LA Times Crossword 10 Nov 19, Sunday

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Constructed by: Ed Sessa
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Fowl Play

Themed answers are all FOWL-related, and each sounds like a common phrase:

  • 23A Action at a coop dance? : POULTRY IN MOTION (from “Poetry in Motion”)
  • 39A Nestling tossed out of a bar? : BOUNCED CHICK (from “bounced check”)
  • 47A Story subtitled “Murder Most Fowl”? : THE FRYER’S TALE (from “The Friar’s Tale”)
  • 66A Rooster’s wake-up call? : ALARM CLUCK (from “alarm clock”)
  • 69A Tiny hatchling group? : MICRO-BROOD (from “microbrewed”)
  • 88A What fussy hens do? : PECK AND CHOOSE (from “pick and choose”)
  • 97A Fowl haulin’ a semi? : CAPON TRUCKIN’ (from “keep on truckin’”)
  • 117A “Rooster Wars” sequel in which Hen Solo rescues Princess Layer? : THE BANTAM MENACE (from “The Phantom Menace”)

Bill’s time: 17m 15s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Alerts that may lead to roadblocks, briefly : APBS

An All Points Bulletin (APB) is a broadcast from one US law enforcement agency to another.

5 Bela Lugosi was buried in one : CAPE

Bela Lugosi was a Hungarian stage and screen actor who was perhaps best known for playing the title role in the 1931 film “Dracula” and for playing the same role on Broadway. Lugosi found himself typecast for the rest of his career and almost always played the role of the villain, often in horror movies. When he passed away in 1956, his wife had him buried in the costume he wore playing Count Dracula on Broadway.

9 Orkney components : ISLES

Orkney (also called “The Orkney Islands”) is a group of about 70 islands in the very north of Scotland. When locals who inhabit the archipelago refer to the Mainland, they aren’t talking about Scotland that is just ten miles away. Instead, the Mainland in Orkney is the name of the largest of all the islands.

19 Ball game : POLO

The sport of polo originated in Iran, possibly before the 5th century BC. Polo was used back them primarily as a training exercise for cavalry units.

21 Steel plow pioneer : DEERE

John Deere invented the first commercially successful steel plow in 1837. Prior to Deere’s invention, farmers used an iron or wooden plow that constantly had to be cleaned as rich soil stuck to its surfaces. The cast-steel plow was revolutionary as its smooth sides solved the problem of “stickiness”. The Deere company that John founded uses the slogan “Nothing Runs Like a Deere”, and has a leaping deer as its logo.

26 Catkin producer : ALDER

Alder trees are deciduous (i.e. not evergreen), and the fruit of the tree is called a “catkin”. The tree carries both male and female catkins that look very similar to each other, but the male catkin is longer than the female. Alders are pollinated by wind usually, although bees can play a role.

27 Make a bundle farming? : SHEAVE

To sheave is to collect into a sheaf, into a bundle.

29 The Tempter : SATAN

Satan is the bringer of evil and temptation in the Abrahamic religions. The name “Satan” is Hebrew for “adversary”.

31 __ fide : BONA

“Bona fide(s)” translates from the Latin as “in good faith”, and is used to indicate honest intentions. It can also mean that something is authentic, like a piece of art that is represented in good faith as being genuine.

32 D.C. fundraisers : PACS

A political action committee (PAC) is a private group that works to influence the outcome of a particular election or group of elections. Any group becomes a PAC by law when it receives or spends more than $1,000 for the purpose of influencing the outcome of an election. In 2010 the Supreme Court ruled that PACS that did not make direct contributions to candidates or parties could accept unlimited contributions. These “independent, expenditure-only committees” are commonly referred to as “super PACs”.

36 Guitarist Clapton : ERIC

Can you believe that the great Eric Clapton only had one chart-topper in the US? In 1974, Clapton released a cover version of the Bob Marley classic “I Shot the Sheriff” and ended up selling more copies of that song than Bob Marley did himself. Clapton is the only person to have been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame three times: once as a member of the Yardbirds, once as a member of the supergroup Cream, and once as a solo artist.

