LA Times Crossword 16 Jun 19, Sunday

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Constructed by: Matt McKinley
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Low-Tech Glossary

Themed answers are phrases commonly associated with the high-tech industry, but they have been reinterpreted in a low-tech sense:

  • 23A Part of a parallel parking lesson? : BACKUP PROCEDURE
  • 46A Cookie recipe? : BATCH FILE
  • 65A Déjà vu? : VIRTUAL MEMORY
  • 87A Spider-Man? : WEBMASTER
  • 112A What a jittery camera operator may be having? : TROUBLE SHOOTING
  • 32D “I’ll skip it, thanks”? : PASSWORDS
  • 35D Poirot’s note-to-self about locating the Orient Express murder weapon? : SEARCH ENGINE
  • 39D Meteorologist’s rainfall prediction measure? : CLOUD STORAGE
  • 57D Tide table? : FLOWCHART

Bill’s time: 17m 41s

Bill’s errors: 2

  • MUKLUK (muklut)
  • NYUK! (nyut!)

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

5 New newts : EFTS

Newts wouldn’t be my favorite animals. They are found all over the world living on land or in water depending on the species, but always associated with water even if it is only for breeding. Newts metamorphose through three distinct developmental stages during their lives. They start off as larvae in water, fertilized eggs that often cling to aquatic plants. The eggs hatch into tadpoles, the first developmental form of the newt. After living some months as tadpoles swimming around in the water, they undergo another metamorphosis, sprouting legs and replacing their external gills with lungs. At this juvenile stage they are known as efts, and leave the water to live on land. A more gradual transition takes place then, as the eft takes on the lizard-like appearance of the adult newt.

9 Trying to break a tie, briefly : IN OT

In overtime (In OT)

13 Battle zone journalist : EMBED

Although journalists have been directly reporting from the front lines in military conflicts for some time, the term “embedded journalism” only came into fashion during the 2003 Invasion of Iraq. A formal arrangement was made between the US Military and hundreds of reporters allowing the journalists to travel with military units and, under pre-ordained conditions, report directly from those units. Some say that the arrangement was mutually beneficial. On the one hand the journalists had relatively little to worry about in terms of transportation and travel through combat zones. On the other hand, the military had better control over what did and did not get reported.

18 Courier alternative : ARIAL

Courier and arial are fonts.

20 Area below Greenwich Village : SOHO

The Manhattan neighborhood known today as SoHo was very fashionable in the early 1900s, but as the well-heeled started to move uptown the area became very run down and poorly maintained. Noted for the number of fires that erupted in derelict buildings, SoHo earned the nickname “Hell’s Hundred Acres”. The area was then zoned for manufacturing and became home to many sweatshops. In the mid-1900s artists started to move into open loft spaces and renovating old buildings as the lofts were ideal locations in which an artist could both live and work. In 1968, artists and others organized themselves so that they could legalize their residential use of an area zoned for manufacturing. The group they formed took its name from the name given to the area by the city’s Planning Commission i.e “South of Houston”. This was shortened from So-uth of Ho-uston to SoHo as in the SoHo Artists Association, and the name stuck.

22 Weeper of myth : NIOBE

In Greek mythology, Niobe fled to Mount Sipylus when her children were killed. There, she was turned into stone and wept for eternity. There is indeed a Niobe’s Rock on Mount Sipylus (in modern-day Turkey) that resembles a female face, and so is known as “The Weeping Rock”.

28 Sealskin boot : MUKLUK

Mukluks are soft boots worn by Arctic peoples such as the Inuit and Yupik. The boots are made from reindeer skin or sealskin. The term “mukluk” come from the Yupik “maklak”, the word for “bearded seal”.

29 Castle defense : MOAT

A moat is a protective trench that surrounds a castle, say, or a an exhibit in a zoo. A moat may or may not be filled with water.

31 City west of Boise : NAMPA

Located about 20 miles from Boise, Nampa is a the third-most populous city in the state of Idaho. Nampa grew up as a railroad town. The railroad tracks run through the town diagonally, from northeast to southwest. As a result, Nampa’s street plan is a little unusual, breaking with the traditional north-south and east-west layout. Founders opted to direct roads parallel and perpendicular to the railroad tracks, in the interest of safety.

