LA Times Crossword 2 Apr 20, Thursday

Advertisement

Constructed by: Alan DerKazarian
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Jump Scare

The grid includes five rows with hidden synonyms of “SCARE”. Each synonym starts at the end of one answer, JUMPS over a black box, and then finishes in the start of another answer:

  • 61A Scream-evoking horror film technique … and a hint to what’s hiding in five puzzle rows : JUMP SCARE
  • 17A Lay to rest : INTER
  • 18A With 42-Across, part of a psychologist’s battery : RORSCHACH … (hiding “TER-ROR”)
  • 22A HDTV part, for short : HI-DEF
  • 24A They may be civil : RIGHTS (hiding “F-RIGHT”)
  • 34A Deadly : LETHAL
  • 37A West Point team : ARMY (hiding “AL-ARM”)
  • 42A See 18-Across : … TEST
  • 43A Stella __: Belgian beer : ARTOIS (hiding “ST-ART”)
  • 50A __ Zee: Hudson River area : TAPPAN
  • 53A Divine fluid : ICHOR (hiding “PAN-IC”)

Bill’s time: 7m 23s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Egyptian god with an ibis head : THOTH

Thoth was an ancient Egyptian god who was depicted as a man with the head of either a baboon or an ibis. He was the god of many things, including wisdom, writing, magic and the dead.

6 One who crosses the line : SCAB

We first started calling strikebreakers scabs in the early 1800s, and before that a scab was a person who refused to join a trade union (back as early 1777). The word “scab” probably comes from the use of “scab” as a symptom of a skin disease, and so is a term that is meant to insult.

10 Blight-stricken tree : ELM

Dutch elm disease is a fungus devastating to all species of elm trees that is transmitted by the elm bark beetle. The disease is thought to have originated in Asia and is now rampant in Europe and North America. Even though there is a hybrid of elm known as the Dutch elm, the disease isn’t named after the tree. Rather, the disease is called “Dutch” as it was identified in 1921 by a phytopathologist (plant pathologist) in the Netherlands.

13 “Donnie Brasco” actress Anne : HECHE

My favorite movie starring the actress Anne Heche is “Six Days Seven Nights”, a romantic comedy in which she plays opposite Harrison Ford. Heche is noted for her difficult private life. She wrote that her father had molested her as a child and gave her a sexually transmitted disease (he later revealed that he was homosexual, and died of AIDS). Heche dated comedian Steve Martin for two years, and then lived with comedian Ellen DeGeneres for three. Soon after breaking up with DeGeneres, she started exhibiting eccentric behavior for a while, claiming that she was the daughter of God, and that she would take everyone back to heaven in her spaceship. Happily, I think things have calmed down for her in recent years.

The 1997 movie “Donnie Brasco” is about an FBI agent who infiltrates a New York City crime family. The film is loosely based on the true story of agent Joseph Pistone who worked his way into the Bonanno family. Johnny Depp plays Pistone on screen, and uses the name Donnie Brasco when undercover.

15 Corp. leaders : CEOS

Chief executive officer (CEO)

18 With 42-Across, part of a psychologist’s battery : RORSCHACH …
(42A See 18-Across : … TEST)

The Rorschach test is a psychological test in which a subject is asked to interpret a series of inkblots. The test was created by Swiss Freudian psychoanalyst Hermann Rorschach in the 1920s.

20 Seven-time Wimbledon winner : GRAF

Steffi Graf is a former World No. 1 professional tennis player from Germany. Graf won 22 Grand Slam singles titles, which is more than any other man or woman other than Margaret Court. She is married to another former World No. 1, namely Andre Agassi.

21 Wisconsin city on the Mississippi : LA CROSSE

The city of La Crosse, Wisconsin is located on the Mississippi River, on the eastern border of the state. The city’s name was given by US Army officer Lt. Zebulon Pike (of “Pike’s Peak” fame). He witnessed Native Americans playing a game in the area with sticks that resembled a bishop’s staff (“la crosse” in French).

22 HDTV part, for short : HI-DEF

High-definition television (HDTV)

25 Singing stars : DIVAS

The term “diva” comes to us from Latin via Italian. “Diva” is the feminine form of “divus” meaning “divine one”. The word is used in Italy to mean “goddess” or “fine lady”, and especially is applied to the prima donna in an opera. We often use the term to describe a singer with a big ego.

27 “60 Minutes” regular : STAHL

Television journalist Lesley Stahl first appeared on “60 Minutes” in 1991, after serving as moderator of “Face the Nation” for almost 8 years starting in 1983. Stahl is married to author and journalist Aaron Latham. One of Latham’s claims to fame is that he wrote the article that inspired the movie “Urban Cowboy”.

31 Strong brew : ALE

The many, many different styles of beer can generally be sorted into two groups: ales and lagers. Ales are fermented at relatively warm temperatures for relatively short periods of time, and use top-fermenting yeasts, i.e. yeasts that float on top of the beer as it ferments. Lagers ferment at relatively low temperatures and for relatively long periods of time. Lagers use bottom-fermenting yeasts, i.e. yeasts that fall to the bottom of the beer as it ferments.