38 Car in a ’60s hit : GTO

The 1964 song “G.T.O” was the debut recording for the surf rock group from the sixties known as Ronny & the Daytonas.

43 Eggy quaff : NOG

It’s not really clear where the term “nog” (as in “eggnog”) comes from although it might derive from the word “noggin”, which was originally a small wooden cup that was long associated with alcoholic drinks.

46 Silver, to Long John : TREASURE

Long John Silver is a character in the novella “Treasure Island” by Robert Louis Stevenson (RLS). Long John is a pirate with a peg leg.

47 Story subtitled “Murder Most Fowl”? : THE FRYER’S TALE (from “The Friar’s Tale”)

“The Friar’s Tale” is one of the stories related in Geoffrey Chaucer’s “The Canterbury Tales”.

50 Cotton Club site : HARLEM

The Cotton Club was a famous jazz club in New York City’s Harlem neighborhood that thrived during the days of prohibition. Although the stars on stage were mainly African-American, including Duke Ellington, Count Basie and Ella Fitzgerald, the club generally denied admission to African-American patrons.

54 Imam’s faith : ISLAM

An imam is a Muslim leader, and often the person in charge of a mosque or perhaps a Muslim community.

63 Puffin relative : AUK

Auks are penguin-like sea birds that live in colder northern waters including the Arctic. Like penguins, auks are great swimmers, but unlike penguins, auks can fly.

Puffins are seabirds that are found in the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans. They feed primarily by diving into the water to catch fish, and are known for their ability to swim underwater using a “flying” technique.

65 Gp. with many sub-par members : PGA

The Professional Golfers’ Association (PGA) was founded in 1916 and today has its headquarters (unsurprisingly) in Florida, where so many golfers live. Back in 1916, the PGA was based in New York City.

76 Inuit transport : UMIAK

There is a type of boat used by Inuit people called an “umiak”. . The term “umiak” means “woman’s boat”, whereas “kayak” means “man’s boat”.

79 Income for Inc., say : AD SPACE

“Inc.” is a business magazine that specializes in articles about growing companies. “Inc.” publishes a list of the 500 fastest-growing private companies in the country each year, calling it the “Inc. 500”. The “Inc. 5000” is an expanded list also published by the magazine.

86 Unleash a tirade : LET RIP

The term “tirade” describes a long and vehement speech, and is a word that came into English from French. “Tirade” can have the same meaning in French, but is also the word for “volley”. So, a tirade is a “volley” of words.

96 Home-school link: Abbr. : PTA

Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

97 Fowl haulin’ a semi? : CAPON TRUCKIN’ (from “keep on truckin’”)

A capon is a castrated cockerel (poor guy!). Castration has a profound effect on the bird (duh!), making the meat more tender to eat when it is slaughtered.

101 Some boxing wins : KOS

Knockout (KO)

102 Disappearing ski resort feature : T-BAR

A T-bar is a ski lift on which the skiers are pulled up the hill in pairs, with each pair standing (not sitting!) either side of a T-shaped metal bar. The bar is placed behind the thighs, pulling along the skiers as they remain standing on their skis (hopefully!). There’s also a J-bar, which is a similar device but with each J-shaped bar used by one skier at a time.

103 Saudi Arabia neighbor : OMAN

Oman lies on the southeast coast of the Arabian Peninsula and is neighbored by the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Oman is a monarchy, and the official name of the state is the Sultanate of Oman. All of the country’s legislative, executive and judiciary power resides with the hereditary sultan.

104 42-Down’s leg count : TEN
(42D Seabed sidler : CRAB)

Decapods are an order of crustaceans that includes crayfish, crabs, lobsters, prawns and shrimp. Even though decapods can have perhaps over 30 appendages, only ten of these are considered legs, hence the name “decapod”.

107 Smack, as a mosquito : SWAT

“Mosquito” is the Spanish for “little fly”. The female mosquito actually has to have a “blood meal” before she is able to lay her eggs. Mosquitoes are sometimes referred to as “skeeters”.

