LA Times Crossword 12 May 19, Sunday

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Constructed by: Gail Grabowski
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Youth Group

Each of today’s themed answers includes “LAD” as a hidden word:

  • 23A Warning during a snowstorm : TRAVEL ADVISORY
  • 32A Octane booster : FUEL ADDITIVE
  • 46A High naval rank : FULL ADMIRAL
  • 67A One who can’t put down the phone? : DIGITAL ADDICT
  • 86A Founding Father found in a bar? : SAMUEL ADAMS
  • 102A Common login component : EMAIL ADDRESS
  • 113A Shelter mission : ANIMAL ADOPTION

Bill’s time: 15m 49s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

21 Illinois city west of Chicago : AURORA

Aurora, Illinois is the second-most populous city in the state, after Chicago. Aurora’s nickname is “City of Lights”, a nod to the early implementation of all-electric street lighting in 1881.

25 Wyndham-owned chain : RAMADA

The Ramada Inn hotel chain takes its name from the Spanish word for a shady resting place. A ramada is a shelter with a roof and no walls, mainly found in the American southwest. Nowadays a ramada can be temporary or permanent, but originally ramadas were makeshift shelters constructed by aboriginal Indians from branches or bushes.

26 Seashore raptor : ERNE

The ern (sometimes “erne”) is also known as the white-tailed eagle or the sea eagle.

“Raptor” is a generic term for a bird of prey, one that has talons to grip its victims.

27 Watch readout abbr. : LCD

Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs) are the screens that are found in most laptops today, and in flat panel computer screens and some televisions. LCD monitors basically replaced Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) screens, the old television technology.

30 Quote qualifier : [SIC]

[Sic] indicates that a quotation is written as originally found, perhaps including a typo. “Sic” is Latin for “thus, like this”. The term is more completely written as “sic erat scriptum”, which translates as “thus was it written”.

31 Last stroke, usually : PUTT

That would be golf.

32 Octane booster : FUEL ADDITIVE

The difference between a premium and regular gasoline is its octane rating. The octane rating is measure of the resistance of the gasoline to auto-ignition i.e. its resistance to ignition just by virtue of being compressed in the cylinder. This auto-ignition is undesirable as multiple-cylinder engines are designed so that ignition within each cylinder takes place precisely when the plug sparks, and not before. If ignition occurs before the spark is created, the resulting phenomenon is called “knocking”. We sometimes use the adjective “high-octane” to mean “intense, dynamic, high-powered”

36 Disc golf starting points : TEEPADS

Disc golf is also known as Frisbee golf, and sometimes even Frolf. Believe it or not, disc golf predates the introduction of the Frisbee. The first game was played at a school in Bladworth, Saskatchewan in 1926. The participating schoolkids threw tin lids into circles drawn on a course they created in the school grounds. They named the game “Tin Lid Golf”.

38 German title : HERR

In German, a “Herr” (Mr.) is married to a “Frau” (Mrs.), and they live together in a “Haus” (house).

40 Goose egg : NIL

The use of the phrase “goose egg” to mean “zero” is baseball slang that dates back to the 1860s. The etymology is as expected: the numeral zero and a goose egg are both large and round.

42 NYC tourist attraction : MOMA

The founding of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City was very much driven by Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, the wife of John D. Rockefeller, son of the oil magnate. Working with two friends, Abby managed to get the museum opened in 1929, just nine days after the Wall Street Crash. The MoMA’s sculpture garden bears the name of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, and has done so since 1949.

43 Slim predatory swimmer : CONGER EEL

Conger eels can grow to be very, very large, perhaps up to 10 feet in length.

51 Jazz singer Jones : ETTA

Etta Jones was a jazz singer who was sometimes known as the “jazz musician’s jazz singer”. Because she has a similar name to Etta James, Jones was often confused with the more famous singer. Jones never really had any huge commercial success though, despite the respect that she engendered within the inner sanctums of the jazz world.

