LA Times Crossword 19 Aug 18, Sunday

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Constructed by: Mike Torch
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Loaf Affair

Themed answers sound like common phrases, but are actually zany answers featuring a type of bread:

  • 27A. Bread worshipers? : NAAN BELIEVERS (sounds like “nonbelievers”)
  • 41A. Musical composition about a bread-loving pack animal? : PITA AND THE WOLF (sounds like “Peter and the Wolf”)
  • 51A. Bread joke-teller’s trait? : RYE SENSE OF HUMOR (sounds like “wry sense of humor”)
  • 73A. Celebratory wish over Jewish bread? : HAPPY CHALLAH DAY (sounds like “Happy Holiday!”
  • 81A. Ibsen title character’s bread? : PEER GYNT’S WHEAT (sounds like “‘Peer Gynt’ suite”)
  • 96A. “Sorry, I meant to give you a plain burger”? : NO BUN INTENDED (sounds like “no pun intended”)
  • 16D. Bread that only appears for a short time? : CAMEO ROLLS (sounds like “cameo roles”)
  • 66D. Bread with a winelike aroma? : NOSE SCONES (sounds like “nose cones”)

Bill’s time: 20m 13s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

6. Window framework : SASH

A movable (up and down) window frame is called a sash, from the French word for a frame “châssis”. The term is also applied to that part of a door or window into which windows are set.

19. Dugout, for one : CANOE

The boat know as a canoe takes its name from the Carib word “kenu” meaning “dugout”. It was Christopher Columbus who brought “kenu” into Spanish as “canoa”, which evolved into our English “canoe”.

20. Either of matching words, in a way: Abbr. : ANAG

Anagram (anag.)

21. Home to the Palazzo della Ragione : PADUA

The city of Padua is in northern Italy, and not far from Venice. Padua has many claims to fame. For example, Galileo was one of the lecturers at the University of Padua, and William Shakespeare chose the city as the setting for his play “The Taming of the Shrew”.

The Palazzo della Ragione is a town hall building in Padua, Italy on which construction started in the Middle Ages, in 1218 specifically. Supposedly, the building has the largest roof unsupported by columns in the whole of Europe.

22. Pew area : NAVE

In large Christian churches, the nave is the main approach to the altar, and is where most of the congregation are seated.

A pew is a bench in a church, one usually with a high back. The original pews were raised and sometimes enclosed seats in the church used by women and important men or families. “Pew” comes from the Old French “puie” meaning “balcony, elevation”.

27. Bread worshipers? : NAAN BELIEVERS (sounds like “nonbelievers”)

Naan (also “nan”) bread is very popular in Indian restaurants, as well as in other West, Central and South Asian cuisines. Indian Naan is traditionally baked in a clay oven known as a tandoor.

32. __ Geo: cable channel : NAT

The National Geographic Channel (Nat Geo) is jointly owned by Fox and the National Geographic Society, and was launched in 2001.

33. Source of intolerance : LACTOSE

The sugar known as lactose is a disaccharide, comprising a molecule of galactose combined with a molecule of glucose. Lactose is a major component in milk, and it is broken down in the body by an enzyme called lactase. The production of lactase used to diminish over time in humans, as babies stopped nursing and transitioned to solid food. Many human populations have evolved to maintain lactose production throughout life, in response to the inclusion of animal milk in the diet. Individuals and populations that do not have the genes enabling lifelong production of lactase are said to be lactose intolerant.

39. “One of Ours” Pulitzer-winning author : CATHER

American novelist Willa Cather wrote what’s referred to as the “prairie trilogy”, books that tell the story of Swedish immigrants living in Nebraska. The titles in the trilogy are “O Pioneers!”, “The Song of the Lark” and “My Ántonia”. Cather won the Pulitzer Prize for another novel “One of Ours”, which is set in Nebraska and the French battlefields of WWI.

41. Musical composition about a bread-loving pack animal? : PITA AND THE WOLF (sounds like “Peter and the Wolf”)

Pita is a lovely bread from Middle-Eastern and Mediterranean cuisines. Pita is usually round, and has a “pocket” in the center. The pocket is created by steam that puffs up the dough during cooking leaving a void when the bread cools.

As is the case for many I am sure, Prokofiev’s “Peter and the Wolf” was my introduction to the world of classical music, as it was played for us at school many, many moons ago. Prokofiev wrote the piece as a commissioned work for the Central Children’s Theater in Moscow, in 1936. He loved the idea of the project, and wrote the story and music in just four days!

