LA Times Crossword 13 Jun 19, Thursday

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Constructed by: C.C. Burnikel
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Club Sandwiches

Themed answers include the names of golf CLUBS as hidden words:

  • 56A Layered lunch orders … or a hint to 16-, 24-, 34- and 48-Across : CLUB SANDWICHES
  • 16A Data-entering devices : INPUT TERMINALS (hiding “putter”)
  • 24A Like bread knives : SAW-EDGED (hiding “wedge”)
  • 34A August Wilhelmj’s arrangement of a movement from Bach’s “Orchestral Suite No. 3” : AIR ON THE G STRING (hiding “iron”)
  • 48A Part of the Texas/Oklahoma border : RED RIVER (hiding “driver”)

Bill’s time: 6m 14s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Story trajectories : ARCS

A story arc is a continuing storyline in say a television show that runs through a number of episodes. Story arcs are also found in comics, books, video games, and other forms of media.

9 Pulitzer columnist Maureen : DOWD

Maureen Dowd is a celebrated columnist for “The New York Times” as well as a best-selling author. Dowd won a Pulitzer for her columns about the Monica Lewinsky scandal.

15 Great Lake bordering four states : ERIE

Lake Erie is the fourth largest of the five Great Lakes by area (Lake Ontario is the smallest). The lake takes its name from the Erie tribe of Native Americans that used to live along its southern shore. Erie is the smallest of the Great Lakes by volume and the shallowest, something for which nearby residents must be quite grateful. Being relatively shallow, much of Erie freezes over part way through most winters putting an end to most of the lake-effect snow that falls in the snow belt extending from the lake’s edge.

19 Brouhahas : TO-DOS

“Brouhaha”, meaning “ado, stir”, was a French word that back in the 1550s meant “the cry of the devil disguised as clergy” . Wow!

20 Semi unit : TON

A “semi” is a “semi-trailer truck”. The vehicle is so called because it consists of a tractor and a half-trailer. The half-trailer is so called because it only has wheels on the back end, with the front supported by the tractor.

21 Document to protect confidential info: Abbr. : NDA

Non-disclosure agreement (NDA)

27 Chin-up targets, for short : LATS

The muscles known as the “lats” are the latissimi dorsi, and are the broadest muscles in the back. “Latissimus” is the Latin for “broadest” and “dorsum” is Latin for “back”.

29 Brontë heroine : EYRE

“Jane Eyre” is the celebrated novel written by Charlotte Brontë, under the pen name Currer Bell. The love story is perhaps represented by the oft-quoted opening lines of the last chapter, “Reader, I married him”. There is a wonderful 4-hour television adaptation made by the BBC that I highly recommend to fans of the novel …

30 Creative writing deg. : MFA

Master of Fine Arts (MFA)

32 Dim sum go-with : TEA

Dim sum is a Chinese cuisine made up of small portions of various dishes. The tradition of serving dim sum is associated with the serving of tea, when small delicacies were offered to travelers and guests along with tea as a refreshment. The name “dim sum” translates as “touch the heart” implying that dim sum is not a main meal, just a snack “that touches the heart”.

34 August Wilhelmj’s arrangement of a movement from Bach’s “Orchestral Suite No. 3” : AIR ON THE G STRING (hiding “iron”)

The second movement of Johann Sebastian Bach’s “Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D major” is a very recognizable piece of music. Its renown is largely due to August Wilhelmj’s arrangement of the movement for violin and piano, which has come to be known as “Air on a G String“.

43 Prefix meaning “god” : THEO-

The prefix “theo-” means “god”, coming from the Greek word “theos” that has the same meaning.

46 Einsteinhaus locale : BERN

The “Einsteinhaus” (Einstein House) in Bern, Switzerland is a former residence of Albert Einstein that is now open to the public as a museum. Einstein lived there from 1903 to 1905 with his first wife, Mileva Marić, and their eldest son Hans Albert Einstein.

