LA Times Crossword 19 Apr 20, Sunday

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Constructed by: David Alfred Bywaters
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: What’s Missing?

Themed answers come in pairs, side-by-side in the grid. Each is a common phrase, with the answer on the left losing the last letter of the first word, and the answer on the right gaining that same letter at the end of its first word:

  • 23A Feeling caused by reading too many self-referential articles? : META FATIGUE (“metal fatigue” – L)
  • 25A Where movie actors rehearse Southern accents? : DRAWL LOTS (“draw lots” + L)
  • 50A Overhead support for a small army? : ANT AIRCRAFT (“anti-aircraft” – I)
  • 54A Urban pedestrian’s maneuver? : TAXI DODGE (“tax dodge” + I)
  • 88A Insult humor in a cornfield? : CROW ROAST (“crown roast” – N)
  • 91A Trust that a supervised job will lead to full-time work? : INTERN FAITH (“interfaith” + N)
  • 118A Legume farmer’s concern? : PEA DEMAND (“peak demand” – K)
  • 121A Sailing one small ship after another? : BARK HOPPING (“bar hopping” + K)

Bill’s time: 17m 21s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

19 Musical genre that means “work” in Italian : OPERA

The Latin for “work” is “opus”, with the plural being “opera”. We sometimes also use the plural “opuses” in English.

20 Wrist bones : CARPI

The human wrist is known anatomically as the carpus (plural “carpi”). The carpal bones allow the wrist its remarkable range of motion.

21 Nautilus captain : NEMO

The Jules Verne sci-fi novel “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea” was first published in 1869-1870 as a serial in a French magazine. Star of the novel (to me) is Captain Nemo’s magnificent submarine called the Nautilus. The “20,000 leagues” in the title is the distance travelled by the Nautilus underwater, and not a depth. 20,000 leagues is about three times the circumference of the Earth.

22 “A-Hunting We Will Go” songwriter : ARNE

“A-Hunting We Will Go” is a song by Thomas Arne that the composer penned for a 1777 production of “The Beggar’s Opera”. I grew up with this song, as it is a popular nursery rhyme on the other side of the pond …

A-hunting we will go, a-hunting we will go
(Heigh-ho, the derry-o, a-hunting we will go
A-hunting we will go, a-hunting we will go)
We’ll catch a fox and put him in a box
And then we’ll let him go

23 Feeling caused by reading too many self-referential articles? : META FATIGUE (“metal fatigue” – L)

In recent decades the prefix “meta-” has been used as a standalone adjective. In this sense “meta” means “self-referential”, describing something that refers to itself. For example, “This sentence starts with the word ‘this’ and ends with the word ‘this’” might be called a meta sentence. A movie that is about the making of the very same movie could also be described as meta.

30 Soybean paste : MISO

Miso is the name of the seasoning that makes miso soup. Basic miso seasoning is made by fermenting rice, barley and soybeans with salt and a fungus to produce a paste. The paste can be added to stock to make miso soup, or perhaps to flavor tofu.

31 Factor of DX : CII

In Roman numerals, DX (510) divided by CII (102) is V (5).

32 Spray : AEROSOL

Strictly speaking, the term “aerosol” defines a suspension of either liquid droplets or solid particles in a gas. A good example of an aerosol is smoke. We tend to use the “aerosol” to describe what comes out of a spray can, even though the liquid droplets usually fall out of the gas and don’t stay suspended.

36 Lobster __ : NEWBURG

Lobster Newburg is a rich dish made from lobster with butter, cream, cognac, sherry, eggs and Cayenne pepper. The dish was created by one Ben Wenberg for Delmonico’s Restaurant in New York City in 1876, and was listed on the menu as Lobster à la Wenberg. Wenberg and the restaurant owner had a falling out, and so the restaurant owner renamed the dish to Lobster à la Newberg.