53 “Chopped” utensil : PAN

“Chopped” is a cooking game show on the Food Network that is hosted by Ted Allen, formerly of “Queer Eye”. Four chefs compete in each episode to wine the princely sum of $10,000.

66 A third of nove : TRE

In Italian, one third of “nove” (nine) is “tre” (three).

71 Vichy vacation time : ETE

Vichy is a spa town in the center of France. The people from Vichy are known as Vichyssois. After Paris, was occupied by the Germans in WWII, Vichy was chosen as the seat of government for what was called the French State. The Vichy government had theoretical authority even in occupied France, and is remembered for its collaboration with the German authorities. Vichy was chosen as the new seat of government because of its relative proximity to Paris, and simply because the town had the largest hotel room capacity in the “free zone” of the country.

In French, “été” (summer) is a common time to go “en vacances” (on vacation).

74 Crafts website : ETSY

Etsy.com is an e-commerce website where you can buy and sell the kind of items that you might find at a craft fair.

75 Indian brew : ASSAM TEA

Assam is a state in the very northeast of India, and just south of the Himalayas. Assam is noted for its tea, as well as its silk.

77 “The Blues Brothers” fashion accessories : RAY-BANS

Ray-Ban sunglasses were introduced in 1937 for the US Army Air Corps. The Ray-Ban Aviator model of glasses became very popular with the pilots, and apparently with General Douglas MacArthur. MacArthur was wearing a pair when he was photographed “returning” to the Philippines in WWII.

The Blues Brothers blues band was created in 1978 for a “Saturday Night Live” sketch. The original Blues Brothers were Dan Aykroyd (Elwood Blues) and John Belushi (“Joliet” Jake Blues).

82 “David Copperfield” girl : EM’LY

In the Charles Dickens novel “David Copperfield”, Little Em’ly is a childhood friend of the title character.

85 Student leader? : ESS

The word “student” is led by a letter S (ess).

86 Founding Father found in a bar? : SAMUEL ADAMS

Samuel Adams beers (sometimes ordered as “Sam Adams”) are named in honor of the American patriot who played a role in the American Revolution and the Boston Tea Party. Samuel Adams came from a family associated the brewing industry, mainly involved in the production of malt.

By one definition, the Founding Fathers were the leaders of the American Revolution against the British Crown. By another, they were the individuals who signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776. The term “Framers” is sometimes confused with “Founding Fathers”. According to the National Archives, the Framers were the 55 delegates to the 1787 Constitutional Convention, those who played a key role in drafting the Constitution of the United States. The phrase “Founding Fathers” is a relatively recent term, and one coined by future US president Warren D. Harding in 1916.

93 Senior’s highlight : PROM

A prom is a formal dance held upon graduation from high school (we call them “formals” over in Ireland). The term “prom” is short for “promenade”, the name given to a type of dance or ball.

96 Aloha shirt go-with : LEI

“Lei” is the Hawaiian word for “garland, wreath”, although in more general terms a lei is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

97 Truck maker with a bulldog logo : MACK

Mack Trucks was founded by John Mack in the early 1900s, after he had spent some years working in companies that made carriages and electric motor cars. Along with his two brothers, Mack started their company to focus on building heavy-duty trucks and engines.

106 Eliot title hero : BEDE

“Adam Bede” was the first novel written by the English writer George Eliot (aka Mary Ann Evans). It was published in 1859 and has been in print since then, for over 150 years.

109 Put the kibosh on : END

A kibosh is something that constrains or checks. “Kibosh” looks like a Yiddish word but it isn’t, and is more likely English slang from the early 1800s.

110 Brad’s role in “Inglourious Basterds” : ALDO

I tried hard to enjoy the 2009 movie “Inglourious Basterds”, but I find the violence in a Quentin Tarantino film so very hard to take. However, it got good reviews, so maybe you shouldn’t let me put you off.

