LA Times Crossword 10 Apr 19, Wednesday

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Constructed by: Jeff Stillman
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer Restoration

The starting words in the themed answers define steps taken by a handyman when doing a RESTORATION:

  • 59A Handyman’s work suggested by the starts of 18-, 20-, 38- and 57-Across : RESTORATION
  • 18A Controversial excavation method : STRIP MINING
  • 20A Beach house? : SAND CASTLE
  • 38A Beachfront property, often : PRIME REAL ESTATE
  • 57A Breed of Tonto’s Scout : PAINT HORSE

Bill’s time: 5m 30s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Punk rock subgenre : EMO

The emo musical genre originated in Washington D.C. in the 80s, and takes its name from “emotional hardcore”. “Emo” is also the name given to the associated subculture. Not my cup of tea …

4 Catches red-handed : NABS

To be caught red-handed is to be caught in the act. The expression originated in Scotland and dates back at least to the 1400s. The red in question is blood, as in being caught with blood on one’s hands after perhaps committing a murder or an act of poaching.

8 Medieval stringed instruments : REBECS

The rebec is an old stringed instrument played with a bow. It was played like a violin, under the chin or sometimes on the arm.

14 GoPro product, briefly : CAM

GoPro is a company that makes high-definition video cameras that have a rugged design. Famously, GoPro cameras are used in extreme conditions. For example, they are often mounted on moving vehicles or used by people playing sports. Recently, two astronauts on the International Space Station inserted a GoPro camera inside a floating ball of water, and then showed the view from inside the ball of water. Amazing footage …

15 Many a homecoming attendee : ALUM

An alumnus (plural “alumni”) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is “alumna” (plural “alumnae”). The term comes into English from Latin, in which an alumnus is a foster-son or pupil. “Alum” is an informal term used for either an alumna or an alumnus.

16 Covent Garden offerings : OPERAS

The Royal Opera House is located in Covent Garden in the West End of London. The Opera House is home to both the Royal Opera and the Royal Ballet, as well as the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House. The institution was founded in 1728 as the Theatre Royal, although the original building was destroyed by fire in 1808. The second Theater Royal opened on the site the following year, but it was also lost in a fire, in 1856. The current building opened in 1858, and was renamed to the Royal Opera House in 1892.

18 Controversial excavation method : STRIP MINING

Strip mining is a process used to mine minerals that are relatively close to the surface. A long strip of overlying soil and rock is first removed, and then the ore beneath is excavated. Once each long strip has been excavated then the overlying soil and rock is redeposited. Strip mining wouldn’t be most environmentally friendly practice …

22 Little biter : GNAT

Gnats are attracted to the smell of rotting food, and to vinegar. Simple homemade traps that use vinegar are often constructed to attract and kill gnats.

23 Bible book between Daniel and Joel : HOSEA

Hosea was one of the Twelve Prophets of the Hebrew Bible. The Twelve Prophets are also known as the Minor Prophets of the Old Testament in the Christian Bible.

26 Form 1040 agcy. : IRS

Here in the US we can choose one of three main forms to file our tax returns. Form 1040 is known as the “long form”. Form 1040A is called the “short form”, and can be used by taxpayers with taxable income below $100,000 who don’t itemize deduction. Form 1040EZ is an even simpler version of the 1040, and can be used by those with taxable income less than $100,000 who take the standard deduction and who also have no dependents. Form 1040 was originally created just for tax returns from 1913, 1914 and 1915, but it’s a form that just keeps on giving, or should I say “taking” …?

28 Permanent sites? : SALONS

“Perm” is the common name given to a permanent wave, a chemical or thermal treatment of hair to produce waves or curls.

33 __ Fables : AESOP’S

Aesop is remembered today as a fabulist, a writer of fables. Aesop lived in Ancient Greece, probably around the sixth century BC. Supposedly he was born a slave, somehow became a free man, but then met with a sorry end. Aesop was sent to the city of Delphi on a diplomatic mission but instead insulted the Delphians. He was tried on a trumped-up charge of stealing from a temple, sentenced to death and was thrown off a cliff.

41 Org. for netmen : ATP

The Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) is an organization that looks out for the interests of male tennis professionals. The equivalent organization for women is the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA).

