LA Times Crossword 19 May 19, Sunday

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Constructed by: Ross Trudeau
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Elimination

Themed answer are common phrases from which “EL” has been ELIMINATED:

  • 22A Cracked river barriers? : DAMS IN DISTRESS (from “Damsels in distress”)
  • 40A What a generous mechanic might do after a wreck? : THROW IN THE TOW (from “throw in the towel”)
  • 50A David or Saul? : JEW IN THE CROWN (from “jewel in the crown”)
  • 68A Request to the local marriage oath writer? : CAN I BUY A VOW (from “can I buy a vowel?”)
  • 89A Variety headline for director Lee’s U.S. debut? : ANG’S IN AMERICA (from “Angels in America”)
  • 97A Magician’s tote? : EVERYTHING BAG (from “everything bagel”)
  • 118A Talks about woks? : PAN DISCUSSIONS (from “panel discussion”)

Bill’s time: 19m 28s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 __ vu : DEJA

“Déjà vu” is French for “already seen”.

5 Command from Kirk : BEAM ME UP!

There’s a story (not sure if it’s really true) about an Irishman who was being sentenced in the dock in a Dublin courtroom years ago. When asked by the judge, “Do you have anything to say before I pass sentence?”, the convicted man took out a pack of cigarettes from his pocket, flipped open the cardboard lid and brought the pack to his lips. He then said, “Beam me up, Scotty”.

13 Drink word for “strained” : COLADA

“Piña colada” is a Spanish term that translates into “strained pineapple”. The piña colada cocktail was introduced in the Caribe Hilton San Juan in 1954, and since 1978 it has been the official beverage of Puerto Rico. Yum …

22 Cracked river barriers? : DAMS IN DISTRESS (from “damsels in distress”)

A damsel is a young woman, and often a lady of noble birth. The term “damsel” came into English from the Old French “dameisele”, which had the same meaning. The modern French term is “demoiselle”, which in turn is related to the term of address “mademoiselle”.

28 “Yesterday!” : STAT!

The exact etymology of “stat”, a term meaning “immediately” in the medical profession, seems to have been lost in the mists of time. It probably comes from the Latin “statim” meaning “to a standstill, immediately”. A blog reader has helpfully suggested that the term may also come from the world of laboratory analysis, where the acronym STAT stands for “short turn-around time”.

33 Org. with quarantine authority : CDC

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is based in Atlanta, Georgia. The CDC started out life during WWII as the Office of National Defense Malaria Control Activities. The CDC worries about much more than malaria these days …

35 Western alliances : POSSES

Our word “posse” comes from an Anglo-Latin term from the early 15th century “posse comitatus” meaning “the force of the county”.

37 How the satisfied stand : PAT

To stand pat is to resist change. The term comes from the game of poker, in which one stands pat if one keeps one’s hand as is, not drawing any extra cards.

40 What a generous mechanic might do after a wreck? : THROW IN THE TOW (from “throw in the towel”)

The expression “to throw in the towel” means “to give up”, and of course comes from the world of boxing. In boxing, when someone in the corner feels that a fight needs to be stopped, he or she throws a towel into the ring and accepts the loss. Back in the 1700s, it wasn’t a towel that was thrown into the ring, but rather a sponge.

53 “Sunday Morning” channel : CBS

“CBS News Sunday Morning” has been on air since 1979, when it was anchored by journalist Charles Kuralt. Charles Osgood took over as host in 1994, and he was replaced by Jane Pauley in 2016.

55 __-de-sac : CUL

Even though “cul-de-sac” can indeed mean “bottom of the bag” in French, the term cul-de-sac is of English origin (the use of “cul” in French is actually quite rude). The term was introduced in aristocratic circles at a time when it was considered very fashionable to speak French. Dead-end streets in France are usually signposted with just a symbol and no accompanying words, but if words are included they are “voie sans issue”, meaning “way without exit”.

57 Greek X : CHI

The Greek letter “chi” is the one that looks like our letter X.

