LA Times Crossword Answers 29 Jul 2017, Saturday










Constructed by: Mary Lou Guizzo

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: None

Bill’s time: 8m 04s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Two-sided : BIPARTISAN

I’ll say nothing …

11. Shows one’s hand, in a way : GINS

Gin rummy is a variant of the slower game of standard rummy and was introduced in 1909 by one Elwood Baker and his son.

17. George Washington in New York, e.g. : TOLL BRIDGE

New York City’s George Washington Bridge spans the Hudson River and links the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan with Fort Lee in New Jersey. When the bridge was opened in 1931 it had one deck, allowing six lanes of traffic to traverse the river. The bridge’s designer allowed for the construction of a second deck under the first, and this was added in 1946. Some locals refer to the second deck as “Martha”, a reference to the president’s wife.

18. Middle of a classical trio : VIDI

The oft-quoted statement “Veni, vidi, vici” (“I came, I saw, I conquered”) is believed by many to have been written by Julius Caesar. The words date back to 47 BC and refer to the short war between Rome and Pharnaces II of Pontus.

19. Tolkien character : ENT

Ents are those tree-like creatures that live in J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth in his series of books “The Lord of the Rings”. “Ent” is an Old English word for “giant”.

20. Pindar works : ODES

Pindar was an ancient Greek poet who is best known perhaps for composing a series of Victory Odes that celebrated triumph in competition, most notably the Olympian Games of the day.

21. 2,000-year-old portrayal for Eden : GENIE

Back in 1964, the second most watched show on American television was ABC’s “Bewitched”. Sidney Sheldon was tasked with the job of creating a rival sitcom and he came up with “I Dream of Jeannie”, which first aired in 1965 and starred Barbara Eden in the title role. The censors had a big say in how the story developed. For starters, Jeannie’s skimpy costume was permitted on air, provided that Eden didn’t show off her navel on the screen. Also, Jeannie was only allowed to live with an unmarried man as long as the story made it clear that she slept in a bottle.

23. “Semper Fidelis” group : MARINES

“Semper Fidelis” (often abbreviated to “semper fi”) is the motto of the United States Marine Corps (USMC). The phrase is Latin and means “Always Faithful”. The US Marine Corps isn’t the only military unit using “Semper Fidelis” as a motto. It’s also used by the Portuguese Marine Corps, the Republic of China Marine Corps and the Swiss Grenadiers.

28. Tuscan treat : GELATO

Gelato (plural “gelati”) is the Italian version of American ice cream, differing in that it has a lower butterfat content than its US counterpart.

Tuscany is a beautiful region of central Italy, the capital of which is the city of Florence. Tuscany is considered to be the birthplace of the Italian Renaissance, centered around Florence. It was home to great artistic icons such as Dante, Botticelli, Michelangelo, da Vinci, Galileo and Puccini.

29. Model Cheryl : TIEGS

Cheryl Tiegs was only 17-years-old when she appeared as a model on the cover of “Glamour” magazine. After that Tiegs became famous for sequential appearances in the “Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue” throughout the seventies.

30. Audacious : BALD-FACED

Our “bald-faced” lies here in the US are “bare-faced” lies on the other side of the Atlantic. The original expression was indeed “bare-faced”, which portrays the concept of lying with an uncovered face, unashamedly.

34. Kazantzakis title character : ZORBA

“Zorba the Greek” the film, and “Zorba” the musical, are adaptations of the 1952 novel “Zorba the Greek” by Nikos Kazantzakis. The 1964 film version stars Anthony Quinn in the title role, and Alan Bates. The movie is set and was filmed on location on the island of Crete, the home of author Kazantzakis.

35. HR dept. concern : RELO

Relocate (relo) is a real estate and human resources (HR) term.

36. 2013 Nelson Mandela portrayer : IDRIS ELBA

The English actor Idris Elba is probably best known in North America for playing the drug lord Stringer Bell in the marvelous HBO drama series “The Wire”, and the title character in the 2013 film “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom”. Off the screen, Elba occasionally works as a disk jockey using the name DJ Big Driis.

