LA Times Crossword 15 Feb 19, Friday

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Constructed by: Winston Emmons
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: C-Plus

Themed answers are common phrases PLUS a letter C that has been added:

  • 67A. Grade describing the four longest puzzle answers? : C-PLUS
  • 16A. Social media buzz about Alfred E. Neuman? : MAD CHATTER (C + Mad Hatter)
  • 62A. Jalopy that still works? : GOING CRATE (C + going rate)
  • 9D. Vegan regimen for a willowy look? : CATKINS DIET (C + Atkins diet)
  • 22D. Trysting place? : CHEATING PAD (C + heating pad)

Bill’s time: 8m 30s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Dip with a kick : SALSA

“Salsa” is simply Spanish for “sauce”.

13. “A Lesson From __”: Fugard play : ALOES

Playwright Athol Fugard was born in South Africa. Fugard became involved in the theater, writing plays that opposed apartheid, many of which had to be produced outside of South Africa given the political climate at home. Fugard now lives in San Diego, California.

14. Electronic music effect : WA-WA

A wah-wah (also “wa-wa”) pedal connected to an electric guitar alters the tone of the signal created so that it mimics the human voice.

16. Social media buzz about Alfred E. Neuman? : MAD CHATTER (C + Mad Hatter)

Alfred E. Neuman is the mascot of “Mad” magazine, although the image of the smiling, jug-eared youth had been around for decades before the magazine. “Mad” first used the likeness in 1955, and young Mr. Neuman has appeared on the cover of almost every issue of the magazine since then. Neuman’s name was inspired by American composer Alfred Newman, a prolific writer of film scores.

In Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”, the “Mad Hatter” makes his first appearance in a chapter called “A Mad Tea-Party”. This event is usually described as “The Mad Hatter’s Tea Party”, even though the Mad Hatter was just a guest. The host was the March Hare. In fact, the phrase “Mad Hatter” doesn’t appear anywhere in Lewis Carroll’s novel, although the character, the Hatter (and sometimes “Hatta”), is described as “mad”.

19. Montgomery-to-Macon dir. : ENE

Montgomery is the capital of Alabama, and is the state’s second biggest city (after Birmingham). Montgomery is a port city, located on the Alabama River. The city is actually named for an Irishman. Richard Montgomery was an Irish-born soldier who served in the British Army and later in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War.

The Georgia city of Macon was named in 1823 in honor of North Carolina politician Nathaniel Macon, who served as Speaker of the US House of Representatives from 1801 to 1807.

22. Fiscal exec : CFO

Chief financial officer (CFO)

26. It’s not an equine : SEAHORSE

Seahorses belong to the genus Hippocampus. The genus name comes from the Greek “hippo” meaning “horse” and “kampos” meaning “sea monster”. It’s the male seahorse who carries the fertilized eggs, and not the females. The region of the brain known as the hippocampus, is so called because it resembles a seahorse in shape.

34. “There’s many __ ‘twixt the cup and the lip”: old proverb : A SLIP

“There’s many a slip twixt the cup and the lip” is a favorite proverb of mine. The idea behind the adage is that even when things look certain, things can still go wrong.

38. About one-third of Earth’s land area : ASIA

Most of the world’s population lives in Asia (60%), and Asia is the largest continent in terms of landmass (30% of the world). Asia also has the highest population density (246 people per square mile), and the most populous city on the continent is Shanghai, China.

41. Monopoly pieces : DICE

The commercial game of Monopoly is supposedly a remake of “The Landlord’s Game” created in 1903 by a Quaker woman called Lizzie Phillips. Phillips used her game as a tool to explain the single tax theory of American economist Henry George. The Landlord’s Game was first produced commercially in 1924. The incredibly successful derivative game called Monopoly was introduced in 1933 by Charles Darrow, who became a very rich man when Parker Brothers bought the rights to the game just two years later in 1935.

44. Like some posters : STENCILED

A stencil is a sheet of impervious material with perforations in the shape of letters or a design. The stencil is placed over a surface to be printed and then the printing medium is applied, so that the medium only attaches to the surface beneath the perforations.

46. Windows competitor : IOS

iOS is what Apple now call their mobile operating system. Previously, it was known as iPhone OS.

