LA Times Crossword 13 Aug 19, Tuesday

Advertisement

Constructed by: Gail Grabowski
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Power Play

Themed answers comprise two words, and each of those words often follows “POWER”:

  • 64A Takeover endeavor … and a hint to what can precede each word in the answers to starred clues : POWER PLAY
  • 17A *Cafeteria queue : LUNCH LINE (power lunch & power line)
  • 39A *Non-glitzy local tavern : DIVE BAR (power dive & power bar)
  • 11D *Corporate retreat with team-building activities : COMPANY TRIP (power company & power trip)
  • 25D *Basil sitting on a sill, e.g. : WINDOW PLANT (power window & power plant)

Bill’s time: 5m 23s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

5 Polynesian carving : TIKI

A tiki is a large carving of wood or stone resembling a human form that is found in Polynesian cultures. The carvings often mark out boundaries surrounding sites that are sacred to the locals.

The term “Polynesia” was coined in 1756 by author Charles de Brosses when he used it to describe all the islands in the Pacific. This usage was later restricted to what we now refer to as a subregion of Oceania.

9 Ebenezer’s partner Marley : JACOB

Jacob Marley is a character appearing in the wonderful novella “A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens. Marley is the deceased business partner of Ebenezer Scrooge who appears to him as a ghost.

14 Luxury hotel name : OMNI

Omni Hotels & Resorts is headquartered in Irvine, California and has properties in the US, Canada and Mexico.

15 Word before rock or rain : ACID …

The musical genre known as acid rock is a subset of psychedelic rock. The term comes from the influence of the drug LSD (acid) on some compositions in the early days.

Acid rain is any precipitation that is unusually acidic. The acidity in rain mainly comes from sulfur dioxide that is discharged into the atmosphere from industrial plants and volcanic eruptions.

17 *Cafeteria queue : LUNCH LINE (power lunch & power line)

“Cafeteria” is a Mexican-Spanish word meaning “coffee store” that we imported into American English around 1840. Somehow, that coffee store became a self-service dining establishment in the 1890s.

20 Dr. Mark Sloan portrayer in “Grey’s Anatomy” : ERIC DANE

Actor Eric Dane is best known for playing Dr. Mark “McSteamy” Sloan on TV’s “Grey’s Anatomy”.

26 Rio Grande city : EL PASO

Although there have been human settlements in the El Paso area for thousands of years, the first European settlement was founded in 1659 by the Spanish. That first community was on the south bank of the Rio Grande, and was called El Paso del Norte (the North Pass). Most of the urban development under Spanish rule took place on the south side of the river, with El Paso del Norte acting as the center of governance for the Spanish for the territory of New Mexico. The Rio Grande was chosen as the border between Mexico and the US in 1848, so most of the city of El Paso del Norte became part of the Mexican state of Chihuahua (and is now called Ciudad Juárez ). The area north of the river developed as a US military post, eventually becoming the modern city of El Paso, Texas.

28 Buckeye State : OHIO

Ohio is sometimes referred to as the Buckeye State, taking the name from the state tree. In turn, the buckeye tree gets its name from the appearance of its fruit, a dark nut with a light patch, thought to resemble a “buck’s eye”.

32 From scratch : ANEW

Apparently the phrase “start from scratch” arose in the world of sports, probably in cricket or boxing. A line would be scratched into the ground to indicate a starting point.

33 Drums held between the knees : BONGOS

Bongo drums are Cuban percussion instruments consisting of a pair of drums, one larger than the other. The smaller drum is called the “hembra” (female) and the larger the “macho” (male).

38 Australian hub, in itineraries : SYD

Australia’s Sydney Airport (SYD) is located just five miles south of the city center, and next to Botany Bay. There have been plans dating back to the 1940s to build a second airport on the outskirts of the city.

39 *Non-glitzy local tavern : DIVE BAR (power dive & power bar)

We’ve been using the word “dive” in American English for a run-down bar since the latter half of the 19th century. The term comes from the fact that disreputable taverns were usually located in basements, so one had to literally and figuratively dive into them.

41 Quattro meno uno : TRE

In Italian, “quattro meno uno” (four minus one) is “tre” (three).

44 Part of a mug shot profile : ONE EAR

A mug shot is a photograph of a person’s face, one often taken for a police record.

