within the Prophet Muhammad’s own family, and favoured the Prophet’s son-in-law Ali.

20…*Artsy Lower Manhattan neighborhood..EAST VILLAGE

The East Village is a neighborhood of Manhattan lying between Broadway and the East River, extending from 14th Street in the northeast to Houston Street in the southwest. The area was known simply as the northern part of the Lower East Side until the 1960s, when the moniker “East Village” was applied in an effort to distinguish it from the Lower East Side and its less desirable reputation. The name chosen leveraged the established image of the neighboring Greenwich Village as Manhattan’s Bohemian capital.

24…American of Japanese descent..NISEI

There are some very specific terms used to describe the children born to Japanese immigrants in their new country. The immigrants themselves are known as “Issei”. “Nisei” are second generation Japanese, “Sansei” the third generation (grandchildren of the immigrant), and “Yonsei” are fourth generation.

36…Title for Doubtfire or Dash..MRS

The 1993 comedy “Mrs. Doubtfire” is based on a 1987 novel called “Madame Doubtfire” by Anne Fine. The movie is set and was filmed in San Francisco. The title role is played by Robin Williams, who spent most of the movie dressed as the female Mrs. Doubtfire. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the movie won the Oscar for Best Makeup.

38…Site of Arizona’s Red Rock State Park..SEDONA

I’ve been to Red Rock State Park near Sedona several times, and it is a lovely place to visit. I read somewhere that there is a guided moonlight hike available, a 2½-hour guided trek that takes in sunset and moonrise. It’s on my list of things to do …

40…Set in a den, slangily … or, initially, what can be found in each answer to a starred clue..THE TUBE

Television (TV, teevee, the tube, the boob tube)

43…Dessert with a cherry..SUNDAE

There’s a lot of speculation about how the dessert called a sundae got its name, but there seems to be agreement that it is an alteration of the word “Sunday”.

47…__ seat: advantageous spot..CATBIRD

The idiomatic phrase “the catbird seat” is used to describe an enviable position in which one has the upper hand. The first documented use of the expression is in a 1942 story by James Thurber called “The Catbird Seat”.

51…France dance..VALSE

In French, a triple-meter dance might be a “valse” (waltz).

56…Architect I.M. __..PEI

I. M. Pei (full name: Ieoh Ming Pei) is an exceptional American architect who was born in China. Of Pei’s many wonderful works, my favorite is the renovation of the Louvre in Paris, especially the Glass Pyramid in the courtyard.

62…Throat ailment..STREP

Streptococcus bacteria multiply and divide along a single axis so that they form linked chains. That behavior gives the genus of bacteria its name, as “streptos” is Greek for “easily twisted, like a chain”. I had to battle with streptococcal pharyngitis (strep throat) twice in the past few years and it was not at all pleasant, I must say. Another species of streptococcus is responsible for that terrible “flesh-eating” infection that makes the news from time to time.

65…Writer Jaffe..RONA

Rona Jaffe was an American novelist perhaps most famous for two of her books, “The Best of Everything” and “Mazes and Monsters”. “The Best of Everything” was published in 1958 and has been compared with the HBO television series “Sex and the City” as it depicts women in the working world. “Mazes and Monsters” was published in 1981 and explores a role-playing game similar to Dungeons & Dragons and the impact it has on players.

66…Video game pioneer..ATARI

At one point, the electronics and video game manufacturer Atari was the fastest growing company in US history. However, Atari never really recovered from the video game industry crash of 1983.

71…Bay Area cop gp…SFPD

The San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) is the 11th largest police department in the country. The SFPD dates back to the days of the Gold Rush, being founded in 1849 as a force of 35 officers. SFPD has featured a lot in movies and on television. The most famous films are probably “Bullitt”, the “Dirty Harry” series and “48 Hrs.” On television there was “Ironside”, “The Streets of San Francisco” and “Monk”.