48. Big name in auto racing : ANDRETTI

Mario Andretti is a retired Italian American racing driver who was named US Driver of the Year in 1967, 1978 and 1984. Both of Mario’s sons, Michael and Jeff are successful auto racers, as well as Mario’s nephews, John and Adam Andretti. John and Adam are sons of Mario’s brother Aldo Andretti. Aldo also raced cars, but quit after a crash in 1969 that severely damaged his face. Aldo is Mario’s identical twin brother, but there is no resemblance after the reconstructive surgery necessitated by the accident.

49. Chicago mayor since 2011 : EMANUEL

Rahm Emanuel was an Illinois representative in the US House before resigning in 2009 to take up President Obama’s offer to become the White House Chief of Staff. Emanuel moved on from the White House the following year in order to run as a candidate in Chicago’s mayoral election in 2011. He won the 2011 race, and was re-elected in 2015.

53. Addams cousin : ITT

In the television sitcom “The Addams Family”, the family had a frequent visitor called Cousin Itt. Itt is a short man with long hair that runs from his head to the floor. Cousin Itt was played by Italian actor Felix Silla.

They’re creepy and they’re kooky,
Mysterious and spooky,
They’re altogether ooky,
The Addams Family.

54. Actress Helgenberger : MARG

Marg Helgenberger is an actress best known for roles she plays on television. Helgenberger played investigator Catherine Willows on “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”. She also played drug-addicted prostitute K.C. Koloski in the Vietnam War drama “China Beach”.

55. Case, often : DOZEN

Our word “dozen” is used for a group of twelve. We imported it into English from Old French. The modern French word for “twelve” is “douze”, and for “dozen” is “douzaine”.

58. Hanoi holiday : TET

The full name for the New Year holiday in Vietnam is “Tet Nguyen Dan” meaning “Feast of the First Morning”, with the reference being to the arrival of the season of spring. Tet usually falls on the same day as Chinese New Year.

Hanoi (“Hà Nội” in Vietnamese) was the capital of North Vietnam, and Saigon the capital of South Vietnam. After the Vietnam War, Hanoi was made capital of the reunified state. Saigon, the larger metropolis, was renamed to Ho Chi Minh City. Hanoi is located in the delta of the Red River, and is just over 50 miles from the Gulf of Tonkin in the South China Sea.

61. Radar readout feature : BLIP

Scientists have been using radio waves to detect the presence of objects since the late 1800s, but it was the demands of WWII that accelerated the practical application of the technology. The British called their system RDF standing for Range and Direction Finding. The system used by the US Navy was called “Radio Detection And Ranging”, which was shortened to the acronym RADAR.

62. Jalopy that still works? : GOING CRATE (C + going rate)

The origins of our word “jalopy” meaning “dilapidated old motor car” seem to have been lost in time, but the word has been around since the 1920s. One credible suggestion is that it comes from Xalapa, Mexico as the Xalapa scrap yards were the destination for many discarded American automobiles.

65. “Frozen” princess : ELSA

“Frozen” is a 2013 animated feature from Walt Disney Studios that is based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale “The Snow Queen”. The film is all about the exploits of Princess Anna, the younger sister of Elsa, Snow Queen of Arendelle. Spoiler alert: Prince Hans of the Southern Isles seems to be a good guy for most of the film, but turns out to be a baddie in the end. And, a snowman named Olaf provides some comic relief.

66. Grandson of 33-Down exiles : ENOS
(33D. Paradise : EDEN)

Enos was the son of Seth, and therefore the grandson of Adam and Eve. According to the ancient Jewish work called the Book of Jubilees, Enos married his own sister Noam.

69. Case, for example, Abbr. : SYN

The word “case” is a synonym (syn.) of the word “example”.

Down

2. Jackson of country : ALAN

Alan Jackson is a country music singer, and a bit of an author too. Jackson married his high school sweetheart in 1979, but they had a parting of the ways about twenty years later due to the pressures on the marriage from Jackson’s career. The pair reconciled, and Jackson wrote a book describing the relationship he has with his wife and his commitment to Christianity. The book is called “It’s All About Him: Finding the Love of My Life”, and it topped the New York Times Bestseller List.

3. Pay dirt : LODE

A lode is a metal ore deposit that’s found between two layers of rock or in a fissure. The mother lode is the principal deposit in a mine, usually of gold or silver. “Mother lode” is probably a translation of “veta madre”, an expression used in mining in Mexico.