42 “Barney Miller” star Hal : LINDEN

“Barney Miller” is a sitcom set in a Greenwich Village, New York police station. All of the action takes place actually within the station house, except for a once-a-year “special” that followed one of the detectives on a stakeout or in their home. The title character is the captain of the precinct, and is played by Hal Linden.

43 Linear : ONE-D

The dimension of an object is defined as the minimum number of coordinates needed to specify each point in the object. Therefore a line is one-dimensional, as you only need an x-coordinate to specify a particular point on the line. A surface is two-dimensional, as you need both an x-coordinate and a y-coordinate to locate a point on the surface. The inside of a solid object is then three-dimensional, needing an x-, y- and z-coordinate to specify a point, say within a cube.

44 Biathlon weapons : RIFLES

A biathlon is an event requiring expertise in two sporting disciplines. The most common biathlon is the winter sport that combines cross-country skiing with rifle shooting. This traditional biathlon was born out of an exercise for Norwegian soldiers.

46 __ Bund: Swiss newspaper : DER

“Der Bund” is a German-language newspaper published in Bern, Switzerland. The newspaper’s title translates into English as “The Union”.

48 Skelton’s Kadiddlehopper : CLEM

Clem Kadiddlehopper was a character played by comedian Red Skelton. Clem was inspired by a real person named Carl Hopper, who was one of Skelton’s neighbors in his hometown of Vincennes, Indiana.

49 Merit badge org. : BSA

As every little boy (of my era) knows, the Scouting movement was founded by Lord Baden Powell, in 1907. The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) soon followed, in 1910. And, the Boy Scouts motto is “Be Prepared”.

57 Breed of Tonto’s Scout : PAINT HORSE

A paint horse is a breed of horse. The coloring of a paint horse is known as “pinto”. That said, the term “paint” and “pinto” are often used interchangeably.

Famously, the Lone Ranger’s horse was named “Silver” and Tonto’s mount was named “Scout”. In the earlier shows, Tonto rode a horse named “White Feller”.

61 Shortest surname in Cooperstown : OTT

At 5′ 9″, baseball legend Mel Ott weighed just 170 lb (I don’t think he took steroids!) and yet he was the first National League player to hit over 500 home runs. Sadly, Ott died in a car accident in New Orleans in 1958 when he was only 49 years old. And, according to Wikipedia, “Ott’s name frequently appears in crossword puzzles, on account of its letter combination and brevity.” True that …

Cooperstown is a village in New York that is famous as the home to the Baseball Hall of Fame. The village was named for Judge William Cooper, the founder of Cooperstown and the father of the noted writer James Fenimore Cooper.

62 Kin of jujitsu : AIKIDO

Aikido is a Japanese martial art that only dates back to the 1920s and 1930s. It was developed by Morihei Ueshiba, who is often referred to as “the Founder” or “Great Teacher”.

Jujitsu (also “jiujitsu”) is a group of martial arts associated with Japan. The name “jujitsu” comes from “ju” meaning “gentle” and “jitsu” meaning “technique”. The name was chosen to represent the principle of using the opponent’s force against himself, rather than relying on one’s own strength.

64 Once known as : NEE

“Née” is the French word for “born” when referring to a female. The male equivalent is “né”.

65 Planted a red herring, say : MISLED

The exact origin of the term “red herring”, meaning “something that misleads”, isn’t known. The most common explanation for the use of the phrase is that kippers (strong-smelling smoked herrings) were used to by fugitives to distract bloodhounds who were on their trail. Kippers become red-colored during the smoking process, and are no longer “white herrings”.

66 Poolroom powder : TALC

Talc is a mineral, actually hydrated magnesium silicate. Talcum powder is composed of loose talc, although these days “baby powder” is also made from cornstarch.

Down

2 Chinese gambling mecca : MACAO

Macau (also “Macao”) is an autonomous territory of China located on the Pearl River estuary about 40 miles west of Hong Kong. Macau was a Portuguese colony from the mid-1500s until 1999. It was in fact the first European colony in China, and the last, having been handed back to the Chinese in 1999, two years after Hong Kong was returned by the British. Macau’s economy is driven by tourism and gambling. The territory’s gaming revenue is the highest for any gambling center in the world.