38 When doubled, a dangerous fly : TSE

The tsetse fly is responsible for the transmission of sleeping sickness, a disease that is more correctly called African trypanosomiasis. The disease is only observed in humans who have been bitten by a tsetse fly that is infected with the trypanosome parasitic protozoan.

39 “Yo ho ho” beverage : RUM

The fictional sea shanty called “Dead Man’s Chest” was introduced in Robert Louis Stevenson’s great novel, “Treasure Island”. In the book, Stevenson only describes the chorus, which goes:

Fifteen men on the dead man’s chest–
…Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!
Drink and the devil had done for the rest–
…Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!

41 “Poison” shrub : SUMAC

Sumacs are a group of flowering shrubs and small trees that include poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac (nasty stuff!). The leaves of some species of sumac contain tannins that are used for tanning leather. Morocco leather is an example of the use of sumac tannins.

49 Goddess of peace : IRENE

Eirene (also “Irene”) was the Greek goddess of peace, with “eirene” being the Greek word for “peace”. The Roman equivalent to Eirene was the goddess Pax.

59 Performer with a record 21 Oscar nominations : STREEP

Meryl Streep has had more nominations for an Academy Award than any other actor, which is both a tribute to her talent and the respect she has earned in the industry. I am not a huge fan of her earlier works but some of her recent movies are now on my list of all-time favorites. I recommend “Mamma Mia!” (you’ll either love it or hate it!), “Julie & Julia”, “It’s Complicated” and ”Hope Springs”.

63 Try : STAB

To have a whack, take a stab, is to give it a try.

67 Rite lead-in? : AMI-

“Amirite?” is an informal exclamation meaning “Am I right?”

68 Fútbol cheer : OLE!

“Fútbol” is the Spanish word for “football, soccer”.

70 Chicago’s __ Center : AON

The Aon Center in Chicago is the third-tallest building in the city. There is also an Aon Center in Los Angeles that is the second-tallest building in that city.

71 Shamus : TEC

“Shamus” is a slang term describing a policeman or a private investigator. The experts don’t seem so sure, but there is no doubt in my mind that the term derives from the Irish name “Séamus” (“James” in English). In days past, the stereotypical cop hailed from the Auld Sod.

73 Ostrichlike bird : EMU

Even though emu meat is classified as a red meat because of its color, it has a fat content that is comparable to other poultry.

87 Savory jelly : ASPIC

Aspic is a dish in which the main ingredients are served in a gelatin made from meat stock. “Aspic” is a French word meaning “jelly”.

94 Demeter’s Roman counterpart : CERES

In Greek mythology, Demeter was the goddess of the harvest. Her Roman equivalent was Ceres.

96 Cat pickup spot : SCRUFF

The “scruff” is the nape of the neck.

99 1972 missile pact : SALT I

There were two rounds of Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT) between the US and the Soviet Union, and two resulting treaties (SALT I & SALT II). The opening round of SALT I talks were held in Helsinki as far back as 1970, with the resulting treaty signed by President Richard Nixon and General Secretary Leonid Brezhnev in 1972. Brezhnev also signed the SALT II treaty, with President Jimmy Carter in 1979.

101 Pig thief of rhyme : TOM

Tom, Tom, the piper’s son,
Stole a pig, and away did run;

The “pig” mentioned in the rhyme isn’t actually a live animal but rather a small pastry with an apple filling.

102 Estonia, once: Abbr. : SSR

The European nation of Estonia has embraced the concept of electronic voting. Each citizen is issued an ID card that includes a chip. The ID card allows a citizen to cast a vote via the Internet using a computer with a card reader. One advantage of electronic voting in Estonia is that votes can be cast early, but can be changed right up to the end of election day.

105 Winner’s flag : PENNANT

By definition, a pennant (also “pennon”) is a flag that tapers, is larger at the hoist (near the flagpole) than the fly (the “tail”). Pennants tend to be triangular, tapered or triangular swallow-tailed.

