LA Times Crossword Answers 8 Oct 16, Saturday




LA Times Crossword Solution 8 Oct 16







Constructed by: Greg Johnson

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: None

Bill’s time: 10m 31s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

15…Black-and-white vegetarian..PANDA

Taxonomic classification of the giant panda has been a subject of great debate for years, the main question being whether it belongs to the bear or raccoon family. The accepted opinion these days, based on molecular studies, seems to be that the panda is in fact a true bear.

16…Black-and-white..POLICE CAR

A police car is often referred to by the slang term “black and white”, a reference to the vehicle’s common paint scheme.

19…Ivory, e.g…BAR SOAP

Ivory soap is one of Procter & Gamble’s oldest products, introduced way back in 1879. Ivory soap is noted for its “purity” and also because of its property of floating in water. Despite urban myths to the contrary, the property of floating in water was developed deliberately by a chemist at the time Ivory was being formulated. The soap floats because the ingredients are mixed longer than necessary for homogenization, which introduces more air into the product.

26…Protect against harm, in a way..VACCINATE

A vaccine is a modified virus that causes a particular disease, which is administered to an individual to stimulate the immune system into developing immunity. British physician Edward Jenner came up with the first vaccine, injecting people with the cowpox virus in order to prevent smallpox. The term “vaccination” comes from the Latin “vaccinus” meaning “from cows”, with “vacca” translating as “cow”.

30…It’s about 40.5 for Pittsburgh, Pa…N LAT

The latitude and longitude coordinates for Pittsburgh are: 40.440624, -79.995888. The positive value of latitude indicates a latitude north. The negative value of longitude indicates longitude west.

32…Tirana is its cap…ALB

The Republic of Albania is a country in the Balkans in southeastern Europe. Albania was made a communist state after WWII but became independent again with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1990. Albania has been a member of NATO since 2009, and was accepted as an official candidate to join the European Union in 2014. The nation’s capital and largest city is Tirana.

33…One of ten in the Kentucky Derby..FURLONG

There are about five furlongs in a kilometer. The name “furlong” comes from the Old English “furh” (meaning “furrow”) and “lang” (meaning “long”). In Anglo-Saxon times, a furlong was the length of a furrow in ploughed field that was one acre in area. The width of said one-acre field was defined as one chain.

The first Kentucky Derby was run in 1875, and is a race modelled on the Epsom Derby in England and the Grand Prix de Paris (now called the “Prix de l‘Arc de Triomphe”). As such, The Kentucky Derby was run over 1½ miles (12 furlongs), although in 1896 this was shortened to 1¼ miles (10 furlongs). The winning horse is presented with a very elaborate blanket made of red roses.

34…”Gr8 joke!”..LOL

Gr8 joke! (great joke!); LOL (laugh out loud).

37…Where le nez is..TETE

“Tête” is the French word for “head”, and “le nez” is French for “the nose”.

38…Typical ham feature..THEATRICS

The word “ham”, describing a performer who overacts, is apparently a shortened form of “hamfatter” and dates back to the late 1800s. “Hamfatter” comes from a song in old minstrel shows called “The Ham-Fat Man”. It seems that a poorly performing actor was deemed to have the “acting” qualities of a minstrel made up in blackface.

41…Inc. magazine subject..CEO

Chief executive officer (CEO)

“Inc.” is a business magazine that specializes in articles about growing companies. “Inc.” publishes a list of the 500 fastest-growing private companies in the country each year, calling it the “Inc. 500”. The “Inc 5000” is an expanded list also published by the magazine.

42…A museum in Pesaro, Italy, marks his birthplace..ROSSINI

Gioachino Rossini was a prolific and very successful composer from Pesaro, Italy. During his lifetime, Rossini was lauded as the most successful composer of operas in history. His best known opera today is probably “The Barber of Seville”. His best known piece of music is probably the finale of the overture from his opera “William Tell”.

49…Possible response to “I raise”..ALL IN

The official birthplace of the incredibly popular poker game of Texas hold ‘em is Robstown, Texas where the game dates back to the early 1900s. The game was introduced into Las Vegas in 1967 by a group of Texan enthusiasts including Doyle Brunson, a champion often seen playing on TV today. Doyle Brunson published a poker strategy guide in 1978, and this really helped increase the popularity of the game. But it was the inclusion of Texas hold ‘em in the television lineup that really gave the game its explosive surge in popularity, with the size of the prize money just skyrocketing.