4 Sprint Cup org. : NASCAR

In the world of NASCAR, what was called the Nextel Cup in 2004-2007, is now known as the Sprint Cup (as Sprint took over Nextel). Prior to 2004, the prize was called the Winston Cup.

5 Utah ski resort : ALTA

Alta ski resort actually lies within the Salt Lake City Metropolitan Area. The first ski lift in the resort was opened way back in 1939. Today, Alta is one of only three ski resorts in the country that prohibits snowboarding (along with Deer Valley, Utah and Mad River Glen, Vermont. The ski resort of Snowbird, located next to Alta, has been in operation since 1971.

7 Word for word? : SMITH

A wordsmith is someone who works with words, and is usually an expert writer.

8 Tiber River capital : ROME

The Tiber is the principal river in Italy in that it runs through the capital of Rome. It is also the third longest river in the country.

9 Center starter : EPI-

The epicenter is that point on the surface of the earth that is directly above the focus of an earthquake.

10 Cincinnati player : BENGAL

The NFL’s Cincinnati Bengals team was founded in 1966 as a member of the American Football League (AFL). There was an earlier team called the Bengals in the city that played from 1937 to 1941. That team used the “Bengal” name because Cincinnati Zoo was home to a very rare Bengal tiger.

11 “Happy Days” actress : ERIN MORAN

Erin Moran was the lovely actress most famous for playing Joanie Cunningham on “Happy Days” and the resulting (short-lived) spin-off sitcom called “Joanie Loves Chachi”. Long before she got her big break in “Happy Days”, Moran played Jenny Jones on the children’s drama “Daktari” from the late sixties.

12 Inhabitant of ancient Palestine : CANAANITE

The ancient region in the Middle East known as Canaan corresponds roughly to modern-day Lebanon, Syria, Jordan and Israel. The term “Canaanite” is used in the Bible to describe various indigenous populations in the region. In fact, “Canaanite” is an ethnic term used more frequently in the Bible than any other.

13 NCO rank : SSGT

A staff sergeant (SSgt.) is a non-commissioned officer (NCO).

21 Reason-based faith : DEISM

Deism (from the Latin “deus” meaning god) is the belief that a supreme being created the universe, a belief based on observation and reason and without the need for faith. Further, a deist does not accept divine intervention and rather believes that the supreme being, having created the universe, leaves the world to it own devices.

25 Easter liturgy : MASS

The principal act of worship in the Roman Catholic tradition is the Mass. The term “Mass” comes from the Late Latin word “missa” meaning “dismissal”. This word is used at the end of the Latin Mass in “Ite, missa est” which translates literally as “Go, it is the dismissal”.

27 One-piece dresses : SARIS

The item of clothing called a “sari” (also “saree”) is a strip of cloth, as one might imagine, unusual perhaps in that is unstitched along the whole of its length. The strip of cloth can range from four to nine meters long (that’s a lot of material!). The sari is usually wrapped around the waist, then draped over the shoulder leaving the midriff bare. I must say, it can be a beautiful item of clothing.

31 Constitution section that creates the executive branch : ARTICLE II

Article Two of the US Constitution establishes and defines the powers of the executive branch of the federal government. The article specifically assigns those powers to the office of the US president.

40 Upper body : TORSO

“Torso” (plural “torsi”) is an Italian word meaning the “trunk of a statue”, and is a term that we imported into English.

45 Soup legume : LENTIL

Plants called legumes are notable in that they work symbiotically with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, microorganisms found in the root nodules that convert atmospheric nitrogen into ammonium ions. As nitrogen is an essential component of proteins, legumes are exceptionally rich sources of plant protein. Examples of legumes are peas, beans, lentils and peanuts.

51 Santa __ racetrack : ANITA

Santa Anita Park is a racetrack for horses located in Arcadia, California. The most famous races on the track’s calendar are the Santa Anita Derby and the Santa Anita Handicap.