33 “__ for Alibi”: Grafton novel : A IS

Sue Grafton wrote detective novels, and her “alphabet series” feature the private investigator Kinsey Millhone. She started off with “A Is for Alibi” in 1982 and worked her way up to “Y is for Yesterday” before she passed away in 2017.

34 Sch. in Manhattan : KANSAS ST

Manhattan, Kansas is the fourth largest city in the state and is known as a college town, as it is home to Kansas State University. The original settlement that grew to be Manhattan was known as Boston back in the mid-1800s when settlers from the Cincinnati-Manhattan Company of Ohio landed (actually, they ran aground!) in the area. The settlers agreed to stay in Boston provided the settlement was renamed to Manhattan, a condition that was readily agreed to. In 1977 Manhattan was officially given the nickname of “The Little Apple”, for obvious reasons.

38 One of Mary Stuart’s people : SCOT

Mary, Queen of Scots ruled over Scotland from 1542 until 1567, even though she spent most of that reign in France, where she had grown up. 16-year-old Mary married 9-year-old Francis, the Dauphin of France in 1558, and the following year became queen consort when her husband acceded to the throne. Francis only ruled for a year before dying of natural causes. The young widow returned to Scotland, the country of her birth, in 1561. In 1567, Mary was forced to abdicate the Scottish throne in favor of her one-year-old son James, after an uprising against Mary and her third husband, the Earl of Bothwell. Mary fled south to seek the protection of her cousin, Elizabeth I of England. As Mary had once claimed Elizabeth’s throne as her own, Elizabeth had Mary imprisoned. Mary was held in confinement for over 18 years and eventually beheaded in 1587, having been found guilty of plotting to assassinate Elizabeth.

43 Lead-in for worm : EAR-

“Earworm” is a colloquial term used for a catchy tune that is also somewhat irritating, one that you can’t get out of your head.

48 1977 Steely Dan album : AJA

Steely Dan’s heyday was in the seventies when they toured for a couple of years, although the group mainly focused on studio work. The band was formed in 1972 and broke up in 1981. The core of the band reunited in 1993, and is still performing today despite the passing of founding member Walter Becker in 2017. Steely Dan’s best-selling album is “Aja” (pronounced like “Asia”), which was released in 1977.

52 Mayall of “Drop Dead Fred” : RIK

Rik Mayall is a comedian from England who is noted as half of a double-act with Adrian Edmondson. The pair hit the big times in the hit BBC sitcom “The Young Ones”, a show that was broadcast in the US on MTV. I love Britcoms, but not this one …

“Drop Dead Fred” is one of those cult films that I never seem to get into. It was released in 1991 and is billed as a children’s movie, but it has attracted a large number of adult fans.

54 Monetary promises : IOUS

I owe you (IOU)

56 Starbucks order : DECAF

Starbucks is a coffee company based in Seattle, Washington. It is the largest coffeehouse company in the world and has over 19,000 stores. In the 1990s, Starbucks was opening one new store every single day! Starbucks is named after the chief mate on the Pequod in Herman Melville’s book “Moby Dick”.

60 Tar Heel State campus : ELON

Elon is a city in the Piedmont region of North Carolina located close to the city of Burlington. Elon University is a private liberal arts school founded in 1889.

“Tar Heel” is a nickname for anyone living in, or from, the state of North Carolina. As such, it is the also nickname for an athlete of the University of North Carolina (UNC). No one seems to know for sure where the term “Tar Heel” originated, but it is thought to be related to the historical importance of the tar, pitch and turpentine industries that thrived in the state due to the presence of vast forests of pine trees.

64 USN rank : ENS

Ensign (ens.)

65 Déjà vu? : VIRTUAL MEMORY

“Déjà vu” is French for “already seen”.

68 Shore bird : ERN

The ern (sometimes “erne”) is also known as the white-tailed eagle or the sea eagle.