112 Gnome cousin : ELF

In English folklore, the fairy’s anti-hero is the diminutive gnome, an evil ugly character. Over the centuries, the gnome has become more lovable. We now have garden gnomes, and even the Travelocity Gnome.

113 Floral neckwear : LEIS

“Lei” is a Hawaiian word meaning “garland, wreath”, although in more general terms a lei is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

118 Legume farmer’s concern? : PEA DEMAND (“peak demand” – K)

Plants called legumes are notable in that they work symbiotically with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, microorganisms found in the root nodules that convert atmospheric nitrogen into ammonium ions. As nitrogen is an essential component of proteins, legumes are exceptionally rich sources of plant protein. Examples of legumes are peas, beans, lentils and peanuts.

121 Sailing one small ship after another? : BARK HOPPING (“bar hopping” + K)

A barque (also “bark”) is a sailboat with three or more masts. The two forward masts are square-rigged, and the aftermast has triangular sails

123 Violin music word : ARCO

“Arco” is a musical direction instructing a string player to return to normal bowing technique after a passage played using some other technique (perhaps pizzicato).

124 Hudson-to-Niagara River canal : ERIE

The Erie Canal runs from Albany to Buffalo in the state of New York. What the canal does is allow shipping to proceed from New York Harbor right up the Hudson River, through the canal and into the Great Lakes. When it was opened in 1825, the Erie Canal had immediate impact on the economy of New York City and locations along its route. It was the first means of “cheap” transportation from a port on the Atlantic seaboard into the interior of the United States. Arguably it was the most important factor contributing to the growth of New York City over competing ports such as Baltimore and Philadelphia. It was largely because of the Erie Canal that New York became such an economic powerhouse, earning it the nickname of “the Empire State”. Paradoxically, one of the project’s main proponents was severely criticized. New York Governor DeWitt Clinton received so much ridicule that the canal was nicknamed “Clinton’s Folly” and “Clinton’s Ditch”.

126 Shilling’s five : PENCE

I grew up with shillings and pence in Ireland, until they were replaced with decimal currency in 1971. There used to be twelve pence in a shilling, and twenty shillings in a pound. When the conversion was made on “Decimal Day”, the shilling disappeared and the penny was replaced by what was then called the “new penny”. One shilling was pegged at five new pence.

127 Fraction of a min. : NSEC

“Nanosecond” is more correctly abbreviated to “ns” (as opposed to “nsec”) and really is a tiny amount of time: one billionth of a second.

130 Biblical mounts : ASSES

The ass or donkey is mentioned several times in the Bible. One of the most-quoted biblical stories involving an ass is the story of Balaam. Balaam was a diviner who appears in the Book of Numbers in. In one account, Balaam is held to task by an angel for particularly cruel treatment of an ass.

Down

4 Muse with a lyre : ERATO

In Greek mythology, Erato was the Muse of lyric poetry. She is often depicted with a wreath of myrtle and roses, and playing a lyre.

8 Rival of Sparta : ARGOS

Argos is one of the oldest cities in Greece, and indeed in Europe, having been continuously inhabited for over 7,000 years. In ancient times, Argos was a rival city-state to the powerful Sparta.

Sparta was a city-state in ancient Greece that was famous for her military might. Spartan children had a tough upbringing, and newborn babies were bathed in wine to see if the child was strong enough to survive. Every child was presented to a council of elders that decided if the baby was suitable for rearing. Those children deemed too puny were executed by tossing them into a chasm. We’ve been using the term “spartan” to describe something self-disciplined or austere since the 1600s.

13 With full force : AMAIN

“Amain” is an old term meaning “at great speed” or “of great strength”.

14 Searches for a well, say : DOWSES

Dowsing is the practice of divining, not just for water but also for buried metals and gemstones. Often a dowser will use a Y-shaped or L-shaped rod as a tool, which can also be called a dowser. Here in the US, the tool used might be referred to as a “witching rod”, as it is usually made from witch-hazel.