62 Chipotle alternative : QDOBA

Qdoba is a chain of casual restaurants specializing in Mexican cuisine. The chain started out in 1995 with the name Zuma Fresh Mexican Grill, then Z-Teca Mexican Grill in 1997. Both “Zuma” and “Z-Teca” were challenged by establishments that already had similar names, and so the company settled on Qdoba Mexican Grill in 1999, a completely invented moniker.

Chipotle Mexican Grill is a chain of casual dining restaurants that was founded and is now headquartered in Denver, Colorado. For several years, the major investor in Chipotle was McDonald’s. The chain is named for the smoke-dried jalapeño called a “chipotle”.

65 DNC chair Tom : PEREZ

Tom Perez was elected chairman of the Democratic National Committee in 2017, after having served as Secretary of Labor for four years in the Obama administration.

66 Pittance : SOU

A sou is an old French coin. We use the term “sou” to mean “an almost worthless amount”.

72 Some dishwashers : GES

The General Electric Company is usually referred to simply as “GE”. One of the precursor companies to GE was Edison General Electric, founded in 1890 by the inventor Thomas Edison. What we know today as GE was formed two years later when Edison merged his company with Charles Coffin’s Thomson-Houston Electric Company. In 1896, GE was selected as one of the 12 companies listed on the newly formed Dow Jones Industrial Average. GE was the last the original 12 to survive on that list, being replaced by Walgreens in 2018. I spent over ten years with GE at the beginning of my working career, and in fact it was GE that asked me to transfer to the US from Ireland back in the 1980s …

73 Gap rival : J.CREW

J.Crew is a clothing and accessory retailer. Never been there, but I’ve seen the name turn up on credit card statements somehow …

76 Odist’s inspiration : ERATO

In Greek mythology, Erato was the Muse of lyric poetry. She is often depicted with a wreath of myrtle and roses, and playing a lyre.

79 Best Female Athlete, e.g. : ESPY

The ESPY Awards are a creation of the ESPN sports television network. One difference with similarly named awards in the entertainment industry is that ESPY winners are chosen solely based on viewer votes.

80 Eur. country in the Olympics since 1992 : CRO

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) uses its own set of three-letter abbreviations for country names, e.g. HUN (Hungary) and CRO (Croatia).

82 Dulles alternative : REAGAN

Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA) is located in Arlington, Virginia. It is one of the two main airports serving the nation’s capital, along with Washington Dulles. Washington National opened for business in 1941, and was dedicated to President Ronald Reagan in 1998.

Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD) opened for business in 1962. It was named for John Foster Dulles, who served as Secretary of State in the Eisenhower administration. When it opened, Dulles used the airport code “DIA”, standing for Dulles International Airport. However, “IAD” was often confused with “DCA” when handwritten, with the latter being the code for nearby Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport. So, Dulles adopted the IAD code letters in 1968.

89 Variety headline for director Lee’s U.S. debut? : ANG’S IN AMERICA (from “Angels in America”)

Taiwanese director Ang Lee sure has directed a mixed bag of films, mixed in terms of genre but not in terms of quality. He was at the helm for such classics as “Sense & Sensibility” (my personal favorite), “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”, “Hulk”, “Brokeback Mountain” and “Life of Pi”.

“Angels in America” is a two-part play by Tony Kushner, part one of which premiered in 1991. The play explores AIDS and homosexuality in the context of America in the 1980s. “Angels in America” was adapted into a miniseries of the same name in 2003 by HBO.

93 With 66-Down, when Lady Macbeth says, “Leave all the rest to me” : ACT I …
(66D See 93-Across : … SCENE V)

Lady Macbeth is an evil and treacherous woman in William Shakespeare’s “Macbeth”. The most famous line uttered by Lady Macbeth has to be:

Out, damned spot! Out, I say!

In this line, Lady Macbeth is frantically rubbing at her hand trying to get rid of an imaginary bloodstain left there after she committed four murders.