Brad Pitt’s first major role was the cowboy hitchhiker in the 1991’s “Thelma and Louise”. Pitt’s life offscreen garners as much attention as his work onscreen, it seems. The tabloids revel in the series of high-profile relationships in which he has been involved. He was engaged to Gwyneth Paltrow for a while, married to Jennifer Aniston and then to Angelina Jolie.

111 Hat of Ecuadorian origin, oddly : PANAMA

Panama hats are traditional headgear from Ecuador, and have never been made in Panama. The “panama” moniker came about as many of the hats were shipped to the Isthmus of Panama for transportation by sea to the rest of the world. Authentic panama hats are made from the leaves of a palm-like plant known locally as the jipijapa palm.

118 She outwitted a witch : GRETEL

“Hansel and Gretel” is a Germanic fairy tale found in the collection of the Brothers Grimm. It tells of two siblings, Hansel and Gretel, the children of a woodcutter. The youngsters are abandoned in a forest at the behest of an evil stepmother. Clever Hansel hears of the plan and leaves a trail of pebbles so that he and his sister can find their way home, which they do. But the children are abandoned again and this time leave a trail of breadcrumbs. Unfortunately, the crumbs are eaten by birds and so the children do indeed become lost. But eventually they do all live happily ever after …

119 Puget Sound city : TACOMA

Tacoma is a city on Puget Sound in the state of Washington. The city took its name from Mount Rainier that is nearby, as the peak used to be known as Mount Tahoma and Mount Tacoma.

120 Like candy canes : TWO-TONE

Apparently, candy canes were created at the behest of the choirmaster at Cologne Cathedral in Germany in 1672. The sweet sticks were basically used as bribes to keep children quiet during services. The choirmaster specified that the candy sticks should have a crook at the top so that they reminded the children of the three shepherds who visited the infant Jesus just after his birth.

123 Poor Yelp rating : ONE STAR

yelp.com is a website that provides a local business directory and reviews of services. The site is sort of like Yellow Pages on steroids, and the term “yelp” is derived from “yel-low p-ages”.

Down

2 King’s first published novel : CARRIE

“Carrie” was Stephen King’s first published novel. The title character is humiliated in a cruel prank during her high school prom in which she ends up covered in the blood of an animal. This trauma leads to a fit rage, with Carrie slaughtering her classmates and the rest of her hometown’s inhabitants. At least, that’s what I read. I don’t do horror …

4 Cathedral section : NAVE

In large Christian churches, the nave is the main approach to the altar, and is where most of the congregation are seated.

5 Ending with fluor- : -IDE

Fluoridation is the addition of a fluoride salt to the public drinking water system, a measure taken to reduce tooth decay. What I find interesting is that bottled water usually has no added fluoride, and most domestic water filters remove the fluoride from the water coming out of the faucet. Maybe that explains why my dental hygienist has been applying a fluoride varnish to my teeth …

6 Conspired : COLLUDED

A popular word these days …

8 Big D hoops pro : MAV

The Mavericks are the NBA franchise in Dallas, Texas. The team was founded in 1980, and the Mavericks name was chosen by fan votes. The choice of “Mavericks” was prompted by the fact that the actor James Garner was a part-owner of the team, and Garner of course played the title role in the “Maverick” television series.

9 Tokyo : hai :: Paris : __ : OUI

That would be “yes”.

10 Commuting options: Abbr. : RRS

Railroad (RR)

12 Weasley family owl : ERROL

Harry Potter, Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger are the principal characters in the “Harry Potter” series of fantasy novels by J. K. Rowling. The three are the best of friends.

13 Clapton classic : LAYLA

“Layla” is one of the great rock anthems of the seventies, released by Derek and the Dominos as a single in 1971. It is a masterpiece of composition, with the first half of the song a great vehicle for the guitar-playing talents of Eric Clapton. The second half is a beautifully melodic piano coda (a coda … taking up half the length of the track!). To top things off we have the “unplugged” version recorded by Clapton in 1992, a fabulous and inventive variation on the original.

