LA Times Crossword 21 Aug 19, Wednesday

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Constructed by: Jim Bordoni & C.C. Burnikel
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Aloha State

Themed answers each comprise two words starting with “HI”, which is the postal code for Hawaii, the ALOHA STATE. Hawaii became the 50th US state, 60 years ago today.

  • 56A With “The,” one of 50 since 8/21/1959, as hinted at by the answers to starred clues : ALOHA STATE
  • 17A *British-owned American hotel chain : HOLIDAY INN
  • 22A *Went on foot : HOOFED IT
  • 33A *Wind chill factor relative : HEAT INDEX
  • 38A *Three-time U.S. Open champion : HALE IRWIN
  • 46A *Subject of much debate : HOT ISSUE

Bill’s time: 6m 52s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Half of a stiff price to pay : ARM

It might cost “an arm and a leg”.

4 Chinese food additive : MSG

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the sodium salt of a naturally-occurring,non-essential amino acid called glutamic acid. It is used widely as a flavor enhancer, particularly in many Asian cuisines. Whether or not it is harmful seems to be still under debate. I say that something produced in a test tube shouldn’t be in our food …

7 Breed from Honshu : AKITA

The Akita breed of dog is named for its point of origin, the Akita Prefecture in Japan. When Helen Keller visited Japan in 1937, she asked for and was given an Akita breed of dog, with the name of Kamikaze-go. Sadly, the dog died within a year from distemper. The following year the Japanese government officially presented Keller with a replacement dog. Supposedly Keller’s dogs were the first members of the breed to be introduced into the US.

Honshu is the largest island in Japan, and the seventh largest island in the world. The name “Honshu” translates as “Main Island”.

14 __ Nui: Easter Island : RAPA

“Rapa Nui” is the Polynesian name for what we are more likely to call “Easter Island”. The European name was coined by the Dutch explorer Jacob Roggeveen, who came across the island on Easter Sunday in the year 1722. Chilean-owned Easter Island is inhabited and is a location that is remarkably distant from neighboring civilization. The nearest inhabited island is Pitcairn Island, which is almost 1300 miles away.

15 Jell-O flavor : LEMON

If you like Jell-O, then you might want to stop by LeRoy, New York where you can visit the only Jell-O museum in the world. While at the museum, you can walk along the Jell-O Brick Road …

16 Food for the kitty? : ANTE

17 *British-owned American hotel chain : HOLIDAY INN

The first Holiday Inn hotel was opened in 1952. The name for the hotel chain was inspired by the 1942 movie “Holiday Inn” starring Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire. The Holiday Inn chain has been British-owned since 1988.

19 Robert the Bruce, for one : SCOT

The pot in a card game has been referred to as the kitty since the 1880s. It’s not certain how the name “kitty” evolved but possibly it came from “kit”, the necessary equipment for the game.

26 Actress Longoria : EVA

Eva Longoria is a fashion model and actress who had a regular role on TV’s “Desperate Housewives” playing Gabrielle Solis.

30 Cat Deeley’s role on “So You Think You Can Dance” : EMCEE

“So You Think You Can Dance” is a reality show and dance competition that started airing in 2005. From its origins in the US, the show turned into a global franchise.

Cat Deeley is a TV presenter from England who is best known in the US as host of the televised dance competition “So You Think You Can Dance”. Deeley married Irish comedian and TV presenter Patrick Kielty in 2012.

33 *Wind chill factor relative : HEAT INDEX

The heat index combines air temperature and relative humidity. It is an attempt to measure the relative temperature that is actually perceived by a person. The idea is that temperatures are perceived by us as being higher if accompanied by high humidity. This is because when the humidity is high the body finds it more difficult to cool itself by perspiring.

Wind chill is the lowering of body temperature due to the flow of colder air over the body’s surface. The faster the cold air moves, the more readily the body’s temperature falls.

35 Jobs title, once : CEO

Chief executive officer (CEO)

Steve Jobs certainly was a business icon in Silicon Valley. I don’t think it is too surprising to learn that the brilliant Jobs didn’t even finish his college education, dropping out of Reed College in Oregon after only one semester. Steve Jobs co-founded Apple in 1976, but in 1985 he was basically fired from his own company during the computer sales slump of the mid-eighties. Jobs then founded NeXT Computer, a company focused on supplying workstations to the higher education and business markets. Apple purchased NeXT in 1996, and that’s how Jobs found himself back with his original company.