53 Scandinavian coin : KRONE

“Krone” translates into English as “crown”, and was the name given to coins that bore the image of the monarch in several countries. Today, the krone is the name given to the currency of Norway and of Denmark. Some of the Norwegian and Danish kroner have holes in the middle, giving them a “doughnut” or “torus” shape.

54 Fragrant compound : ESTER

Esters are very common chemicals. The smaller, low-molecular weight esters are usually pleasant smelling and are often found in perfumes. At the other end of the scale, the higher-molecular weight nitroglycerin is a nitrate ester and is very explosive, and polyester is a huge molecule and is a type of plastic. Fats and oils found in nature are fatty acid esters of glycerol known as glycerides.

60 “__ to My Right Knee”: Rita Dove poem : ODE

Poet Rita Dove received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1987, and was the second African American to be so honored (the first being Gwendolyn Brooks).

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Punk rock subgenre : EMO
4 Catches red-handed : NABS
8 Medieval stringed instruments : REBECS
14 GoPro product, briefly : CAM
15 Many a homecoming attendee : ALUM
16 Covent Garden offerings : OPERAS
17 All-Star pitcher : ACE
18 Controversial excavation method : STRIP MINING
20 Beach house? : SAND CASTLE
22 Little biter : GNAT
23 Bible book between Daniel and Joel : HOSEA
24 Biblical pronoun : THY
25 Nursery cry : MAMA!
26 Form 1040 agcy. : IRS
28 Permanent sites? : SALONS
30 Sounds of contentment : AAHS
33 __ Fables : AESOP’S
37 Criticize harshly : RIP
38 Beachfront property, often : PRIME REAL ESTATE
41 Org. for netmen : ATP
42 “Barney Miller” star Hal : LINDEN
43 Linear : ONE-D
44 Biathlon weapons : RIFLES
46 __ Bund: Swiss newspaper : DER
48 Skelton’s Kadiddlehopper : CLEM
49 Merit badge org. : BSA
52 Tut-tutted : TSKED
56 Scottish family : CLAN
57 Breed of Tonto’s Scout : PAINT HORSE
59 Handyman’s work suggested by the starts of 18-, 20-, 38- and 57-Across : RESTORATION
61 Shortest surname in Cooperstown : OTT
62 Kin of jujitsu : AIKIDO
63 Yours, to Yves : A TOI
64 Once known as : NEE
65 Planted a red herring, say : MISLED
66 Poolroom powder : TALC
67 Drop the ball : ERR

Down

1 Cybermoney : E-CASH
2 Chinese gambling mecca : MACAO
3 Forebodings : OMENS
4 Sprint Cup org. : NASCAR
5 Utah ski resort : ALTA
6 Break open : BURST
7 Word for word? : SMITH
8 Tiber River capital : ROME
9 Center starter : EPI-
10 Cincinnati player : BENGAL
11 “Happy Days” actress : ERIN MORAN
12 Inhabitant of ancient Palestine : CANAANITE
13 NCO rank : SSGT
19 Work at, as a trade : PLY
21 Reason-based faith : DEISM
25 Easter liturgy : MASS
27 One-piece dresses : SARIS
28 Go through : SPEND
29 Floored it : SPED
30 On __ with : A PAR
31 Constitution section that creates the executive branch : ARTICLE II
32 On-the-sly alcohol containers : HIP FLASKS
34 Poetic time : E’EN
35 Downcast : SAD
36 Bullfight cheer : OLE!
39 K thru 6 : ELEM
40 Upper body : TORSO
45 Soup legume : LENTIL
47 Cultural, as cuisine : ETHNIC
49 Sheep’s cry : BAA!
50 Occupy, as a desk : SIT AT
51 Santa __ racetrack : ANITA
53 Scandinavian coin : KRONE
54 Fragrant compound : ESTER
55 Discourage : DETER
56 Pull an all-nighter : CRAM
57 Urge : PROD
58 Item in a kit : TOOL
60 “__ to My Right Knee”: Rita Dove poem : ODE

20 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 10 Apr 19, Wednesday”

  1. LAT: 5:41, no errors. WSJ: 12:41, no errors. Newsday: 5:56, no errors.

    @Dave
    Finished up the ACPT set. As for your Monday statement about “harder puzzles than the puzzles discussed here”, I’d have to disagree to a certain degree. Regardless, a good “branching out” experience.

