LA Times Crossword 26 Mar 20, Thursday

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Constructed by: Jeffrey Wechsler
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Strike One

The starts of the themed answers give us a sequence leading to a STRIKE in baseball:

    • 61A Ump’s call, often based on a sequence found in the answers to starred clues : STRIKE ONE
  • 17A *Mechanical plaything : WIND-UP TOY
  • 25A *Dark as can be : PITCH BLACK
  • 35A *Duke led one : SWING BAND
  • 52A *Nursery rhyme arachnophobe : MISS MUFFET

Bill’s time: 6m 10s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

6 Pinot alternative : CAB

The cabernet sauvignon (often just “cab”) grape has been around since the 17th century, and is the result of a chance crossing in southwestern France of the cabernet franc and sauvignon blanc grapes.

The Pinot noir wine grape variety takes its name from the French for “pine” and “black”. The grapes grow in tight clusters shaped like pine cones, and are very dark in color. The Pinot noir grape is most closely associated with Burgundy wines in France, although in recent years the popularity (and price) of California Pinot noir wine has soared after it featured so prominently in the wonderful, wonderful 2004 movie “Sideways”. Grab a bottle of Pinot, and go rent the movie …

14 Ryan of “Paper Moon” : O’NEAL

Actor Ryan O’Neal got his big break in the sixties on television. He appeared in the prime-time soap opera “Peyton Place”, opposite fellow newcomer Mia Farrow. Then in 1970 he landed a starring role in the hit movie “Love Story”, which established him in Hollywood. O’Neal was an amateur boxer before he turned to acting, and established a respectable record Golden Gloves competitions. These days, O’Neal has a recurring role on the TV show “Bones”, playing the title character’s father.

“Paper Moon” is a 1973 comedy film that tells the story of a father and daughter during the Great Depression. The onscreen father and daughter are played by real-life father and daughter Ryan and Tatum O’Neal. The original choices for the lead roles were Paul Newman and his daughter Nell Potts, but they left the project after director John Huston also dropped out.

15 Brouhaha : ADO

“Brouhaha”, meaning “ado, stir”, was a French word that back in the 1550s meant “the cry of the devil disguised as clergy” . Wow!

16 Paint choice : LATEX

Latex is a naturally occurring polymer made by some plants, that can also be made synthetically. About one in ten of the flowering plants in the world make the milky fluid called latex. It serves as a defense against insects and is exuded when a plant is injured or attacked by insects. Latex is collected commercially and is the source of natural rubber, which can be used to make things such as gloves, condoms and balloons.

19 __-garde : AVANT

Someone or something described as avant-garde is especially innovative. “Avant-garde” is French for “advance guard”.

20 Ambulance gp. : EMS

Emergency medical services (EMS)

Our word “ambulance” originated from the French term “hôpital ambulant” meaning “field hospital” (literally “walking hospital”). In the 1850s, the term started to be used for a vehicle transporting the wounded from the battlefield, leading to our “ambulance”.

22 Horseshoe-shaped letter : OMEGA

Omega is the last letter of the Greek alphabet and is the one that looks like a horseshoe when in uppercase. The lowercase omega looks like a Latin W. The word “omega” literally means “great O” (O-mega). Compare this with the Greek letter Omicron, meaning “little O” (O-micron).

23 Pennant __ : RACE

The last few weeks of the baseball season are known as the pennant race. Before 1969, the term “pennant race” was perhaps more apt, as the pennant winner (league champion) would be the team with the best win-loss record at the end of the season. Starting in 1969, when both the National and American Leagues formally split into East and West divisions, the pennant has been awarded to the winner of a best-of-five series of games played by the division winners each October. The pennant winners then go on to the best-of-seven World Series, also played in October.

30 “Insecure” actress/writer Issa __ : RAE

Issa Rae is a Stanford University graduate who created a YouTube web series called “The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl”. Rae also plays the title role in the series, a young lady named “J”. “Awkward Black Girl” was adapted into an HBO comedy-drama called “Insecure”, in which Issa Rae stars.

31 Enero, por ejemplo : MES

In Spanish, “enero” (January) is a “mes con 31 días” (month with 31 days).

32 Foil alternative : EPEE

The sword known as an épée has a three-sided blade. The épée is similar to a foil and sabre, although the foil and saber have rectangular cross-sections.The sword known as an épée has a three-sided blade. The épée is similar to a foil and sabre, although the foil and saber have rectangular cross-sections.