4. Holding-on period? : SEC

Hold on a sec.

6. Expos, now : NATS

The Washington Nationals (“Nats”) baseball team started out life as the Montreal Expos in 1969, and were the first Major League Baseball team in Canada. The Expos moved to Washington in 2005 becoming the Nats. There are only two Major Leagues teams that have never played in a World Series, one being the Mariners and the other the Nats.

7. Rough material : TWEED

Tweed is a rough woolen fabric that is very much associated with Scotland in the UK, and with County Donegal in Ireland. The cloth was originally called “tweel”, the Scots word for “twill”. Apparently a London merchant misinterpreted some handwriting in the early 1800s and assumed the fabric was called “tweed”, a reference to the Scottish River Tweed, and the name stuck …

9. Vegan regimen for a willowy look? : CATKINS DIET (C + Atkins diet)

Alder trees are deciduous (i.e. not evergreen), and the fruit of the tree is called a “catkin”. The tree carries both male and female catkins that look very similar to each other, but the male catkin is longer than the female. Alders are pollinated by wind usually, although bees can play a role.

Perhaps most notably, the eating of relatively few carbohydrates is central to the diet proposed by Robert Atkins. Atkins first laid out the principles behind the Atkins diet in a research paper published in 1958 in the “Journal of the American Medical Association”. He popularized his diet starting in 1972 with his book “Dr. Atkins’ Diet Revolution”.

10. Ford Field team : LIONS

The Detroit Lions are the NFL team that play home games at Ford Field in Detroit, Michigan. The team was founded way back in 1929 as the Portsmouth Spartans from Portsmouth, Ohio. The Spartans joined the NFL during the Great Depression as other franchises collapsed. However, the Spartans couldn’t command a large enough gate in Portsmouth so the team was sold and relocated to Detroit in 1934.

Ford Field is the football stadium that is home to the Detroit Lions. Ford Field is an indoor stadium, and was opened for business in 2002. The naming rights were purchased at that time by the Ford Motor Company.

12. Trapper’s collection : PELTS

A pelt is the skin of a furry animal.

14. Athletic org. founded by Billie Jean King : WTA

The former World No. 1 tennis player Billie Jean King founded the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) in 1973.

22. Trysting place? : CHEATING PAD (C + heating pad)

In its most general sense, a tryst is a meeting at an agreed time and place. More usually we consider a tryst to be a prearranged meeting between lovers. The term comes from the Old French “triste”, a waiting place designated when hunting. Further, a tryst taking place at lunchtime is sometimes referred to as a nooner.

25. Mike Trout’s team, on scoreboards : LAA

Mike Trout debuted as a professional baseball player for Los Angeles Angels in 2011. Trout’s nickname is “the Millville Meteor”, as he grew up in Millville, New Jersey.

26. Swedish auto : SAAB

“SAAB” stands for Svenska Aeroplan AB, which translates into English as Swedish Aeroplane Limited. Although we usually think of SAAB as an auto manufacturer, it is mainly an aircraft manufacturer. If you take small hops in Europe you might find yourself on a SAAB passenger plane. The SAAB automotive division was acquired by General Motors in the year 2000, who then sold it to a Dutch concern in 2010. However, SAAB (automotive) finally went bankrupt in 2011. A Chinese consortium purchased the assets of SAAB Automotive in 2012, and so SAAB vehicles are in production again. The new vehicles are using the SAAB name, but cannot use the SAAB griffin logo, the rights to which have been retained by the mother company.

27. Latin I verb : ESSE

“Esse” is the Latin for “to be”. “Sum” means “I am”, and “erat” means “he, she was”.

28. Craigslist caveat : AS IS

Craigslist (usually written as “craiglist”) is an online network of communities that features classified advertisements organized geographically. Craigslist was started by Craig Newmark in 1995, originally as an email distribution list for his friends who lived and worked in the San Francisco Bay Area.

A caveat is a warning or a qualification. “Caveat” is the Latin for “let him beware”.

29. Sloth and the like : SINS

“Sloth”, meaning “indolence, sluggishness”, comes from the Middle English word “slowe”, the same root for our contemporary word “slow”. The animal, the sloth, is so named as it exhibits slow-moving behavior.