36 Represent inaccurately : BELIE

The verbs “to confute” and “to belie” both mean “to show to be false”.

37 Web access co. : ISP

An Internet service provider (ISP) is just what the name indicates, a company that provides its customers with access to the Internet. One way that ISPs differentiate themselves from each other is in the way in which end users are connected to the ISP’s network. So, there are cable ISPs, DSL ISPs, dial-up ISPs and satellite ISPs.

38 *Three-time U.S. Open champion : HALE IRWIN

Hale Irwin is one of only a handful of golfers to win three US Open golf championships. When he won his last US Open, in 1990, he became the oldest person to win the tournament, at 45 years old.

41 “Semper fidelis” is one : MOTTO

“Semper Fidelis” (often abbreviated to “Semper Fi”) is the motto of the United States Marine Corps (USMC). The phrase is Latin and means “Always Faithful”. The US Marine Corps isn’t the only military unit using “Semper Fidelis” as a motto. It’s also used by the Portuguese Marine Corps, the Republic of China Marine Corps and the Swiss Grenadiers.

44 Refuge for couples? : ARK

The term “ark”, when used with reference to Noah, is a translation of the Hebrew word “tebah”. The word “tebah” is also used in the Bible for the basket in which Moses was placed by his mother when she floated him down the Nile. It seems that the word “tebah” doesn’t mean “boat” and nor does it mean “basket”. Rather, a more appropriate translation is “life-preserver” or “life-saver”. So, Noah’s ark was Noah’s life-preserver during the flood.

45 Italian automaker : FIAT

Fiat is the largest car manufacturer in Italy, and is headquartered in Turin in the Piedmont region in the north of the country. Fiat was founded in 1899 by Giovanni Agnelli, when the company’s name was “Fabbrica Italiana di Automobili Torino” (FIAT). A few years ago, Fiat became the majority shareholder in Chrysler.

55 Radius neighbor : ULNA

The radius and ulna are bones in the forearm. If you hold the palm of your hand up in front of you, the radius is the bone on the “thumb-side” of the arm, and the ulna is the bone on the “pinky-side”.

56 With “The,” one of 50 since 8/21/1959, as hinted at by the answers to starred clues : ALOHA STATE

The official nickname for Hawaii is “The Aloha State”. Hawaii is also referred to as “Paradise of the Pacific” and “The Islands of Aloha”.

59 Have more People come to the house? : RENEW

There used to be a “People” page in each issue of “Time” magazine. This page was spun-off in 1974 as a publication of its own, which we now call “People” magazine. “People” is noted for its annual special editions with features such as “Best & Worst Dressed” and “Sexiest Man Alive”. The “Sexiest Man Alive” edition now appears at the end of November each year. The first choice for “Sexiest Man” was Mel Gibson, in 1985.

60 City near Anaheim : BREA

The city of Brea, California takes its name from “brea”, the Spanish word for “tar”. Back in the 1800s, entrepreneurs were attracted to the area by the “black gold” (crude oil) that in some locations was just bubbling up from the ground.

The California city of Anaheim is famous as home to the Disneyland resort. Prior to Disneyland opening in 1955, Anaheim was largely an agricultural community. It had been founded in 1857 by a group of German-Americans who were looking for an area suitable for growing grapes. The name “Anaheim” comes from “Ana”, referring to the nearby Santa Ana River, and from “Heim”, a German word meaning “home”.

61 Dueling sport : EPEE

The sword known as an épée has a three-sided blade. The épée is similar to a foil and sabre, although the foil and saber have rectangular cross-sections.

62 Midler of “Hello Dolly” : BETTE

I am a huge, huge fan of Bette Midler. I love her bawdy humor, her expansive personality, and her amazing voice. Midler will forever be associated with the 1979 film “The Rose”, which is loosely based on the life of the self-destructive singer Janis Joplin, with Bette playing the lead. Midler shows that she can act in this movie, and boy does she show that she can sing. The title song was written by Amanda McBroom and became a huge hit for Midler in 1979.