33 Rock’s __ Supply : AIR

The soft rock duo Air Supply comprises guitarist Graham Russell and vocalist Russell Hitchcock. Englishman Russell and Australian Hitchcock met in Australia when they were fellow cast mates in the musical “Jesus Christ Superstar”. Air Supply’s list of hits includes “Lost in Love” and “All Out of Love”, both released in 1980.

34 Campus suffix : EDU

The .edu domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:

  • .com (commercial enterprise)
  • .net (entity involved in network infrastructure e.g. an ISP)
  • .mil (US military)
  • .org (not-for-profit organization)
  • .gov (US federal government entity)
  • .edu (college-level educational institution)

35 *Duke led one : SWING BAND

Duke Ellington was a bandleader and composer believed by many to have elevated jazz to the same level as other respected genres of music. Ellington tended not to use the word “jazz” to describe his compositions, preferring the term “American Music”.

40 Keeps in the email loop : CCS

I wonder do the kids of today know that “cc” stands for carbon copy, and do they have any idea what a carbon copy was? Do you remember how messy carbon paper was to handle? A kind blog reader pointed out to me a while back that the abbreviation has evolved and taken on the meaning “courtesy copy” in our modern world.

44 Litter’s littlest : RUNT

Back around 1500, a runt was an old or decayed tree stump, and by the early 1600s “runt” was being used to describe animals that were similarly old and decayed. Ultimately “runt” came to mean the smallest and often sickest in a litter.

47 Chef’s dish words : A LA

The phrase “in the style of” can be translated into “alla” in Italian and “à la” in French.

48 Med. country : ISR

The land that is now Israel was ruled by the British after WWI as the British Mandate of Palestine. The British evacuated the area after WWII, largely responding to pressure from both Jewish and Arab nationalist movements. The British Mandate expired on 14 May 1948 and the State of Israel was established at the same time. This declaration of a new state was followed by the immediate invasion of the area by four Arab countries and the start of the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. A ceasefire was declared after a year of fighting, and tension has persisted in the region ever since.

52 *Nursery rhyme arachnophobe : MISS MUFFET

“Little Miss Muffet sat on a tuffet eating her curds and whey”, in the popular nursery rhyme. A tuffet is a low seat or a footstool, another word for a pouffe or a hassock. When milk curdles it separates into two parts, solid curds and liquid whey. Then “along came a spider and sat down beside her”.

55 Barter : SWAP

Arachnophobia is the fear of spiders, scorpions and other arachnids. The term “arachnophobia“ comes from the Greek “arachne” meaning “spider” and “phobos” meaning “fear”.

60 Scoville unit food : CHILI

The Scoville scale is a measure of the spiciness of chili peppers. The scale was invented by a pharmacist in 1912, Wilbur Scoville. To determine the position of a pepper on Scoville scale, the amount of capsaicin in the chili is measured. Capsaicin is an irritant that causes the sensation of burning when it comes into contact with tissue, particularly mucous membranes.

61 Ump’s call, often based on a sequence found in the answers to starred clues : STRIKE ONE

That would be baseball.

63 Muscle beach bro : HE-MAN

The original Muscle Beach was located on the south side of Santa Monica Pier in Southern California. Bodybuilders started working out on the beach back in the 1930s when exercise equipment was installed there as part of the WPA program. Some of the equipment was removed in the fifties, so the bodybuilding community shifted to the Venice Beach Weight Pen. That area was developed and is now known as Muscle Beach Venice.

65 When left turns are rarely allowed : ON RED

If you’re sitting behind a car that doesn’t make a right on red, it may just be a rental car driven by someone from Europe. Speaking as someone who learned to drive over there, I must admit I held up a few people at red lights when I first visited this country. That’s because in Europe we aren’t allowed to make any move past a red light, unless there is an accompanying green arrow. So, if you’re driving overseas, take care …

68 Fills up : SATES

“Sate” is a variant of the older word “satiate”. Both terms can mean either to satisfy an appetite fully, or to eat to excess.

Down

2 Do some work at Pixar : ANIMATE

Pixar Animation Studios started out as part of Lucasfilm in 1979, George Lucas’s production company. Lucas sold what was to become Pixar to Apple CEO Steve Jobs in 1986. Pixar produced its first feature film in 1995, the fabulous “Toy Story”, and followed up with a string of hits. The company was then sold to Walt Disney in 2006, when valued at $7.4 billion. That transaction resulted in Steve Jobs becoming the biggest shareholder in Walt Disney.