50…Words seen before a dollar sign..AMOUNT DUE

The “$” sign was first used for the Spanish American peso, in the late 18th century. The peso was also called the “Spanish dollar” (and “piece of eight”). The Spanish dollar was to become the model for the US dollar that was adopted in 1785, along with the “$” sign.

52…Filmmaker’s __ light..KLIEG

A Klieg light is the intensely bright spotlight used to illuminate film sets and theater stages. The lights use tungsten-halogen filaments, and were invented by brothers John and Anton Kliegl.

Down

2…Organic compound..ENOL

An enol is an alkene with a hydroxyl group, sort of part-alkene and part-alcohol. The term “enol” therefore, is a portmanteau of “alkene” and “alcohol”.

3…Landlocked African country..MALI

The Republic of Mali is a landlocked country in western Africa, south of Algeria. Formerly known as French Sudan, the nation’s most famous city is Timbuktu. Mali is the third-largest producer of gold on the continent, after South Africa and Ghana.

8…Union foe in the 19th cen…CSA

The Confederate States of America (CSA) set up government in 1861 just before Abraham Lincoln took office. Jefferson Davis was selected as President of the CSA at its formation and retained the post for the life of the government.

13…Weather protection..TARP

Originally, tarpaulins were made from canvas covered in tar that rendered the material waterproof. The word “tarpaulin” comes from “tar” and “palling”, with “pall” meaning “heavy cloth covering”.

22…Black arts practitioner..WARLOCK

A male practitioner of black magic can be referred to as a witch, but also as a warlock. The term “witch” is used predominantly for female sorcerers.

24…Quran deity..ALLAH

The name “Allah” comes from the Arabic “al-” and “ilah”, meaning “the” and “deity”. So “Allah” translates as “God”.

The Koran is also known as the Qur’an in English, a transliteration of the Arabic name for the holy text of the Muslim faith. The literal translation of “Koran” is “the recitation”.

26…Jefferson and others..VIRGINIANS

Thomas Jefferson was born a British subject in 1743 in the Colony of Virginia, one of ten children born to Peter Jefferson and Jane Randolph Jefferson. The Jefferson’s had four sons in all, with two dying in infancy. The remaining two sons inherited Peter’s estate, divided between them. Thomas came into 5,000 acres of land, including Monticello, and 20-40 slaves.

27…Dancer posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2014..AILEY

Alvin Ailey was a dancer who formed his own group in New York in 1958, the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. The most famous work that Ailey choreographed was called “Revelations”. President Barack Obama awarded Ailey the Presidential Medal of Freedom, posthumously in 2014.

28…Govt. issue..T-NOTE

A Treasury note (T-Note) is a government debt that matures in 1-10 years. A T-Note has a coupon (interest) payment made every six months. The T-note is purchased at a discount to face value, and at the date of maturity can be redeemed at that face value. A T-Bill is a similar financial vehicle, but it matures in one year or less, and a T-Bond matures in 20-30 years.

29…Pot-using sportsman..EELER

A sniggler is a person who angles for eels (also called an “eeler”). The term “sniggler” comes from “snig”, a young eel, which in turn is probably related to Old English “snegge” meaning “snail”.

36…Many Aberdeen residents..LASSIES

The Scottish city of Aberdeen is located amidst plentiful supplies of granite, which were actively quarried until the 1970s. Many local buildings incorporate the granite in their structure. Aberdeen granite is especially prized for its high levels of mica, which can cause the stone to sparkle like silver.

42…Casino tool..RAKE

The “casino” originated in the 1700s, first describing a public room for music or dancing. The name “casino” is a diminutive of “casa” meaning “house”.

43…Paella cooker..OLLA

An olla is a traditional clay pot used for the making of stews. “Olla” was the Latin word used in Ancient Rome to describe a similar type of pot.

Paella is sometime referred to as the Spanish national dish, but not by Spaniards. In Spain, paella is regarded as a typical regional dish from Valencia.