46. Cooped-up critters : HENS

The Old English word “cypa”, meaning “basket”, evolved in the 14th century to the word “coop” to describe a small cage for poultry. We still use that word today.

47. Arms carriers? : TORSI

“Torso” (plural “torsi”) is an Italian word meaning the “trunk of a statue”, and is a term that we imported into English.

50. Adjective for rapper Kim : LIL’

Lil’ is a short form of the word “little”. There are a whole slew of rappers named Lil’ something, like Lil Wayne, Lil’ J, and Lil’ Kim.

54. Diet including wild fruit : PALEO

The paleolithic (or “paleo, caveman”) diet is a fad diet that became popular in the 2000s. The idea is to eat wild plants and animals that would have been available to humans during the Paleolithic era (roughly the Stone Age). This period precedes the introduction of agriculture and domestication of animals. As a result, someone on the diet avoids consuming grains, legumes, dairy and processed foods. The diet consists mainly of lean meat (about 45-65% of the total calorie intake), non-starchy vegetables, fruits, berries and nuts.

60. Two-time A.L. Manager of the Year Francona, familiarly : TITO

Major League Baseball manager Terry Francona is often referred to by the nickname “Tito”. Terry father is Tito Francona, who was an MLB outfielder from 1956 to 1970.

61. Ballet movements : PLIES

The French word for “bent” is “plié”. In the ballet move known as a plié, the knees are bent. A “demi-plié” is a similar move, but with less bending of the knees.

63. Cougar, e.g., briefly : MERC

1967 was a big year or American muscle cars. The Pontiac Firebird was introduced that year, as was the Chevrolet Camaro that shared the same platform as the Firebird. At the same time, Ford introduced the Mercury Cougar, which was built on the same platform as the Ford Mustang that went into production just three years earlier.

72. Norwegian capital : KRONE

“Krone” translates into English as “crown”, and was the name given to coins that bore the image of the monarch in several countries. Today, the krone is the name given to the currency of Norway and of Denmark. Some of the Norwegian and Danish kroner have holes in the middle, giving them a “doughnut” or “torus” shape.

73. Celebratory wish over Jewish bread? : HAPPY CHALLAH DAY (sounds like “Happy Holiday!”

Challah is a special braided bread that is eaten by Ashkenazi Jews on the Sabbath. The bread is served to commemorate the manna that fell from the heavens as the Israelites wandered around the desert after the Exodus from Egypt.

79. Big hits : BELTS

A belt is a swift swig of hard liquor.

80. NASA approvals : A-OKS

Our term “A-OK” is supposedly an abbreviation for “A(ll systems are) OK”, and arose in the sixties during the Space Program.

81. Ibsen title character’s bread? : PEER GYNT’S WHEAT (sounds like “‘Peer Gynt’ suite”)

Henrik Ibsen’s play “Peer Gynt” is based on a Scandinavian fairy tale “Per Gynt”. The incidental music to the play, written by Edvard Grieg, is some of the most approachable classical music ever written, at least in my humble opinion …

85. Stop in Québec? : ARRET

Québec is the largest province in Canada, and the only one with French as its sole official language. The name “Québec” comes from an Algonquin word “kebec” meaning “where the river narrows”. This refers to the area around Quebec City where the St. Lawrence River narrows as it flows through a gap lined by steep cliffs. The province has voted twice in referenda asking whether or not Quebec should become an independent country, once in 1980, and again in 1995. The 1995 result was 49% in favor of sovereignty, up from 40% in 1980.

88. Insurance company founded for rural workers : FARMERS

Farmers Insurance was set up in 1928 as Farmers Automobile Inter-Insurance Exchange in Los Angeles. The intent was to provide cheaper insurance to farmers and ranchers, a group that the Farmers’ founders believed to be safer drivers.

92. Like some discount mdse. : IRR

Irregular (“irr.” or “irreg.”)

94. Left-hand page : VERSO

The left and right pages of a book or magazine are known in publishing circles as verso and recto. “Recto” comes from the Latin for “right”, and “verso” comes from the Latin word for “turned”. The idea is that the left side of the page is turned and is the reverse of the recto/right side.

95. King in “The Tempest” : ALONSO

In William Shakespeare’s play “The Tempest”, Alonso is the King of Naples. Alonso helps Antonio to depose his brother Prospero as Duke of Milan and set him adrift in a boat with Prospero’s young daughter Miranda.