6 Keep a Persian company, perhaps : CAT-SIT

7 Take in, as a Persian : ADOPT

The Persian is that long-haired cat with a squashed muzzle. The breed takes its name from its place of origin, namely Persia (Iran).

8 Huck Finn, for one : BOY

“The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain was first published in 1884, not here in the US but rather in England. The original launch planned for the US had to be delayed until the following year because some rascal had defaced the plate for one of the illustrations, making an obscene joke. Once the problem was spotted a new plate had to be made, and 30,000 copies already printed had to be reworked to cover up the obscenity.

9 Served blazing : FLAMBE

“Flambé” is the French word for “flamed”, and was originally a term used to describe certain types of porcelain. The word “flambé” crept into cookery just after 1900.

10 “Bolero” composer : RAVEL

Maurice Ravel was a great French composer of the Romantic Era. Ravel’s most famous piece of music by far is his “Bolero”, the success of which he found somewhat irksome as he considered it a trivial work. Personally though, I love the minimalism and simplicity …

Maurice Ravel’s “Boléro” is a remarkable piece of music that has a very insistent theme that just builds and builds, with instruments being added to the mix as the piece develops. Famously, “Boléro” played a significant role in the 1979 film “10” starring Bo Derek, Dudley Moore and Julie Andrews. Not a bad movie …

13 Interoffice no. : EXT

Extension (ext.)

18 Bear whose bed was too hard : PAPA

The story of “Goldilocks and the Three Bears” was first recorded in 1837 in England, although the narrative was around before it was actually written down. The original fairy tale was rather gruesome, but successive versions became more family-oriented. The character that eventually became Goldilocks was originally an elderly woman, and the three “nameless” bears became Papa Bear, Mama Bear and Baby Bear.

22 Maureen of “Rio Grande” : O’HARA

The beautiful and talented Maureen O’Hara was an Irish actress, someone famous for films made with fellow actor John Wayne and director John Ford. Soon after color films hit the theaters, O’Hara earned the nickname “Queen of Technicolor”. This was because the combination of her vivid red hair and bright green eyes showed off the new technology to full advantage. O’Hara was born in a suburb of Dublin called Ranelagh, where many of my own ancestors were born …

“Rio Grande” is a 1948 western directed by John Ford and starring John Wayne and Maureen O’Hara. The film is the third in a series of John Ford films referred to as the “cavalry trilogy”, all of which star Wayne as a US Cavalry office. The preceding movies are “Fort Apache” (1948) and “She Wore a Yellow Ribbon” (1949).

27 Sunflower St. school : KSU

Kansas State University (KSU) was founded as the Kansas State Agricultural College in 1863 during the Civil War. The main KSU campus is located in the city of Manhattan, which is 56 miles northwest of Topeka, Kansas.

One of Kansas’s major crops is the sunflower, and so the state’s official nickname is the Sunflower State. . The sunflower is the state symbol, and Mount Sunflower is the highest point in Kansas.

36 A single Time? : ISSUE

“Time” magazine has a readership of about 25 million, making it the largest-circulation weekly news magazine in the world.

37 Soft ball : NERF

Nerf is soft material used in a whole series of toys designed for “safe” play indoors. The Nerf product is used to make darts, balls and ammunition for toy guns. “NERF” is an acronym, standing for Non-Expanding Recreational Foam.

38 New Deal agcy. : NRA

The National Recovery Administration (NRA) was one of the first agencies set up under President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal program. On the one hand the NRA help set minimum wages and maximum working hours for workers in industry, and on the other hand it helped set minimum prices for goods produced by companies. The NRA was very popular with the public, and businesses that didn’t opt to participate in the program found themselves boycotted. The NRA didn’t survive for long though, as after two years of operation it was deemed to be unconstitutional by the US Supreme Court and so it ceased operations in 1935.

39 Outfit : DUDS

“Duds” is an informal word meaning “clothing”. The term comes from the word “dudde” that was used around 1300 as the name for a cloak.

40 Engine part : CAM

Cams are wheels found on the camshaft of a car’s engine that are eccentric in shape rather than circular. The rotation of the cams causes the intake and exhaust valves of the cylinders to open and close.