73 Schulz’s “psychiatric help” dispenser : LUCY

In Charles Schulz’s fabulous comic strip “Peanuts”, Charlie Brown is friends with at least three members of the van Pelt family. Most famously there is Lucy van Pelt, who bosses everyone around, and who operates a psychiatric booth that looks like a lemonade stand. Then there is Linus, Lucy’s younger brother, the character who always has his security blanket at hand. Lastly there is an even younger brother, Rerun van Pelt. Rerun is constantly hiding under his bed, trying to avoid going to school.

80 Soft shoes : MOCS

“Moc” is short for “moccasin”, a type of shoe. The moccasin is a traditional form of footwear worn by members of many Native American tribes.

81 PC scrolling key : PGDN

PGUP (Page Up) and PGDN (Page Down) are two navigation keys found on a PC keyboard.

85 Board game with a lawsuit card : LIFE

The board game we call “The Game of Life” (also just “Life”) was created quite a few years ago, in 1869 by Milton Bradley. Back then it was called “The Checkered Game of Life” and was the first parlor game to become a popular hit. The modern version of the game was first released in 1960.

86 Org. with a two-leaved flower logo : EPA

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

87 Spider-Man? : WEBMASTER

Spider-Man is a creation of Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, and first appeared in comics in 1962. Spider-Man was a somewhat groundbreaking character in that his alter ego was a teenage high school student (named Peter Parker), which marked the first time that a young person featured front and center as the superhero.

93 Wrinkly-faced dog : PUG

The pug is a breed of dog of Chinese origin. Our current family pet is a boxer/pug cross, and is a good-looking mutt!

95 Actress Samantha : EGGAR

Actress Samantha Eggar is from London. Eggar starred in the 1966 film “Walk, Don’t Run” beside Cary Grant, which was his last movie.

97 Tax-evasion agts. : T-MEN

A T-man is a law-enforcement agent of the US Treasury (T stands for “Treasury”).

98 Deceptively convincing : SPECIOUS

Prior to the 17th century, something described as specious was pleasing to look at, with “specious” coming from the Latin “species” meaning “appearance, form, beauty”. Somehow, the term came to describe something that is only superficially attractive, having a false appearance of genuineness.

100 Bearded bovine : GNU

The gnu is also known as the wildebeest, and is an antelope native to Africa. “Wildebeest” is a Dutch meaning “wild beast”.

101 Not quite first-stringers : B-TEAM

We’ve been using the phrases “first string” and “second string” in athletics since the mid-19th century. The expressions come from archery, in which a competitor would carry a second bowstring in case the first bowstring broke.

103 Fords whose initials didn’t actually stand for anything : LTDS

There has been a lot of speculation about what the abbreviation “LTD” stands for in the car model known as “Ford LTD”. Many say it is an initialism standing for “Luxury Trim Decor”, and others say that it is short for “limited”. Although the car was produced in Australia with the initialism meaning “Lincoln Type Design”, it seems that “LTD” was originally chosen as just three meaningless letters that sound well together.

104 West Coast surfing mecca : MALIBU

Malibu is a beach city in Southern California that is known as home to many Hollywood movie stars. It is also home to several beaches including Malibu Surfrider Beach, which was dedicated in 2010 as the first World Surfing Reserve.

106 Musical symbols : CLEFS

“Clef” is the French word for “key”. In music, a clef is used to indicate the pitch of the notes written on the stave. The bass clef is also known as the F-clef, the alto clef is the C-clef, and the treble clef is the G-clef.

116 Candy heart words : I LUV U

The forerunner to Sweethearts candy was introduced in 1866, with the famous sayings written on the candy tailored for use at weddings. One of the original expressions was, “Married in pink, he will take a drink”. The original candy was a lot bigger, to fit all those words! The smaller, heart-shaped candy hit the shelves in 1901. We’ve been able to buy Sweethearts with the words “Text me” since 2010.