95 Nonprofit reporting app : AP NEWS

The Associated Press (AP) is a news agency based in New York City. AP is a non-profit cooperative that was set up by five New York newspapers in 1846 to share the cost of transmitting news. Nowadays, AP recoups most of its cost by selling news stories and related materials to newspapers all around the world, mostly outside of the US.

97 Magician’s tote? : EVERYTHING BAG (from “everything bagel”)

An everything bagel has everything on it, i.e. a variety of traditional seasonings like poppy seeds, salt, and sesame seeds.

101 Clancy’s “The __ of All Fears” : SUM

“The Sum of All Fears” is a 1991 Tom Clancy novel that features his hero Jack Ryan. It’s all about Ryan battling East German terrorists who are intent on bringing the US and USSR into a nuclear war. The title is inspired by a quotation from Winston Churchill:

Why, you may take the most gallant sailor, the most intrepid airman or the most audacious soldier, put them at a table together—what do you get? The sum of their fears.

104 “The Yodeling Cowgirl” in “Toy Story” films : JESSIE

Jessie the Yodeling Cowgirl” is a character in the “Toy Story” series of films who is voiced by Joan Cusack. Jessie develops a romantic relationship with Buzz Lightyear.

105 Novelist Rand : AYN

Ayn Rand was a Russian-American novelist born Alisa Rosenbaum. Her two best known works are her novels “The Fountainhead” published in 1943 and “Atlas Shrugged” from 1957. Back in 1951, Rand moved from Los Angeles to New York City. Soon after, she gathered a group of admirers around her with whom she discussed philosophy and shared drafts of her magnum opus, “Atlas Shrugged”. This group called itself “The Collective”, and one of the founding members was none other than future Federal Reserve chairman, Alan Greenspan. Rand described herself as “right-wing” politically, and both she and her novel “Atlas Shrugged” have become inspirations for the American conservatives, and the Tea Party in particular.

106 Rodeo contestants, at times : ROPERS

“Rodeo” is a Spanish word that is usually translated into English as “round up”.

112 It’s dropped for emphasis : MIC

A mic drop takes place when a performer has done particularly well and decides to celebrate by throwing or dropping the microphone to the floor. That doesn’t seem to happen at the performances I tend to frequent …

116 Pioneer 35mm cameras : LEICAS

Leica is a German optics company that is famous for production of lenses and cameras. The 1913 Leica was the first practical camera that could use 35mm film, a size chosen because it was already the standard for film used in motion pictures.

118 Talks about woks? : PAN DISCUSSIONS (from “panel discussion”)

“Wok” is a Cantonese word, and the name for the frying pan now used in many Asian cuisines.

122 Shmoo creator : AL CAPP

The Shmoo is a cartoon creature who first appeared in the Al Capp comic strip “Li’l Abner” in 1948. Apparently, shmoos are delicious to eat, and love to be eaten. They’ll even jump into the frying pan themselves!

123 Tapered cigar : PERFECTO

A perfecto is an irregularly shaped cigar. It is narrow at the ends and bulges in the middle.

124 __ Brasi, “The Godfather” enforcer : LUCA

Luca Brasi is one of Don Corleone’s most loyal “enforcers” in Mario Puzo’s novel “The Godfather”. Brasi comes to a violent end, garroted while his hand is pinned to a wooden bar with a knife. Famously, the Corleone family learn of his demise when they receive Brasi’s bulletproof vest wrapped around dead fish. The message is that he “sleeps with the fishes”. In the big screen adaptation of “The Godfather”, Luca Brasi is played by ex-wrestler and professional bodyguard Lenny Montana. The role launched a very successful television character-acting career for Montana.

125 Frank : WIENER

What we call a wiener in this country is known as a Vienna sausage in Germany. It was first produced by a butcher from Frankfurt who was living in Vienna, hence the name “Wiener”, which is German for “of Vienna”. Paradoxically, the same sausage is called a Frankfurter in Vienna, as it was created by someone from Frankfurt. It’s all very confusing …

The frankfurter sausage that is typically used in a North American hot dog get its name from Frankfurter Würstchen. The latter is a German sausage that is prepared by boiling in water, just like a hot dog frank.