The verb “to mug” means to make an exaggerated facial expression. The term comes from mugs used to drink beer (called Toby mugs) that are made in the shape of heads with grotesque expressions. “Mug” can also be a noun meaning “face”.

50 Self-important type : SNOB

Back in the 1780s, a snob was a shoemaker or a shoemaker’s apprentice. By the end of the 18th century the word “snob” was being used by students at Cambridge University in England to refer to all local merchants and people of the town. The term evolved to mean one who copies those who are his or her social superior (and not in a good way). From there it wasn’t a big leap for “snob” to include anyone who emphasized their superior social standing and not just those who aspired to rank. Nowadays a snob is anyone who looks down on those considered to be of inferior standing.

52 “Lovely” musical meter maid : RITA

“Lovely Rita” is a Beatles song on the “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” album. When the album was released in 1967, the term “meter maid” wasn’t used in the UK, although it was a slang term used in the US. The song helped spread the usage of “meter maid” all around the English-speaking world. Apparently the inspiration for the song was McCartney getting a parking ticket one day outside the Abbey Road Studios. He accepted the ticket with good grace, from a warden named Meta Davis. McCartney felt that Meta “looked like a Rita”, so that was the name she was given in the song.

53 Maven : EXPERT

I’ve always loved the term “maven”, which is another word for “expert”. Maven comes into English from the Yiddish “meyvn” describing someone who appreciates and is a connoisseur.

55 Unwrap with gusto : RIP OPEN

“Gusto” is an Italian word meaning “taste”. We use it in English in the phrase “with gusto” meaning “with great enjoyment”.

59 Device used to record aerie hatchlings : EAGLE CAM

An aerie is the nest of an eagle, and is also known as an “eyrie”.

62 “Better late than never,” e.g. : ADAGE

Apparently, the expression “better late than never” was first used in print by Geoffrey Chaucer in 1386 in his collection of stories “The Canterbury Tales”. He writes, in “The Yeoman’s Tale”:

For better than never is late; never to succeed would be too long a period.

69 Taiwanese PC giant : ACER

Acer is a Taiwanese company that I visited a couple of times when I was in the electronics business. I was very impressed back then with the company’s dedication to quality, although I have heard that things haven’t gone so well in recent years …

70 Word game piece : TILE

The game of Scrabble has been produced in many international versions, and each of these editions has its own tile distribution to suit the local language. For example, in English we have two tiles worth ten points: one “Q” and one “Z”. If you play the game in French then there are five tiles worth ten points: one “K”, one “W”, one “X”, one “Y” and one “Z”.

71 Lauder of makeup : ESTEE

Estée Lauder was a very successful businesswoman, and someone with a great reputation as a salesperson. Lauder introduced her own line of fragrances in 1953, a bath oil called “Youth Dew”. “Youth Dew” was marketed as a perfume, but it was added to bathwater. All of a sudden women were pouring whole bottles of Ms. Lauder’s “perfume” into their baths while using only a drop or two of French perfumes behind their ears. That’s quite a difference in sales volume …

Down

1 Bit of cybermirth : LOL

Gr8 joke! (great joke!); LOL (laugh out loud).

2 Earthbound bird : EMU

The large flightless birds called emus make sounds by manipulating inflatable neck-sacs. The sac is about a foot long, has a thin wall and allows the bird to emit a booming sound. The type of sound emitted is the easiest way to differentiate between male and female emus.

3 Gothic novelist Radcliffe : ANN

Ann Radcliffe was an English author famous for her Gothic novels, a genre that she helped to pioneer in the late 18th century. I’m not a huge fan of Gothic novels, Gothic horror in particular …

5 Shire of “Rocky” : TALIA

Actress Talia Shire is best-known for playing Rocky’s wife Adrian in the “Rocky” series of movies. She also played Connie, the daughter of Don Corleone, in “The Godfather” films. Shire is the sister of movie director Francis Ford Coppola and the aunt of actor Nicolas Cage. Her son is the actor Jason Schwartzman.

8 Think tank nugget : IDEA

A think tank is a research institute. The use of the term “think tank” dates back to 1959, and apparently was first used to describe the Center for Behavioral Sciences in Palo Alto, California.