118 Where Zeno taught : ELEA

Zeno of Elea was a Greek philosopher who lived in Elea, a Greek colony in Southern Italy. Zeno is famous for his paradoxes, a set of problems that really make you think! In the problem known as “Achilles and the Tortoise”, Zeno tells us that Achilles races a tortoise, giving the tortoise a head start (of say 100 meters). By the time Achilles reaches the starting point of the tortoise, the tortoise will have moved on, albeit only a small distance. Achilles then sets his sights on the tortoise’s new position and runs to it. Again the tortoise has moved ahead a little. Achilles keeps on moving to the tortoise’s new position but can never actually catch his slower rival. Or can he …?

119 Cellphone group pic, in slang : WEFIE

A selfie is a self-portrait, one usually taken with a digital camera or cell phone. A “group selfie” is sometimes referred to as a “groufie” or “wefie”. A “couple selfie” is known as an “usie” or “ussie”, although those terms are sometimes also used for a group picture.

120 Military rookie : CADET

The term “rookie”, used for a raw recruit, first appeared in Rudyard Kipling’s collection of songs and poems called the “Barrack-Room Ballads”, which was originally published in 1892.

123 Macy’s div., e.g. : DEPT

The original Macy’s store was opened by Rowland Hussey Macy in Haverhill, Massachusetts in 1851. This store, and several others that Macy opened, all failed. Macy picked himself up though, and started over again in New York City. Those early New York stores all focused on the sale of dry goods, but added departments quickly as the clientele grew. The Macy’s “star” logo has been around since the company was first established. Macy chose the star because it mimicked the star tattoo that he got as a teenager when he was working on a whaling ship out of Nantucket.

Down

2 Q.E.D. word : ERAT

The initialism “QED” is used at the end of a mathematical proof or a philosophical argument. QED stands for the Latin “quod erat demonstrandum” meaning “that which was to be demonstrated”.

5 Medium power? : ESP

Extrasensory perception (ESP)

8 Save, as money : SOCK AWAY

We’ve been “socking away” money, i.e. saving money, since the early 1940s. The etymology of “sock away” is related to the idea of hiding cash in one’s sock.

9 Pakistan’s longest river : INDUS

The Indus river rises in Tibet and flows through the length of Pakistan and empties into the Arabian Sea, the part of the Indian Ocean lying to the west of the Indian subcontinent. The Indus gives its name to the country of India as “India” used to be the name of the region along the eastern banks of the river, which paradoxically is now in modern-day Pakistan.

10 Stooge laugh : NYUK!

If you’ve seen a few of the films starring “The Three Stooges” you might have noticed that the line up changed over the years. The original trio was made up of Moe and Shemp Howard (two brothers) and Larry Fine (a good friend of the Howards). This line up was usually known as “Moe, Larry and Shemp”. Then Curly Howard replaced his brother when Shemp quit the act, creating the most famous trio, “Moe, Larry And Curly”. Shemp returned when Curly had a debilitating stroke in 1946, and Shemp stayed with the troupe until he died in 1955. Shemp was replaced by Joe Besser, and then “Curly-Joe” DeRita. When Larry Fine had a stroke in 1970, it effectively marked the end of the act.

12 Travelers celebrated annually : THE MAGI

“Magi” is the plural of the Latin word “magus”, a term applied to someone who was able to read the stars. Hence, “magi” is commonly used with reference to the “wise men from the East” who followed the star and visited Jesus soon after he was born. In Western Christianity, the three Biblical Magi are:

  • Melchior: a scholar from Persia
  • Caspar: a scholar from India
  • Balthazar: a scholar from Arabia

13 How tour groups move : EN MASSE

“En masse” is a French term, one that best translates as “as a group”

14 Mazda two-seater : MIATA

The Mazda MX-5 is sold as the Miata in North America, and as the Roadster in Japan. I’ve always liked the looks of the Mazda Miata, probably because it reminds me so much of old British sports cars. The Miata is built in Hiroshima, Japan. The name “Miata” comes from an Old High German word meaning “reward”.

19 Crescent-shaped : LUNATE

Something lunate is crescent-shaped, shaped like a crescent moon. “Luna” is Latin for “moon”.