The cardinal sins of Christian ethics are also known as the seven deadly sins. The seven deadly sins are:

  • Wrath
  • Greed
  • Sloth
  • Pride
  • Lust
  • Envy
  • Gluttony

30. Musical narrated by Che : EVITA

Che is the narrator in the musical “Evita” by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice.

36. Tracy Marrow’s stage name : ICE-T

Rapper Ice-T must be sick of having his name come up as an answer in crossword puzzles (I know I am!). Born Tracy Marrow, Ice-T has been interested in acting for decades and made his film debut in the 1984 movie about breakdancing called “Breakin’”. He has also played Detective Fin Tutuola in the TV show “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” since the year 2000.

37. Salon offering : PEDI

Pedicure (pedi)

43. Trifling amount : SOU

A sou is an old French coin. We use the term “sou” to mean “an almost worthless amount”.

45. Old PC monitor : CRT

Cathode ray tube (CRT)

47. Marsh plants : SEDGES

Sedges are a family of plants that resemble grasses and rushes. Sedges are more properly called Cyperaceae.

50. “Atlantic City” director Louis : MALLE

Louis Malle was a French film director who is perhaps best known in this country for the 1981 film “My Dinner with Andre”. Malle was married to American actress Candice Bergen.

“Atlantic City” is a 1980 film by French director Louis Malle. It stars Susan Sarandon as a waitress in an Atlantic City casino who falls foul of some nasty drug dealers. Sarandon’s co-star is Burt Lancaster.

52. More than a little silly : LOONY

Something described as loony is insane, crazy. “Loony” is short for “lunatic”, an adjective that is now considered offensive. The term arose in the late 1400s when it meant “affected with periodic insanity”, insanity attacks brought on by the cycles of the moon. “Lunatic” comes from the Latin “luna” meaning “moon”.

56. Angels Landing’s national park : ZION

Angels Landing is a rock formation in Utah’s Zion National Park.

To me, the most spectacular feature of Zion National Park, in southwestern Utah, is the magnificent Zion Canyon. The canyon cuts through red Navajo sandstone and is a truly beautiful sight.

57. Nation borders? : ENS

The letters at either end of the word “nation” are letters N (ens).

58. Soothing application : TALC

Talc is a mineral, actually hydrated magnesium silicate. Talcum powder is composed of loose talc, although these days “baby powder” is also made from cornstarch.

59. Notions case : ETUI

An etui is an ornamental case used to hold small items, in particular sewing needles. We imported both the case design and the word “etui” from France. The French also have a modern usage of “etui”, using the term to depict a case for carrying CDs.

Notions are miscellaneous items, especially the likes of needles, buttons and thread.

63. Half of D : CCL

In Roman numerals, half of D (500) is CCL (250).

64. Hudson Riv. engineering school : RPI

The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) is a private school in Troy, New York. The university is named after its founder Stephen Van Rensselaer who set up the school in 1824. The goal of RPI has always been the “application of science to the common purposes of life”, an objective set by the founder. Given that, the name for the school’s sports teams is quite apt: the Engineers.

The Hudson River flows through eastern New York State from Henderson Lake in the Adirondacks to the Port of New York and New Jersey. The river is named for the English explorer Henry Hudson, who navigated the waterway in 1609.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Dip with a kick : SALSA
6. Highest : NTH
9. Video segment : CLIP
13. “A Lesson From __”: Fugard play : ALOES
14. Electronic music effect : WA-WA
15. Helper : AIDE
16. Social media buzz about Alfred E. Neuman? : MAD CHATTER (C + Mad Hatter)
18. Labor : TOIL
19. Montgomery-to-Macon dir. : ENE
20. Founded : BASED
21. Tie feature : KNOT
22. Fiscal exec : CFO
24. Removes from the exchange : DELISTS
26. It’s not an equine : SEAHORSE
31. Directed : RAN
32. Forceful : ASSERTIVE
34. “There’s many __ ‘twixt the cup and the lip”: old proverb : A SLIP
38. About one-third of Earth’s land area : ASIA
39. Slyly disparaging : SNIDE
41. Monopoly pieces : DICE
42. Tops : BESTS
44. Like some posters : STENCILED
46. Windows competitor : IOS
48. Big name in auto racing : ANDRETTI
49. Chicago mayor since 2011 : EMANUEL
53. Addams cousin : ITT
54. Actress Helgenberger : MARG
55. Case, often : DOZEN
58. Hanoi holiday : TET
61. Radar readout feature : BLIP
62. Jalopy that still works? : GOING CRATE (C + going rate)
65. “Frozen” princess : ELSA
66. Grandson of 33-Down exiles : ENOS
67. Grade describing the four longest puzzle answers? : C-PLUS
68. Marsh plant : REED
69. Case, for example, Abbr. : SYN
70. Permissible : LICIT