Down

1…”Barnaby Jones” actor Buddy..EBSEN

The actor Buddy Ebsen was best known for playing Jed Clampett in television’s “The Beverly Hillbillies”. Ebsen had been cast in the role of the Tin Man in the 1939 movie “The Wizard of Oz”, but he developed an allergy to the aluminium dust that was used in the makeup. He ended up in hospital and had to walk away from the part. Ebsen blamed “The Wizard of Oz” on persistent problems that he had with his lungs in subsequent years. But Ebsen lived 16 years longers that any of the other major cast members of the film, so maybe he got the last laugh!

Barnaby Jones is a character on the seventies detective show called “Canon”. The Jones character was played by Buddy Ebsen. Ebsen then starred in the title role of the spinoff show called “Barnaby Jones”.

2…Persian faith..BAHA’I

The Baha’i Faith is relatively new in the grand scheme of things, and was founded in Persia in the 1800s. One of the tenets of the religion is that messengers have come from God over time, including Abraham, the Buddha, Jesus, Muhammad, and most recently Bahá’u’lláh who founded the Baha’i Faith.

5…Anklebones..TALI

The collection of seven bones in the foot just below the foot are known collectively as the tarsus. One of those bones is the talus (plural “tali”), more commonly called the ankle bone. The talus is the lower part of the ankle joint and articulates with the lower ends of the tibia and fibula in the lower leg.

8…Name on a Trump card?..DONALD

When Donald Trump won the nomination as presidential candidate in 2016, he wasn’t the first candidate to become the Republican nominee without any political experience. The most famous such candidate in recent decades was Dwight D. Eisenhower, who was put on the top of the ticket in 1952.

10…Suffix with fruct-..-OSE

Fructose is also known as “fruit sugar”. It is commonly found in plants, and is the most water-soluble of all sugars. Many of us consume a lot of “high-fructose corn syrup”. This is a sweetener made from corn starch that is a mixture of glucose and fructose. The natural ratio of fructose to glucose is altered to produce a sweeter syrup by chemically converting much of the naturally occurring glucose into fructose.

12…”The Hunger Games” extra..TEEN

“The Hunger Games” is a 2008 novel by Suzanne Collins, the first in a trilogy of titles that also includes “Catching Fire” (2009) and “Mockingjay” (2010). “The Hunger Games” was adapted into a very successful movie released in 2012, with the sequels following soon after. Amazon.com reports more sales of “The Hunger Games” series books than even the “Harry Potter” series.

13…Picnic invaders..ANTS

Our term “picnic” comes from the French word that now has the same meaning, namely “pique-nique”. The original “pique-nique” was a fashionable pot-luck affair, and not necessarily held outdoors.

21…”C’est la __!”..VIE

“C’est la vie” is French for “that’s life”.

28…UMass town..AMHERST

The University of Massachusetts Amherst (UMass) is the largest public university in New England. UMass was founded back in 1863, although it took a while to get the school into service. Construction work was delayed and the college went through two presidents before William S. Clark took charge. He cracked the whip, completed the construction and enrolled the first students in the same year that he took over the reins, in 1867. As a result, although Clark was the third President of UMass, he is regarded by most as the school’s founding father.

29…Hip-hop Dr…DRE

Dr. Dre is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. Dr. Dre is known for his own singing career as well as for producing records and starting the careers of others such Snoop Dogg, Eminem and 50 Cent.

31…Oklahoma’s “Wheat Capital”..ENID

Enid, Oklahoma takes its name from the old railroad station around which the city developed. Back in 1889, that train stop was called Skeleton Station. An official who didn’t like the name changed it to Enid Station, using a character from Alfred Lord Tennyson’s “Idylls of the King”. Maybe if he hadn’t changed the name, the city of Enid would now be called Skeleton, Oklahoma! Enid has the nickname “Queen Wheat City” because is has a huge capacity for storing grain, the third largest grain storage capacity in the world.

33…Phonograph record..DISC

“Phonograph” was an early name for what became known as a gramophone and later a record player. Famously, the phonograph was invented in 1877 by Thomas Edison.