47 Zebra’s mother : MARE

The term “zebra” comes from an old Portuguese word “zevra” meaning “wild ass”. Studies of zebra embryos show that zebras are basically black in color, with white stripes that develop with growth. Before this finding, it was believed they were white, with black stripes.

48 Part of the Texas/Oklahoma border : RED RIVER (hiding “driver”)

The Red River (sometimes “Red River of the South”) runs for almost 1,400 miles, and for much of its length serves as the border between Texas and Oklahoma. It is a saltwater river, with the salt coming from vast deposits buried in the upper reaches of the river and its tributaries. Almost 3,500 tons of salt flows down the Red River every day.

53 “__ the Walrus” : I AM

“I Am the Walrus” is a Beatles song released in 1967. It was written by John Lennon, with the “Walrus” being a reference to the poem “The Walrus and the Carpenter” from Lewis Carroll’s “Through the Looking-Glass”.

54 Peeples of “Pretty Little Liars” : NIA

Actress Nia Peeples played the character Nicole Chapman in the TV series “Fame”. Peeples is also a successful singer, having released the 1988 song “Trouble” that made it to #35 in the Billboard charts.

“Pretty Little Liars” is a mystery drama TV series aimed at teens. It is based on a series of novels penned by Sara Shepard.

55 Horse-and-buggy group : AMISH

The Amish are members of a group of Christian churches, and a subgroup of the Mennonite churches. The Amish church originated in Switzerland and Alsace in 1693 when it was founded by Jakob Ammann. It was Ammann who gave the name to the Amish people. Many Amish people came to Pennsylvania in the 18th century.

56 Layered lunch orders … or a hint to 16-, 24-, 34- and 48-Across : CLUB SANDWICHES

The club sandwich is a double-decker affair with three layers of bread and two layers of filling. This style of sandwich has been around since the end of the 19th century, and some say it was invented at an exclusive gambling “club” in Saratoga Springs, New York.

60 Sicily’s tallest mountain : ETNA

Mount Etna on the island of Sicily is the largest of three active volcanoes in Italy, and indeed the largest of all active volcano in Europe. Etna is about 2 1/2 times the height of its equally famous sister, Mt. Vesuvius. Mt. Etna is home to a 110-km long narrow-gauge railway, and two ski resorts. It is sometimes referred to as “Mongibello” in Italian, and as “Mungibeddu” in Sicilian. The English name “Etna” comes from the Greek “aitho” meaning “I eat”.

63 Many profs : PHDS

“Ph.D.” is an abbreviation for “philosophiae doctor”, Latin for “teacher of philosophy”. Often, candidates for a PhD already hold a bachelor’s and a master’s degree, so a PhD might be considered a “third degree”.

Down

1 Tuna at sushi bars : AHI

Yellowfin and bigeye tuna are usually marketed as “ahi”, the Hawaiian name. They are both big fish, with yellowfish tuna often weighing over 300 pounds, and bigeye tuna getting up to 400 pounds.

2 Enterprise enterprise : RENT-A-CAR

Enterprise Rent-A-Car was established in 1957 by Jack. C. Taylor in St. Louis, Missouri, where the company is still headquartered today. The company was originally called Executive Leasing Company. The name was changed in 1962 in honor of the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise, on which Taylor served during WWII.

3 “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” author : CAPOTE

“Breakfast at Tiffany’s” is a 1958 novella written by Truman Capote. Truman’s colorful protagonist in the story is Holiday “Holly” Golightly, who was played so very, very ably by Audrey Hepburn in the marvelous 1961 movie adaptation. It must be said that the film is a rather loose interpretation of Capote’s novella.

7 Main arteries : AORTAS

The aorta originates in the heart and extends down into the abdomen. It is the largest artery in the body.

12 Marquis of note : DE SADE

The Marquis de Sade was a French aristocrat with a reputation for a libertine lifestyle. De Sade was also a writer, well known for his works of erotica. He fell foul of the law for some of his more extreme practices and for blaspheming the Catholic church. On and off, de Sade spent 32 years of his life in prison and in insane asylums.

18 Suffix with elephant : -INE

Something “elephantine” resembles an elephant, or more figuratively is huge and clumsy.