“Hello, Dolly!” is a Broadway musical that was first produced in 1964, and adapted into a hugely successful movie in 1969. The title role of Dolly Levi was played by Barbra Streisand in the film, with Gene Kelly directing and a leading part for a young Michael Crawford. The stage show was revived on Broadway in 2017, with Bette Midler in the title role.

63 Leb. neighbor : SYR

The modern state that we know as Syria was established after WWI as a French mandate. Syria was granted independence from France in 1946.

64 Cap initials at Busch Stadium : STL

The St. Louis Cardinals Major League Baseball team plays at Busch Stadium. Busch Stadium is the third stadium in the history of St. Louis to have the Busch name. The first two were named for Gussie Busch, the brewing magnate and former Cardinals team owner. The current stadium is named for the brewery though, and not Gussie per se.

Down

2 Chop-O-Matic maker : RONCO

Ronco is a company that manufactures and sells products mainly for the kitchen. Over the years, the company has been closely associated with the “-O-Matic” suffix, and particularly the “Veg-O-Matic” vegetable slicer. Ronco is also associated with the phrase “set it and forget it”, which was used for the Showtime Rotisserie Grill.

3 Anti-harassment movement : ME TOO

The use of the hashtag #MeToo was encouraged initially by actress Alyssa Milano in 2017 to draw attention to sexual assault and sexual harassment. Milano’s was acting in response to the growing number of allegations against film producer Harvey Weinstein. The use of the phrase “Me Too” in the context of sexual misconduct dates back to 2006. Social activist Tarana Burke started to use the phrase on the Myspace social network after a 13-year-old girl told her that she had been sexually assaulted. Apparently, Burke had no response at the time the girl confided in her, but later wished she had responding, “Me too”.

4 New Zealand settler : MAORI

The Māori are the indigenous people of New Zealand. They are eastern Polynesian in origin and began arriving in New Zealand relatively recently, starting some time in the late 13th century. The word “māori” simply means “normal”, distinguishing the mortal human being from spiritual entities. The Māori refer to New Zealand as “Aotearoa”.

7 In the style of : A LA

The phrase “in the style of” can be translated into “alla” in Italian and “à la” in French.

11 Heche of “Psycho” (1998) : ANNE

My favorite movie starring the actress Anne Heche is “Six Days Seven Nights”, a romantic comedy in which she plays opposite Harrison Ford. Heche is noted for her difficult private life. She wrote that her father had molested her as a child and gave her a sexually transmitted disease (he later revealed that he was homosexual, and died of AIDS). Heche dated comedian Steve Martin for two years, and then lived with comedian Ellen DeGeneres for three. Soon after breaking up with DeGeneres, she started exhibiting eccentric behavior for a while, claiming that she was the daughter of God, and that she would take everyone back to heaven in her spaceship. Happily, I think things have calmed down for her in recent years.

The original “Psycho” film from 1960 was directed by Alfred Hitchcock and starred Anthony Perkins and Janet Leigh. “Psycho” was remade in 1998. The remake was directed by Gus Van Sant and starred Vince Vaughn and Anne Heche.

14 Valerie Harper sitcom : RHODA

The seventies sitcom “Rhoda”, starring Valerie Harper, was a spin-off of “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”. The eighth episode of the show was an hour-long special in which Rhoda married her fiance Joe (played by David Groh). At the time of airing it was the second-most watched television episode in history, second only to the 1953 birth of Little Ricky on “I Love Lucy”.

Valerie Harper is best known for playing Rhoda Morgenstern on “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”, and on her own spin-off sitcom “Rhoda”. Harper was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2009, and in 2013 was given just months to live. Despite the prognosis, and her age of 74 years, she decided to appear in the 17th season of “Dancing with the Stars”. Harper is still with us.