34…Quito’s country: Abbr…ECUA

The full name of the capital city of Ecuador is San Francisco de Quito. Quito is the second highest administrative capital city in the world, after La Paz, Bolivia.

41…Wire service letters..UPI

Founded in 1958, United Press International (UPI) used to be one of the biggest news agencies in the world, sending out news by wire to the major newspapers. UPI ran into trouble with the change in media formats at the end of the twentieth century and lost many of its clients as the afternoon newspapers shut down due to the advent of television news. UPI, which once employed thousands, still exists today but with just a handful of employees.

44…Corporate alias abbr…DBA

Doing business as (DBA)

50…Where a Brit may powder her nose..LAV

Our word lavatory (sometimes “lav”) originally referred to a washbasin, and comes from the Latin “lavatorium”, a place for washing. In the 1600s a “lavatory” came to mean a washroom, and in the 1920s a toilet.

53…Unlikely to get excited..ALOOF

I suppose one might guess from the “feel” of the word “aloof” that is has nautical roots. Originally “aloof” meant “to windward” and was the opposite of “alee”. A helmsman might be instructed to stay aloof, to steer the boat into the weather to keep a distance from a lee-shore. It is from this sense of maintaining a distance that aloof came to mean “distant” in terms of personality. Interesting, huh …?

56…”This is your brain on drugs” ads, briefly..PSAS

Public service announcement (PSA)

“This Is Your Brain on Drugs” was a memorable anti-narcotics campaign launched in 1987 that used the effective imagery of two eggs frying in a pan.

57…Singer James..ETTA

Etta James was best known for her beautiful rendition of the song “At Last”. Sadly, as she disclosed in her autobiography, James lived a life that was ravaged by drug addiction leading to numerous legal and health problems. Ms. James passed away in January 2012 having suffered from leukemia.

59…Irish name for Ireland..EIRE

“Éire”, is the Irish word for “Ireland”. The related “Erin” is an anglicized version of “Éire” and actually corresponds to “Éirinn”, the dative case of “Éire”.

60…Xanadu..EDEN

Shangdu (also “Xanadu”) was located in Inner Mongolia in China, just over 200 miles north of China. Shangdu was the capital of the Yuan dynasty that was established in 1271 by Kublai Khan. The Venetian traveller Marco Polo visited Shangdu in about 1272, and the city was destroyed by the Ming army in 1369. Centuries later in 1797, the English poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge immortalized the city (as “Xanadu”) in his celebrated poem “Kubla Khan”.

61…Spanish aunts..TIAS

In Spanish, the “hermana” (sister) of your “padre” (father) is your “tia” (aunt).

63…Suffix with ranch..-ERO

A ranchero is someone employed on a ranch, and is a word with Spanish roots.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1…__ and flows..EBBS

5…Stepped heavily..TROD

9…__ Rica..COSTA

14…Pitcher’s goof..BALK

15…Inflatable mattress prefix with Bed..AERO-

16…Colorado ski mecca..ASPEN

17…Muslim denomination..SHIA

18…Not fatty, as meat..LEAN

19…Lease again..RELET

20…*Artsy Lower Manhattan neighborhood..EAST VILLAGE

23…Car owner’s premium pmt…INS

24…American of Japanese descent..NISEI

25…Dieter’s catchword..LO-FAT

27…Sweat unit..BEAD

30…Originates (from)..DERIVES

33…Like morning grass..DEWY

36…Title for Doubtfire or Dash..MRS

38…Site of Arizona’s Red Rock State Park..SEDONA

39…Rocks in bars..ICE

40…Set in a den, slangily … or, initially, what can be found in each answer to a starred clue..THE TUBE