10 “Aladdin” prince : ALI

In Disney’s version of the “Aladdin” story, released in 1992, the street urchin Aladdin uses one of three wishes to become a prince, so that he can get near to the Princess Jasmine, with whom he has become besotted. With the genie’s help, Aladdin takes on the persona of “Prince Ali of Ababwa”.

18 Charlemagne’s realm: Abbr. : HRE

Charlemagne was the first king to use the title “Holy Roman Emperor”, even though the Holy Roman Empire (HRE) was not actually founded until over a century later when Otto I was crowned Emperor. Otto was the first of an unbroken line of Holy Roman Emperors who ruled Central Europe from 962 until 1806.

21 Doubles partner who’s not serving : NETMAN

That would be tennis, for example.

24 Crow’s-nest call : AHOY!

A crow’s nest is a structure atop the mainmast of a ship that is used as a lookout point. The first crow’s nest was erected in 1807, and was simply a barrel that was lashed to the tallest mast. Supposedly, the structure is named for the crows or ravens that Vikings carried with them on their voyages. The birds were released and used as navigation aids as invariably, the crow or raven headed straight for the nearest land.

25 *Basil sitting on a sill, e.g. : WINDOW PLANT (power window & power plant)

Traditionally, basil is considered “the king of herbs”. And in fact, the herb’s name comes from the Greek “basileus” meaning “king”.

27 Sidekick : PAL

We use the term “sidekick” to mean an associate. Prior to the early 1900s we used the similar terms “side-pal” and “side-partner”.

30 Final Olds made : ALERO

The Oldsmobile Alero was the last car made by General Motors under the Oldsmobile brand. It was produced from 1999 to 2004.

35 Sonora snooze : SIESTA

Sonora is the state in Mexico that lies just south of Arizona and New Mexico. Sonora is the second-largest state in the country, after Chihuahua.

40 Delivery vehicle : VAN

The vehicle we call a “van” takes its name from “caravan”, and is a shortened version of the older term. Back in the 1600s, a caravan was a covered cart. We still use the word “caravan” in Ireland to describe what we call a “mobile home” or “recreational vehicle” here in the US.

43 Israeli diplomat Abba : EBAN

Abba Eban was an Israeli diplomat and politician. He was born Aubrey Solomon Meir Eban in Cape Town, South Africa. While working at the United Nations after WWII, Eban changed his given name to “Abba”, the Hebrew word for “father”. Reportedly, he made this change as Eban saw himself as the father of the nation of Israel.

45 Emmy-winning scientist Bill : NYE

That would be “Bill Nye the Science Guy”. Bill’s show ran on PBS for four years, from 1993-97.

49 Book after Genesis : EXODUS

The Book of Exodus is the second book in the Bible, and deals with Moses leading the Hebrews out of Egypt. The name “Exodus” comes from the Greek “exodos” meaning “departure”.

54 Maker of tasty “pieces” : REESE

Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups were invented by Harry Burnett “H.B.” Reese. Peanut Butter Cups were originally called penny cups, reflecting the price at which they were sold. Then inflation took over, and maybe that’s why they were broken into smaller “Pieces” …

57 Achievement for a duffer : PAR

A duffer is a golfer, and not a very good one at that.

60 Transcript nos. : GPAS

Grade point average (GPA)

61 Bonkers : LOCO

In Spanish, if one isn’t “sano” (sane) one might be described as “loco” (crazy).

The word “bonkers” meaning “crazy” originated in the fifties. The term might come from navy slang meaning “slightly drunk”, behaving as though one received a “bonk” on the head.

65 Beyond tipsy : LIT

The term “tipsy” comes from the verb “to tip” meaning “to overturn, knock over”, and has been meaning “drunk” since the late 1500s.

66 Many a microbrew : ALE

Originally, the term “microbrewery” applied to smaller breweries. In contemporary usage, a microbrewery really describes a brewery that competes in the market on the basis of quality and diversity, rather than on the basis of price and advertising. The really small brewing operations are now referred to as “nanobreweries”.