15 Actor Mineo : SAL

Actor Sal Mineo’s most famous role was John “Plato” Crawford, the kid who was in awe of the James Dean character in “Rebel Without a Cause”. Sadly, Mineo was murdered in 1976 when he was just 37 years old. He was attacked in the alley behind his Los Angeles apartment and stabbed through the heart. When an arrest was made it was discovered that the murderer had no idea that his victim was a celebrity, and that his plan was just to rob anyone who came along.

29 Camel’s fat-storage site : HUMP

Perhaps the most distinctive feature of a camel is the large deposit of fatty tissue on its back. The dromedary is the most common camel, and has two humps of fatty tissue on its back. The Bactrian camel has two humps, and makes up just 6% of the world’s camel population. Those fatty humps are useful if no food or water is available, as fat can be broken down into water and energy.

35 Seafood sauce : TARTAR

Tartar sauce is basically mayonnaise with some chopped pickles, capers and onion or chives. The recipe was invented by the French (as “sauce tartare”) with the name somehow linked to the Tatars, a people who once occupied Ukraine and parts of Russia.

37 Industry bigwigs : BARONS

A bigwig is someone important. The use of the term “bigwig” harks back to the days when men of authority and rank wore … big wigs.

40 Aesopian conclusion : MORAL

Aesop is remembered today as a fabulist, a writer of fables. Aesop lived in ancient Greece, probably around the sixth century BC. Supposedly he was born a slave, somehow became a free man, but then met with a sorry end. Aesop was sent to the city of Delphi on a diplomatic mission but instead insulted the Delphians. He was tried on a trumped-up charge of stealing from a temple, sentenced to death and was thrown off a cliff.

45 Pitcher Nomo with two no-nos : HIDEO

Hideo Nomo is a former professional baseball pitcher from Osaka, Japan. After achieving success in Japan, Nomo became the first Japanese-born player to appear in Major League Baseball in the US. Nomo threw two no-hitters while playing here in the Majors. He is the only Japanese-born player to have thrown even one no-hitter.

46 Spring month in Porto : MAIO

In Portuguese, “maio” (May) is a month in spring.

Portugal’s city of Oporto (“Porto” in Portuguese) gave its name to port wine in the late 1600s. Oporto was the seaport through which most of the region’s fortified red wine was exported.

50 Indian tea region : ASSAM

Assam is a state in the far northeast of India, and just south of the Himalayas. Assam is noted for its tea, as well as its silk.

52 Italian city known for a shroud : TURIN

The Shroud of Turin has to be one of the most controversial, and most studied, human artifacts ever unearthed. The Shroud is a linen cloth on which there is the image of a man who appears to have wounds inflicted by crucifixion. Many believe that the Shroud is the burial cloth in which Jesus Christ was placed after he died on the cross. The Shroud was kept in various locations in France for centuries before being moved to Turin Cathedral in 1578, from which it gets its name, and where it has been located ever since.

53 Providence athletes : FRIARS

Providence College is a private Roman Catholic school that was founded in 1917 in Providence, Rhode Island. It is the only university in the US that is administered by the Dominican Friars, and indeed the college’s sports teams are called “the Friars”.

60 Dwarf planet since 2006 : PLUTO

Pluto was discovered in 1930, and was welcomed as the ninth planet in our solar system. Pluto is relatively small in size, just one fifth of the mass of our own moon. In the seventies, astronomers began to discover more large objects in the solar system, including Eris, a “scattered disc object” at the outer reaches. Given that Eris is actually bigger than Pluto, and other objects really aren’t that much smaller, Pluto’s status as a planet was drawn into question. In 2006 there was a scientific definition for a “planet” agreed for the first time, resulting in Pluto being relegated to the status of “dwarf planet”, along with Eris.

64 Adagio and presto : TEMPI

The tempo (plural “tempi”) of a piece of music is usually designated with an Italian word on the score. For example, “grave” is slow and solemn, “andante” is at a walking pace, “scherzo” is fast and light-hearted, and “allegro” is fast, quickly and bright.