51…”Excusez-__”..MOI

“Excusez-moi” is French for “excuse me”.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1…Decorative border..HEMSTITCH

10…Business investment?..SUIT

14…Regardless..IN ANY CASE

15…Black-and-white vegetarian..PANDA

16…Black-and-white..POLICE CAR

17…One putting two and two together..ADDER

18…Exit discreetly..SLIP OUT

19…Ivory, e.g…BAR SOAP

21…Unannounced, as a quiz..POP

22…Beyond silly..WACKO

23…Corroded..EATEN

26…Protect against harm, in a way..VACCINATE

30…It’s about 40.5 for Pittsburgh, Pa…N LAT

31…Inspiration for a red shade..FIRE ENGINE

32…Tirana is its cap…ALB

33…One of ten in the Kentucky Derby..FURLONG

34…”Gr8 joke!”..LOL

35…Classroom no-no..CALLING OUT

37…Where le nez is..TETE

38…Typical ham feature..THEATRICS

39…More twisted..WRYER

40…Cleared the room, perhaps..STUNK

41…Inc. magazine subject..CEO

42…A museum in Pesaro, Italy, marks his birthplace..ROSSINI

45…Alternative histories..WHAT-IFS

49…Possible response to “I raise”..ALL IN

50…Words seen before a dollar sign..AMOUNT DUE

52…Filmmaker’s __ light..KLIEG

53…Only you..NO ONE ELSE

54…Casual food..EATS

55…Formal choice..SILK DRESS

Down

1…Swinging joints?..HIPS

2…Organic compound..ENOL

3…Landlocked African country..MALI

4…Fragment..SNIPPET

5…Business VIP..TYCOON

6…Freeze..ICE UP

7…Careful handling..TACT

8…Union foe in the 19th cen…CSA

9…Not woody, to a botanist..HERBACEOUS

10…Tearjerker..SAD SONG

11…Command following “Oops!”..UNDO

12…Flash, maybe..IDEA

13…Weather protection..TARP

15…Downtown challenge..PARKING

20…Reason for a misunderstanding..ACCENT

22…Black arts practitioner..WARLOCK

23…Make law..ENACT

24…Quran deity..ALLAH

25…Stand with a leaf..TABLE

26…Jefferson and others..VIRGINIANS

27…Dancer posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2014..AILEY

28…Govt. issue..T-NOTE

29…Pot-using sportsman..EELER

31…2K, say..FUN RUN

33…Tailor’s service..FITTING

36…Many Aberdeen residents..LASSIES

37…Harness racer..TROTTER

39…Withdrew gradually..WEANED

41…Piece..CHUNK

42…Casino tool..RAKE

43…Paella cooker..OLLA

44…Clothing opening..SLIT

45…Clothing material..WOOL

46…Off..IDLE

47…Bellyache..FUSS

48…Gets it..SEES

51…”Excusez-__”..MOI

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13 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 8 Oct 16, Saturday”

  1. Really???? Using latitude and/or longitude in clue? Isn’t that a bit desperate? And I’m most likely wrong, but I never associated the word “wry” with twisted. It’s too late (or early, depending on your schedule), so I’m disinclined to look it up *big yawn.”

    I apologize in advance, as I was disinclined to look it up (see above), but I thought an olla was a pot, used for soups and stews. Paella is cooked and served in a large shallow pan. It’s kind of the Spanish version of pilaf, and the shallow pan allows the rice at the bottom to get brown and crispy. Damn! Now I’ll have to make some.

    I don’t care if it’s “2k,” “1k,” or fifty meters, no run is ‘fun!” Well maybe for others; I can barely make it from the bedroom to the kitchen. Walking!

    And shame on me, not to get AILEY on the first go ’round. I’m a dancer, dammit, even if I don’t dance anymore. And I’ve seen “Revelations” at least a half a dozen times. Poop!

    And “le nez” isn’t on “la tete,” it’s on “la visage” I don’t have a nose on my head! It’s on my face.

    I’m also pretty sure that the color red existed before fire engines were in use and painted red (here in Vegas, they’re mostly baby puke yellow).

    I had a really difficult time with this grid, and only managed to finish it with multiple guesses (love that option to “show mistakes” on the website version). But I am looking forward to tomorrow’s puzzle. Sunday is my fav; I take my time, cheat if I need to ( or I’m just too damned lazy), and when the grid is finished I’m satisfied (and usually a bit buzzed). ??

  2. 14:02, no errors, iPad. And no cheating! I hate cheating! (Okay, so … once in a long while, I do cheat, but … if and when I cheat, I confess it here. And, usually, it’s the kind of cheating that on-line solving sort of forces you into: when you fill in the last square and you don’t get the happy little message telling you that you’re done, so you know that you have an error somewhere, so you go looking for it and take your lumps on the clock time.)

    If “le nez” is on “la visage” and “la visage” is on “la tete”, then isn’t “le nez” on “la tete”? (Sorry … just a bit of “wry humor” … 🙂 )

  3. Fun puzzle today. Like a lot of Saturdays it took me a while to get any traction, but once I did it filled in relatively quickly.