67 Archery wood : YEW

Yew is the wood of choice for the longbow, a valued weapon in the history of England. The longbow is constructed with a core of yew heartwood (as the heartwood resists compression) that has a sheath of yew sapwood (as the sapwood resists stretching). The yew was in such demand for longbows that for centuries yew trees were in short supply in Britain and the wood had to be imported from all over Europe.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Not fatty : LEAN
5 Polynesian carving : TIKI
9 Ebenezer’s partner Marley : JACOB
14 Luxury hotel name : OMNI
15 Word before rock or rain : ACID …
16 Run off to wed : ELOPE
17 *Cafeteria queue : LUNCH LINE (power lunch & power line)
19 Chickens (out) : WIMPS
20 Dr. Mark Sloan portrayer in “Grey’s Anatomy” : ERIC DANE
22 Flower holder : POT
23 Harsh treatment : RAW DEAL
26 Rio Grande city : EL PASO
28 Buckeye State : OHIO
29 Vane heading : EAST
32 From scratch : ANEW
33 Drums held between the knees : BONGOS
36 How wet hair hangs : LIMPLY
38 Australian hub, in itineraries : SYD
39 *Non-glitzy local tavern : DIVE BAR (power dive & power bar)
41 Quattro meno uno : TRE
44 Part of a mug shot profile : ONE EAR
46 “I’ll handle it” : NO PROB
48 Like early-morning golf greens : DEWY
50 Self-important type : SNOB
52 “Lovely” musical meter maid : RITA
53 Maven : EXPERT
55 Unwrap with gusto : RIP OPEN
58 Rank above maj. : COL
59 Device used to record aerie hatchlings : EAGLE CAM
62 “Better late than never,” e.g. : ADAGE
64 Takeover endeavor … and a hint to what can precede each word in the answers to starred clues : POWER PLAY
68 Desert drifts : DUNES
69 Taiwanese PC giant : ACER
70 Word game piece : TILE
71 Lauder of makeup : ESTEE
72 Lays down a lawn : SODS
73 Worry obsessively : STEW

Down

1 Bit of cybermirth : LOL
2 Earthbound bird : EMU
3 Gothic novelist Radcliffe : ANN
4 Words to pacify a pooch : NICE DOG
5 Shire of “Rocky” : TALIA
6 Christmas eave decoration : ICICLE
7 Bighearted : KIND
8 Think tank nugget : IDEA
9 Tiara sparkler : JEWEL
10 “Aladdin” prince : ALI
11 *Corporate retreat with team-building activities : COMPANY TRIP (power company & power trip)
12 Try to block : OPPOSE
13 Give : BESTOW
18 Charlemagne’s realm: Abbr. : HRE
21 Doubles partner who’s not serving : NETMAN
23 Steals from : ROBS
24 Crow’s-nest call : AHOY!
25 *Basil sitting on a sill, e.g. : WINDOW PLANT (power window & power plant)
27 Sidekick : PAL
30 Final Olds made : ALERO
31 Bro or sis : SIB
34 Laudatory lines : ODE
35 Sonora snooze : SIESTA
37 Supporting : PRO
40 Delivery vehicle : VAN
42 Memorization method : ROTE
43 Israeli diplomat Abba : EBAN
45 Emmy-winning scientist Bill : NYE
47 Gives a cue : PROMPTS
48 Ten-year period : DECADE
49 Book after Genesis : EXODUS
51 Prepared, as coffee : BREWED
54 Maker of tasty “pieces” : REESE
56 Cupcake finishers : ICERS
57 Achievement for a duffer : PAR
60 Transcript nos. : GPAS
61 Bonkers : LOCO
63 “That’s surprising” : GEE
65 Beyond tipsy : LIT
66 Many a microbrew : ALE
67 Archery wood : YEW

18 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 13 Aug 19, Tuesday”

  1. LAT: 5:08, no errors. WSJ: 8:31, no errors. Newsday: 5:06, no errors. Jones: 8:08, 1 error. Yesterday’s New Yorker: 30:00, no errors. Yesterday’s BEQ: 37:30, no errors.

    1. To add a couple of stories that I didn’t get to add when I wrote this. I got into a book I got from a Goodwill-type place – turns out it’s a Newsday book (not branded that way but Newman as editor). It’s been about the same so far – roughly 18 puzzles down last night. Of course, some sections were written in by the previous owner, which is okay considering what I gave for the book. Looks like the puzzle set is structured like the regular Newsday, including 10 Saturday Stumpers. Gonna see how it all turns out!