65 Gamut : AMBIT

An ambit is an outer boundary or limit, a circumference. The term can also be used to mean the sphere or scope of influence. “Ambit” comes from the Latin “ambire” meaning “to go around”.

In medieval times, the musical scale was denoted by the notes “ut, re, mi, fa, sol, la”. The term “gamma ut”, shortened to “gamut”, was used to describe the whole scale. By the 1620s, “gamut” was being used to mean the entire range of anything, the whole gamut.

66 Kyle or Kurt of NASCAR : BUSCH

NASCAR racer Kyle Busch is the younger brother of fellow racer Kurt Busch. Kyle is nicknamed “Shrub”, because he’s the smaller “bush” …

69 Early computer : ENIAC

The acronym ENIAC stands for Electronic Numerical Integrator and Calculator (although many folks insist that the C was for “Computer”). ENIAC was introduced at the University of Pennsylvania in 1946, at which time it was the first general-purpose electronic computer, and dubbed “Giant Brain” by the press. Its original purpose was the calculation of artillery firing tables, but it ended up being used early on to make calculations necessary for the development of the hydrogen bomb. Given its uses, it’s not surprising to hear that development of ENIAC was funded by the US Army during WWII.

72 Badinage : CHAFF

“Badinage” and “chaff” are both terms referring to playful banter, jesting.

79 Pair in jigs? : DOTS

A tittle is a small diacritical mark used in writing. Examples are the cedilla and tilde used in some languages, and the dot over the lowercase letters i and j in English.

82 Mil. flying branch : USAF

The US Air Force (USAF) is the youngest of the seven uniformed services in this country, having been formed in 1947. Today’s USAF was preceded by:

  • Aeronautical Division, Signal Corps (1907-1914)
  • Aviation Section, Signal Corps (1914-1918)
  • Division of Military Aeronautics (1918)
  • US Army Air Service (1918-1926)
  • US Army Air Corps (1926-1941)
  • US Army Air Forces (1941-1947)

88 Galette cooker : CREPE PAN

A galette is a flat, round bakery item in French cuisine. The term “galette” includes items such as pancakes and crepes, and even large cookies.

91 Port straddling the Bosporus : ISTANBUL

Istanbul, Turkey (formerly “Byzantium” and “Constantinople”) is the only metropolis in the world that is situated in two continents. The city extends both on the European side and on the Asian side of the Bosphorus river.

The Bosphorus (also “Bosporus”) is one of the two Turkish Straits, the other being the Dardanelles. The Bosphorus and the Dardanelles lie either side of the Sea of Marmara, allowing continuous navigation from the Aegean Sea to the Black Sea. The Turkish Straits also form the boundary between Europe and Asia.

92 Uno, por ejemplo : NUMERO

In Spanish, uno (one) is a low “número” (number).

95 Magazine with a pronoun title : ELLE

“Elle” magazine was founded in 1945 in France and today has the highest circulation of any fashion magazine in the world. “Elle” is the French word for “she”. “Elle” is published monthly worldwide, although you can pick up a weekly edition if you live in France.

98 Large size of the ’80s that now sounds tiny : ONE MEG

In the world of computing, a bit is the basic unit of information. It has a value of 0 or 1. A “byte” is a small collection of “bits” (usually 8), the number of bits needed to uniquely identify a character of text. The prefix mega- stands for 10 to the power of 6, so a megabyte (meg) is 1,000,000 bytes. The prefix giga- means 10 to the power of 9, and so a gigabyte (gig) is 1,000,000,000 bytes. Well, those are the SI definitions of megabyte and gigabyte. The purists still use 2 to the power of 20 for a megabyte (i.e. 1,048,576), and 2 to the power of 30 for a gigabyte.

103 Wall fixture : SCONCE

A sconce is a light fixture that today uses electric bulbs, but in the past used candles and torches. The defining feature of a sconce is that it is supported by a wall and does not have a base that stands on the ground. Usually the light is indirect, projected upwards towards the ceiling.