109 Anarchist in 1921 news : SACCO

Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were two anarchists accused of committing murder during an armed robbery in 1920. They were arrested the day after the crime. There followed two controversial trials, guilty verdicts and several appeals that went all the way to the US Supreme Court. Despite mounting evidence that the pair was innocent, the guilty verdicts were repeatedly upheld. A lot of the public accepted that Sacco and Vanzetti were not guilty, and many protests were staged. Regardless, the two were executed in the electric chair in 1927.

112 Voluminous ref. work : OED

Work started on what was to become the first “Oxford English Dictionary” (OED) in 1857. Several interim versions of the dictionary were published in the coming years with the first full version appearing, in ten bound volumes, in 1928. The second edition of the OED appeared in 1989 and is made up of twenty volumes. The OED was first published in electronic form in 1988 and went online in 2000. Given the modern use of computers, the publishing house responsible feels that there will never be a third print version of the famous dictionary.

115 Wes Craven film locale: Abbr. : ELM ST

“A Nightmare on Elm Street” is a Wes Craven slasher-horror film that was released in 1984. As I don’t do “slasher” or “horror”, I was surprised to learn that Johnny Depp was in the movie, making his feature film debut.

117 “Rooster Wars” sequel in which Hen Solo rescues Princess Layer? : THE BANTAM MENACE (from “The Phantom Menace”)

Small breeds of poultry might be known as bantam breeds. European sailors found smaller fowl in Southeast Asia that they referred to as “bantam”, with “Bantam” being an old Indonesian seaport.

“Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace” was the fourth film released in the “Star Wars” franchise, and the first in a prequel trilogy (the first three films were Episodes IV, V & VI). “The Phantom Menace” was released in 1999, twenty-two years after the original “Star Wars” movie, and sixteen years after the previous episode, “Return of the Jedi”.

120 Herder’s rope : RIATA

A riata is a lariat or a lasso. “Riata” comes from “reata”, the Spanish word for lasso.

122 Sentiment-al piece? : OP-ED

“Op-ed” is an abbreviation for “opposite the editorial page”. Op-eds started in “The New York Evening World” in 1921 when the page opposite the editorials was used for articles written by a named guest writer, someone independent of the editorial board.

123 What beavers do : GNAW

Beavers build dams so that they can live in and around the slower and deeper water that builds up above the dam. This deeper water provides more protection for the beavers from predators such as bears. Beavers are nocturnal animals and do all their construction work at night.

125 Auto bust : EDSEL

The Edsel brand of automobile was named for Edsel Ford, son of Henry. Sadly, the name “Edsel” has become synonymous with “failure”, which was no fault of Edsel himself who had died several years before the Edsel line was introduced. When the Ford Motor Company introduced the Edsel on 4 September 1957, Ford proclaimed the day to be “E Day”.

Down

3 Navy aerobatic team member : BLUE ANGEL

“Blue Angels” is the popular name for the US Navy’s Flight Demonstration Squadron. The group was formed in 1946 and is the oldest of the US military’s flying aerobatic teams. The squadron took its nickname back in ‘46 from the Blue Angel nightclub that was around at that time in New York City.

6 “Clueless” director Heckerling : AMY

Film director Amy Heckerling is from the Bronx in New York. She was at the helm for several notable films, including “Fast Times at Ridgemont High”, “National Lampoon’s European Vacation” and “Clueless”.

The 1995 movie “Clueless” is apparently based on Jane Austen’s “Emma”, which is a favorite novel of mine. As a result, I am going to have to check out the film. That said, “Clueless” is set in a Beverly Hills high school, so I probably should prepare myself to be disappointed …

7 Loose dressing gown : PEIGNOIR

A peignoir is a loose-fitting dressing gown worn by a woman. The term “peignoir” comes from “peigner”, the French for “to comb the hair”. The idea was that a peignoir was worn by a lady while she was combing her hair before retiring.

8 Same old same old feeling : ENNUI

“Ennui” is the French word for “boredom”, and a word that we now use in English. It’s one of the few French words we’ve imported that we haven’t anglicized, and actually pronounce “correctly”.

10 Board-and-pieces units : SETS

Like a chess set, perhaps.