“Long Walk to Freedom” is a 1994 autobiography by the revolutionary and eventual statesman Nelson Mandela. The book was adapted into a very successful film entitled “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom”, with English actor Idris Elba in the title role. The movie was released in South Africa at the end of November 2013, and Nelson Mandela passed away just a few days later.

39. Voice of Magoo : BACKUS

Actor Jim Backus was perhaps most famous for playing Thurston Howell III on the sixties sitcom “Gilligan’s Island”, and for voicing the cartoon character Mr. Magoo. In a less-remembered appearance, Backus also played the father of James Dean’s character in the classic film “Rebel Without a Cause”.

Mr. Quincy Magoo is a wonderful cartoon character voiced by Jim Backus. Backus is probably equally well-known for playing Mr. Magoo as well as Thurston Howell, III on “Gilligan’s Island”. Mr. Magoo first appeared on the screen in a short called “The Ragtime Bear” in 1949. His persona was at least in part based on the antics of W. C. Fields. Backus originally used a fake rubber nose that pinched his nostrils in order to create the distinctive voice, although in time he learned to do the voice without the prop. My absolute favorite appearance by Mr. Magoo is in “Mr Magoo’s Christmas Carol”, a true classic from the sixties. There was a movie adaptation of “Mr Magoo” released in 1997, with Leslie Nielsen playing the title role.

40. Shade-tolerant foliage : HOSTAS

The Hosta genus of plant was once classified as a lily, but is now in a family of its own and is described as “lily-like”. The plant was given the name “Hosta” in honor of the Austrian botanist Nicholas Thomas Host.

45. Fashion designer Jacobs : MARC

Marc Jacobs is an American fashion designer from New York City with his own line of clothing. He is also the creative director for the French design house, Louis Vuitton.

46. Arctic coast explorer : RAE

John Rae was a Scottish explorer who took on the task of searching for the ill-fated Franklin Expedition of 1845. The Franklin Expedition was itself searching for the elusive Northwest Passage through the Arctic Ocean connecting the Atlantic to the Pacific. John Rae stirred up much controversy back in England when he reported evidence of cannibalism among the ill-fated Franklin explorers.

50. California Raisins ads production technique : CLAYMATION

Clay animation, also known as “claymation”, is a stop motion animation technique that has been around since the early 1900s. The list of famous claymation productions includes the “Gumby” series of TV show segments, the California Raisins musical group ad campaign, and “Wallace and Gromit” British comedy series.

53. Pitcher Hershiser : OREL

Orel Hershiser is big into poker now that he has retired from Major League Baseball. Hershiser lives in Las Vegas and when he isn’t working for ESPN, apparently he is at the poker tables, playing professionally. When Hershiser is eliminated in a poker tournament, he is in the habit of presenting the person who ousts him with an autographed baseball.

54. Cylindrical stuffed pasta : CANNELLONI

Cannelloni differs from manicotti, even though both are essentially tubes of pasta. Manicotti (Italian for “sleeves”) are pre-shaped tubes. Cannelloni (Italian for “large reeds”) are rectangular sheets of pasta that are rolled into tubes after having been stuffed with some filling.

55. River in Rwanda : NILE

Depending on definition, the Nile is generally regarded as the longest river on the planet. The Nile forms from two major tributaries, the White Nile and the Blue Nile, which join together near Khartoum, the capital of Sudan. From Khartoum the Nile flows north, traveling almost entirely through desert making it central to life for the peoples living along its length.

Rwanda is a sovereign nation in central Africa that is populated by three groups: the Hutu, Tutsi (aka “Watutsi”) and Twa. The Tutsi are the second largest population of people in Rwanda, with the Hutu being the largest group. The bloody conflict that has existed between the Tutsi and Hutu peoples dates back to about 1880 when Catholic missionaries arrived in the region. The missionaries found that they had more success converting the Hutus than the Tutsi, and when the Germans occupied the area during WWI they confiscated Tutsi land and gave it to Hutu tribes in order to reward religious conversion. This injustice fuels fighting to this very day.

Down

1. Subside : BATE

To bate is to restrain, as in “with bated breath”, with restrained breath. The term can also mean to lessen, and is a shortening of “abate”.