Down

1. Matching : SAME
2. Jackson of country : ALAN
3. Pay dirt : LODE
4. Holding-on period? : SEC
5. 49-Down remnant : ASH
6. Expos, now : NATS
7. Rough material : TWEED
8. Taking more time, probably, as a test : HARDER
9. Vegan regimen for a willowy look? : CATKINS DIET (C + Atkins diet)
10. Ford Field team : LIONS
11. Nitwit : IDIOT
12. Trapper’s collection : PELTS
14. Athletic org. founded by Billie Jean King : WTA
17. Ends prematurely : ABORTS
22. Trysting place? : CHEATING PAD (C + heating pad)
23. Pro : FOR
25. Mike Trout’s team, on scoreboards : LAA
26. Swedish auto : SAAB
27. Latin I verb : ESSE
28. Craigslist caveat : AS IS
29. Sloth and the like : SINS
30. Musical narrated by Che : EVITA
33. Paradise : EDEN
35. Rhythmic cadence : LILT
36. Tracy Marrow’s stage name : ICE-T
37. Salon offering : PEDI
40. Outcome : ENDING
43. Trifling amount : SOU
45. Old PC monitor : CRT
47. Marsh plants : SEDGES
49. Eventual 5-Down : EMBER
50. “Atlantic City” director Louis : MALLE
51. Stand : ARISE
52. More than a little silly : LOONY
56. Angels Landing’s national park : ZION
57. Nation borders? : ENS
58. Soothing application : TALC
59. Notions case : ETUI
60. Acid __ : TEST
63. Half of D : CCL
64. Hudson Riv. engineering school : RPI

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25 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 15 Feb 19, Friday”

  1. I thought todays puzzle theme was weird. Got messed up around 20 D I had slow instead of sins, took me awhile, finally looked it up and 31 A , I had led instead of ran. So thats it. Everyone be safe.

  2. Fairly easy fun puzzle, more like a Wednesday. Never heard of the Fugard play but perps helped. Put “sawhorse” initially got “seahorse” from perps as well. Don’t get fooled as much anymore by obtuse clues like “Nations Borders.”
    Interesting that some puzzles refer to a female performer as an “actor” while others use “actress.” Still a lot of snow in central New York.

  3. LAT 27:35 with one error….ATA for WTA.
    NYT 0111 from my paper today, after about an hour and 30% completion I gave up. When I see Jeff Chen teaming up with a coauthor I should know better than to attempt the puzzle but I try it every time to no avail. Does he ever do a puzzle alone?

    1. Hey Jack! It seems to me that Chen used always to do solo puzzles, but lately he’s partnering up more. I prefer his solo efforts, though those generally have me pulling my hair out…!!😮

  4. LAT: 13:42, no errors; a little slow to pick up on the extra C-soning. Newsday: 9:46, no errors. WSJ: 12:12, no errors; still scratching my head over the meta. NYT: 20:53 after finding and fixing an error (a personal Natick at the intersection of 50D and 54A). Croce at 4:00.

    1. Tim Croce’s latest: 28:55, no errors. A little easier than usual, but with a sort of metapuzzle (or Easter egg) hidden in it, celebrating the birth of a son, which took a bit more time to work out. What a cool way to commemorate the occasion!

      And thanks, Heidi, for responding to Steve’s query …

  5. A wah-wah pedal is not spelled “wawa.” Look it up. “Taking more time, probably, as a test” takes the cake, probably, as the most dumbass clue imaginable for HARDER. All around, cluing closer to a D-minus than a C-PLUS.

  6. 18:39. A worthy Friday puzzle IMNSHO (Not So Humble…). An alternative clue for CHEATING PAD could have been “Crib notes”….maybe. Clever theme that I did lean on a few times.