41 Trite expressions : CLICHES

“Cliché” is a word that comes from the world of printing. In the days when type was added as individual letters into a printing plate, for efficiency some oft-used phrases and words were created as one single slug of metal. The word “cliché” was used for such a grouping of letters. It’s easy to see how the same word would become a term to describe any overused phrase. Supposedly, “cliché” comes from French, from the verb “clicher” meaning “to click”. The idea is that when a matrix of letters was dropped in molten metal to make a cliché, it made a clicking sound.

42 Bento box selection : SASHIMI

Sashimi is thinly sliced raw fish, although it can also be raw meat. The word “sashimi” translates literally as “pierced body”, which may be a reference to the practice of sticking the tail and fin to sliced fish to identify it.

A bento is a single-person meal that is eaten quite commonly in Japan. A bento can be purchased as a take-out meal, or it may be packed at home. A bento is usually sold as a “bento box”.

45 Jazz festival site : NEWPORT

The Newport Jazz Festival is held annually in Newport, Rhode Island.

46 One learning the ropes : TRAINEE

As one might expect perhaps, the phrase “learning the ropes” is nautical in origin. A new recruit on a sailing vessel would have to learn how to tie the appropriate knots and learn which rope controlled which sail or spar.

49 Bar mitzvah language : HEBREW

A Jewish girl becomes a bat mitzvah at 12 years of age, the age at which she becomes responsible for her actions. Boys become bar mitzvahs at 13. The terms translate into English as daughter and son of the commandments.

50 Notions case : ETUI

An etui is an ornamental case used to hold small items, in particular sewing needles. We imported both the case design and the word “etui” from France. The French also have a modern usage of “etui”, using the term to depict a case for carrying CDs.

Notions are miscellaneous items, especially the likes of needles, buttons and thread.

51 Races round the bases : SPEEDS

That would be baseball.

53 Caesar __ : SALAD

The caesar salad was created by restaurateur Caesar Cardini at the Hotel Caesar’s in Tijuana, Mexico. The original recipe called for whole lettuce leaves that were to be lifted up by the stem and eaten with the fingers.

54 Mufti’s proclamation : FATWA

In the Muslim tradition, a fatwā is a religious opinion issued by an Islamic scholar (a “mufti”) on a matter of Islamic law. There is a common misconception that a fatwā is a death sentence imposed on a person, and although such a drastic directive is a possible component of the opinion, it is a very rare occurrence.

58 17 of Laila Ali’s wins, for short : TKOS

Technical knockout (TKO)

Laila Ali is the daughter of the great Muhammad Ali and is a very capable boxer in her own right. Laila’s professional record is an impressive 24 wins, including 21 knockouts. Now retired, she never lost a fight, and nor did she ever draw. One of those victories was against Jackie Frazier-Lyde, daughter of her father’s nemesis Joe Frazier. Laila is not a bad dancer either, coming in third place in the fourth season of “Dancing with the Stars”.

60 “__-ching!” : CHA

The interjection “cha-ching!” is used to celebrate a windfall, the unexpected reception of lots of money. The term is imitative of the sound made by a mechanical cash register when ringing up a transaction. “Cha-ching!” was popularized by the 1992 movie “Wayne’s World”. It was also used around the same time in a TV spot for Rally’s hamburgers that featured a young Seth Green.

62 “Bambi” doe : ENA

Ena is Bambi’s aunt in the 1942 Disney film “Bambi”. The movie is based on the novel “Bambi, A Life in the Woods” written by Austrian author Felix Salten and first published in 1923. There is a documented phenomenon known as the Bambi Effect, whereby people become more interested in animal rights after having watched the scene where Bambi’s mother is shot by hunters.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Puts at ease : CALMS
6 Pinot alternative : CAB
9 Something about a painting? : FRAME
14 Ryan of “Paper Moon” : O’NEAL
15 Brouhaha : ADO
16 Paint choice : LATEX
17 *Mechanical plaything : WIND-UP TOY
19 __-garde : AVANT
20 Ambulance gp. : EMS
21 Quick inhalation : GASP
22 Horseshoe-shaped letter : OMEGA
23 Pennant __ : RACE
25 *Dark as can be : PITCH BLACK
28 Patronizes, in a way : STAYS AT
30 “Insecure” actress/writer Issa __ : RAE
31 Enero, por ejemplo : MES
32 Foil alternative : EPEE
33 Rock’s __ Supply : AIR
34 Campus suffix : EDU
35 *Duke led one : SWING BAND
40 Keeps in the email loop : CCS
43 Comprehend : SEE
44 Litter’s littlest : RUNT
47 Chef’s dish words : A LA
48 Med. country : ISR
49 Web page banners : HEADERS
52 *Nursery rhyme arachnophobe : MISS MUFFET
55 Barter : SWAP
56 Cause friction : CHAFE
57 Be up against : ABUT
59 Diner slice : PIE
60 Scoville unit food : CHILI
61 Ump’s call, often based on a sequence found in the answers to starred clues : STRIKE ONE
63 Muscle beach bro : HE-MAN
64 Bedazzle : AWE
65 When left turns are rarely allowed : ON RED
66 Off-mic comment : ASIDE
67 Furry foot : PAW
68 Fills up : SATES