22 “Homeland” rating : TV-MA

“Homeland” is a psychological drama on Showtime about a CIA officer who is convinced that a certain US Marine is a threat to the security of the United States. The show is based on a series from Israeli television called “Hatufim” (Prisoners of War”). I saw the first season of this show and highly recommend it …

23 Old audio system : HI-FI

Hi-fi systems were introduced in the late forties. A hi-fi is a piece of audio equipment designed to give a much higher quality reproduction of sound than cheaper systems available up to that point. “Hi-fi” stands for “high fidelity”.

24 Pearly gates greeter : ST PETER

In the Christian tradition, Saint Peter is often depicted as the keeper of the gates of heaven. This depiction arises from a passage in the Gospel of Matthew:

I tell you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hell will not overcome it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven; whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.

“Pearly gates” is a term used for the gates of Heaven. The term comes from a description of “Heavenly Jerusalem’ in the Book of Revelations in which the walls of the city had twelve gates, each made from a single pearl.

31 Serengeti antelope : GNU

The gnu is also known as the wildebeest, and is an antelope native to Africa. “Wildebeest” is a Dutch meaning “wild beast”.

The Serengeti is a region in Africa that is located in northern Tanzania and southwest Kenya. The name “Serengeti” comes from the Maasai language and means “Endless Plains”.

32 Word on an “evacuation route” sign : TSUNAMI

“Tsunami” is a Japanese word meaning “harbor wave”.

33 Sorbonne summer : ETE

“Sorbonne” is the name usually used for the old University of Paris, and some of the institutions that have succeeded it. The institution was named for French theologian Robert de Sorbonne who founded the original Collège de Sorbonne in 1257. That’s quite a while ago …

36 Boxer’s warning : GRR!

The boxer breed of dog (one of my favorites!) originated in Germany. My first dog was a boxer/Labrador mix, a beautiful combination. Our current family dog is a boxer/pug mix, and is another gorgeous animal.

38 Screenwriter Ephron : NORA

Nora Ephron had many talents, including writing film scripts and novels. Many of the movies that she wrote, she also directed. These would include some of my favorite movies of all time like “Sleepless in Seattle”, “You’ve Got Mail” and most recently, the wonderful “Julie & Julia”. And, did you know that Nora Ephron’s second marriage was to journalist Carl Bernstein of Watergate fame? She wrote an autobiographical novel based on her life with Bernstein, which deals in particular with Bernstein’s affair with the daughter of British Prime Minister James Callaghan.

43 __ dips: upper-arm workout : TRICEP

The triceps brachii muscle is found at the back of the upper arm. The muscle’s name translates to “three-headed arm muscle”, fitting as it is actually made up of three bundles of muscles.

44 Toast topic : HEALTH

The tradition of toasting someone probably dates back to the reign of Charles II, when the practice was to drink a glass of wine to the health of a beautiful or favored woman. In those days, spiced toast was added to beverages to add flavor, so the use of the word “toast” was an indicator that the lady’s beauty would enhance the wine. Very charming, I must say …

45 Mountaineer Hillary : EDMUND

Edmund Hillary was a mountaineer and explorer from New Zealand. Famously, Hillary and Tenzing Norgay were the first climbers to summit Mount Everest, doing so in 1953. Edmund’s son Peter Hillary also became a climber, and he reached the summit of Everest in 1990. Peter repeated the feat in 2002, climbing alongside Tenzing Norgay’s son Jamling.

46 Head-hugging brimless cap : BEANIE

A beanie is a knitted, close-fitting hat with no brim. The name probably comes from the slang term “bean” meaning “head”.

52 “Now and Then” actress : RICCI

Christina Ricci is an American actress who found fame on the big screen at an early age, playing the very young Wednesday Addams in the 1991 movie version of “The Addams Family”.