    NYT blog is indeed still down. I guess it’s a bad combination of an emergency on other side of the world with a site going down at the same time. I suspect Bill will make the necessary repairs when he has the time. I just hope we don’t lose too many posters over there.

    I was at a conference in Denver Monday and Tuesday. Dave K dropped off a $70 bottle of tequila for me as I was leaving. I bring this up because I promised Dave I’d make fun of the fact that he still uses a flip phone, and I never break my promises… 😛

    I stated this yesterday, but it’s a clear anejo. When I saw the bottle, I thought it must be a blanco because it looked like water. Anejos are usually more honey colored. I’ll have to look up how the color stays clear for this type of tequila, but it is very very smooth. Don Julio 70 if anyone wants to try some.

    NYT blog is indeed still down. I guess it’s a bad combination of an emergency on other side of the world with a site going down at the same time. I suspect he’ll make the necessary repairs when he has the time. I just hope we don’t lose too many over there.

    I’ve had a very long week. I think Dave’s tequila might get a workout this evening.

    Best –

    1. Gee, thanks, Jeff … 🙂

      My parents had a mantra: Waste not, want not; use it up, wear it out, make it do! My little flip phone has been serving as an emergency contact device for so many years that I can’t recall just when I got it and it has only cost me about $20/year. Unfortunately, it does seem to be having problems with cell signals in some areas where my iPad works just fine and T-Mobile has warned me that its days may be numbered. It’ll be a sad day when I have to turn it off for the last time … 🙂

      I did a little more research about the extra añejo tequila that I sampled and liked so much in Cozumel. I can actually order a bottle from them, but I also found an awful lot of other choices, so now I’m confused and will probably do without. In any case, the whole episode was a sort of uncharacteristically random whim, but I’m glad it worked out as well as it did … 🙂

    1. “The Post’s own crossword”? I’m a little confused, as the principal subject of discussion on this blog is the Los Angeles Times puzzle. I guess there must have been a Washington Post daily puzzle that is no longer published; I wasn’t aware of that one …

    1. @Ann –
      Talc is not a known carcinogen. Talc that is tainted with asbestos can be carcinogenic. That was the problem. Talc that has no asbestos isn’t linked to any specific cancer.

      Research on animals (which doesn’t necessarily pertain to humans; it only points to a possibility of a risk) at most shows a slight possibility of a slight increase in risk of some cancers.

      Research on humans gives even less definitive results. Also keep in mind these studies use these substances in (IMO) absurdly large doses and they usually rely on someone’s memory of talc use earlier in life.

      As long as the talc is asbestos free, I’d feel comfortable using it daily, if needed.

      Also – whether it is a carcinogen or not, it is indeed soothing so it is irrelevant to the clue itself.

      Not trying to pick on you, but I just finished auditing/editing a set of documents making this same claim so it hits home when I see data misused (most notably by certain attorneys at present) as it is so often these days. I’ve seen the raw data, and it amazes me the conclusions people reach from these data.

      Best –

      1. Talc and asbestos are often found in close proximity. Easy it have talc mixed with a little asbestos. Best to avoid it. Where I worked, nurses quit using talcum powder on babies due to possible lung problems caused by inhaling the dust.

  7. 20 mins 16 sec and 2 errors where SEC crosses ALOES. Just couldn’t get the sense of the down clue, and am still scratching my head over the crossing clue. This hasn’t been my week.

  8. Mostly easy Friday; took 23:24 on-line, albeit with one quick peek after I’d filled everything out. Didn’t know MALLE or MARG and had trouble at the junction of HARDER and RAN, since I had led, just like Cathy.

    Strange puzzle, that was easy with lots of regular crossword fill and difficult with odd personal nouns junctions. On to Saturday…

  9. Hay y’all!!!🐔

    No errors but this puzzle had its challenges! Didn’t know ALOES and wasn’t sure I got it right– but I did.🤗

    Agree with anonymous on WA WA! Even if that’s an acceptable spelling, those guitar pedals are wah wahs, or sometimes just wah– that was the original spelling. George Harrison has a song called “Wah-Wah.” He named it for the pedal, altho the song also talks about how he’s not crying over the breakup of The Beatles. I guess I’m a traditionalist when it comes to certain spellings… 🎵🎵🎵

    Be well ~~🎸

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