3. Skin : PELT

A pelt is the skin of a furry animal.

5. Completes an installation, perhaps : REBOOTS

The verb “to boot” as used in the world of computers comes from the phrase “pull oneself up by one’s bootstraps”. The idea is that the software that has to be loaded before a computer can do anything useful is called a “bootstrap load”.

6. “Buenas __” : TARDES

“Buenas tardes” is Spanish for “Good afternoon”.

9. Director Lee : ANG

Taiwanese director Ang Lee sure has directed a mixed bag of films, mixed in terms of genre but not in terms of quality. He was at the helm for such classics as “Sense & Sensibility” (my personal favorite), “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”, “Hulk”, “Brokeback Mountain” and “Life of Pi”.

10. Born : NEE

“Née” is the French word for “born” when referring to a female. The male equivalent is “né”.

21. German count : GRAF

“Graf” and “Gräfin” are the male and female forms of a historical title used by German nobility. The terms are usually translated into English as “count” and “countess”, or “earl” and “countess”.

22. Pasta commonly served with Bolognese sauce : TAGLIATELLE

Tagliatelle is a type of pasta from eastern Italy. Tagliatelle is similar to fettuccine, and so is made up of long, flat ribbons. The name comes from the Italian “tagliare” meaning “to cut”.

Bolognese sauce is a meat-based sauce originating from Bologna in Italy, hence the name. The recipe is usually referred to as “ragù alla bolognese” in Italian, or simply “ragù”. Note that the Ragú brand of sauces introduced in North America in 1937 takes its name from the same source (pun … sauce!). However, the brand name uses the wrong accent (“Ragú” instead of “Ragù”), which drives a pedant like me crazy …

23. Peach __ : MELBA

Peach Melba is a dessert comprising peaches and raspberry sauce with vanilla ice cream. The dish was the creation of chef Auguste Escoffier, who introduced it at the Savoy Hotel in London in the 1890s in honor of Australian soprano Dame Nellie Melba. Escoffier later developed Melba toast, also in honor of the singer.

24. Pierce portrayer : ALDA

Alan Alda has had a great television career, especially of course on “M*A*S*H”. Alda won his first Emmy in 1972, for playing Hawkeye Pierce on “M*A*S*H”. He won his most recent Emmy in 2006 for his portrayal of Presidential candidate Arnold Vinick in “The West Wing”. When it comes to the big screen, my favorite of Alda’s movies is the 1978 romantic comedy “Same Time, Next Year” in which he starred opposite Ellen Burstyn.

Hawkeye Pierce is the lead character in the “M*A*S*H” novel, movie and TV series. Hawkeye was originally portrayed by Donald Sutherland in the film, and then by Alan Alda in the television show. Pierce is the only character appearing in all 250 episodes of the groundbreaking TV series.

25. Abruzzi bell town : ATRI

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote “The Sicilian’s Tale; The Bell of Atri”, a narrative poem set in the small town of Atri in the Abruzzo region of Italy.

30. Hard pill to swallow : BOLUS

The term “bolus” is used for a soft lump, especially of chewed food. The same term is used for a particularly large pill or mass of medicinal material.

31. “Frozen” queen : ELSA

“Frozen” is a 2013 animated feature from Walt Disney Studios that is based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale “The Snow Queen”.

34. Cowardly Lion’s farmhand alter ego : ZEKE

Zeke is the farmworker played by Bert Lahr in 1939’s “The Wizard of Oz”. Zeke is the character who morphed into the Cowardly Lion in Dorothy’s dream.

37. Skim along, as clouds : SCUD

To scud is a move swiftly as if propelled forward. The term is often used with reference to clouds, scudding across the sky.

40. Spam source : HORMEL

Spam is a precooked meat product that is sold in cans. It was introduced by Hormel Foods in 1937. The main meat ingredients are pork shoulder meat and ham. The name “Spam” was chosen as the result of a competition at Hormel, with the winner earning himself a hundred dollars. According to the company, the derivation of the name “Spam” is a secret known by only a few former executives, but the speculation is that it stands for “spiced ham” or “shoulders of pork and ham”. Spam is particularly popular in Hawaii, so popular that it is sometimes referred to as “the Hawaiian steak”.