11 Sister of Luke : LEIA

Princess Leia is Luke Skywalker’s twin sister in the original “Star Wars” trilogy and was played by Carrie Fisher. Carrie Fisher has stated that she hated the famous “cinnamon bun hairstyle” that she had to wear in the films, as she felt it made her face look too round. She also had to sit for two hours every day just to get her hair styled. Two hours to get your hair done? It takes me just two seconds …

12 X-rated works : EROTICA

The name of Eros, the Greek god of love, gives rise to our word “erotic” meaning “arousing sexual desire”. Eros was referred to in Latin as both “Amor” (meaning “love”) and “Cupid” (meaning “desire”).

16 With 35-Across, Japanese Olympian : … MIDORI
(35A See 16-Down : … ITO)

Midori Ito is a Japanese figure skater. Ito was the first woman to land a triple/triple jump and a triple axel in competition. In fact, she landed her first triple jump in training when she was only 8 years old. Ito won Olympic silver in 1992, and was chosen as the person to light the Olympic cauldron at the commencement of the 1998 Winter Games in Nagano, Japan.

18 Start another eight-ball game : RE-RACK

Eight-ball and nine-ball are arguably the most popular variants of pool played in North America. In eight-ball, one player sinks the striped balls and the other the solid balls. The first to sink all his or her balls and then the black 8-ball, without fouling, wins the game. In nine-ball, each player must hit the lowest numbered ball on the table first with the cue ball. The first player to sink the 9-ball wins. Sinking the nine ball can happen when first hitting the lowest bowl on the table, or possibly when balls numbered 1-8 have been sunk.

25 Brief warning to a busybody : MYOB

Mind your own business (MYOB)

33 Eclectic magazine : UTNE

The “Utne Reader” is known for aggregation and republishing of articles on politics, culture and the environment from other sources in the media. The “Utne Reader” was founded in 1984 by Eric Utne, with management taken over by Eric’s wife Nina Rothschild Utne in 1990.

38 Part of LGBTQ : GAY

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer/questioning (LGBTQ)

40 Online addresses : URLS

An Internet address (like NYXCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) is more correctly called a Uniform Resource Locator (URL).

44 1983 Keaton film : MR MOM

“Mr. Mom” is a 1983 comedy written by John Hughes that stars Michael Keaton and the great Teri Garr. The movie is all about an engineer in the auto industry in Detroit who loses his job and then takes over the running of the household while his wife heads back to work. It’s funny stuff …

45 Jelly garnish : ASPIC

Aspic is a dish in which the main ingredients are served in a gelatin made from meat stock. “Aspic” is a French word meaning “jelly”.

48 “M*A*S*H” actor Jamie : FARR

Actor Jamie Farr is best known for playing the cross-dressing Max Klinger in the sitcom ”M*A*S*H”. Although Farr landed a role in the 1955 movie “Blackboard Jungle”, his career didn’t really take off until he started appearing regularly on “The Red Skelton Show”. Years later he managed to get a one-episode appearance in ”M*A*S*H”, and his character and performance were received so well that he became a regular on the show. Farr actually did serve in the US Army in Korea, although it was after hostilities had ended. The dog tags that Farr wore when filming ”M*A*S*H” were the ones that he actually wore while serving in the military.

49 Go south : TANK

Apparently, the first use of the verb “to tank” to mean “to lose or fail” can be pinpointed quite precisely. Tennis great Billie Jean King used the verb in that sense in an interview with “Life” magazine in 1967, with reference to male players. A more specific use of “tanking” in recent years is “deliberately losing” a contest.

51 Fat-reducing procedure, briefly : LIPO

Liposuction (lipo) dates back to the 1920s when it was developed by a surgeon in France. However, the procedure quickly lost favor when a French model developed gangrene after surgery. As a result, it wasn’t until the mid-seventies that modern liposuction took off, after being popularized by two Italian-American surgeons in Rome.

52 Thick & Fluffy waffle brand : EGGO

Eggo is a line of frozen waffles and related products made by Kellogg’s. When they were introduced in the 1930s, the name “Eggo” was chosen to promote the “egginess” of the batter. “Eggo” replaced “Froffles”, the original name chosen by melding “frozen” and “waffles”.

53 Beverage that goes back millennia : MEAD

Mead is a lovely drink that’s made from fermented honey and water.