25 Boxer who beat Frazier twice : ALI

Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier had three memorable fights. The first was billed as the “Fight of the Century” and took place in 1971 in Madison Square Garden. It was a fight between two great boxers, both of whom were undefeated up till that point. Frazier won in a unanimous decision after fifteen rounds. A couple of years later, in 1973, Frazier lost his title to George Foreman. Ali and Frazier had a non-title rematch in 1974, with Ali coming out ahead this time, also in a unanimous decision. Later that year, Ali grabbed back the World Heavyweight Title in “The Rumble in the Jungle”, the famous “rope-a-dope” fight against George Foreman. That set the stage for the third and final fight between Ali and Frazier, “The Thrilla in Manila”. Ali won the early rounds, but Frazier made a comeback in the middle of the fight. Ali took control at the end of the bout, so much so that Frazier wasn’t able to come out of his corner for the 15th and final round. He couldn’t come out of his corner because both of his eyes were swollen shut, giving Ali a victory due to a technical knockout (TKO).

28 Tuxedo part : VEST

Apparently, the style of men’s evening dress called a “tuxedo” was first worn to a country club event in 1886 in New York. The use of a dark dinner jacket without tails became fashionable at the club with the members, and the tradition spread from there. The country club was located in Tuxedo Park, New York, giving the style of dress its name.

29 Former Canadian MLBer : EXPO

The Washington Nationals (“Nats”) baseball team started out life as the Montreal Expos in 1969, and were the first Major League Baseball team in Canada. The Expos moved to Washington in 2005 becoming the Nats. There are only two Major Leagues teams that have never played in a World Series, one being the Mariners and the other the Nats.

31 Happy __ : MEAL

The McDonald’s Happy Meal was introduced in 1977. The Happy Meal was inspired by a selection of food designed in a Guatemalan McDonald’s to suit children that was called “Menu Ronald”. The toys in Happy Meals often tie-in with some movie and so are part of an advertising campaign.

32 Leading edge of cooler temperatures : COLD FRONT

A cold front is the leading edge of a relatively cold mass of air that is replacing a warmer mass of air at ground level. In the presence of sufficient moisture in the air, a cold front can bring rain and perhaps thunderstorms.

34 Yale alum : ELI

“Eli” is the nickname for a graduate of Yale University, and a term used in honor of the Yale benefactor Elihu Yale.

39 Peter the Great, e.g. : EPITHET

An epithet is a word or phrase used in a name to describe the quality of the person or thing bearing that name. For example, King Richard I was also known as Richard the Lionheart. The term “epithet” can also describe a word that is disparaging or abusive.

Peter the Great (aka “Peter I”) was perhaps the most successful of the Romanov tsars, and was famous for modernizing Russia and expanding the country’s sphere of influence, creating the Russian Empire. He ruled from 1682 until his death in 1725.

40 401(k) kin, briefly : IRA

A 401(k) account resembles an IRA in that contributions can be made from a paycheck prior to the deduction of income taxes. A 401(k) differs from an IRA in that it is an employer-sponsored plan, with payments taken by the employer directly from an employee’s paycheck. Additionally, contributions can be fully or partially matched by an employer.

41 CT scan relative : MRI

An MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) machine uses powerful magnetic fields to generate its images so there is no exposure to ionizing radiation (such as X-rays). We used MRI equipment in our chemistry labs at school, way back in the days when the technology was still called Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI). Apparently the marketing folks didn’t like the term “nuclear” because of its association with atomic bombs, so now it’s just called MRI.

A CT (or “CAT”) scan produces (via computer manipulation) a three-dimensional image of the inside of an object, usually the human body. It does so by taking a series of two dimensional x-ray images while rotating the camera around the patient. The issue with CT scans is that they use x-rays, and high doses of radiation can be harmful, causing damage that is cumulative over time.

46 White with frost : HOARY

The Old English word “har” meant “gray, venerable, old”, and came into English as “hoar” (and later “hoary”) with the same meaning. The term “hoar-frost” dates back to the 13th century, and reflects the similarity of the white feathers of frost to the gray/white of an old man’s beard.

47 Furry swimmer : OTTER

The fur of the sea otter is exceptionally thick. It is the densest fur in the whole animal kingdom.

48 Berth places : SLIPS

A “slipway” or “slip” is a ramp on the shore in which boats can “slip” into the water. This “slipping” into the water is literally the case in a shipyard, where a vessel’s hull slips off the ramp after it is coated with grease.

50 Art class item : EASEL

The word “easel” comes from an old Dutch word meaning “donkey” would you believe? The idea is that an easel carries its load (an oil painting, say) just as a donkey would be made to carry a load.