Down

1 Some diaper changers : DADS

“Diaper” is another word that I had to learn when I moved to America. What are called “diapers” over here, we call “nappies” back in Ireland. The term “diaper” is actually the original term that was used in England for the garment, where “diaper” referred to the cloth that was used. The term “diaper” was brought to the New World where it stuck. Back in Britain, “diaper” was displaced by the word “nappy”, a diminutive of “napkin”.

2 Panache : ELAN

Our word “élan” was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours, i.e “style, flair”.

Someone exhibiting panache is showing dash and verve, and perhaps has a swagger. “Panache” is a French word used for a plume of feathers, especially one in a hat.

3 1607 settlement : JAMESTOWN

Jamestown in the Colony of Virginia was the first English settlement in what was to become the United States. The settlement was established as James Fort in 1607, and served as capital of the colony from 1616 to 1699. Jamestown started to decline after a fire in the statehouse in 1698 that caused the capital to relocate to Williamsburg. The town was eventually abandoned and today exists as a heritage site.

6 Spooky : ELDRITCH

Something described as eldritch is wierd or ghastly. The term “eldritch” dates back to about 1500, with some saying that it is somehow related to “elf”.

7 Like about 25% of Russia’s population : ASIAN

Over 75% of Russia’s land mass lies in Asia, but the area is home to less than 25% of Russia’s population. The vast majority of Russia’s people reside in the European part of the country.

8 Part of MVP : MOST

MVP (most valuable player)

9 “The A-Team” muscle : MR T

“The A-Team” is an action television series that originally ran in the eighties. The A-Team was a group of ex-US special forces personnel who became mercenaries. Star of the show was Hollywood actor George Peppard (as “Hannibal” Smith), ably assisted by Mr. T (as “B.A.” Baracus) and Robert Vaughn (as Hunt Stockwell).

11 World Heritage Site org. : UNESCO

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization is better known by the acronym “UNESCO”. UNESCO’s mission is help build peace in the world using programs focused on education, the sciences, culture, communication and information. The organization’s work is aimed in particular at Africa, and gender equalization. UNESCO also administers a World Heritage Site program that designates and helps conserve sites of outstanding cultural or natural importance to humanity across the world.

16 College Bd. result using a 1-to-5 scale : AP-TEST SCORE

The Advanced Placement (AP) program offers college-level courses to kids who are still in high school. After being tested at the end of the courses, successful students receive credits that count towards a college degree.

24 Delicious : SAPID

Something that is “sapid” is “tasty, savory”. The opposite to “sapid” is “insipid”, meaning “without taste, bland”.

29 Musical timbre : TONE COLOR

The timbre of a sound is its distinguishing quality above and beyond its volume and pitch. “Timbre” was used in Old French to mean “sound of a bell”.

33 French sweetie : CHERI

“Chéri” is a form of familiar address in French, meaning “dear”. “Chéri” is the form used when talking to a male, and “chérie” when addressing a female.

34 Crab Key villain : DR NO

“Dr. No” may have been the first film in the wildly successful James Bond franchise, but it was the sixth novel in the series of books penned by Ian Fleming. Fleming was inspired to write the story after reading the Fu Manchu tales by Sax Rohmer. If you’ve read the Rohmer books or seen the films, you’ll recognize the similarities between the characters Dr. Julius No and Fu Manchu.

37 Lunchbox staples, initially : PBJS

Peanut butter and jelly (PB&J or PBJ)

38 Protected while sailing : ALEE

Alee is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing aweather.

40 Silicon Valley field : TECH

The Santa Clara Valley, located just a few miles from me at the south of San Francisco Bay, is better known as “Silicon Valley”. The term “Silicon Valley” dates back to 1971 when it was apparently first used in a weekly trade newspaper called “Electronic News” in articles written by journalist Don Hoefler.