    Midwest was my first breakthrough with ALLAH and I guessed ALBania.

    Biggest trap was not knowing how to spell KLIEG light (cleeg) or who ROSSINI was, but finally remembering OLLA from other grids helped finish off the SW and the rest of the puzzle.

    WHAT IFS for “Alternative histories” wins the prize today.

    I did see 40.5… as a latitude right away but hesitated because of the N.

    Joel – I think they’re saying that the FIRE ENGINE is the inspiration for the specific shade of red called “fire engine red”

    Now debating if I’m up to tackling the NYT grid or not today.

    Best –

  4. I forgot to mention that today’s WSJ puzzle is something of a classic. It’s not actually that difficult (but it did take me 57:39 to finish it). I won’t go into details, but I found the theme entries quite astonishing; I don’t think I could create a similar entry if my life depended on it.

  5. @JustJoel- LOL on your rant!!!:-)
    My sentiments exactly!
    Starting with the OLLA to cook paella in.
    Googled it and there are recipes cooked in a pot, but the shallow pan is more common, IMO.
    I did get FUN RUN, but I’m so stiff and achy when I get up the thought of running is scary.
    I should have known AILEY also. I’m no dancer, but love watching ballet and modern dance.
    I put in KELLY because all I had was an “L” and Martha Graham wouldn’t fit. 🙂
    Lastly, I put in “Google Translate” “My nose is on my face” and got-
    “mon nez est sur mon visage”
    My nose is not on my head either!!!
    Anyway, got about a third of this and quit.
    Too tough for me.

  6. Seemed like I had a harder time finishing today’s grid than yesterday, but that’s probably because I was overthinking the clues…When I finally got “vaccinate” for 26 Across that was the answer that led to the finishing of the grid because I saw “sad saga” had to be “sad song” and that was that.

    Hope you all have a great weekend.

  7. @JustJoel
    Yes, and by her website (twylatharp.org) she’s still very busy.
    Go to “works” and you’ll be amazed at her resume.
    For your watching and listening pleasure…..
    One for my Baby

  8. I agree with the above – definitions way too esoteric and arcane. I know I’m just an average retired college girl, and not crossword pros like some of you, but I’m not stupid, either. After teaching reading, writing and vocabulary for 37 years, I know something about the “words” of crossWORD puzzles. The Times editors give constructors way too much latitude in writing definitions that are miles off the real def of the word. They allow the cute to take the place of the clever, the whims of the constructor rather than their whimsy. Since I have a full slate of activities on week days, I used to enjoy my hour-or-so with the Saturday puzzle and a cup of fresh-ground coffee. I now find myself sitting in front of my computer for up to three hours searching the internet – but avoiding the “cheat sites”, often (as today) giving up and tossing the puzzle. Are there others caught in this dilemma?

  9. Hey y’all!
    @Pookie re. yesterday: LOL!!
    I spent so much time with Friday’s puzzle that I had to try to finish it today and STILL had to peek for that blasted “pullover beneficiaries” answer. Cruel and unusual!!!! I only kept at it cuz I REALLY thought I could “break” it. Some puzzles I feel like whatever the story is about the fisherman fighting with the marlin……?
    So, didn’t have much time for today’s, and did not finish. Some REALLY weak cluing: ADDER?? Why didn’t the setter just do some snake reference instead??
    That is kind of to your point, @Bobbi, tho I will say that, of course, Saturday cluing is purposely convoluted. I understand they want to make it tough for us, and when I manage a completed Saturday it’s very gratifying (witness the ones stuck on my fridge).
    Agree about nose not on head!
    Pookie, I’ll check out the link you provide –that’s a great tune. Exciting news: I’m joining a sing-along group in my hood! First meeting is Sunday evening. I’ll have to record the boxing match — I mean debate — and watch later. Wish me luck! I haven’t sung in years!!
    Be well~~™?

  10. Finally finished the Saturday puzzle, had the most difficulty with 43 down, ‘Paella cooker’. Since I already had Rossini and ‘all in’, I correctly surmised that the cooker would work out be Olla…an incorrect answer – given the clue. Traditional and even rustic Paella, (a rice dish) is almost always cooked in a shallow earthenware ‘pan’. The Olla, (full name=Olla de Barro(s) or ‘Mud pot in English), is by definition a very deep clay pot. Mud pots are rarely, if ever, used to cook Paella.
    Still, I suppose that the point of ‘the crossword’ is to solve, (which I did), and not to question the correctness of the clue.

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