42…Gratuity..TIP

43…Dessert with a cherry..SUNDAE

45…Refreshing retreat..SPA

46…Wines that usually go well with beef..REDS

47…__ seat: advantageous spot..CATBIRD

49…In couch-potato mode..IDLE

51…France dance..VALSE

52…Up to one’s ears (in)..AWASH

56…Architect I.M. __..PEI

58…*Drug bust calculation..STREET VALUE

62…Throat ailment..STREP

64…Modest skirt..MIDI

65…Writer Jaffe..RONA

66…Video game pioneer..ATARI

67…Region..AREA

68…Sullen..DOUR

69…Makeover place..SALON

70…Camera attachment..LENS

71…Bay Area cop gp…SFPD

Down

1…”Barnaby Jones” actor Buddy..EBSEN

2…Persian faith..BAHA’I

3…Utter joy..BLISS

4…Glide past on the ice..SKATE BY

5…Anklebones..TALI

6…Movie spool..REEL

7…Verbal..ORAL

8…Name on a Trump card?..DONALD

9…Untroubled..CAREFREE

10…Suffix with fruct-..-OSE

11…*Panel decision that’s not unanimous..SPLIT VOTE

12…”The Hunger Games” extra..TEEN

13…Picnic invaders..ANTS

21…”C’est la __!”..VIE

22…Turns sour..GOES BAD

26…Help..AID

28…UMass town..AMHERST

29…Hip-hop Dr…DRE

31…Oklahoma’s “Wheat Capital”..ENID

32…Drains of strength..SAPS

33…Phonograph record..DISC

34…Quito’s country: Abbr…ECUA

35…*Became a YouTube sensation..WENT VIRAL

37…N.Y. and Calif…STS

40…Dramatic downturn..TAILSPIN

41…Wire service letters..UPI

44…Corporate alias abbr…DBA

46…Bounty hunters’ goals..REWARDS

48…Of the skin..DERMAL

50…Where a Brit may powder her nose..LAV

53…Unlikely to get excited..ALOOF

54…Dawn..SUNUP

55…Listened to..HEARD

56…”This is your brain on drugs” ads, briefly..PSAS

57…Singer James..ETTA

59…Irish name for Ireland..EIRE

60…Xanadu..EDEN

61…Spanish aunts..TIAS

63…Suffix with ranch..-ERO

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10 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 11 Oct 16, Tuesday”

  1. The puzzle was quirky, in a good sense, and I enjoyed it very much. Some unusual words were infact a pleasure to decipher. A good time to be had. Thank you Janice Luttrell, and ofcourse, Bill, for your blog.

    RE: Shia ….. largest number of Shia are in Iran (>99%) and Iraq (~38%). Ali was not only Mohd.’s son in law, he was also the supposedly, the first muslim convert and his most trusted right hand man. Though, the fact that the sect, has still has had such a distinct personality, through all these years, is more of a politico-social reality.

    Something I learnt on todays blog, is that fructose is sweeter than glucose. Who would have thought of that ? I only remember, of a memory of getting a spoonful of glucose, after I had run a semi-demi-marathon in my school days. ( I guess you could not get fructose, in a can ….) I must really research and try to find out if there is an independent test to measure ‘sweetness’, like acidity, (Ph) for instance.
    I suspect Saccharides, cyclamates and Aspartame would easily top the list. Btw, corn syrup is america’s biggest export, more than wheat, for instance.

    Have a nice day, folks.

  2. At the risk of TMI – too much information, here is an article on sweetness How sweet it is ! .

    The article is far too sophisticated and involved, to be merely summarized. Basically, it is very subjective measure, based on a ‘panel’ of experts …. much like evaluating a perfume or an odor. (or odour …. )

  3. This one actually gave me pause in a couple of spots. Although it’s been in other crosswords, NISEI meeting BAHAI made me guess the”I”, but I did. The theme was straightforward enough.

    I’ve never been a nervous flyer (turbulance often rocks me to sleep), but flying into Quito airport was no fun at all. You come down from the clouds, it looks like you’re about to run into the tops of all the buildings in downtown, and then you have to drop again to hit the runway which looks like if you go past it you’re going to fall off a cliff. I believe pilots used to have to get special clearance to land there. They have since built a new airport out in the burbs which opened a couple of years ago, but I had the privilege of landing at the “fun” one.