57 Mongolian tent : YURT

A yurt is a wood-framed dwelling that is used by nomads in the steppes of Central Asia. Although a yurt is a substantial structure, it is also extremely portable.

60 Monk’s condition, in the TV show : OCD

Apparently, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is the fourth most commonly diagnosed mental disorder, making it about as prevalent as asthma.

“Monk” is a police drama set in San Francisco, and starring Tony Shalhoub in the title role of Adrian Monk. Although set the San Francisco Bay Area, the show is actually shot in Los Angeles.

61 No friend of Fido : FLEA

Fleas are flightless insects, but they sure can jump. Their very specialized hind legs allow them to jump up to 50 times the length of their bodies.

62 Swedish university city : LUND

Lund is a city in Sweden that lies almost at the country’s most southern tip. Lund is home to Lund University, one of Sweden’s largest schools, and one founded in 1666. I almost went to graduate school in Lund, many moons ago …

64 Colorful pond fish : KOI

Koi are fish that are also known as Japanese carp. Koi have been bred for decorative purposes and there are now some very brightly colored examples found in Japanese water gardens.

66 Color of el mar : AZUL

In Spanish, “el mar” (the sea) is “azul” (blue) and is full of “agua” (water).

67 Mojito component : LIME

A mojito is a Cuban cocktail, although the exact origins appear to be unclear, as does the derivation of the name. Want one? Put 4 mint leaves in a glass, and add the juice of half a lime and a teaspoon of powdered sugar. Muddle the ingredients, smashing them together with a muddler or a spoon. Add some crushed ice, two ounces of white rum and stir. Top with a couple of ounces of club soda, and garnish with a sprig of mint and/or a slice of lime. Cheers!

69 “The __”: classic Yankee nickname : MICK

Mickey Mantle only played professional baseball for the one team, spending 18 years with the New York Yankees. Mickey Mantle memorabilia is highly prized, especially since he retired from the game in 1969, and even more so since he died in 1995. The only other player memorabilia said to command a higher price is Babe Ruth’s. Mantle holds the record for the most career home runs by a switch hitter, as well as the most World Series home runs.

70 Furniture stores that sell meatballs : IKEAS

Every IKEA store features a restaurant that serves traditional Swedish food, including Swedish meatballs and lingonberry jam. Each store also has a Swedish Food Market where customers can purchase specialty foods from Sweden.

71 Astronomer Tycho __ : BRAHE

Tycho Brahe was a Danish astronomer, and a contemporary of Galileo. Brahe lost his nose in a duel, and wore a replacement made from either silver or gold that was pasted onto his face!

72 Move, in real estate lingo : RELO

“Relocate” (relo)

Lingo is specialized vocabulary. “Journalese” and “legalese” would be good examples.

80 Blueprint detail : SPEC

Blueprints are reproductions of technical or architectural drawings that are contact prints made on light-sensitive sheets. Blueprints were introduced in the 1800s and the technology available dictated that the drawings were reproduced with white lines on a blue background, hence the name “blue-print”.

83 Head honcho : TOP BANANA

The expression “top banana” is used to mean “the main man” or “the main woman”. The first person to use “top banana” was supposedly Vaudeville performer Harry Steppe in 1927, who applied the term to the top comic on the bill. The phrase comes from a comedy routine in which three comics struggle to share two bananas.

“Honcho” is a slang term meaning “leader”. The word comes to us from Japanese military, in which language a “hancho” is a “squad” (han) “leader” (cho).

84 London station wagon : ESTATE CAR

The style of automobile that we call “station wagon” here in North America, is known as “estate car” in Britain and Ireland. Both names are really references to the vehicle’s utility in hauling baggage in the extra space provided in the rear. A station wagon could haul bags to the station, and an estate car could haul bags to one’s country estate!

87 Annie who voiced Bo Peep in “Toy Story” : POTTS

Annie Potts is an actress from Nashville, Tennessee. She had roles in successful films such as “Ghostbusters” and “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” and did voice work for “Toy Story” and “Toy Story 2”. Potts was lucky to survive a car crash when she was 21 years old, as she broke nearly every bone in her lower body.