Layla, you’ve got me on my knees.
Layla, I’m begging, darling please.
Layla, darling won’t you ease my worried mind.

14 County fair fare : CORN DOG

The hot dog on a stick (corn dog) dates back at least to 1947, and probably earlier. The name corn dog comes from the corn batter around the hot dog, and its resemblance on the stick to an ear of corn.

17 Instrument with a flared 60-Across : CLARINET
(60A See 17-Down : BELL)

The clarinet is a lovely-sounding instrument, isn’t it? The name “clarinet” comes from the Italian word “clarino” meaning “trumpet”, with the “-et” suffix indicating “small”.

19 Weather-sensitive hr. : ETA

Estimated time of arrival (ETA)

24 EPA-banned pesticide since 1972 : DDT

DDT is dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (don’t forget now!). DDT was used with great success to control disease-carrying insects during WWII, and when made available for use after the war it became by far the most popular pesticide. And then Rachel Carson published her famous book “Silent Spring”, suggesting there was a link between DDT and diminishing populations of certain wildlife. It was the public outcry sparked by the book, and reports of links between DDT and cancer, that led to the ban on the use of the chemical in 1972. That ban is touted as the main reason that the bald eagle was rescued from near extinction.

29 Danish seaport : ODENSE

Odense is a city in Denmark named after the Norse god Odin. One of the most famous sons of Odense was Hans Christian Andersen, the celebrated author of children’s stories.

31 Bear with a too-hard bed : PAPA

The story of “Goldilocks and the Three Bears” was first recorded in 1837 in England, although the narrative was around before it was actually written down. The original fairy tale was rather gruesome, but successive versions became more family-oriented. The character that eventually became Goldilocks was originally an elderly woman, and the three “nameless” bears became Papa Bear, Mama Bear and Baby Bear.

32 Storm relief org. : FEMA

Federal emergency management has been structured for over 200 years, but what we know today as the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) was created in 1979 in an Executive Order issued by President Jimmy Carter.

33 Region in the Eurasian Steppe : URAL

A steppe is a grassland that is devoid of trees, apart from those growing near rivers and lakes. The term “steppe” is Russian in origin, and is used to describe the geographical feature that extends across Eurasia. In South Africa, the same feature is called a “veld”, and in North America it is called a “prairie”.

34 Nam lead-in : VIET-

Vietnam is the country with the 13th-largest population in the word. It covers all of the eastern coast of the Indochinese Peninsula in Southeast Asia.

35 “Enchanted” film title girl : ELLA

“Ella Enchanted” is a fantasy novel written by Gail Carson Levine, and published in 1997. It is a retelling of the story of Cinderella, with lots of mythical creatures added. A film adaptation was released in 2004 that features Anne Hathaway in the title role.

37 Coconut sources : PALMS

The coconut is the fruit of the coconut palm. The term “coconut” comes from “coco” and “nut”, with “coco” being 16th-century Spanish and Portuguese for “head”, and more specifically “grinning face”. The three holes found in the base of a coconut shell might be said to resemble a human face.

42 Coconut Grove setting : MIAMI

Coconut Grove is an old neighborhood in Miami that is often referred to simply as “the Grove”. The name “Coconut Grove” dates back to 1873. The list of former residents of the Grove includes Madonna, Sylvester Stallone and LeBron James.

43 Jack Reacher creator Lee __ : CHILD

Lee Child is the pen name of British thriller writer Jim Grant. The hero of Child’s stories is an American ex-military policeman called Jack Reacher. The novel “One Shot” was adapted for the big screen as “Jack Reacher”, which was released in 2012 with Tom Cruise in the title role.