    Carrie – Boo Cubs! I’ve been a life long Cardinal fan, and the one joy I’ve always carried in my life is the Cubs’ futility. Whatever will I do if they actually win? The fanbase is insufferable even after 108 years of losing. If they win it will be even worse….

    Best –

    1. Your comments about Quito reminded me: In April of ’89, during my one and only climbing trip in Nepal, we flew in a little “Twin Otter” from Katmandu to Lukla, which is a few days’ trek away from Everest. As you come in for a landing, you’re flying straight into the side of a mountain. When the wheels make contact with the runway (which slopes uphill), the pilot slams on the brakes. Shortly thereafter, you’re still approaching the end of the runway. At what appears to be the last second, you make a sharp right turn and finally come to a stop. Later, I walked around the runway and observed the wreckage of planes that didn’t make it. (Edmund Hillary’s first wife and one of his children died on a similar flight, and I had been told that it happened in Lukla, but a Wikipedia article says that it happened near Katmandu.) Taking off for the return flight to Katmandu is similarly interesting: At the end of the runway, you go off a cliff, so your distance from the ground goes from zero to several thousand feet in a matter of seconds. So … enough … my palms are sweating … 🙂

  4. 7:58, no errors, iPad. Did not know what DBA stood for. Appreciate finally having an explanation of ERIN versus EIRE, which I’ve wondered about for years.

    Recently, I’ve been buying an occasional item from a discount shelf at my local supermarket. Twice, I have bought bakery items that were marked “sugar-free”, taken a few bites, and thrown them in the trash. My first experiences with sugar substitutes … awful, awful, offal … 🙂

    @Carrie … My gratitude and the “Careful Reader Award” for picking up on my little pun yesterday … 🙂

  5. Quicker than yesterday, but I too had pause at BAHA’I/ NISEI like Jeff.
    I never remember where the apostrophe goes.
    Still stuck on BODEGAS for groceries in yesterday’s puzzle.
    Comestibles is what google comes up with. I’ll have to ask my friend and former student from Mexico what he thinks.
    My ex-next-door neighbor called her pantry the BODEGA.
    Doesn’t Carrie want the Cubs to GO!………. back to Chicago?
    Like, GO HOME!!!????

    1. Pookie –

      Like a lot of Spanish words, the meaning and especially the usage varies depending on the country. In Spain bodega is probably more often than not a winery. In a lot of central american countries it’s usually a grocery store.

      Whenever I’m in Mexico – especially the industrial city of Monterrey – I see advertisements and signs all over the place for bodegas for rent or for sale in industrial parks. What they’re renting are warehouses. That’s how I see the word used more than in any other form in Mexico – as a warehouse.

      So – I guess all of these answers are correct. It just depends on the country and the context.

      Best –

  6. Didn’t have too much trouble with this grid. As to being Nisei, if you are born in Japan and come to the US you are Issei and if you are born to Nisei parents you are Sansei and now we even have Yonsei and Gosei citizens, meaning born to a Sansei parent or a Yonsei parent.

    See here for more information: Japanese American Lineage

  7. Bonsoir mes amis!!
    @Jeff, LOL! FWIW, I also love the Cards. Fantastic history, that team. But, my mom was born in Chicago, and she and my uncles always loved the Cubs. Being from LA, the Dodgers are, of course, my team, and I’m not sure WHAT I’ll do if it’s Dodgers vs Cubs in the NLCS.
    Hey Pookie! Made a mistake about the city…? Cubs beat Giants Monday in San Francisco, keeping the series alive, and I thought their next game would be in Chicago! I was wrong; they were still in San Francisco for Tuesday’s game 4, which they WON!
    @Dave — meanwhile, I’d like to award YOU the prize for Scariest Plane Story — I was ALREADY jittery after reading Jeff’s adventure. Carcasses of hapless planes!! I’d never fly again after that!
    As to today’s puzzle: all went fine till I hit the southeast corner! I had LOO instead of LAV and STOIC instead of ALOOF. Took awhile to untangle.
    Till tomorrow!
    Be well~~™??

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