108 Myanmar, once : BURMA

The Republic of the Union of Myanmar is the official name of the Asian country that some nations still recognize as the Union of Burma.

119 Holliday nickname : DOC

The famous gunslinger Doc Holliday was from Georgia, and received the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery in Philadelphia. Holliday moved to the Southwest after he contracted tuberculosis, in the hope that the climate might be good for his health. He first settled in Dallas, where he soon discovered that he could make a better living gambling than by running a dental practice. It was while gambling in saloons that Holliday got involved in gunfights and built a reputation as a gunslinger. The most famous shootout in which he was involved was the Gunfight at the OK Corral in Tombstone, Arizona when he fought alongside the Earp brothers. Holliday survived his many gunfights, but eventually succumbed to the disease in his lungs. He died in Glenwood Springs, Colorado at the age of 36.

120 Snider of Twisted Sister : DEE

Dee Snider is the frontman from the heavy metal band Twisted Sister from Long Island, New York. Not my kind of music …

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Worrier’s agenda : CARES
6 Audibly amazed : AGASP
11 “Zounds!” : EGAD!
15 Ingredient in some pancakes : SPUD
19 Musical genre that means “work” in Italian : OPERA
20 Wrist bones : CARPI
21 Nautilus captain : NEMO
22 “A-Hunting We Will Go” songwriter : ARNE
23 Feeling caused by reading too many self-referential articles? : META FATIGUE (“metal fatigue” – L)
25 Where movie actors rehearse Southern accents? : DRAWL LOTS (“draw lots” + L)
27 Left : EXITED
28 Often-improvised light source : TORCH
30 Soybean paste : MISO
31 Factor of DX : CII
32 Spray : AEROSOL
34 Walk proudly : STRUT
36 Lobster __ : NEWBURG
38 When doubled, a dangerous fly : TSE
39 “Yo ho ho” beverage : RUM
41 “Poison” shrub : SUMAC
43 Get top billing for : STAR IN
44 Prodigy : PHENOM
47 Unrestrained episode : SPREE
49 Goddess of peace : IRENE
50 Overhead support for a small army? : ANT AIRCRAFT (“anti-aircraft” – I)
54 Urban pedestrian’s maneuver? : TAXI DODGE (“tax dodge” + I)
56 Noise : SOUND
57 Narrow victory margin : HAIR
58 Infielders : BASEMEN
59 Performer with a record 21 Oscar nominations : STREEP
61 They hang around : LOITERERS
63 Try : STAB
67 Rite lead-in? : AMI-
68 Fútbol cheer : OLE!
70 Chicago’s __ Center : AON
71 Shamus : TEC
73 Ostrichlike bird : EMU
74 Edit __ : MENU
76 Seamy component, as of politics : UNDERSIDE
81 Digits in a clumsiness metaphor : THUMBS
83 Big league members : NATIONS
85 R-rating reason : GORE
87 Savory jelly : ASPIC
88 Insult humor in a cornfield? : CROW ROAST (“crown roast” – N)
91 Trust that a supervised job will lead to full-time work? : INTERN FAITH (“interfaith” + N)
93 Transplant, in a way : REPOT
94 Demeter’s Roman counterpart : CERES
96 Cat pickup spot : SCRUFF
97 Very : EVER SO
99 1972 missile pact : SALT I
101 Pig thief of rhyme : TOM
102 Estonia, once: Abbr. : SSR
105 Winner’s flag : PENNANT
107 Fallback strategy : PLAN B
109 Perfectly detailed model : REPLICA
112 Gnome cousin : ELF
113 Floral neckwear : LEIS
115 Follow : ENSUE
117 Cheer for : ROOT ON
118 Legume farmer’s concern? : PEA DEMAND (“peak demand” – K)
121 Sailing one small ship after another? : BARK HOPPING (“bar hopping” + K)
123 Violin music word : ARCO
124 Hudson-to-Niagara River canal : ERIE
125 Not yet realized : UNMET
126 Shilling’s five : PENCE
127 Fraction of a min. : NSEC
128 Stare blankly : GAPE
129 Shows the way : LEADS
130 Biblical mounts : ASSES