45 Russo of “The Intern” : RENE

The very talented actress Rene Russo is a native of Burbank, California. Russo went to highschool (with actor/director Ron Howard), but dropped out in tenth grade. At seventeen, she was given the opportunity to train as a model and within a very short time appeared on the cover of “Vogue”. As her modelling jobs slowed down in her early thirties, Russo made a career change and studied theater and acting. I am so glad she did, as Rene Russo is one of my favorite actresses …

“The Intern” is an entertaining comedy released in 2015 starring Robert De Niro in the title role, a 70-year-old retired executive who joins a senior citizen intern program. De Niro’s young boss is played by Anne Hathaway. The initial plan had been to cast Michael Caine and Tina Fey as leads, but things worked out just fine with the “replacements”, I’d say …

46 Fruity soda : FANTA

The soft drink named “Fanta” has quite an interesting history. As WWII approached, the Coca-Cola plant in Germany had trouble obtaining the ingredients it needed to continue production of the cola beverage, so the plant manager decided to create a new drink from what was available. The new beverage was built around whey (leftover from cheese production) and pomace (left over after juice has been extracted from fruit). The inventor asked his colleagues to use their “imagination” (“Fantasie” in German) and come up with a name for the drink, so they piped up “Fanta!”

47 Development areas : UTERI

“Uterus” (plural “uteri”) is the Latin word for “womb”.

49 Compressed video format : MPEG

The Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) was established in 1988 to set standards for audio and video compression. The standards they’ve come up with use the acronym “MPEG”.

54 Celebrity chef Bobby : FLAY

Bobby Flay is a celebrity chef who has hosted several shows on the Food Network. Flay is also an Iron Chef on the show “Iron Chef America”, which also airs on the Food Network.

55 Apple.com array : MACS

Macintosh (also “Mac”) is a line of computers from Apple Inc. The first Mac was introduced in 1984, and I remember someone showing me one at work in those early days of personal computing. There was a piece of white plastic connected to the main computer by a cord, and I was amazed when the guy showed me that it controlled where the cursor was on the screen. My colleague told me that this lump of plastic was called “a mouse” …

60 Louisville Sluggers, e.g. : BATS

Louisville Slugger is a brand of baseball bat manufactured by the Hillerich & Bradsby Company in Louisville, Kentucky. The famous bat is made of Northern White Ash grown on the New York/Pennsylvania border. These ash forests used by the company are threatened by the emerald ash borer which is moving closer and closer every year. There are already plans in place to replace the traditional wood used in the bat as the assumption is that the source of ash will succumb to infestation.

61 Golf’s “Big Easy” Ernie : ELS

Ernie Els is a South African golfer. Els a big guy but he has an easy fluid golf swing that has earned him the nickname “The Big Easy”. He is a former World No. 1 and has won four majors: the US Open (1994 & 1997) and the British Open (2002 & 2012).

63 Aquarium favorite : TETRA

The neon tetra is a freshwater fish that is native to parts of South America. The tetra is a very popular aquarium fish and millions are imported into the US every year. Almost all of the imported tetras are farm-raised in Asia and very few come from their native continent.

69 Matter of fact : DATUM

Our word “data” (singular “datum”) comes from the Latin “datum” meaning “given”. The idea is that data are “things given”.

73 __ Mawr College : BRYN

Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania is a women’s liberal arts school that was founded in 1885. Bryn Mawr was the first women’s university in the nation to offer graduate education through to a PhD. While the undergraduate program is open only to females, the school opened up the postgraduate program to males in 1931.

79 Sch. with a Phoenix campus : ASU

Arizona State University (ASU) has a long history, and was founded as the Tempe Normal School for the Arizona Territory in 1885. The athletic teams of ASU used to be known as the Normals, then the Bulldogs, and since 1946 they’ve been called the Sun Devils.

80 Wild way to run : AMOK

The phrase “to run amok” (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for “attacking furiously”, “amuk”. The word “amok” was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were “frenzied”. Given Malaya’s troubled history, the natives probably had good reason for that frenzy …

82 Former “Fashion Emergency” host : EMME

Emme is the highest-paid plus-size model in the world. Emme was born Melissa Miller in New York City, and was raised in Saudi Arabia.