41 Ryder of “Stranger Things” : WINONA

The Hollywood actress Winona Ryder’s real name is Winona Horowitz. Ryder was born near the town of Winona in Minnesota, from which she got her name. Her success on the screen has garnered as much media attention as her life off the screen. The papers had a field day when she was arrested in 2001 on a shoplifting charge followed by a very public court appearance. Her engagement with Johnny Depp in the early nineties was another media frenzy. Depp had “Winona Forever” tattooed on his arm, which he had changed after the breakup to “Wino Forever”. A man with a sense of humor …

“Stranger Things” is a sci-fi horror TV show made for Netflix that aired its first season in 2016. I don’t do horror, and so haven’t seen it …

42 Works : OPUSES

The Latin for “work” is “opus”, with the plural being “opera”. We sometimes also use the plural “opuses” in English.

43 Chopin work : WALTZ

Frédéric Chopin was a Polish composer who spent most of his life in France. He was most famous for his piano works in the Romantic style. Chopin was a sickly man and died quite young, at 39. For many of his final years he had a celebrated and tempestuous relationship with the French author George Sand (the nom de plume of the Baroness Dudevant). Those years with Sand may have been turbulent, but they were very productive in terms of musical composition.

45 Creamy soups : BISQUES

A traditional bisque is a creamy soup made from crustaceans such as lobster, crab or shrimp. The term “bisque” probably comes from the Bay of “Biscay” off the west coast of France, a nod to the French origin of the soup and its seafood content. So, if you see a vegetable “bisque” in a restaurant, you’ll know that the term is being misused …

47 Mends, as a rattan chair : RECANES

Rattan is the name of a large number of species of palms, all of which look less like trees and more like vines. The woody stems are used for making cane furniture.

51 Stark in “Game of Thrones” : NED

Ned Stark is the protagonist in George R. R. Martin’s fantasy novel “A Game of Thrones”, although his character doesn’t exactly come out on top by the end of the story. Stark is played by actor Sean Bean in the HBO television adaptation of the novel.

52 Muffet fare : WHEY

“Little Miss Muffet sat on a tuffet eating her curds and whey”, in the popular nursery rhyme. A tuffet is a low seat or a footstool, another word for a pouffe or a hassock. When milk curdles it separates into two parts, the solid curds and the liquid whey. Then “along came a spider and sat down beside her”.

61 Creations with colorful blocks : LEGO ART

Lego produces some wonderful specialized sets with which you can build models of celebrated structures, including:

  • The Statue of Liberty (2,882 pieces)
  • The Sydney Opera House (2,989 pieces)
  • The Eiffel Tower (3,428 pieces)
  • Tower Bridge (4,295 pieces)
  • The Taj Mahal (5,922 pieces)

70 __ Mawr College : BRYN

Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania is a women’s liberal arts school that was founded in 1885. Bryn Mawr was the first women’s university in the nation to offer graduate education through to a PhD. While the undergraduate program is open only to females, the school opened up the postgraduate program to males in 1931.

73 Scrabble 8-pointer : J TILE

The game of Scrabble has been produced in many international versions, and each of these editions has its own tile distribution to suit the local language. For example, in English we have two tiles worth ten points: one “Q” and one “Z”. If you play the game in French then there are five tiles worth ten points: one “K”, one “W”, one “X”, one “Y” and one “Z”.

77 Driving aid : TEE

That would be golf.

80 It covers the House : C-SPAN

C-SPAN is a privately-funded, nonprofit cable channel that broadcasts continuous coverage of government proceedings.

83 Thin Mints seller : GIRL SCOUT

Depending on which bakery makes the particular variety of Girl Scout cookie, the name can vary. For example, Little Brownie Bakers makes the Samoa cookies, while ABC Bakers uses the same recipe and calls the cookies Caramel deLites. The assumption is that these cookies have the exotic name of “Samoa” because they contain the tropical ingredients of coconut and cocoa. The most popular variety of Girl Scout cookie sold are Thin Mints.

84 Trendy berry : ACAI

Açaí (pronounced “ass-aye-ee”) is a palm tree native to Central and South America. The fruit has become very popular in recent years and its juice is a very fashionable addition to juice mixes and smoothies.