89 Man, in a Desmond Morris best-seller : NAKED APE

Desmond Morris is an English zoologist, and someone I remember from my childhood in the late fifties as the presenter of a weekly animal life program(me) back in the UK called “Zoo Time”. Morris’s most famous publication is “The Naked Ape”, which takes a look at the human species and explores the many behaviors that resemble that of lower primates and mammals.

90 Tango groups : DUOS

It takes two to tango …

91 Emails a dupe to : CCS

I wonder do the kids of today know that “cc” stands for carbon copy, and do they have any idea what a carbon copy was? Do you remember how messy carbon paper was to handle? A kind blog reader pointed out to me a while back that the abbreviation has evolved and taken on the meaning “courtesy copy” in our modern world.

93 Encircle, as with a lei : WREATHE

“Lei” is a Hawaiian word meaning “garland, wreath”, although in more general terms a lei is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

98 2001 Audrey Tautou title role : AMELIE

“Amélie” is a 2001 French film, a romantic comedy about a shy waitress in Montmartre, Paris played by Audrey Tautou (who also played the female lead in “The Da Vinci Code”). The movie was originally released under the French title, “Le Fabuleux Destin d’Amélie Poulain” (“The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain”).

Franch actress Audrey Tautou is perhaps most famous in North America for playing the title role in 2001’s “Amélie”, and the female lead in 2006’s “The Da Vinci Code”. In 2009, Tuatou replaced Nicole Kidman as spokesmodel for Chanel No. 5.

99 Game with ghosts : PAC-MAN

The Pac-Man arcade game was first released in Japan in 1980, and is as popular today as it ever was. The game features characters that are maneuvered around the screen to eat up dots and earn points. The name comes from the Japanese folk hero “Paku”, known for his voracious appetite. The spin-off game called Ms. Pac-Man was released in 1981.

106 __ Hall : SETON

Seton Hall is a private, Roman Catholic college in South Orange, New Jersey. The most famous of their sports programs is men’s basketball, played by the Seton Hall Pirates.

107 Mae West’s “__ Done Him Wrong” : SHE

“She Done Him Wrong” is a 1933 crime comedy starring Mae West and Cary Grant. The film is perhaps most famous as the original source of some of West’s most famous quips, including “Why don’t you come up sometime and see me?” West used a similar line in her next film “I’m No Angel”, i.e. “Come up and see me sometime”.

110 Disney collectibles : CELS

In the world of animation, a cel is a transparent sheet on which objects and characters are drawn. In the first half of the 20th century the sheet was actually made of celluloid, giving the “cel” its name.

111 Tony relative : OBIE

The Obies are the Off-Broadway Theater Awards. The Obies have been presented annually since 1956. The recipients used to be chosen by “The Village Voice” newspaper, but now are jointly administered with the American Theatre Wing.

113 Iraq War concerns, briefly : WMDS

The first recorded use of the term “Weapon of Mass Destruction” (WMD) was in 1937. The words were used by Cosmo Gordon Lang, the Archbishop of Canterbury at the time, in reference to the bombardment of Guernica in Spain during the Spanish Civil War by the German Luftwaffe. He said, “Who can think without horror of what another widespread war would mean, waged as it would be with all the new weapons of mass destruction?”

116 __ kwon do : TAE

Tae kwon do is the national sport of Korea. “Tae” means “to strike or break with foot”; “kwon” means “to strike or break with fist”; “do” means “way” or “art”. Along with judo, tae kwon do is one of only two martial arts included in the Olympic Games.