41. “Danke __” : SCHON

“Danke schön” is German from “Thank you very much”.

42. Alpha __: Bull constellation star : TAURI

Aldebaran is a star that also goes by the name Alpha Tauri, as it is the brightest star in the constellation of Taurus. The name “Aldebaran” translates from Arabic as “the follower”. Aldebaran forms the eye of Taurus the bull, and appears to “follow” the Hyades star cluster that forms the head, hence the name.

43. ESPN journalist Kenny : MAYNE

Kenny Mayne is a sports journalist who started working for ESPN in 1994. Famously, Mayne appeared in the second season of ABC’s hit show “Dancing with the Stars”, and was the first contestant to be eliminated. More famously, Mayne returned repeatedly for a “Dances with the Stars” segment called “DanceCenter”, a parody of ESPN’s “SportsCenter”.

46. Fracas : RIOT

“Fracas”, meaning “noisy quarrel”, is a French word that we absorbed into English. In turn, the French usage evolved from the Italian “fracasso” meaning “uproar, crash”.

48. Lover of Geraint : ENID

Enid is a Welsh name, from “einit” an old Welsh word meaning “purity”. Enid was the wife of Geraint, one of King Arthur’s knights. Enid is described as “the personification of spotless purity”.

50. Ward for heart patients, briefly : CCU

Cardiac/coronary care unit (CCU)

51. PC connection : LAN

Local Area Network (LAN)

52. Attention in a 50-Down : TLC
(50D. Ward for heart patients, briefly : CCU)

Tender loving care (TLC)

Return to top of page

Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Two-sided : BIPARTISAN

11. Shows one’s hand, in a way : GINS

15. “Is anyone else here?” : ARE WE ALONE?

16. “My turn” : I’M UP

17. George Washington in New York, e.g. : TOLL BRIDGE

18. Middle of a classical trio : VIDI

19. Tolkien character : ENT

20. Pindar works : ODES

21. 2,000-year-old portrayal for Eden : GENIE

22. Word with steel or square : -TOED

23. “Semper Fidelis” group : MARINES

25. Baseball statistic : AT BATS

28. Tuscan treat : GELATO

29. Model Cheryl : TIEGS

30. Audacious : BALD-FACED

33. React to dizziness : REEL

34. Kazantzakis title character : ZORBA

35. HR dept. concern : RELO

36. 2013 Nelson Mandela portrayer : IDRIS ELBA

38. Strained : TENSE

39. Voice of Magoo : BACKUS

40. Shade-tolerant foliage : HOSTAS

41. Busts, e.g. : STATUES

43. The better part : MOST

44. Took the trouble : CARED

45. Fashion designer Jacobs : MARC

46. Arctic coast explorer : RAE

49. Fling : HURL

50. California Raisins ads production technique : CLAYMATION

53. Pitcher Hershiser : OREL

54. Cylindrical stuffed pasta : CANNELLONI

55. River in Rwanda : NILE

56. Not taken : UNSELECTED

Down

1. Subside : BATE

2. Pressing agent : IRON

3. Skin : PELT

4. Its point is often boring : AWL

5. Completes an installation, perhaps : REBOOTS

6. “Buenas __” : TARDES

7. Jaw-dropping courtroom admission : I LIED

8. Does lawn work : SODS

9. Director Lee : ANG

10. Born : NEE

11. “Enough already!” : GIVE IT A REST!

12. “It wasn’t me!” : I’M INNOCENT!