90 “Girls” Emmy nominee Hoffmann : GABY

Gaby Hoffmann started her career as a child actress with appearances in “Field of Dreams” and “Uncle Buck”. I remember her from “Sleepless in Seattle”, in which she played Jessica, the playmate to young Jonah who helps her friend fly from Seattle to New York City. More recently, Hoffman played Adam’s troubled sister on the hit comedy-drama “Girls”.

100 January birthstone : GARNET

Garnets are silicate minerals that come in many colors. However, the color that we call “garnet” is a dark red.

106 2014 Lizzie Borden portrayer Christina : RICCI

Christina Ricci is an American actress who found fame on the big screen at an early age, playing the very young Wednesday Addams in the 1991 movie version of “The Addams Family”.

Lizzie Borden was a resident of Fall River, Massachusetts who was tried and acquitted for the axe murders of her father and stepmother in 1892. After Borden was acquitted, the authorities decided not to charge anyone else with the murders, which contributed to Borden being ostracized by the citizens of Fall River. Despite being shunned by society, Borden lived out the rest of her days in Fall River. There’s a celebrated rhyme relating to the affair, which was used by children when skipping rope:

Lizzie Borden took an ax
And gave her mother forty whacks.
When she saw what she had done,
She gave her father forty-one.

107 Flight safety equipment? : RAILS

That would be a flight of stairs.

108 Crunchy side : SLAW

The term “coleslaw” is an Anglicized version of the Dutch name “koolsla”, which in itself is a shortened form of “Koolsalade” meaning “cabbage salad”.

112 Advanced teaching deg. : MSED

Master of Science in Education (M.S.Ed.)

114 Machu Picchu denizen : INCA

Machu Picchu is known as “The Lost City of the Incas”, and it can be visited on a mountain ridge in Peru, 50 miles northwest of the city of Cuzco in the southeast of the country. The name Machu Picchu means “old peak”. The Inca Trail to Machu Picchu originates about 50 miles from Cusco on the Urubamba River in Peru. It can take travelers about 5 days to trek the full length of the trail, passing through many Incan ruins before reaching the Sun Gate on Machu Picchu mountain. The trail was becoming greatly overused, forcing the Peruvian government to limit the number of people on the trail each day to 500. Book early …

115 Peter the Great, e.g. : TSAR

Peter the Great (aka “Peter I”) was perhaps the most successful of the Romanov tsars, and was famous for modernizing Russia and expanding the country’s sphere of influence, creating the Russian Empire. He ruled from 1682 until his death in 1725.

119 Dr. who 111-Down : DRE
(111D See 119-Down : RAPS)

“Dr. Dre” is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. Dr. Dre is known for his own singing career as well as for producing records and starting the careers of others such Snoop Dogg, Eminem and 50 Cent.

120 “__ tree falls … ” : IF A

If a tree falls in a forest and nobody’s around to hear it, does it make a sound? Answers on a postcard please …

121 USCG reception : SOS

The combination of three dots – three dashes – three dots, is a Morse signal first introduced by the German government as a standard distress call in 1905. The sequence is remembered as the letters SOS (three dots – pause – three dashes – pause – three dots). That said, in the emergency signal there is no pause between the dots and dashes, so “SOS” is really only a mnemonic. Similarly, the phrases “Save Our Souls” and “Save Our Ship” are also mnemonics that were introduced after the SOS signal was adopted.