24 Poe title stowaway : PYM

American author Edgar Allen Poe was noted mainly for his short stories and only wrote one complete novel in his short life, namely “The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket”. The novel recounts the adventures of a young man who journeys to the South Seas aboard four different vessels. The book was to become an inspiration for the more famous “Moby Dick” by Herman Melville.

25 Jennyanydots’ creator : ELIOT

Jennyanydots is a character from T. S. Eliot’s “Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats”, and the derivative stage musical “Cats” by Andrew Lloyd Webber. She appears to be a lazy cat, based on her behavior during the day. At night, Jennyanydots comes alive, taking charge of the mice and the cockroaches.

30 Turow memoir : ONE L

Scott Turow is an author and lawyer from Chicago. Turow has had several bestselling novels including “Presumed Innocent”, “The Burden of Proof” and “Reversible Errors”, all three of which were made into films. He also wrote the autobiographical book “One L: The Turbulent True Story of a First Year at Harvard Law School”.

34 “The Trial” author : KAFKA

Franz Kafka was born in 1883 in Prague, then part of Bohemia and today the capital of the Czech Republic. Kafka is known as one of the greatest novelists who worked in the German language, and even has an adjective named after him. Something that is “kafkaesque” is senseless, disorienting and may have menacing complexity. As it was for many great artists, Kafka’s fame came after his death when much of his work was published.

35 Poirot’s note-to-self about locating the Orient Express murder weapon? : SEARCH ENGINE

“Murder on the Orient Express” is perhaps the most famous detective novel penned by the Queen of Crime, Agatha Christie. Christie’s Belgian detective Hercule Poirot has to determine which of the passengers on the Orient Express train committed a murder. Spoiler alert: they all did!

36 “Solve or spin?” host : SAJAK

Pat Sajak took over the hosting of “Wheel of Fortune” from Chuck Woolery back in 1983 and has been doing the job ever since. Sajak had a short run as a talk show host in 1989/1990 and used to sub quite often for Larry King and Regis Philbin.

41 Skier’s aid : T-BAR

A T-bar is a ski lift on which the skiers are pulled up the hill in pairs, with each pair standing (not sitting!) either side of a T-shaped metal bar. The bar is placed behind the thighs, pulling along the skiers as they remain standing on their skis (hopefully!). There’s also a J-bar, which is a similar device but with each J-shaped bar used by one skier at a time.

42 Gum source : CHICLE

Chicle is a natural gum or latex that can be extracted from the Manilkara chicle tree that is native to Mexico and Central America. Companies like Wrigley were major users of chicle prior to the sixties as the product was used as the base ingredient in chewing gum. Today chewing gum manufacturers generally use a synthetic rubber that is cheap to manufacture as a replacement for natural chicle. I am so happy I don’t chew gum!

53 Ms. __-Man : PAC

The Pac-Man arcade game was first released in Japan in 1980, and is as popular today as it ever was. The game features characters that are maneuvered around the screen to eat up dots and earn points. The name comes from the Japanese folk hero “Paku”, known for his voracious appetite. The spin-off game called Ms. Pac-Man was released in 1981.

56 Car battery pioneer : DELCO

“Delco” is an acronym standing for Dayton Engineering Laboratories Company. Delco is often seen in the brand name “ACDelco”. The AC stands for Albert Champion, who was famous for the development of the spark plug.

61 Cooks in oil : SAUTES

“Sauté” is a French word. The literal translation from the French is “jumped” or “bounced”, a reference to the tossing of food while cooking it in a frying pan.

66 Michelob diet beers : ULTRAS

Michelob Ultra is a diet beer, a beer low in carbohydrates that was introduced in 2002.

67 Like arguments no longer worth having : MOOT

To moot is to bring up as a subject for discussion or debate. So, something that is moot is open to debate. Something that is no longer moot, is no longer worth debating. We don’t seem to be able get that right, which drives me crazy …

70 A chamber work by Louis Spohr was the first to bear this title : NONET

The German composer Louis Spohr was also violinist, and indeed invented the instrument’s chinrest. Spohr was also on friendly terms with fellow composer Ludwig van Beethoven.

A nonet is a piece of music requiring nine musicians for a performance. The term is also used for the group itself.