13. Film with few costumes? : NUDIE

14. Infiltrators : SPIES

21. German count : GRAF

22. Pasta commonly served with Bolognese sauce : TAGLIATELLE

23. Peach __ : MELBA

24. Pierce portrayer : ALDA

25. Abruzzi bell town : ATRI

26. Even : TIED

27. It might be tapped : BEER BARREL

28. Costumes : GARBS

30. Hard pill to swallow : BOLUS

31. “Frozen” queen : ELSA

32. Impersonates : DOES

34. Cowardly Lion’s farmhand alter ego : ZEKE

37. Skim along, as clouds : SCUD

38. Built like models : TO SCALE

40. Spam source : HORMEL

41. “Danke __” : SCHON

42. Alpha __: Bull constellation star : TAURI

43. ESPN journalist Kenny : MAYNE

45. Operates : MANS

46. Fracas : RIOT

47. Excellent : A-ONE

48. Lover of Geraint : ENID

50. Ward for heart patients, briefly : CCU

51. PC connection : LAN

52. Attention in a 50-Down : TLC

Return to top of page

10 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 29 Jul 2017, Saturday”

  1. 17:21, no errors. I zipped through this pretty quickly until I got to the lower right, where I initially had ICU instead of CCU and was missing the “Y” of Kenny MAYNE (new to me), so I stared at ILA_MATION for several minutes before CLAYMATION came to mind and I realized that CCU made sense (but was still hesitant for a minute or two more).

    Still in Iowa. Early morning. Sirens outside. Guess I better go see if it’s just the Heartland’s Finest in pursuit of a leadfoot or if the motel is on fire … ?

  2. 99 minutes, 7 errors on the WSJ (pretty much a junk-strewn slog-fest). Why I was patient enough to finish, I don’t know. Then the usual DNF/finish after I fix my errors on the Saturday Stumper. Onto other things…

    1. Hi Glenn. I just finished the WSJ and it was a real “hunt & peck” special today. I finally figured out where I had gone wrong in 115 Across at the start and then, after I got that answer straightened out I saw the answer to 116 Down needed to be corrected which then showed me the answer to 119 Across and that finished the grid. Whew! Hope you have a good weekend.

  3. This looked harder than it turned out to be. Now on to the WSJ (and going by Glenn’s report this will probably be a real cluster**** (pardon my asterisks!).

  4. 23:41 on a Saturday. I’ll take it. I guess there was a lot in my wheelhouse today. I even knew Kenny MAYNE off the top of my head. The guy could make it as a stand up comic if he wanted too. He is hilarious.
    Coincidence or conspiracy? Regardless, I like the Barbara Eden nostalgia….again.

    We’ll see what the NYT Saturday does to my ego after this ego boost..

    Best –

  5. @Bill. An avowed pedant! Good on you! To far too many folks, pedant is synonymous with snob, or worse. @David Kennison. My experience EXACTLY in the SE! (And I hope the sirens were for a speeder, not a blaze.) @Jeff. If you haven’t gotten to the NYT yet, you’re in for a tough but fun Saturday puzzle by the esteemed Erik Agard. Heads up: The NE is a bear; be prepared to dislike 6A immensely.

    1. JB –

      Finished the NYT in 43 minutes. NE and NW both gave me trouble…and yes 6A seems downright unfair….”Tough but fun” describes the puzzle perfectly. You should visit Bill’s NYT blog.

      Best –

      Best –

  6. Blah, flamed out on most of the East side…even GENIE, which is sad.

    @Carrie I did go over to Youtube and watch the Andy Griffith episode you mentioned. I love how Andy explains to her: “You see, Nature’s been good to you in fact it’s been real, real, real good to you, in fact I can’t remember when I’ve seen Nature spend so much time on any one person.” 🙂 too true

  7. Hi gentlemen!! (WHERE are the ladies????)
    Cheated on four answers and STILL had 2 wrong letters in that scary SE: PENNELLONI instead of CANNELLONI. Thought it was related to penne pasta.

    I do try to take SOME satisfaction in having completed most of this grid. It’s easy to consider a DNF as a total failure but we shouldn’t…?

    Dirk! That’s so funny, just yesterday you mentioned her and she shows up today! Yes, I love that response from Andy. I noticed it too.

    As for Jim BACKUS, also on Andy Griffith Show there’s an episode with Bob Denver, as a mountain gal’s husband, and another episode with Alan Hale as a burly farmer in search of a wife. He calls Barney “little buddy!”

    So I guess it’s evident that I’ve been watching a lot of Andy Griffith lately….?

    Till tomorrow, or rather, till later today!

    Be well~~™⚾

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.