    1. @Glenn … True enough. I guess I was thinking of what some of the top ACPT folks can do. On his website, BEQ recently mentioned an incident in which Erik Agard told him that he had a hard time doing one of BEQ’s puzzles, and BEQ was puzzled by that, but it turned out that, to make it more interesting, Erik was using only the “across” clues … 😜.

      1. @Dave
        I’m going to refrain from specific commentary, but for what I did, I finished out all of them but two before the allotted time cap and even then I had most of the other two. I made copies of the two and will look at them later. Anyhow, they’ll score them so I’ll get to see a fuller picture when that mail returns. One lesson out of this: My handwriting is messy – hopefully they won’t mistake certain letters for other letters.

        As far as what the top solvers do, when I set up my streaming account, I found out that a lot of the top solvers will go on there and solve the Saturday Newsday “downs-only”. That’s pretty amazing to me.

        1. @Glenn … The only ACPT puzzles I’ve actually done are the ones from the book “Word Play”; I did think that a couple of them were harder than anything one would see in the LAT. (I ordered the ones from last year’s ACPT, but they arrived late and I’ve never found/made time to try them.)

          And, as for doing the Saturday Newsday “downs-only”: I can only say that I’m in awe of anyone who can do that and it reinforces my notion that, no matter how good you are, there’s probably someone out there who’s better (unless your name is “Erik” or “Usain” and you have the right last name … 😜).

          I have tangled with a few puzzles that made me feel like I was not so much solving a puzzle as constructing one. Interesting … 😳.

  2. You can enjoy in real spots, and you may actually keep your favorite hands
    so you can display your friends the massive bluff you created or even the amazing lucky bring of your adversary.

    1. Agree.

      We needed our usual 45 minutes; I was all set to report 100%, but found
      2 dumb errors – SALON and SPEND. Should have gotten those. So, a
      “meager” 99%, assuming 200 total squares. Learned a couple of new words
      in the process.

    2. @ATR … The following online dictionary entry would appear to disagree:

      https://www.dictionary.com/browse/thy

      It says that “thy” is a pronoun (the possessive case of “thou”) and that it is used as an “attributive adjective” before a noun beginning with a consonant sound.

      Perhaps Carrie, our resident English teacher, will weigh in on the issue.

  3. 11:07. Decent Wednesday grid. The spelling of MACAO(U) always trips me up.

    Regarding “thy” as a pronoun:

    There are actually a bunch of types of pronouns. Most people think of pronouns exclusively as personal pronouns (he, she it), but possessive pronouns (his, her, their, THY..) are indeed pronouns. Some others are demonstrative pronouns (this, that), interrogative pronouns (who, which) , indefinite pronouns (none, several …believe it or not those are also considered pronouns) among others.

    Carrie – Now the Cardinals have taken the first two of the series from your Dodgers! I have the tv package Extra Innings so I SHOULD get all the Cardinal games, but the MLB tv rights are so convoluted that Las Vegas is considered part of the LA market, the San Diego market, the Phoenix market, the San Francisco market and the Oakland market….Anaheim too.

    Long story short (if that’s still possible at this point), because of the contractual mess involving the Dodgers’ tv rights, I can’t see any of the Dodger/Cardinal games.

    Best –

  4. This was fairly easy for a Wed. But for the life of me, I’ve never heard of “paint horse” before. Where did that come from? Anyone know? And I’ll stay out of the “thy vs thou” discussion and leave it to Carrie!

  5. 11 mins 51 sec and 2 errors REBECS/CANAANITE. All kinds of trouble in the top right, and I surely resent all the biblical/ancient fills and proper names.

  6. @Kay – Agree. I always called it just “a PAINT.” We know it’s a HORSE.

    I hadto Google for BENGAL. I’m sports deficient. noticed there were 7 sports clues. Too many for me.

  7. DARN!! IT HAPPENED AGAIN!! I ERASED MY COMMENTS!!

    oh well– THY is a possessive pronoun–

    Jeff, so sorry you can’t watch Dodgers/Cards games!! That’s lousy.

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