102. El __ : NINO

When the surface temperature of much of the Pacific Ocean rises more that half a degree centigrade, then there is said to be an El Niño episode. That small temperature change in the Pacific has been associated with climatic changes that can stretch right across the globe. El Niño is Spanish for “the boy” and is a reference to the Christ child. The phenomenon was given this particular Spanish name because the warming is usually noticed near South America and around Christmas-time.

106. Jenna, to Jeb : NIECE

Jenna Bush is one of the twin daughters of President George W. Bush. During her father’s 2004 presidential campaign, Jenna met and started dating Henry Hager who was a White House aide for deputy chief of staff Karl Rove. The couple were married in 2008.

Jeb Bush is the son of President George H. W. Bush, and the brother of President George W. Bush. I always thought that Jeb was an American nickname for James or Joseph but I must be wrong, because George and Barbara’s son John Ellis Bush is called “Jeb”. A kind blog reader has suggested the the name “Jeb” may have been chosen as JEB are the initials of John Ellis Bush.

107. Nerd : GEEK

Originally, a geek was a sideshow performer, perhaps one at a circus. We use the term today for someone regarded as foolish or clumsy, or for someone who is technically driven and expert, but often socially inept.

108. Folding declaration : I’M OUT

That might be poker.

109. Cosmo rival : ELLE

“Elle” magazine was founded in 1945 in France and today has the highest circulation of any fashion magazine in the world. “Elle” is the French word for “she”. “Elle” is published monthly worldwide, although you can pick up a weekly edition if you live in France.

“Cosmopolitan” magazine was first published way back in 1886! It started out life as a family magazine, then as a literary publication. “Cosmo” took its present form as a women’s magazine in the sixties.

110. Europop’s __ Base : ACE OF

Ace of Base is a pop group from Sweden. The band had several names before settling on “Ace of Base”, which was inspired by the Motörhead song “Ace of Spades”.

Down

2. Part of TTFN : TA-TA

Ta-ta for now (TTFN)

3. Most eligible for service : ONE-A

The US government maintains information on all males who are potentially subject to military conscription, using what is called the Selective Service System (SSS). In the event that a draft was held, men registered would be classified into groups to determine eligibility for service. Class 1-A registrants are those available for unrestricted military service. Other classes are 1-A-O (conscientious objector available for noncombatant service), 4-A (registrant who has completed military service) and 4-D (Minister of religion).

6. Fine furs : SABLES

Sables are small mammals about two feet long that are found right across northern Europe and northern Asia. The sable’s black pelt is highly prized in the fur trade. Sable is unique among furs in that it feels smooth no matter which direction it is stroked.

7. Writer Nin : ANAIS

Anaïs Nin was a French author who was famous for the journals that she wrote for over sixty years from the age of 11 right up to her death. Nin also wrote highly regarded erotica and cited D. H. Lawrence as someone from whom she drew inspiration. Nin was married to banker and artist Hugh Parker Guiler in 1923. Decades later in 1955, Nin married former actor Rupert Pole, even though she was still married to Guiler. Nin and Pole had their marriage annulled in 1966, but just for legal reasons, and they continued to live together as husband and wife until Nin passed away in 1977.

9. “Fixer Upper” network : HGTV

HGTV first went on air in 1994, as the “Home, Lawn and Garden Channel”. The name was shortened (the lawn was dropped) soon after. Nowadays, it’s referred to as HGTV.

10. Verdi creation : OPERA

Giuseppe Verdi was an Italian composer, mainly of operas, who was active during the Romantic era. Equally as famous as Verdi’s operas, are arias from those operas such as “La donna è mobile” from “Rigoletto”, “The Drinking Song” from “La Traviata” and “The Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves” from “Nabucco”. Verdi was a big fan of William Shakespeare and wrote three operas based on the Bard’s plays: “Macbeth”, “Otello” and “Falstaff”.

11. L.A.-based brewery : PABST

Pabst Blue Ribbon (PBR) is the most recognizable brand of beer from the Pabst Brewing Company. There appears to be some dispute over whether or not Pabst beer ever won a “blue ribbon” prize, but the company claims that it did so at the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893. The beer was originally called Pabst Best Select, and then just Pabst Select. With the renaming to Blue Ribbon, the beer was sold with an actual blue ribbon tied around the neck of the bottle until it was dropped in 1916 and incorporated into the label.