51 Atkins no-no : CARB

Perhaps most notably, the eating of relatively few carbohydrates is central to the diet proposed by Robert Atkins. Atkins first laid out the principles behind the Atkins diet in a research paper published in 1958 in the “Journal of the American Medical Association”. He popularized his diet starting in 1972 with his book “Dr. Atkins’ Diet Revolution”.

52 Toward shelter : ALEE

Alee is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing aweather.

54 Some parlors, for short : OTBS

Off-track betting (OTB) is the legal gambling that takes place on horse races outside of a race track. A betting parlor can be referred to as an OTB.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Half of a stiff price to pay : ARM
4 Chinese food additive : MSG
7 Breed from Honshu : AKITA
12 Sob story makeup : WOES
14 __ Nui: Easter Island : RAPA
15 Jell-O flavor : LEMON
16 Food for the kitty? : ANTE
17 *British-owned American hotel chain : HOLIDAY INN
19 Robert the Bruce, for one : SCOT
20 Speak with style : ORATE
21 Latin “to be” : ESSE
22 *Went on foot : HOOFED IT
24 Boys : LADS
26 Actress Longoria : EVA
27 Substitute for : RELIEVE
30 Cat Deeley’s role on “So You Think You Can Dance” : EMCEE
33 *Wind chill factor relative : HEAT INDEX
35 Jobs title, once : CEO
36 Represent inaccurately : BELIE
37 Web access co. : ISP
38 *Three-time U.S. Open champion : HALE IRWIN
41 “Semper fidelis” is one : MOTTO
43 Veterans : OLD PROS
44 Refuge for couples? : ARK
45 Italian automaker : FIAT
46 *Subject of much debate : HOT ISSUE
51 Golfer’s transport : CART
53 Night calls : HOOTS
55 Radius neighbor : ULNA
56 With “The,” one of 50 since 8/21/1959, as hinted at by the answers to starred clues : ALOHA STATE
58 Eyeglass frames : RIMS
59 Have more People come to the house? : RENEW
60 City near Anaheim : BREA
61 Dueling sport : EPEE
62 Midler of “Hello Dolly” : BETTE
63 Leb. neighbor : SYR
64 Cap initials at Busch Stadium : STL

Down

1 Knee-deep (in) : AWASH
2 Chop-O-Matic maker : RONCO
3 Anti-harassment movement : ME TOO
4 New Zealand settler : MAORI
5 Paint spill sound : SPLAT!
6 Stable pace : GAIT
7 In the style of : A LA
8 Entered, as data : KEYED IN
9 “That went right over my head” : I MISSED IT
10 Truckloads : TONS
11 Heche of “Psycho” (1998) : ANNE
13 Fixed charge : SET FEE
14 Valerie Harper sitcom : RHODA
18 Get rid of : DELETE
23 Christmas __ : EVE
25 Boxer who beat Frazier twice : ALI
27 Ball game delayer : RAIN
28 Tuxedo part : VEST
29 Former Canadian MLBer : EXPO
30 Repeat : ECHO
31 Happy __ : MEAL
32 Leading edge of cooler temperatures : COLD FRONT
33 Cuts down : HEWS
34 Yale alum : ELI
36 Thin soups : BROTHS
39 Peter the Great, e.g. : EPITHET
40 401(k) kin, briefly : IRA
41 CT scan relative : MRI
42 “Sounds good” : OK SURE
44 Utterly confused : AT SEA
46 White with frost : HOARY
47 Furry swimmer : OTTER
48 Berth places : SLIPS
49 Not yet achieved, as a goal : UNMET
50 Art class item : EASEL
51 Atkins no-no : CARB
52 Toward shelter : ALEE
54 Some parlors, for short : OTBS
57 Stun : AWE

19 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 21 Aug 19, Wednesday”

  1. Got stuck in the bottom right corner until I realized ULNA was a neighbor of radius. A pleasant doable puzzle today.

    Eddie

  2. Enjoyable puzzle. No errors, but several erasures before completion.
    Re 4A notes: It is incorrect to say MSG comes from a test tube. MSG is naturally-occurring in many plants, and most MSG additive is distilled from seaweed. No less noxious to me, as it makes my esophagus spasm, most recently eating sushi which had no added MSG but from the seaweed wrap.
    Re 59A notes: I always keep a copy of Time for first aid, because of the expression.
    Re 62A: Reminded me of how much I enjoyed Divine Madness when it played the cinemas.