Down

1 Hides in fear : COWERS
2 Do some work at Pixar : ANIMATE
3 Protective camera piece : LENS CAP
4 Sore : MAD
5 Whack over the wall : SLUG
6 Keep a Persian company, perhaps : CAT-SIT
7 Take in, as a Persian : ADOPT
8 Huck Finn, for one : BOY
9 Served blazing : FLAMBE
10 “Bolero” composer : RAVEL
11 In the ballpark? : AT A GAME
12 Intimidated : MENACED
13 Interoffice no. : EXT
18 Bear whose bed was too hard : PAPA
22 Maureen of “Rio Grande” : O’HARA
24 Focuses on, as the catcher for signals : EYES
26 Bed with sliding sides : CRIB
27 Sunflower St. school : KSU
29 Patch, perhaps : SEW
33 Ticket price determinant, at times : AGE
36 A single Time? : ISSUE
37 Soft ball : NERF
38 New Deal agcy. : NRA
39 Outfit : DUDS
40 Engine part : CAM
41 Trite expressions : CLICHES
42 Bento box selection : SASHIMI
45 Jazz festival site : NEWPORT
46 One learning the ropes : TRAINEE
48 “Nothing’s wrong” : I’M FINE
49 Bar mitzvah language : HEBREW
50 Notions case : ETUI
51 Races round the bases : SPEEDS
53 Caesar __ : SALAD
54 Mufti’s proclamation : FATWA
58 17 of Laila Ali’s wins, for short : TKOS
60 “__-ching!” : CHA
61 Weaken : SAP
62 “Bambi” doe : ENA

26 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 26 Mar 20, Thursday”

      1. Wow! Way to pick a nit, guys!

        I just Googled “pantheon of the gods” and got this:

        “The Greek Pantheon was ruled by a council of twelve great gods known as the Olympians, namely Zeus, Hera, Poseidon, Demeter, Athene, Hephaistos, Ares, Aphrodite, Apollon, Artemis, Hermes, Dionysos, and sometimes Hestia. These twelve gods demanded worship from all their subjects.”

        You will note that a number of the names in that list are the names of goddesses. So, in the plural, “gods” is used as it was in the NYT clue.

        IMHO, crossword puzzle setters have a better reputation for accuracy than their perennial critics … 😜.

  1. Nice Wechsler grid. Haven’t seen him over at the LA Times for a while. 51D – not sure the runner “speeds” around the bases or “races” around the bases. He might trot or hustle or steal a base. I guess if it’s an in the park homer one might “speed” around the bases?

  2. I went like a house afire until I came to “Bento box selection : SASHIMI”
    Not bad at all considering it’s a Thursday puzzle.

    Eddie

  3. 9:39, no errors (but I certainly didn’t “speed” through it 😜).

    NYT: 12:18, no errors.

    @Bill … Today’s NYT blog is missing its comment section.

  4. 9:29. Pretty easy solve today. I’m used to Wechslers being Friday puzzles. Today was supposed to be opening day in Major League Baseball. Sigh.

    Like Nonny said, no comments link for the NYT today at nyxcrossword.com. I took 22:01 to finish that one. Very tame theme for a NYT Thursday. Not sure why it took me that long. Wordplay said it was originally slated to be a Wednesday puzzle but some of the cluing bumped it to a Thursday.

    Best –

  5. Agree with@Jodie. Didn’t actually know RAE, KSU or Scoville unit. Keep forgetting ENA. Had sUit before DUDS.
    The Bento box also refers to the lunches mothers prepare for their kids.