118 2015 Verizon acquisition : AOL

Telecom giant Verizon acquired AOL in 2015, and Yahoo! in 2017. Just after the latter purchase, Verizon launched Oath, a subsidiary company that served as the umbrella under which AOl and Yahoo! continued to operate. Oath was renamed to Verizon Media Group after a corporate reorganization at the end of 2018.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Alerts that may lead to roadblocks, briefly : APBS
5 Bela Lugosi was buried in one : CAPE
9 Orkney components : ISLES
14 Egg boiler’s aid : TIMER
19 Ball game : POLO
20 “You said it!” : AMEN!
21 Steel plow pioneer : DEERE
22 Ask for “fish ‘n’ chips,” say : ELIDE
23 Action at a coop dance? : POULTRY IN MOTION (from “Poetry in Motion”)
26 Catkin producer : ALDER
27 Make a bundle farming? : SHEAVE
28 Fella : GUY
29 The Tempter : SATAN
31 __ fide : BONA
32 D.C. fundraisers : PACS
33 Confederacy foe : UNION
35 See 16-Down : … ITO
36 Guitarist Clapton : ERIC
37 Primo : A-ONE
38 Car in a ’60s hit : GTO
39 Nestling tossed out of a bar? : BOUNCED CHICK (from “bounced check”)
43 Eggy quaff : NOG
44 Mad fad : MANIA
46 Silver, to Long John : TREASURE
47 Story subtitled “Murder Most Fowl”? : THE FRYER’S TALE (from “The Friar’s Tale”)
50 Cotton Club site : HARLEM
54 Imam’s faith : ISLAM
55 Towels off gently : PATS DRY
58 Neutral tone : BEIGE
59 Part of a house profile : ROOFLINE
63 Puffin relative : AUK
65 Gp. with many sub-par members : PGA
66 Rooster’s wake-up call? : ALARM CLUCK (from “alarm clock”)
69 Tiny hatchling group? : MICRO-BROOD (from “microbrewed”)
73 Promgoer’s concern : ZIT
74 Television station? : DEN
75 One of two on a three-speed : BIKE TIRE
76 Inuit transport : UMIAK
79 Income for Inc., say : AD SPACE
82 Tailor : ALTER
86 Unleash a tirade : LET RIP
88 What fussy hens do? : PECK AND CHOOSE (from “pick and choose”)
92 Intermittent drip cause : SLOW LEAK
95 Ristorante potful : SAUCE
96 Home-school link: Abbr. : PTA
97 Fowl haulin’ a semi? : CAPON TRUCKIN’ (from “keep on truckin’”)
101 Some boxing wins : KOS
102 Disappearing ski resort feature : T-BAR
103 Saudi Arabia neighbor : OMAN
104 42-Down’s leg count : TEN
105 Breathers? : NOSES
107 Smack, as a mosquito : SWAT
108 Start to meter or liter : DECI-
109 Anarchist in 1921 news : SACCO
112 Voluminous ref. work : OED
113 Canine complaints : WHINES
115 Wes Craven film locale: Abbr. : ELM ST
117 “Rooster Wars” sequel in which Hen Solo rescues Princess Layer? : THE BANTAM MENACE (from “The Phantom Menace”)
120 Herder’s rope : RIATA
121 Sun: Pref. : HELIO-
122 Sentiment-al piece? : OP-ED
123 What beavers do : GNAW
124 Have a feeling : SENSE
125 Auto bust : EDSEL
126 What’s going on : NEWS
127 Deserve : EARN