      The other one is more a NYT thing since I found out about this long past, but not directly related. Given 0706 and what it is, it was rather interesting that Agard admitted in the constructor notes that “I wouldn’t submit this puzzle today.” Whatever you might say about his efforts, it’s interesting to see a constructor admit what most of the rest of us solvers know on something.

      In other news, I’m excited on the solve-at-home thing that’s going to come next week. Should be an interesting solving time.

      1. Ah, yes … the NYT 0706. A Saturday puzzle. Very difficult. Required a lot of patience. I liked what Jeff Chen had to say about it, because he pretty well captured my feelings: “Such a tough solving experience; an intense workout that feels great to have completed. There weren’t a lot of entries that played to a broad audience; an interesting mix of material that will elate one subset of solvers, and potentially alienate others.”

        The NYT publishes a wide variety of puzzles and I, for one, would be extremely disappointed to see them dumb it down to suit one group of solvers. Where is it written that I should be able to solve each and every puzzle without error? Where’s the challenge in that?

        And a question: What’s the source of your “solve-at-home thing”?

          1. Ah … Thanks … I’ve seen Lollapuzzoola mentioned more than once, but haven’t been able to work up much interest in it. And I had some thoughts of going to the ACPT this year, but Sloth intervened. Maybe next year … 😜.

  2. I was amused by 1D. My brother was signing all his emails with LOL for awhile. I finally asked him why he signs with “laugh out loud”. He said Oh, I thought it meant “lots of love”!!

  3. LAT: 7:24, no errors. Newsday: 5:02, no errors. WSJ: 9:05, no errors. Forgot about Jones until just now. Croce at 4:00 …

    Murphy had a field day at my house yesterday. Among other things, when my overhead kitchen light wouldn’t come on and I started to replace the fluorescent tubes in it, I discovered that one end of the fixture had come loose and was threatening to come down on my head. All fixed now, and I switched to LED tubes, so I have a much brighter kitchen … 😜 … which means I can see all the dust in the corners … 😳 … (I’m not the world’s worst housekeeper, but I’m a contender) … 😜.

    Now, about that escape into the mountains … 😁

    1. And … Jones: 13:48, no errors; spent a minute or two trying to come up with a better option at the intersection of 1D and 14A (a personal Natick) , but finally went with what turned out to be the correct choice; otherwise, pretty straightforward.

    2. And … Croce: 55:27, no errors. Another great (albeit angst-ridden 😜) encounter with a Tim Croce masterwork …

  4. 8:01. I’d just like to add that I have nothing to add. Off to Houston tonight for a 3 day trip – some business some personal. As long as there are no hurricanes while I’m there I should be fine.

    Best –

  5. Re 33A notes: “Hembra” and “macho” started out as terms for chickens. I know this from my father-in-law, who had chickens. Specifically, the fertile females were hembra, and the fertile males were macho. So a desexed male was not macho. Quien es mas macho?
    Re 15A notes: Reminded me of the first rock concert I attended- Jefferson Airplane, in October, 1969. They were in their prime and they literally rocked.
    Re 70A notes: Bill forgot to mention double points for naughty words!
    Once again, Bill’s notes were quite illuminating and interesting.

  6. Got it all, but was pretty slow about it. Kudos to you guys for your continued
    good work and fast times. I found it both challenging and fun.

    I had to make a few changes, like DAMP to DEWY and respell a few. But,
    100% is 100% anyway you slice it.

    Gearing up for tomorrow for a number to go with our two 100’s. More then.

  7. 9 mins, 54 secs, no errors. Not much to say about this one. But, since there’s nothing to complain about, I’d say that’s a big plus these days.

  8. Had harD before ACID. It’s an ACID rain’s gonna fall.

    Didn’t know ERIC DANE, NETMAN, LIT, or ACER. I think the last manufactures mostly gamer machines, so I wouldn’t have looked. Also, don’t know POWER – DIVE. thought it might be swimming, but it’s planes. Got all the above by crosses.

  9. Greetings!!🦆

    No errors. Cute puzzle, tho I didn’t use or even look for the theme. Is it weird to have NO PROB as an answer, with the clue not saying it’s a shortened version? 🤔 Of course I use that expression all the time…

    Sallee– when I was first seeing LOL I too thought it stood for Lots of Love! 😁

    Be well~~🚋⚾️

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.