“Fashion Emergency” is a reality TV show that originally aired on E!

84 19-y’ar-old comics character : LI’L ABNER

“Li’l Abner” was created and drawn by Al Capp for over 43 years starting in 1934. Al Capp stopped producing the strip in 1977, largely due to illness (he died from emphysema two years later). As the strip finished up, he went so far as to apologize to his long-standing fans, saying that he should have stopped 3-4 years earlier as he felt that the quality of his work had gone down in those latter years. The title character’s full name is “Li’l Abner Yokum”.

89 “A Death in the Family” author : AGEE

James Agee was a noted American film critic and screenwriter. Agee wrote an autobiographical novel “A Death in the Family” that won him his Pulitzer in 1958, albeit posthumously. He was also one of the screenwriters for the 1951 classic movie “The African Queen”.

99 2009 Tony-winner “Billy __ the Musical” : ELLIOT

“Billy Elliot” is best known in North America as a stage musical, one first produced in 2005. The musical is based on a British drama film that was released in 2000. “Billy Elliot” is all about an 11-year-old boy who lives in a coal mining town in the north of England and the hostility that the boy faces when he decides to learn ballet.

100 Site of Arizona’s Red Rock State Park : SEDONA

I’ve been to Red Rock State Park near Sedona several times, and it is a lovely place to visit. I read somewhere that there is a guided moonlight hike available, a 2½-hour guided trek that takes in sunset and moonrise. It’s on my list of things to do …

101 Type that can’t stay off the grass? : STONER

“Stoner” is a slang term for someone who is habitually intoxicated by alcohol or drugs.

105 Kidney-related : RENAL

Something described as renal is related to the kidneys. “Ren” is the Latin word for “kidney”.

106 Co-star of Betty, Rue and Estelle : BEA

Actress Bea Arthur’s most famous roles were on television, as the lead in the “All in the Family” spin-off “Maude” and as Dorothy Zbornak in “The Golden Girls”. Arthur also won a Tony for playing Vera Charles on stage in the original cast of “Mame” in 1966, two years after she played Yente the matchmaker in the original cast of “Fiddler on the Roof”.

“The Golden Girls” is a sitcom that originally aired in the eighties and nineties. The show features Bea Arthur, Betty White, Rue McClanahan and Estelle Getty as four older woman who share as house in Miami.

110 Case workers: Abbr. : ATTS

Attorney (att.)

114 Swiffer product : MOP

Swiffer is a brand of cleaning products introduced by Procter & Gamble in 1999. The mainstays of the Swiffer cleaning system are the Swiffer WetJet mop and the Swiffer Sweeper.

115 Soul, to Sartre : AME

Jean-Paul Sartre was a leading French philosopher, as well as a writer and political activist. Sartre also served with the French army during WWII and spent nine months as a prisoner of war having been captured by German troops. He was one of the few people to have been awarded a Nobel Prize and to have then refused to accept it. Sartre was named winner of the prize for Literature in 1964, for his first novel “Nausea”. Before his win, Sartre knew that his name was on the list of nominees so he wrote to the Nobel Institute and asked to be withdrawn from consideration. The letter somehow went unread, so he found himself having to refuse the award after he had been selected.