  3. LAT: 8:27, no errors. Newsday: 5:22, no errors. WSJ: 15:13, no errors; got hung up for a bit on a stupid misstep.

    @Glenn … Thanks again for the info about NYT and WSJ cryptics. I had already decided they must be published intermittently, but didn’t know the schedule. So I’ll look into that, but I may just order a collection of the NYT puzzles from Amazon ($12.95 for 200 of them, which is likely to be more than enough for the rest of my life 😜).

    1. @Glenn … I decided to try this “Beginners’ Puzzle” (from the web site I mentioned in the previous post):

      http://www.alberichcrosswords.com/pages/id209.html

      and … it took me a while, but I succeeded in doing it … with no errors!

      Again, I Googled a (very) few things along the way out of curiosity, but ultimately none of my Googles were of any use in solving the thing. There is one four-letter answer that I view as peculiarly English, but no others. Relatively easy, I would say, though I would point out his comment, at the top of the page, that “any cryptic puzzle, no matter how “easy”, presents a significant challenge to the first-time solver”, which echoes your comments about them.

  4. 16:49 no errors….I stared at this puzzle after completion for quite a while but couldn’t pick up the theme….I was trying to find aloha jumbled up or something similar but HI never entered my mind

  5. Finished, but didn’t understand the clue to 19A and Bill had the answer for 16A there instead. What does “Robert for Bruce” mean? Or is that the translation in Scottish.

    1. Robert *THE* Bruce. He was a Scot leader in the medieval times.

      “Bruce”, in old Scottish, must be a title, like Laird, or Thain or that sort. As years went by, it became a first name in English.

    2. My puzzle said Robert The Bruce, one of the leaders of the Scottish Revolution
      that was the theme of the Mel Gibson Movie, “Braveheart”.

      No special short time, and we had 2 errors, missing HOARY. Got hung up in the NW quadrant, but finally got it. Did not like the clue for 61A. The epee is the rapier that the sport of dueling or fencing is done with and not the sports themselves. Yes? But, no loss.

  6. 9:05. Totally missed the theme, but I never really sought it out either. I just knew it had something to do with Hawaii.

    Bill and Michael were both wrong. MSG was produced in New York City and sits atop Penn Station….

    Best –

  7. Half way through the puzzle I was thinking how nice it was that “we” had moved on from EPEE, which got old quite a while ago. Then, alas, there it was again.
    At least I’ve never had to face Ra, the Egyptian sun god.

    Bill, thanks for the explanation of EPITHET. I was wondering who was being called a Peter the Great, and why it was an insult.

  8. 9 mins 22 sec, and no errors. Had a glitch by entering HOWLS for 53A and not being able to reconcile with down crosses. Same with HOT ISSUE, which I initially entered as HOT TOPIC. Otherwise not too difficult, although OTB was a evil ask. It’s been many years since I used to be into horseracing, and it took me awhile to see it.

  9. Had HOT “topic” and had to Google to get HOT ISSUE. But before I got there, had to Google for RIMS and STL (sports). All in the SE.

    Never knew EPITHET could indicate a non-disparaging word. Was hoping Bill would be telling us something nasty about Peter I.

  10. Mostly easy Wednesday for me; took 18 minutes with no errors. Had to poke around a bit in the middle South section, but eventually sorted it out.

    Had to change isR to SYR to have things make sense. Never heard of Cat Deeley and only vaguely heard of Hale Irwin. Also didn’t know epithet could be used positively. Even though I got BREA, I finally checked Google Maps to see this was an actual city. I’ve always gotten that confused with the La Brea tar pits, which is kinda far from Anaheim… Good to know.

  11. Wassup y’all?!🦆

    No errors. I also didn’t know that EPITHET could have a non-negative meaning.

    Having the house appraised on Thursday, for a refi. Why do appraisers always low-ball it?? I don’t think it will affect my loan, but I’m all hyper and nervous about it…..😣

    ….but Dodgers won and Yankees lost, so I guess all is right with the world–😊

    Be well~~🚋⚾️

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