Down

1 Phone programs : APPS
2 Plays down : POOH-POOHS
3 Navy aerobatic team member : BLUE ANGEL
4 Pain relief : SOLACE
5 Give a hoot : CARE
6 “Clueless” director Heckerling : AMY
7 Loose dressing gown : PEIGNOIR
8 Same old same old feeling : ENNUI
9 Promise sealed with a kiss : I DO
10 Board-and-pieces units : SETS
11 Sister of Luke : LEIA
12 X-rated works : EROTICA
13 Legislative councils : SENATES
14 Leaves in a cup : TEA
15 “You know where to find me” : I’LL BE HERE
16 With 35-Across, Japanese Olympian : … MIDORI
17 Like paradise : EDENIC
18 Start another eight-ball game : RE-RACK
24 Controversial “babysitters” : TVS
25 Brief warning to a busybody : MYOB
30 “Like, obviously!” : NO DUH!
33 Eclectic magazine : UTNE
34 Write, as music : NOTATE
37 Naysayer : ANTI
38 Part of LGBTQ : GAY
40 Online addresses : URLS
41 Scholarship consideration : NEED
42 Seabed sidler : CRAB
44 1983 Keaton film : MR MOM
45 Jelly garnish : ASPIC
48 “M*A*S*H” actor Jamie : FARR
49 Go south : TANK
51 Fat-reducing procedure, briefly : LIPO
52 Thick & Fluffy waffle brand : EGGO
53 Beverage that goes back millennia : MEAD
56 Speed competition : RACE
57 Mongolian tent : YURT
60 Monk’s condition, in the TV show : OCD
61 No friend of Fido : FLEA
62 Swedish university city : LUND
64 Colorful pond fish : KOI
66 Color of el mar : AZUL
67 Mojito component : LIME
68 Having a spat : AT IT
69 “The __”: classic Yankee nickname : MICK
70 Furniture stores that sell meatballs : IKEAS
71 Astronomer Tycho __ : BRAHE
72 Move, in real estate lingo : RELO
75 Start to parallel park : BACK IN
77 Torchbearers? : ARSONISTS
78 Firing site : KILN
80 Blueprint detail : SPEC
81 Crowning point : PEAK
83 Head honcho : TOP BANANA
84 London station wagon : ESTATE CAR
85 End of the line : REAR
87 Annie who voiced Bo Peep in “Toy Story” : POTTS
89 Man, in a Desmond Morris best-seller : NAKED APE
90 Tango groups : DUOS
91 Emails a dupe to : CCS
93 Encircle, as with a lei : WREATHE
94 Had a midday meal : LUNCHED
97 Video game makers : CODERS
98 2001 Audrey Tautou title role : AMELIE
99 Game with ghosts : PAC-MAN
100 High time? : NOON
102 Minor pain : TWINGE
106 __ Hall : SETON
107 Mae West’s “__ Done Him Wrong” : SHE
110 Disney collectibles : CELS
111 Tony relative : OBIE
113 Iraq War concerns, briefly : WMDS
114 In stitches : SEWN
116 __ kwon do : TAE
118 2015 Verizon acquisition : AOL
119 Feline call : MEW

13 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 10 Nov 19, Sunday”

  1. That was the worst ever. After an hour, I still had two thirds of it blank. Why didn’t I just quit? I needed help up until the bitter end.
    But enough about me. How did you do?

  2. This puzzle took some doing but I finally finished with no errors.
    Elide was a new word for me, fortunately I knew Ito Midori so it fell into place.

  3. I was going great guns on this one until the bottom left corner…I stewed
    over that area seemed like forever until I guessed at “Amelie” and “Pacman”
    Then I remembered Elm St which I figured was a fit for Wes Craven. (I
    used to live on Elm St at one point in my life). Finished without errors
    after those entries. The “fowl” theme helped a lot and I enjoyed it.

  4. I laughed out loud at “Hen Solo” and “Princess Layer” Possibly my easiest Sunday ever; the theme helped a lot. Last letter to fill in was the D in LUND and ADSPACE. I’ve never heard of UMIAK, had kayak for quite a while.

  5. What came first, the lame pun or the egg (on my face)? 30 mins and some change and 6 errors scattered across the grid that I flat out didn’t know.

    Knowing what I know now, if I came back to this puzzle fresh I would…. wait for it… **chicken out**

  6. Glenn from yesterday– thanks so much for the WSJ puns!! I actually found them quite amusing, particularly TUROW SHADE and CHEAP YEATS. Appreciate it!

    Anonymous from yesterday– thanks for the tip! I’ll try a different browser. And BTW nice to see you 😜!!!

    1. I guess I’m not as “anonymous” as I had hoped … 😜.

      Actually, I have a reason for going “undercover” (having to do with a troll on Bill’s other blog). I hate to be paranoid, but I’m now hoping people will forget my real name, at which point I can come back with a pseudonym. Most people on Bill’s blog are pretty nice (and you’re one of the best 😄), but the mindless troll on the other blog reminded me that I really don’t know who I’m dealing with when I go online.

      1. Anonymous– well thank you for the kind words! It did take me awhile but I managed to ID you! And, I’m sure sorry about the situation on the other blog. I AM glad that most of us here know how to behave!😜

  7. I’m a little confused by the clue “Fowl haulin’ a semi.” CAPON TRUCKIN would mean a capon driving a semi, right? Not haulin a semi. Maybe the author meant to say “Fowl drivin’ a semi”

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