12. Tokyo, formerly : EDO

“Edo” is the former name of the Japanese city of Tokyo. Edo was the seat of the Tokugawa shogunate, a feudal regime that ruled from 1603 until 1868. The shogun lived in the magnificent Edo Castle. Some parts of the original castle remain and today’s Tokyo Imperial Palace, the residence of the Emperor of Japan, was built on its grounds.

13. O.T. book : NUM

The Book of Numbers in the Hebrew and Christian Bibles relates much of the journey of Moses and the Israelites from Egypt to the promised land. The title comes from the numbering of the people that is described in the beginning of the book.

The Christian Bible is divided into the Old Testament (OT) and the New Testament (NT).

16. Bread that only appears for a short time? : CAMEO ROLLS (sounds like “cameo roles”)

Even in my day, a cameo role was more than just a short appearance in a movie (or other artistic piece). For the appearance to be a cameo, the actor had to playing himself or herself, and was instantly recognizable. With this meaning it’s easy to see the etymology of the term, as a cameo brooch is one with the recognizable carving of the silhouette of a person. Nowadays, a cameo is any minor role played by a celebrity or famous actor, regardless of the character played.

25. Salon coloring : HENNA

Henna has been used for centuries as a dye, for leather and wool as wells as hair and skin. In modern days, henna is often used for temporary tattoos.

28. Program file suffix : EXE

In the Windows operating system, a file with the extension .exe is an “executable” file.

34. Architect Frank : GEHRY

Frank Gehry is an architect from Toronto who is based in Los Angeles. Listed among Gehry’s famous creations are the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao in Spain, The Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles and his own private residence in Santa Monica, California. He is currently working on the upcoming Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial that will be placed in Washington, D.C. I hope to see that one day …

35. Yellow-and-white daisy : OXEYE

Oxeyes are in the daisy family of plants.

36. Sleep study subject : APNEA

Sleep apnea (“apnoea” in British English) can be caused by an obstruction in the airways, possibly due to obesity or enlarged tonsils.

37. Soybean paste : MISO

Miso is the name of the seasoning that makes miso soup. Basic miso seasoning is made by fermenting rice, barley and soybeans with salt and a fungus to produce a paste. The paste can be added to stock to make miso soup, or perhaps to flavor tofu.

39. PC insert : CD-ROM

“CD-ROM” stands for “compact disc read only memory”. The name indicates that you can read information from the disc (like a standard music CD for example), but you cannot write to it. You can also buy a CD-RW, which stands for “compact disc – rewritable”, with which you can read data and also write over it multiple times using a suitable CD drive.

41. Nursery sch. : PRE-K

Pre-kindergarten (pre-K)

47. U.S. security : T-NOTE

A Treasury note (T-note) is a government debt that matures in 1-10 years. A T-note has a coupon (interest) payment made every six months. The T-note is purchased at a discount to face value, and at the date of maturity can be redeemed at that face value. A T-bill is a similar financial vehicle, but it matures in one year or less, and a T-bond matures in 20-30 years.

48. Norwegian capital : OSLO

Oslo is the capital of Norway. The city of Oslo burns trash to fuel half of its buildings, including all of its schools. The problem faced by the city is that it doesn’t generate enough trash. So, Oslo imports trash from Sweden, England and Ireland, and is now looking to import some American trash too.

52. Option for a return : E-FILE

E-file: that’s certainly what I do with my tax return …

54. Prefix with frost : PERMA-

Permafrost is by definition soil that has been below the freezing point of water for two years or more. Usually permafrost is covered by a thin layer of soil that thaws during the warmer months and which can sustain life. Plants can grow in the active layer, but their roots cannot penetrate the permafrost below.

55. Mandela’s org. : ANC

As a young man, Nelson Mandela led the armed wing of the African National Congress (ANC). Mandela was eventually arrested and admitted to charges of sabotage and was sentenced to life in prison in 1964. He remained behind bars for 27 years, mainly in the infamous prison on Robben Island. As the years progressed, Mandela became a symbol of the fight against apartheid. He was released in 1990, and immediately declared his commitment to peace and reconciliation with South Africa’s white minority population. Mandela was elected president of the Republic of South Africa (RSA) in 1994, an office that he held until 1999. Nelson Mandela passed away on December 5, 2013.