117 Author of macabre tales : POE

The celebrated American writer Edgar Allan Poe was born “Edgar Poe” in 1809 in Boston. Poe’s father abandoned Edgar and his two siblings after the death of their mother. As a result, Edgar was taken into the home of the Allan family in Richmond Virginia. His foster parents gave the future author the name “Edgar Allan Poe”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Informal demand for propriety : ACT NICE!
8 Choice bit : MORSEL
14 Group with similar interests : CIRCLE
20 “I always lie,” e.g. : PARADOX
21 Illinois city west of Chicago : AURORA
22 Filled, folded fare : OMELET
23 Warning during a snowstorm : TRAVEL ADVISORY
25 Wyndham-owned chain : RAMADA
26 Seashore raptor : ERNE
27 Watch readout abbr. : LCD
28 Discontinuation phrase : NO LONGER
30 Quote qualifier : [SIC]
31 Last stroke, usually : PUTT
32 Octane booster : FUEL ADDITIVE
36 Disc golf starting points : TEEPADS
38 German title : HERR
39 Geological stretch : EON
40 Goose egg : NIL
41 Wild way to go : APE
42 NYC tourist attraction : MOMA
43 Slim predatory swimmer : CONGER EEL
46 High naval rank : FULL ADMIRAL
50 Doesn’t need : HAS
51 Jazz singer Jones : ETTA
52 Physicist’s study : ATOM
53 “Chopped” utensil : PAN
54 On-call volunteer, perhaps : FIREMAN
57 Reported story : NEWS ITEM
60 See 17-Down : BELL
62 Source of a draft : ALE TAP
66 A third of nove : TRE
67 One who can’t put down the phone? : DIGITAL ADDICT
71 Vichy vacation time : ETE
72 Studio apartment accommodation : AIR BED
74 Crafts website : ETSY
75 Indian brew : ASSAM TEA
77 “The Blues Brothers” fashion accessories : RAY-BANS
80 Made a fast stop? : ATE
81 Like some folklore : ORAL
82 “David Copperfield” girl : EM’LY
85 Student leader? : ESS
86 Founding Father found in a bar? : SAMUEL ADAMS
90 Debate focal point : MAIN ISSUE
93 Senior’s highlight : PROM
94 Eligibility factor : AGE
95 Big bucks, briefly : MIL
96 Aloha shirt go-with : LEI
97 Truck maker with a bulldog logo : MACK
98 Casual Friday adjective : TIELESS
102 Common login component : EMAIL ADDRESS
106 Eliot title hero : BEDE
107 Disappoint, with “down” : LET
108 Arranged, as a deal : BROKERED
109 Put the kibosh on : END
110 Brad’s role in “Inglourious Basterds” : ALDO
111 Hat of Ecuadorian origin, oddly : PANAMA
113 Shelter mission : ANIMAL ADOPTION
118 She outwitted a witch : GRETEL
119 Puget Sound city : TACOMA
120 Like candy canes : TWO-TONE
121 Not easily ruffled : SERENE
122 Angled : SLOPED
123 Poor Yelp rating : ONE STAR