    I’m the kind of person who stocks up on everything on a regular basis. When this Corona virus started, I had 50 rolls of toilet paper in the back, a box of soap and 3 cans or boxes of almost everything I use including sanitizers and cleaners. I shop at BJs, including gas, since it’s cheaper. I’ve been known to wipe out peanut butter Balance bars for a long time. I gave a friend some paper towels, and offered stuff to other friends. As I’ve mentioned before, my license plate is OCDOCD.

    I’m thinking of studying a little Spanish. I rarely know those words unless they are the same as Italian. French words were always in literature back in the day. I guess youngsters pick up Spanish from television. When my son was growing up, he got an hour of French/English Sesame St. from Canada, as well as another hour of some Spanish. He differentiated eau and water – one is to drink, and one in the tub.
    That’s it, I’m rambling from boredom!

  6. Dear Mr. Wechsler,
    There is nothing “rock” about Air Supply.
    Duke led a “big band”, not a “swing band.” They played some swing but not only swing.

  7. This was more like a Mon./Tues. puzzle. But I’ll take this easy Thurs. one any time. It seems like we don’t need big challenges right now.

    Just went to Von’s and they aren’t very welled supplied. And a lot of rules have been added to the shopping experience. Won’t go again. Best choice in the LA area is Gelson’s! They had stocked the shelves (except the paper products, of course) and lots of staff working. (I’m not paid for saying that either.)

    1. Hi Kay — may I ask which Gelsons? Mine is the Silver Lake store, altho I haven’t been in about two weeks. I know that they limit the number of customers, so there are lines.

  8. 65A – Left turns are never allowed on red. The clue should have referenced right turns are rarely allowed. However, as you noted, right turns on red are usually allowed here in the States.

    1. @Fitz – Left turns are often allowed on red when transitioning from a one-way street onto another one-way street. And then of course you can turn left on red in places that drive on the opposite side of the road such as Great Britain and Australia, (among others).

  9. I thought this was a particularly easy Thursday grid. On the other hand I found today’s WSJ particularly devilish, although once I finally caught on to the gimmick it became much easier.

    Anyone else have an opinion on it?

    1. Honestly, I’m not sure what to think of the WSJ right now. This one was average for me (8:51, no errors), but for some reason (either them communicating better lately or me getting better in some way) “average” has been a lot less the last couple of months.

    2. @Tony … I did that puzzle last night at the end of a long day and I don’t remember it very well, but I just took a quick look at it and it seems that it and I had some kind of initial disagreement (perhaps beginning with the fact that I first had CLAN instead of PALS for 10D). I ended up with no errors and a time just under 15 minutes, but I can’t say how much of that was spent on interruptions. (I was trying to rehydrate from a very long hike before going to bed.) I do remember that things went more easily after I really understood the theme.

  10. 14 mins 53 sec, and for the first time since Sunday, no errors. I think the almost entire lack of proper names had something to do with it…

  11. Kind of easy for a Thursday; took me 23:10 before I got the “bing.” Mostly held up by ATAGAME/MES for about 5 minutes. I was looking for approximately rather than a literal definition and I didn’t know months in Spanish. LATEX also took longer than it had to.

    re Shopping – Although my experience at TJ’s was good, I understand that the Safeway around the corner is still supposed to be problematic. Won’t need to go there for a few more weeks though.

  12. Aloha meine Freunden!!!🦆

    Why am I gaining weight when it’s so hard to get groceries??!!🤔

    No errors. Evidently Mr Weschler misses baseball as much as I do. ⚾️ Initially I spelled MUFFET wrong but then I remembered it was probably almost the same as TUFFET….

    I have a question for those of you who do the puzzle online. A friend has told me that he gets odd scores — 748 (not his time) and zero even when it’s mostly correct. So I tried it today, typing in the grid, which I’d already completed on paper. I made one intentional error to see what happened. Clicked on Reveal Grid and there’s a score of zero!! What gives?! I’ve never seen anyone mention this phenomenon here, so maybe that’s because y’all don’t click Reveal Grid….? And I don’t think it’s cuz I revealed the grid, thereby (possibly) cheating. It said CONGRATULATIONS along with my time, as well as the zero score. Anyone?? 🤔

    Be safe ~~🍸

    1. I haven’t tried “reveal grid” yet on the LAT crossword, but I did do it on the WSJ today which was really weird, until I finally figured out what they were doing. If you fill in all the squares correctly, it automatically ends and gives you your time and score.

      I do get those scores and have so far just ignored them.

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