“Now and Then” is a 1995 coming-of-age movie that has quite the cast. The main storyline covers four women as they look back at a 1970 summer when they were all adolescents. The main group of characters are portrayed both young and old:
Samantha Albertson (Gaby Hoffmann/Demi Moore)
Roberta Martin (Christina Ricci/Rosie O’Donnell)
Chrissy DeWitt (Ashleigh Aston Moore/Rita Wilson)
Tina “Teeny” Tercell (Thora Birch/Melanie Griffith)

57 __-relief : BAS

In bas-relief, an image projects just a little above the background, as in perhaps a head depicted on a coin.

58 Genetic letters : DNA

The two most common nucleic acids are deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA), both of which play crucial roles in genetics. The DNA contains the genetic instructions used to keep living organisms functioning, and RNA is used to transcribe that information from the DNA to protein “generators” called ribosomes.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Story trajectories : ARCS
5 Wild pig : BOAR
9 Pulitzer columnist Maureen : DOWD
13 Winter expense : HEAT
14 Soothing botanical : ALOE
15 Great Lake bordering four states : ERIE
16 Data-entering devices : INPUT TERMINALS (hiding “putter”)
19 Brouhahas : TO-DOS
20 Semi unit : TON
21 Document to protect confidential info: Abbr. : NDA
22 “Really?” : THAT SO?
24 Like bread knives : SAW-EDGED (hiding “wedge”)
26 Sinful habit : VICE
27 Chin-up targets, for short : LATS
29 Brontë heroine : EYRE
30 Creative writing deg. : MFA
31 [I’m shocked!] : [GASP!]
32 Dim sum go-with : TEA
34 August Wilhelmj’s arrangement of a movement from Bach’s “Orchestral Suite No. 3” : AIR ON THE G STRING (hiding “iron”)
40 Scheduled to arrive : DUE
41 “Really” : TRUE
42 Pigeon sound : COO
43 Prefix meaning “god” : THEO-
46 Einsteinhaus locale : BERN
47 Zebra’s mother : MARE
48 Part of the Texas/Oklahoma border : RED RIVER (hiding “driver”)
51 Concert venues : ARENAS
53 “__ the Walrus” : I AM
54 Peeples of “Pretty Little Liars” : NIA
55 Horse-and-buggy group : AMISH
56 Layered lunch orders … or a hint to 16-, 24-, 34- and 48-Across : CLUB SANDWICHES
60 Sicily’s tallest mountain : ETNA
61 Word with fishing or party : LINE …
62 Con’s room : CELL
63 Many profs : PHDS
64 Usually choppy expanses : SEAS
65 Guessing game : I SPY

Down

1 Tuna at sushi bars : AHI
2 Enterprise enterprise : RENT-A-CAR
3 “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” author : CAPOTE
4 Virile dudes : STUDS
5 Night fliers : BATS
6 “Bravo!” : OLE!
7 Main arteries : AORTAS
8 Do more lawn work : REMOW
9 Scout group : DEN
10 Like a bad spray tan : ORANGY
11 Not as tame : WILDER
12 Marquis of note : DE SADE
17 “You missed it” : TOO LATE
18 Suffix with elephant : -INE
22 “Homeland” rating : TV-MA
23 Old audio system : HI-FI
24 Pearly gates greeter : ST PETER
25 Sweetie : DEAR
28 Cigar remnants : ASH
31 Serengeti antelope : GNU
32 Word on an “evacuation route” sign : TSUNAMI
33 Sorbonne summer : ETE
35 Trash barge emanation : ODOR
36 Boxer’s warning : GRR!
37 “Let me give you a hand” : I CAN HELP
38 Screenwriter Ephron : NORA
39 “Here __ nothing” : GOES
43 __ dips: upper-arm workout : TRICEP
44 Toast topic : HEALTH
45 Mountaineer Hillary : EDMUND
46 Head-hugging brimless cap : BEANIE
47 Blends well : MESHES
49 Seat winners : INS
50 Lab containers : VIALS
52 “Now and Then” actress : RICCI
55 Bowls over : AWES
57 __-relief : BAS
58 Genetic letters : DNA
59 Underhanded : SLY

25 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 13 Jun 19, Thursday”

  1. 44(D) I cannot see how adding a slice of toast to wine would improve flavor. It would have to be a poor wine. I believe that to be Folk Etymology. Perhaps if the toast were burnt the organic sourced charcoal could remove contaminants, but that’s a weak explanation. However I have no alternate

    1. @P J Colella – I would toast your reply if it wasn’t so sour(dough) in its crumby attempt at humor. I wouldn’t want to be accused of trying to butter you up. So pump(ernickle) into that juke box and play another song. ;-D>

  2. 44d, I think explanation works better when you think about toasting someone’s good health. Of course, Bill’s explanation was entertaining!