72 W. Coast’s 101, e.g. : RTE

US Route 101 runs in the north-south direction along the west coast of the country, through California, Oregon and Washington. US 101 is an important thoroughfare here in the San Francisco Bay Area, but along most of its length, traffic tends to use the parallel Interstate 5.

79 Eponymous chair maker : EAMES

Charles and Ray Eames were a husband-wife team of furniture designers. One of the more famous of their designs is the Eames lounge chair that comes with an ottoman. This trendy piece of furniture featured in a late episode of the television show “Frasier”. In the show, Frasier’s Dad remarks that the Eames chair is so comfortable that he might have gotten rid of his tatty old recliner a long time ago.

80 “CSI” actress Helgenberger : MARG

Marg Helgenberger is an actress best known for roles she plays on television. Helgenberger played investigator Catherine Willows on “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”. She also played drug-addicted prostitute K.C. Koloski in the Vietnam War drama “China Beach”.

88 Bk. after Genesis : EXOD

The Book of Exodus is the second book in the Bible, and deals with Moses leading the Hebrews out of Egypt. The name “Exodus” comes from the Greek “exodos” meaning “departure”.

90 Workout wt. : TEN LB

The unit of mass that we know today as a pound is descended from the old Roman unit of weight known as a “libra”. That “libra” connection is why we abbreviate “pound” to “lb”. The name “pound” though comes from the Latin “pondo” meaning “weight”. Our term “ounce” (abbreviated to “oz.”) comes from the Latin “uncia”, which was 1/12 of a Roman “libra”.

99 Garlic unit : CLOVE

Our word “garlic” evolved via Old English from “gar” (spear) and “leac” (leek). The use of “spear” is apparently a reference to the shape of a clove.

104 Springfield bar : MOE’S

Moe Szyslak is the surly bartender and owner of Moe’s Tavern in “The Simpsons” animated TV show. I don’t really care for “The Simpsons”, but Hank Azaria who supplies the voice for the Moe character … him I like …

105 Composer Bartók : BELA

Bela Bartók was a composer and a pianist. After Liszt, Bartók is considered by many to be Hungary’s greatest composer.

107 Wind similar to a piccolo : FIFE

A fife is a small flute that is often used in military and marching bands. The name “fife” comes from the German “Pfeife” meaning “pipe”.

The piccolo is a small woodwind instrument that looks like a small flute. Piccolos play one octave higher than flutes, and so the instrument is known by Italian musicians as an “ottavino”, Italian for “little octave”. “Piccolo” is Italian for “small”.

110 Phrase on a menu : A LA

The phrase “in the style of” can be translated into “alla” in Italian and “à la” in French.

111 Bar order : BUD

The American beer called Budweiser (often shortened to “Bud”) is named for the Czech town of Budweis (“České Budějovice” in Czech). The name is the subject of a dispute as here is an original Czech beer with a similar name, Budweiser Budvar. American Budweiser is sold in most European countries as “Bud”.

113 “Top Hat” studio : RKO

The RKO Pictures studio was formed when RCA (RADIO Corporation of America) bought the KEITH-Albee-ORPHEUM theaters (and Joe Kennedy’s Film Booking Offices of America). The RKO initialism then comes from the words “Radio”, “Keith” and “Orpheum”.