60. Like the Oz woodsman : TIN

Actor Jack Haley played the Tin Man in “The Wizard of Oz”. Haley was the second choice for the role, as it was originally given to Buddy Ebsen (who later played Jed Clampett in “The Beverly Hillbillies”). Ebsen was being “painted up” as the Tin Man when he had an extreme, near-fatal reaction from inhaling the aluminum dust makeup that was being used. When Haley took over, the makeup was changed to a paste, but it was still uncomfortable and caused him to miss the first four days of shooting due to a reaction in his eyes. During filming, Haley must have made good friends with the movie’s star, Judy Garland, as years later Jack’s son married Judy’s daughter, Liza Minnelli.

62. Looney Tunes stinker : LE PEW

Pepé Le Pew is a very likeable cartoon character from the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series. Pepé is a French skunk, first introduced way back in 1945. He is always thinking of “l’amour” and chases the lady skunks, or a black cat with a white stripe accidentally painted down her back.

64. Hop-jump link : SKIP

The track and field sport sometimes called the “hop, skip and jump” is more correctly termed the “triple jump”. The triple jump dates back as an event to the ancient Olympic Games. When the modern Olympics were introduced in 1896, the triple jump consisted of two hops on the same foot followed by a jump. Today’s triple jump consists of a hop, a bound and then a jump.

65. Art Deco artist : ERTE

“Erté” was the pseudonym of French (Russian born) artist and designer Romain de Tirtoff. Erté is the French pronunciation of his initials “R.T.” Erté’s diverse portfolio of work included costumes and sets for the “Ziegfeld Follies” of 1923, productions of the Parisian cabaret show “Folies Bergère”, as well as the 1925 epic movie “Ben-Hur”. Erté’s most famous work by far is an image titled “Symphony in Black”. It depicts a tall and slender woman dressed in black, holding a black dog on a leash.

74. “Good buddy” : CB’ER

A CB’er is someone who operates a citizens’ band (CB) radio. In 1945, the FCC set aside certain radio frequencies for the personal use of citizens. The use of the Citizens’ Band increased throughout the seventies as advances in electronics brought down the size of transceivers and their cost. There aren’t many CB radios sold these days though, as they have largely been replaced by cell phones.

76. Blues musician’s “harp” : HARMONICA

The harmonica is a reed instrument. A harmonica contains a number of reeds that are usually made from metal, and are all arranged on a reed plate.

78. Literally, Greek for “bad place” : DYSTOPIA

A dystopia is an imaginary community in which the residents live unhappily and in fear. “Dystopia” is the opposite of “utopia”. One example of such a society is that described by George Orwell in “Nineteen Eighty-Four”. A more contemporary example would be the setting for the novels “The Hunger Games”.

82. Lost Colony’s island : ROANOKE

Roanoke Island is in modern-day North Carolina. It was settled in the late 1500s by an expedition financed by Sir Walter Raleigh. The final group of colonists that were landed in Roanoke were left there for three years without resupply from England (due to the Anglo-Spanish War). When a supply ship finally landed, the settlement was found abandoned with no sign of the colonists. All 100 people had disappeared without any indication of a struggle, and so Roanoke became known as the “Lost Colony”.

83. Big biceps, at the gym : GUNS

“Guns” is a slang term for very strong arms or biceps.
The biceps muscle is made up of two bundles of muscle, both of which terminate at the same point near the elbow. The heads of the bundles terminate at different points on the scapula or shoulder blade. “Biceps” is Latin for “two-headed”.

85. London football club : ARSENAL

Arsenal Football Club (nicknamed “the Gunners”) is an English soccer team based in the Holloway district of London. The club was founded in 1886 as Dial Square by workers at the Royal Arsenal munitions factory. Dial Square was the name given to the workshops at the center of the Royal Arsenal complex. After just a few weeks in existence, the club changed its name to Royal Arsenal, which was eventually shortened to just Arsenal.

88. Aromatic herb : FENNEL

Fennel is a hardy perennial plant species in the celery family that is used as a herb. It also goes by the name “sweet anise”. Personally, I can’t stand the stuff …

89. Part of MoMA : ART

The founding of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City was very much driven by Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, the wife of John D. Rockefeller, son of the oil magnate. Working with two friends, Abby managed to get the museum opened in 1929, just nine days after the Wall Street Crash. The MoMA’s sculpture garden bears the name of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, and has done so since 1949.