  3. LAT: 8:46, no errors (and the theme eluded me, as well). Newsday: 10:02, no errors. WSJ: 13:39, no errors. BEQ: 19:51, no errors; had to guess at several names, but all my guesses worked out (and I think the clue for 25A is missing an “s” – once again, BEQ would benefit from the services of an editor).

  4. 12 minutes even, and 2 errors, where ORANGY meets EYRE. I filled in ORANGE and never bothered to proof-read the cross. I’m still not convinced ORANGY is a real word anyway. Dirty pool from CC there.

    1. Google tells me that “orangy” has been around since the 1770’s (well before I was born 😜). I tried (twice) to post a link to a dictionary entry for it, but both posts disappeared.

  5. 17:44 no errors…..more like a Tuesday puzzle but it makes up for the 1 hour and 2 minutes in spent on the NYT#0509 in my paper today.

  6. @Bill … I just made two attempts to post something here and both posts vanished without a trace. They contained links, so perhaps the spam filter has turned vicious again? I’d appreciate it if you’d look into it.

    Thanks …

  7. No theme, either, not unusual for us. We made 2 posting errors on
    INS and BERN. Also had 11 omissions (93.5% total) and I wouldn’t have
    gotten them in any case. I didn’t like all of the clues, also not unusual,
    and just couldn’t do it all. Still a good week so far.

    One thing that amused me was that I missed RENTACAR. I got hung up on
    the USS Enterprise of Star Trek and never got unhung. That is what I get for reading mostly the comics and sports on the daily papers.

    Kudos to all for your continued good work and fast times.

    1. John, I also got hung up on USS Enterprise of Star Trek until after pecking away RENTACAR finally became obvious.

      Eddie

  8. 10:20. Late to the party today (tonight). I was up until 4 AM last night celebrating the St. Louis Blues as Stanley Cup Champions. I’ve waited an exhausting 52 years to say that. 52 years! I went down to the strip (something usually anathema to locals) last night and celebrated after the win. I had someone in town for a conference so I had an excuse.

    Carrie – Thanks for the well-wishes. Maybe I’ll get the chance to return the favor after the World Series.

    Dirk – I have to agree. A little more rationalism and scientific method in the world would do us all some good.

    Best –

  9. Mostly easy Thursday for me; took about 15 minutes with no errors, but one wild guess and one eventual realization. I had a lot of trouble with the A in TVMA, since I wasn’t familiar with either the newer TV ratings or August Wilhelmj’s arrangement. And, it could have been a BFA for all I know. Also the S in TSUNAMI finally came to me when I realized it was one word – gee, just like the clue said.

    Other than that, it was a breeze. Had a good laugh on ORANGY…
    Didn’t know that the Red River was a saltwater river, which is fascinating…so sharks and saltwater crocs could…

    @Jeff – Congratulations on the Blues win. That was a real determined push in the end.

    @Carrie – I just hope whatever they call this age, that it’ll end in a year and a half.

  10. Hi folks!!😎

    No errors. Good challenge and a bit easy for Thursday, tho I did have problem areas. Like John and Eddie, I got caught in one place: GRR for Boxer’s warning. Hung up on boxer the pugilist not the pup. Sometimes we latch onto these notions and can’t let go! It’s a phenomenon.

    Jeff! Yep, I see the Dodgers going all the way this year!!

    Dirk– I’m hopeful that lame-duck status will kick in sooner than it normally would…🦆

    Be well ~~🚋⚾️

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