“Top Hat” is a fun comedy musical starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers that was released in 1935. It was to become the most successful movie that the Astaire-Rogers team made.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Next to nothing? : CENT
5 New newts : EFTS
9 Trying to break a tie, briefly : IN OT
13 Battle zone journalist : EMBED
18 Courier alternative : ARIAL
20 Area below Greenwich Village : SOHO
21 Equivalent of neener : NYAH
22 Weeper of myth : NIOBE
23 Part of a parallel parking lesson? : BACKUP PROCEDURE
26 “I might” : MAYBE
27 Redundant modifier of “bit” : TEENY
28 Sealskin boot : MUKLUK
29 Castle defense : MOAT
31 City west of Boise : NAMPA
33 “__ for Alibi”: Grafton novel : A IS
34 Sch. in Manhattan : KANSAS ST
38 One of Mary Stuart’s people : SCOT
40 When one might have a late lunch : AT TWO
42 Pet store array : CAGES
43 Lead-in for worm : EAR-
44 Hesitates : FALTERS
46 Cookie recipe? : BATCH FILE
48 1977 Steely Dan album : AJA
49 Pleasing application : ALOE
50 Nonfiction piece : ESSAY
52 Mayall of “Drop Dead Fred” : RIK
53 Go right to the top? : PRAY
54 Monetary promises : IOUS
55 Pretty pitcher : EWER
56 Starbucks order : DECAF
58 Stats for NFL defensive linemen : SACKS
59 Fishing __ : ROD
60 Tar Heel State campus : ELON
61 Corporate agreement finalizer : SEAL
62 Basic security feature : LATCH
64 USN rank : ENS
65 Déjà vu? : VIRTUAL MEMORY
68 Shore bird : ERN
71 Graph’s depiction : TREND
73 Schulz’s “psychiatric help” dispenser : LUCY
74 Tot’s scrape : OWIE
75 New beginning : NEO-
76 Devious intentions : PLOTS
78 Scrap : SET-TO
80 Soft shoes : MOCS
81 PC scrolling key : PGDN
82 Not often seen : RARE
83 “What __ the odds?!” : ARE
84 Get clean : BATHE
85 Board game with a lawsuit card : LIFE
86 Org. with a two-leaved flower logo : EPA
87 Spider-Man? : WEBMASTER
91 Best way to play, teamwise : AS A UNIT
93 Wrinkly-faced dog : PUG
94 Bars on the road : AXLES
95 Actress Samantha : EGGAR
97 Tax-evasion agts. : T-MEN
98 Deceptively convincing : SPECIOUS
100 Bearded bovine : GNU
101 Not quite first-stringers : B-TEAM
103 Fords whose initials didn’t actually stand for anything : LTDS
104 West Coast surfing mecca : MALIBU
106 Musical symbols : CLEFS
109 Just not done : TABOO
112 What a jittery camera operator may be having? : TROUBLE SHOOTING
116 Candy heart words : I LUV U
117 Barely made it, with “by” : EKED
118 Where Zeno taught : ELEA
119 Cellphone group pic, in slang : WEFIE
120 Military rookie : CADET
121 Upbeat : ROSY
122 Snippy return : SASS
123 Macy’s div., e.g. : DEPT

Down

1 Locomotive compartment : CAB
2 Q.E.D. word : ERAT
3 “Impressive!” : NICE!
4 What most do in class : TAKE NOTES
5 Medium power? : ESP
6 Configuration : FORMAT
7 Bank heist unit : THOU
8 Save, as money : SOCK AWAY
9 Pakistan’s longest river : INDUS
10 Stooge laugh : NYUK!
11 Row : OAR
12 Travelers celebrated annually : THE MAGI
13 How tour groups move : EN MASSE
14 Mazda two-seater : MIATA
15 Youngster : BOY
16 Go out on the beach? : EBB
17 Bad mark : DEE
19 Crescent-shaped : LUNATE
24 Poe title stowaway : PYM
25 Jennyanydots’ creator : ELIOT
30 Turow memoir : ONE L
32 “I’ll skip it, thanks”? : PASS WORDS
34 “The Trial” author : KAFKA
35 Poirot’s note-to-self about locating the Orient Express murder weapon? : SEARCH ENGINE
36 “Solve or spin?” host : SAJAK
37 Cafeteria staples : TRAYS
38 Swinging-doors site : SALOON
39 Meteorologist’s rainfall prediction measure? : CLOUD STORAGE
41 Skier’s aid : T-BAR
42 Gum source : CHICLE
44 Renaissance __ : FAIRE
45 Land with a 59-Across : REEL IN
47 Like many shakes : CREAMY
51 On its way : SENT
53 Ms. __-Man : PAC
56 Car battery pioneer : DELCO
57 Tide table? : FLOWCHART
58 Apt rhyme for “eye” : STYE
60 Times to prepare : EVES
61 Cooks in oil : SAUTES
63 Happens : ARISES
66 Michelob diet beers : ULTRAS
67 Like arguments no longer worth having : MOOT
69 European perch : REDFIN
70 A chamber work by Louis Spohr was the first to bear this title : NONET
72 W. Coast’s 101, e.g. : RTE
76 Jobs before the main job : PREPS
77 Really enjoy : LAP UP
79 Eponymous chair maker : EAMES
80 “CSI” actress Helgenberger : MARG
81 Crashed : PLUMMETED
84 Enchants : BEGUILES
87 Bide one’s time during, as a storm : WAIT OUT
88 Bk. after Genesis : EXOD
89 Much ado about nothing : BLUSTER
90 Workout wt. : TEN LB
92 As far down as it’s been : AT A LOW
96 Rule violations : ABUSES
99 Garlic unit : CLOVE
100 Overly showy : GAUDY
102 Prefix with tourist : ECO-
104 Springfield bar : MOE’S
105 Composer Bartók : BELA
107 Wind similar to a piccolo : FIFE
108 Small cut : SNIP
109 Involuntary habit : TIC
110 Phrase on a menu : A LA
111 Bar order : BUD
113 “Top Hat” studio : RKO
114 Already acquired : HAS
115 Acquire : GET