91. The senior Saarinen : ELIEL

Eliel Saarinen was a Finnish architect who designed entire city districts in Helsinki. He immigrated to the United States where he became famous for his art nouveau designs. He was the father of Eero Saarinen, who was to become even more renowned in America for his designs, including the Dulles International Airport terminal, and the TWA building at JFK.

92. Ear bone : INCUS

The middle ear is the portion of the ear immediately behind the eardrum. The middle ear contains three small bones called the ossicles, the three smallest bones in the human body. The ossicles’ job is to transmit sound from the outer ear to the inner ear. The shape of the bones gives rise to their names: the hammer (malleus), anvil (incus) and stirrup (stapes).

94. Davis with an Oscar, Emmy and two Tonys : VIOLA

Actress Viola Davis is probably best known on the small screen for playing the lead in the drama “How to Get Away with Murder”. On the big screen, I’d say that her most famous role is the starring role in the 2011 film “The Help”.

98. Luxor’s river : NILE

The modern city of Luxor grew up around the ruins of the ancient Egyptian city of Thebes. Thebes was the city of the god Amon-Ra and was the religious capital of the country until the Greeks took control. Luxor is often called “the world’s greatest open-air museum”. Tourists flock there to see the Luxor Temple and Karnak Temple ruins, as well as the Valley of the Kings and the Valley of the Queens immediately opposite Luxor on the other side of the River Nile.

99. Cook Paula : DEEN

Paula Deen is a celebrity chef from Savannah, Georgia who is noted for her Southern cooking. Deen has been criticized for the amount of salt, fat and sugar in her recipes. The criticism became even more intense when Deen disclosed that she herself has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.

100. B-school course : ECON

A B-school is a business school.

104. Diplomatic bldg. : EMB

Embassy (emb.)

105. Pop artist Lichtenstein : ROY

Roy Lichtenstein was a pop artist from New York City, a contemporary of Andy Warhol. Lichtenstein was famous for his “cartoon-strip” paintings, especially works called “Whaam!” and “Drowning Girl”. If you saw the Ben Stiller film “Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian”, you might remember Lichtenstein’s painting “Crying Girl” coming to life as part of the plot.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Breaks off : STOPS
6. Window framework : SASH
10. Kicks off : OPENS
15. Cake-finishing artist : ICER
19. Dugout, for one : CANOE
20. Either of matching words, in a way: Abbr. : ANAG
21. Home to the Palazzo della Ragione : PADUA
22. Pew area : NAVE
23. Flopped financially : ATE IT
24. ’60s protest slogan : BAN THE BOMB!
26. In : AMID
27. Bread worshipers? : NAAN BELIEVERS (sounds like “nonbelievers”)
29. In a dishonorable manner : BASELY
31. Makes serious demands on : TAXES
32. __ Geo: cable channel : NAT
33. Source of intolerance : LACTOSE
34. Frequent savers : GOALIES
37. Time div. : MIN
39. “One of Ours” Pulitzer-winning author : CATHER
40. Kick out : EXPEL
41. Musical composition about a bread-loving pack animal? : PITA AND THE WOLF (sounds like “Peter and the Wolf”)
46. Cooped-up critters : HENS
47. Arms carriers? : TORSI
49. Concerns : CARES
50. Adjective for rapper Kim : LIL’
51. Bread joke-teller’s trait? : RYE SENSE OF HUMOR (sounds like “wry sense of humor”)
54. Diet including wild fruit : PALEO
56. Vote in favor : YEA
57. Music and art genre : FOLK
58. “Lemme __!” : AT ‘EM
59. Confines : PENS UP
60. Two-time A.L. Manager of the Year Francona, familiarly : TITO
61. Ballet movements : PLIES
63. Cougar, e.g., briefly : MERC
64. Declining due to age : SENILE
67. Harbor view spot : PIER
68. Ore source : SEAM
69. Easy sequence? : ABC
72. Norwegian capital : KRONE
73. Celebratory wish over Jewish bread? : HAPPY CHALLAH DAY (sounds like “Happy Holiday!”
77. “__ yours”: “My gift” : IT’S
78. Gift recipient : DONEE
79. Big hits : BELTS
80. NASA approvals : A-OKS
81. Ibsen title character’s bread? : PEER GYNT’S WHEAT (sounds like “‘Peer Gynt’ suite”)
85. Stop in Québec? : ARRET
86. Immerses in liquid : SOUSES
87. Get it wrong : ERR
88. Insurance company founded for rural workers : FARMERS
90. Takes back : RECANTS
92. Like some discount mdse. : IRR
94. Left-hand page : VERSO
95. King in “The Tempest” : ALONSO
96. “Sorry, I meant to give you a plain burger”? : NO BUN INTENDED (sounds like “no pun intended”)
102. El __ : NINO
103. Orchestra section : PERCUSSION
106. Jenna, to Jeb : NIECE
107. Nerd : GEEK
108. Folding declaration : I’M OUT
109. Cosmo rival : ELLE
110. Europop’s __ Base : ACE OF
111. Besides : ELSE
112. Bottomless gulf : ABYSS
113. Passing out at the table? : DEAL
114. Golf Channel analyst Wadkins : LANNY