Down

1 Act aggressively toward : COME AT
2 Very tops : APEXES
3 Hang it up, so to speak : RETIRE
4 Muse with a lyre : ERATO
5 Hotel amenities : SAFES
6 Do something : ACT
7 Pace of walking : GAIT
8 Rival of Sparta : ARGOS
9 Dramatic growth periods : SPURTS
10 Bakery shell : PIE CRUST
11 Finish : END
12 Microbe : GERM
13 With full force : AMAIN
14 Searches for a well, say : DOWSES
15 Actor Mineo : SAL
16 Obtained with effort : PROCURED
17 Indefatigable : UNTIRING
18 Appointed one : DESIGNEE
24 Worshipper : ADORER
26 Best time for beachcombing : LOW TIDE
29 Camel’s fat-storage site : HUMP
33 Afternoon date, maybe : LUNCH
35 Seafood sauce : TARTAR
37 Industry bigwigs : BARONS
40 Aesopian conclusion : MORAL
42 Stop : CEASE
44 Glass unit : PANE
45 Pitcher Nomo with two no-nos : HIDEO
46 Spring month in Porto : MAIO
48 Bring to bear : EXERT
50 Indian tea region : ASSAM
51 “Ask somebody else” : NOT ME
52 Italian city known for a shroud : TURIN
53 Providence athletes : FRIARS
55 “No more for me” : I’M SET
58 Well-meaning : BENIGN
60 Dwarf planet since 2006 : PLUTO
62 How-__: manuals : TOS
64 Adagio and presto : TEMPI
65 Gamut : AMBIT
66 Kyle or Kurt of NASCAR : BUSCH
69 Early computer : ENIAC
72 Badinage : CHAFF
75 Still eligible for a full refund, as clothing : UNWORN
77 Pill bottle info : DOSES
78 Catch in a sting : ENTRAP
79 Pair in jigs? : DOTS
80 Put up : ERECT
82 Mil. flying branch : USAF
84 Gallery event : ART SALE
86 Miscalculation, say : ERROR
88 Galette cooker : CREPE PAN
89 Merrymakers : REVELERS
90 Feature of a gravy-covered sandwich : OPEN FACE
91 Port straddling the Bosporus : ISTANBUL
92 Uno, por ejemplo : NUMERO
95 Magazine with a pronoun title : ELLE
98 Large size of the ’80s that now sounds tiny : ONE MEG
100 Half-baked : INSANE
102 Sedate protests : SIT-INS
103 Wall fixture : SCONCE
104 Roams freely : RANGES
106 Sparkly headgear : TIARA
108 Myanmar, once : BURMA
110 Family nickname : POPPA
111 Bounding gaits : LOPES
114 Cut off : SNIP
116 __ out a living : EKED
119 Holliday nickname : DOC
120 Snider of Twisted Sister : DEE
122 Elevs. : HTS

21 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 19 Apr 20, Sunday”

  1. 5 misses., never heard of that “PIG” rhyme. I left it as TOE. But I didn’t go back and look at 92D and had NUEERO. Doh! I enjoyed the puzzle.. I completely misread the purpose of LINK. I assumed it just meant there was a missing letter. I never associated the actual LINK letters were the key. Thanks Bill for showing me the way!!

    Be Safe!!

  2. 1:21:00 with one dumb error…I spent a long time on the last 5 clues I filled in and then after a long review I finally saw what the setter was doing.
    I was so concerned with the theme that I let AVERSO instead of ever so cause the dumb error…as I said before put it in perspective with what’s happening and move on…STAY SAFE

  3. No errors after a few erasures (changing tempo into tempi and
    correcting the spelling of Newburg), but I never figured out the
    theme…even after Bill’s explanation, it is still head-shaking.