20 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 16 Jun 19, Sunday”

  1. LAT: 27:13, 4 errors. Highly problematic grid (example out of many: 31A-24D). Newsday: 18:38, no errors. WP: 21:14, no errors. Decent meta (only one of the three I got this weekend).

  2. What could have been so good is one of the worst Clued puzzles I have seen. Starts with 1 Across and continues with 1 Down and doesn’t letup until 123 Across

    It amazes me how people try to obfuscate the obvious with ridiculous clues. I assume it is to stroke their own ego about what a constructor they are.

    Come on editors, please do better.

    Thank you

    1. Many of us appreciate the playful use of language to “obfuscate the obvious” and make the solving process something more than a boring memory test. So I think your assumption is wrong: constructors are not, in general, “stroking their own egos”: instead, they are taking into account the diverse audience for whom they’re constructing puzzles.

      All in all, for me, a very enjoyable puzzle … 😜.

  3. LAT: 29:23, no errors. Newsday: 16:53, no errors. Universal 21×21: 18:05, no errors. Overslept and don’t have enough time for the WP, so I’ll have to do it later.

    1. WP: 27:49, no errors. Got the meta, but I guess there’s nothing special to do with it but clasp it to my bosom and treasure it forever … 😜.

  4. 1 hr& 6 min……I had Noah for Nyah which made nyuk wrong….these are the kind of clues (especially when they cross) that make me want to find another hobby….if someone out there can explain what either word means I’m all ears

    1. >if someone out there can explain what either word means I’m all ears
      Since you asked

      NYAH – it’s a phonetic sound akin to neener, often repeated. To quote the dictionary: “used to express the speaker’s feeling of superiority or contempt for another. “I won the gold and she didn’t. Nyah, nyah, nyah””

      NYUK – it’s a sound-alike rendering of the trademark laugh of the Three Stooges, as Bill explained.

  5. Once again, it took all day because I was in and out. No errors but not because I knew all of the answers…I just knew the crosswords or guessed
    at them. All in all a hard puzzle. I still don’t know what KAFKA in regard
    to high tech means. All the other theme clues made sense, but don’t get
    that one.

  6. Had absolutely no fun with this puzzle. What a waste of time. DNF and don’t even care. That’s all folks!

  7. ~30 minutes, and had 5 errors. About what you’d expect with so many dubious clues. Took me a while to see the theme, and it helped a little. But some areas of the grid just wouldn’t fill in… not at all enjoyable.

  8. ‘Schulz’s “psychiatric help” dispenser’ should have been “van Pelt,” NOT “Lucy.”
    Schulz is the last name of the (late) legendary cartoonist. van Pelt is Lucy’s last name. While far from ideal, ‘Peanuts’ “psychiatric help” dispenser’ would have been sufficient.

    Editor Rich Norris should have emended Constructor Matt McKinley’s original submission.

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