Down

1. Doctor’s order : SCAN
2. Part of TTFN : TA-TA
3. Most eligible for service : ONE-A
4. Ineffective : POINTLESS
5. Put a price on freedom? : SET BAIL
6. Fine furs : SABLES
7. Writer Nin : ANAIS
8. Reasonable : SANE
9. “Fixer Upper” network : HGTV
10. Verdi creation : OPERA
11. L.A.-based brewery : PABST
12. Tokyo, formerly : EDO
13. O.T. book : NUM
14. Religious observances : SABBATHS
15. Fretful : IN A STEW
16. Bread that only appears for a short time? : CAMEO ROLLS (sounds like “cameo roles”)
17. Harmful aspects : EVILS
18. Try a new shade on : REDYE
25. Salon coloring : HENNA
28. Program file suffix : EXE
30. Masseuse’s target : ACHE
33. “See ya!” : LATER!
34. Architect Frank : GEHRY
35. Yellow-and-white daisy : OXEYE
36. Sleep study subject : APNEA
37. Soybean paste : MISO
38. “Do __ you must” : IT IF
39. PC insert : CD-ROM
41. Nursery sch. : PRE-K
42. Sharp : ACUTE
43. Mentions specifically : NAMES
44. Place : LIEU
45. Disaster movie? : FLOP
47. U.S. security : T-NOTE
48. Norwegian capital : OSLO
52. Option for a return : E-FILE
53. Precarious : HAIRY
54. Prefix with frost : PERMA-
55. Mandela’s org. : ANC
59. Bell sounds : PEALS
60. Like the Oz woodsman : TIN
61. Singing voice, informally : PIPES
62. Looney Tunes stinker : LE PEW
63. Soften in feeling : MELT
64. Hop-jump link : SKIP
65. Art Deco artist : ERTE
66. Bread with a winelike aroma? : NOSE SCONES (sounds like “nose cones”)
67. Breathes hard : PANTS
68. Ocean feature : SALT
69. Worship : ADORE
70. 15-Across co-worker : BAKER
71. Dermatologists’ concerns : CYSTS
73. Refines : HONES
74. “Good buddy” : CB’ER
75. Pick up : HEAR
76. Blues musician’s “harp” : HARMONICA
78. Literally, Greek for “bad place” : DYSTOPIA
82. Lost Colony’s island : ROANOKE
83. Big biceps, at the gym : GUNS
84. Chef’s supply : HERBS
85. London football club : ARSENAL
88. Aromatic herb : FENNEL
89. Part of MoMA : ART
90. Span : RANGE
91. The senior Saarinen : ELIEL
92. Ear bone : INCUS
93. Opposites of squeakers, in sports : ROUTS
94. Davis with an Oscar, Emmy and two Tonys : VIOLA
97. Employed : USED
98. Luxor’s river : NILE
99. Cook Paula : DEEN
100. B-school course : ECON
101. Rebel against : DEFY
104. Diplomatic bldg. : EMB
105. Pop artist Lichtenstein : ROY

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9 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 19 Aug 18, Sunday”

  1. Enjoyed this one. Maybe my sense of humor is rye. Or half-baked. Hardest parts were spelling Pier/PEER and Dean/Dene/DEEN

  2. Often , a clue that confuses me most is the very one that doesn’t get an explanation on this site. 93-D clue is: Opposite of squekers, in sports. Answer is shown : ROUTS. However explanation is not listed?

    1. Often, simple dictionary definitions aren’t explained on here. The two words are antonyms to describe point spreads in games. A squeaker is a close game, and a rout is not one.

  3. Hello all 😣
    Didn’t even try this one, really. Rage-quit after about six clues. SUNDAYS ARE SUPPOSED TO BE FUN!!
    Be well ~~😣

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