  4. PS: back in the long-ago days, my paternal grandfather was a
    dowser. He not only could find water, but he could locate coins
    under a line of reclining grandkids. Or so it seemed.

  5. Croce puzzle of 02/28: 1:30:06, no errors. The last of the leftover puzzles from the Mad Time of Moving that preceded the Mad Time of Isolation (and a rather difficult one, at that … 😳). So I’m now free to do my taxes … and unpack some of those boxes … happy, happy, joy, joy … 😜.

  6. Hate it when prepositions are wrong. You do not root “on”; you root “for.” And “half-baked” is simply not “insane.” Still, some good ones here. We liked “CROWROAST” / “INTERNFAITH.”

    1. @Russ … It’s not a phrase I would use, either, but, apparently, some people do “root on”. See

      https://www.thefreedictionary.com/root+on

      which gives the following definition: “spur on or encourage, especially by cheers and shouts”.

      And I would say that “half-baked” and “insane” are often substituted for one another, even if they don’t have the same literal meaning.

      It’s always dangerous to rely solely on one’s own command of English in judging clues, since usage does vary from group to group.

  7. All around, this was for me a fairly challenging puzzle. Any fun it might have held was blown out early on, but it still was no slog. The theme’s clever enough and well-executed. If I had nits to pick, they’d be about that wretched NE quadrant, where the answer to 15A (“Ingredient in some pancakes” … S _ _ _) is neither SALT nor SODA, but SPUD! The straight-ahead clue failed to hint that the answer would be a slang term. And then, can’t the answer to 31A (“Factor of DX”) be gotten only by what the crosses reveal? Yes, the answer (CII, or 120) is a “factor” of CD — because 510 divided by 5 is 120. But isn’t another three-letter string of Roman numerals — III —- also a “factor” of CD, since 510 divided by 170 is 3? Are there other “factors”? Those entries made the eight-letter down answers much harder to get. That whole junked-up corner largely sapped the joy out of the puzzle for me.

    1. I finally figured out Sunday and actually got 100% on it. However, I wonder how many people could actually figure out the factor for DX. This is not a math challenge. It is a word challenge!

  8. Re: 91 Port straddling the Bosporus : ISTANBUL – “Europe” and “Asia” are not separate continents. They are regions of the continent of Eurasia. But the round-eyed, Christian caucasians in the west couldn’t stand sharing the same continent with those heathen mongols to the east, with their epicanthic folds. So they contrived the entirely artificial “continents” of Europe and Asia. They’ve been trying to define a border for centuries. Maps still differ even today.

  9. Bywaters has never been my friend. Really struggled through this one and DNF. And lost all interest in trying.

    Carrie: Hope you get well soon. How alarming that must have been for you. And at this particular time with the hospitals so busy. Let’s us know how you’re doing.

  10. Kay, and Jan and Nonny from yesterday– thank you for the kind words and sympathy! Hopefully it’s nothing serious😶🤗

  11. Three hours plus, about seven errors. NE quadrant tough for me too. I was thinking “Fudd” for “A hunting we will go” writer. Ami Rite? Sheesh…

  12. The L.A. Sunday crossword is too small I struggle to read it. I asked before if you can increase the size by about 20%. I am just an old biddy, no one cares.

    I think I am going to get a life and play bridge or bingo again at the old center soon as the quarantines are lifted.
    You nerds should try other games. There are crossword solvers everywhere now.

  13. Still don’t know which league 83A refers to. My first thought was baseball, but neither Nats nor Nationals fit. I later guessed it must be the League of Nations, but were there any members that were smaller than a nation?

  14. Totally frustrating puzzle—we’re not all geniuses and this one made no sense at all — what does bar hopping have to do with ships? Or Metal fatigue have to do with a feeling? Puleeze!

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