The US Coast Guard (USCG) has the distinction of being the country’s oldest continuous seagoing service. The USCG was founded as the Revenue Cutter Service by Alexander Hamilton in 1790.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 __ vu : DEJA
5 Command from Kirk : BEAM ME UP!
13 Drink word for “strained” : COLADA
19 [Sigh] : [ALAS]
20 Unsuccessful competitors : ALSO-RANS
21 One-footed creature : UNIPED
22 Cracked river barriers? : DAMS IN DISTRESS (from “damsels in distress”)
25 Spiced up : ZESTED
26 Sign of contempt : SNEER
27 In a lab, it’s often white : RAT
28 “Yesterday!” : STAT!
30 Cart count : ITEMS
31 Pop by : STOP IN
33 Org. with quarantine authority : CDC
35 Western alliances : POSSES
37 How the satisfied stand : PAT
39 “Psych!” : NOT!
40 What a generous mechanic might do after a wreck? : THROW IN THE TOW (from “throw in the towel”)
44 Indistinct mass : BLOB
46 Deck-enclosing option : SCREEN
48 Brainchild : IDEA
49 Mani-pedi locale : SPA
50 David or Saul? : JEW IN THE CROWN (from “jewel in the crown”)
53 “Sunday Morning” channel : CBS
55 __-de-sac : CUL
56 Felt : SENSED
57 Greek X : CHI
58 Jolly syllables : HO! HO!
60 Words of defeat : I LOST
62 Chipotle alternative : QDOBA
64 Kind of artery : RENAL
65 DNC chair Tom : PEREZ
66 Pittance : SOU
68 Request to the local marriage oath writer? : CAN I BUY A VOW (from “can I buy a vowel?”)
72 Some dishwashers : GES
73 Gap rival : J.CREW
75 Memoir, for one : GENRE
76 Odist’s inspiration : ERATO
78 Rib : TEASE
79 Best Female Athlete, e.g. : ESPY
80 Eur. country in the Olympics since 1992 : CRO
82 Dulles alternative : REAGAN
86 Place to stay : INN
87 Business card no. : TEL
89 Variety headline for director Lee’s U.S. debut? : ANG’S IN AMERICA (from “Angels in America”)
92 Calf spot : LEG
93 With 66-Down, when Lady Macbeth says, “Leave all the rest to me” : ACT I …
95 Nonprofit reporting app : AP NEWS
96 Coal carrier : TRAM
97 Magician’s tote? : EVERYTHING BAG (from “everything bagel”)
101 Clancy’s “The __ of All Fears” : SUM
103 More-than-stretchy statement : LIE
104 “The Yodeling Cowgirl” in “Toy Story” films : JESSIE
105 Novelist Rand : AYN
106 Rodeo contestants, at times : ROPERS
108 Quiet order : SHUSH!
110 Run smoothly : PURR
112 It’s dropped for emphasis : MIC
113 Implied : TACIT
116 Pioneer 35mm cameras : LEICAS
118 Talks about woks? : PAN DISCUSSIONS (from “panel discussion”)
122 Shmoo creator : AL CAPP
123 Tapered cigar : PERFECTO
124 __ Brasi, “The Godfather” enforcer : LUCA
125 Frank : WIENER
126 Regular guys? : STEADIES
127 Headliner : STAR