Down

1 Most fitting : APTEST
2 King’s first published novel : CARRIE
3 Daze : TRANCE
4 Cathedral section : NAVE
5 Ending with fluor- : -IDE
6 Conspired : COLLUDED
7 Calls for : EXACTS
8 Big D hoops pro : MAV
9 Tokyo : hai :: Paris : __ : OUI
10 Commuting options: Abbr. : RRS
11 With less delay : SOONER
12 Weasley family owl : ERROL
13 Clapton classic : LAYLA
14 County fair fare : CORN DOG
15 “Just think … ” : IMAGINE …
16 Held another session : REMET
17 Instrument with a flared 60-Across : CLARINET
18 Headed up : LED
19 Weather-sensitive hr. : ETA
24 EPA-banned pesticide since 1972 : DDT
29 Danish seaport : ODENSE
31 Bear with a too-hard bed : PAPA
32 Storm relief org. : FEMA
33 Region in the Eurasian Steppe : URAL
34 Nam lead-in : VIET-
35 “Enchanted” film title girl : ELLA
37 Coconut sources : PALMS
38 Road warning : HORN
42 Coconut Grove setting : MIAMI
43 Jack Reacher creator Lee __ : CHILD
44 Stroked tool : OAR
45 Russo of “The Intern” : RENE
46 Fruity soda : FANTA
47 Development areas : UTERI
48 Farther down : LOWER
49 Compressed video format : MPEG
54 Celebrity chef Bobby : FLAY
55 Apple.com array : MACS
56 Resort near Snowbird : ALTA
58 Planning session product : IDEA
59 Fairly large, sumwise : TIDY
60 Louisville Sluggers, e.g. : BATS
61 Golf’s “Big Easy” Ernie : ELS
63 Aquarium favorite : TETRA
64 Subs aren’t on it : A-TEAM
65 Sounds of thunder : PEALS
68 Far from relaxed : TENSE
69 Matter of fact : DATUM
70 “So that’s it!” : I SEE!
73 __ Mawr College : BRYN
76 Pose in fancy clothes, say : MODEL
78 Abutting : BESIDE
79 Sch. with a Phoenix campus : ASU
80 Wild way to run : AMOK
82 Former “Fashion Emergency” host : EMME
83 Severely harm : MAIM
84 19-y’ar-old comics character : LI’L ABNER
86 Seaweed wrap purveyors : SPAS
87 Hammer-throw trajectories : ARCS
88 Gave up, as arms : LAID DOWN
89 “A Death in the Family” author : AGEE
91 It’s a bad sign : ILL OMEN
92 Broad-leafed maritime plant : SEA KALE
97 Doc : MEDICO
98 Look after : TEND TO
99 2009 Tony-winner “Billy __ the Musical” : ELLIOT
100 Site of Arizona’s Red Rock State Park : SEDONA
101 Type that can’t stay off the grass? : STONER
103 Ready to explode : IRATE
104 Mild oaths : DRATS
105 Kidney-related : RENAL
106 Co-star of Betty, Rue and Estelle : BEA
110 Case workers: Abbr. : ATTS
111 Some movie ratings : PGS
112 “All bets __ off” : ARE
114 Swiffer product : MOP
115 Soul, to Sartre : AME
116 Youth found in this puzzle’s seven longest answers : LAD
117 Author of macabre tales : POE

8 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 12 May 19, Sunday”

  1. LAT: 25:36, no errors. Newsday: 20:13, one very stupid one-square error. WP: 27:57, two stupid one-square errors. Universal: 21:00, no errors. Did all of these with a serious time constraint: it’s odd how feeling you have to work fast makes you slower and more error-prone … 😜.

    1. @Jack. You know. Act nice – don’t be a jerk. This was my fastest Sunday ever. I guess Happy Mother’s Day.

  2. This uninspired puzzle, awash in product names (Fanta, Mack, RayBan, Samuel Adams, Swiffer, etc) and some 50 other proper nouns, was a slog — all for the thematic “payoff” of two-word terms, with the first word ending in L and the second starting with AD, to spell … LAD. Seven times. Yawn.

  3. 28 minutes, 5 seconds, 2 errors at the junction of RRS/AURORA. Figured RRS must be RDS (roads) or RTS (routes), if we’re talking about commuting options. Again a proper (city) name ruins an otherwise clean sheet.

    Overall, I felt this puzzle was trying trick me (successfully, as it turns out), so it wasn’t at all enjoyable. And the theme pay-off was a total damp squib. Disappointing.

  4. Not an inspiring puzzle at all. Makes me think of our old friend Merl. He left us too soon and I was just starting to do crosswords at that time. Alas. I maybe burning out on them just like one other person mentioned a few days ago.

  5. 25:47. A little late to the party today.

    I liked this puzzle mainly because of the SAMUEL ADAMS reference. It is a great beer, but it’s so filling I cannot drink more than a couple of them without filling up…the horror!

    CORN DOGS were just the beginning. At the State Fair in Texas every year they have (among other things) deep fried twinkies and yes…deep fried butter sticks for those who are desperate to clog their arteries , I presume.

    Kay – Don’t get discouraged. It’s just a fun hobby/pastime. When it gets you aggravated, you’re taking it too seriously. Just my $0.02.

    Best –

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