Down

1 Some diaper changers : DADS
2 Panache : ELAN
3 1607 settlement : JAMESTOWN
4 Selling point : ASSET
5 Abolish : BAN
6 Spooky : ELDRITCH
7 Like about 25% of Russia’s population : ASIAN
8 Part of MVP : MOST
9 “The A-Team” muscle : MR T
10 Singer’s skill : EAR
11 World Heritage Site org. : UNESCO
12 Subtle “Over here!” : PSST!
13 Member of the fam : CUZ
14 Flexible lunch hour : ONEISH
15 Directory name : LISTEE
16 College Bd. result using a 1-to-5 scale : AP-TEST SCORE
17 Consider : DEEM
18 Throws in : ADDS
23 Golfer’s wedge, e.g. : IRON
24 Delicious : SAPID
29 Musical timbre : TONE COLOR
32 Ph.D.’s next hurdle : POSTDOC
33 French sweetie : CHERI
34 Crab Key villain : DR NO
36 Wild attempt : STAB
37 Lunchbox staples, initially : PBJS
38 Protected while sailing : ALEE
40 Silicon Valley field : TECH
41 Ryder of “Stranger Things” : WINONA
42 Works : OPUSES
43 Chopin work : WALTZ
45 Creamy soups : BISQUES
47 Mends, as a rattan chair : RECANES
51 Stark in “Game of Thrones” : NED
52 Muffet fare : WHEY
54 Nurse : SIP
59 “Try it” : HAVE ONE
61 Creations with colorful blocks : LEGO ART
63 Crunchy snack : BAGEL CHIP
64 Regret : RUE
66 See 93-Across : … SCENE V
67 Breakfast staple : ORANGE JUICE
69 Hurting : IN PAIN
70 __ Mawr College : BRYN
71 Gets ready to play : WARMS UP
73 Scrabble 8-pointer : J TILE
74 Rainy : WET
77 Driving aid : TEE
80 It covers the House : C-SPAN
81 Encircle : RING
83 Thin Mints seller : GIRL SCOUT
84 Trendy berry : ACAI
85 Finger : NAME
88 Has : EATS
90 “Girls” Emmy nominee Hoffmann : GABY
91 “Oh, that’s adorable!” : AW, SO CUTE!
94 Make a mess of, as traffic : TIE UP
98 Swipe again? : RESCAN
99 Slingshot feature : Y-SHAPE
100 January birthstone : GARNET
102 Queens squad : METS
106 2014 Lizzie Borden portrayer Christina : RICCI
107 Flight safety equipment? : RAILS
108 Crunchy side : SLAW
109 Port opener : HELI-
111 See 119-Down : RAPS
112 Advanced teaching deg. : MSED
114 Machu Picchu denizen : INCA
115 Peter the Great, e.g. : TSAR
117 Mar. arrival, in theory : SPR
119 Dr. who 111-Down : DRE
120 “__ tree falls … ” : IF A
121 USCG reception : SOS

16 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 19 May 19, Sunday”

  1. LAT: 29:28, no errors. Newsday: 18:05, no errors. Universal: 19:14, no errors. WP: 25:50, no errors; noticed that I forgot to work on last week’s WP meta (which is a good thing, I think; as a non-TV watcher, I’d have had little chance of solving it).

      1. @Glenn … “Morticia” is vaguely familiar, but it looked to me as if you had to remember a lot of other names before you got the letters to form that particular name? Maybe there was something in the clues for certain entries that made it easier to solve the thing? (As I said, I simply forgot to go back and look at the meta.)

        1. @Dave
          Yeah there was some (easy) Google work. Basically, the solution was to find the TV mom names for all the theme entries (MARCIABRADY = “Carol”) and then look for “one-off” words in the grid and the letters that were off spelled the contest answer.

  2. 1:29:48 with 3 errors…started out fast but really slowed down with too many “never heard ofs” like postdoc. And qdoba. Also never heard of Gaby Hoffman ,sorry Gaby

  3. Nearly 39 minutes before I gave up. Haven’t seen a grid with so many impossibly vague clues in recent memory. “Everything bagEL?” WTF is *that* referring to???? Some of these themes are just getting out of hand with their ability to really stretch things.

  4. The best thing I can say for myself today is all the boxes I filled were
    correct—but there were too many ones I left blank. Oh well,
    tomorrow is another day.

    But I agree J-tiles are worth 8.

  5. 82 across, Dulles alternative: Reagan – Congress’s arbitrary renaming Washington National Airport after Reagan was shameful. I lived there at the time.

    Local authorities have always had, and still have, the authority to name their own local airports. But the ’98 GOP Congress (the party of small government and local authority?) autocratically usurped local authority to rename National.

    This was part of an openly orchestrated campaign to rename as many things after Reagan as possible – literally in every state, county, city, village, and town. Even before the poor old guy was dead. Ghoulish.

    My fave was the Reagan Int’l Trade Center in DC that ran hugely over budget and way late. Ronnie woulda hated it.

  6. eldritch?? I had given up on the clue for ‘spooky’ after working through the crossword. I’m accustomed to some ‘creative’ responses given in these (especially lately, it seems), and found others almost as bad but was able to get them by finding the cross clues. With ‘spooky’ all my personally considered responses simply could not fit. YOUR response given to an online query was the same as my first option (eerie), but clearly it was NOT the response needed. Frustrating. Doesn’t anyone proof these?

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