37 West Point team : ARMY

West Point is a military reservation in New York State, located north of New York City. West Point was first occupied by the Continental Army way back in 1778, making it the longest, continually-occupied military post in the country. Cadet training has taken place at the garrison since 1794, although Congress funding for a US Military Academy (USMA) didn’t start until 1802. The first female cadets were admitted to West Point in 1976, and as of 2018, about 15% of all new cadets were women.

38 Prom adornment : CORSAGE

“Corsage” is a word that we imported from French in the late 15th century and meaning , believe it or not, “body size”. By the early 1800s, a corsage was a bodice, or the body of a woman’s dress. At the beginning of the 20th century, the French term “bouquet de corsage” was being used for a “bouquet worn on the bodice”, and this has been shortened simply to “corsage”.

A prom is a formal dance held upon graduation from high school (we call them “formals” over in Ireland). The term “prom” is short for “promenade”, the name given to a type of dance or ball.

43 Stella __: Belgian beer : ARTOIS

The Belgian beer Stella Artois is named for the brewer Sebastianus Artois. Artois was the master brewer at the Den Hoorn Brewery in Leuven, Belgium in the early 1700s. The Den Hoorn Brewery has been around at least since 1366 … yes, 1366!

45 Düsseldorf direction : OST

In German, “Wien” (Vienna) is located “ost” (east) of “München” (Munich).

Düsseldorf lies in the west of Germany, fairly close to the border with France. The city is located on the River Rhine.

48 Bridge seats : EASTS

The four people playing bridge (the card game) are positioned around a table at seats referred to as north, east, south and west. Each player belongs to a pair, with north playing with south, and east playing with west.

50 __ Zee: Hudson River area : TAPPAN

The Tappan Zee is a 10-mile stretch of the Hudson River in New York, a place where there is a widening of the waterway. The name comes from the Tappan Native American people and the Dutch word “zee” meaning “sea” or “wide expanse of water”.

53 Divine fluid : ICHOR

Ichor is a golden fluid that is the blood of the gods in Greek mythology.

57 Laszlo Kreizler, in a Caleb Carr novel : ALIENIST

“The Alienist” is a 1994 crime novel by Caleb Carr that is set in New York City at the end of the 19th century. The protagonist is Dr. Laszlo Kreizler, a psychologist who works with Police Commissioner and future US president Theodore Roosevelt. The novel was adapted into a 10-part TV series that first aired on TNT in early 2018.

60 Nylons : HOSE

The polymer known as “nylon” was developed by Dupont in the 1930s. The first application for the new product was as bristles in toothbrushes, in 1938. The second application became more famous. The first stockings made from nylon were produced in 1940, and since then stockings have been known as “nylons”. The polymer was developed as a replacement for silk, which was in short supply during WWII.

61 Scream-evoking horror film technique … and a hint to what’s hiding in five puzzle rows : JUMP SCARE

A jump scare is an action taken to frighten an audience by suddenly presenting something completely unexpected and terrifying. An example would be a dead assailant, who opens his or her eyes unexpectedly.

63 Broadway orphan : ANNIE

The Broadway musical “Annie” is based on the Harold Gray comic strip “Little Orphan Annie”. There have been two film adaptations of the musical. Both were really quite successful, including one released in 1982, directed by John Huston of all people. It was his only ever musical.

64 US Open stadium namesake : ASHE

Arthur Ashe Stadium in Queens, New York opened in 1997 and for years was the largest outdoor, tennis-only venue in the world. The stadium was often criticized for not having a retractable dome to protect the playing surface from inclement weather. Well, that changed in 2016 when the stadium debuted its new retractable roof, a $150 million investment in the facility.

65 Surrealist Paul : KLEE

Artist Paul Klee was born in Switzerland, but studied art in Munich in Germany. We can see many of Klee’s works in the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. If you get to Bern in Switzerland, even more of them can be seen at the Zentrum Paul Klee that was opened in 2005. Klee’s most celebrated work is his pointillist painting from 1932 called “Ad Parnassum”, which is owned by the Kunstmuseum, also located in Bern.

66 Paragon : MODEL

A paragon is a model of excellence, a peerless example. Ultimately the term derives from the Greek “para-” meaning “on the side” and “akone” meaning “whetstone”. This derivation comes from the ancient practice of using a touchstone to test gold for its level of purity by drawing a line on the stone with the gold and comparing the resulting mark with samples of known purity.

67 It may be gross : TON

Here in the US, a ton is equivalent to 2,000 pounds. Over in the UK, a ton is 2,240 pounds. The UK unit is sometimes referred to as an Imperial ton, long ton or gross ton. Folks over there refer to the US ton then as a short ton. To further complicate matters, there is also a metric ton or tonne, which is equivalent to 2,204 pounds. Personally, I wish we’d just stick to kilograms …

68 Barrie pirate : SMEE

In J. M. Barrie’s play and novel about Peter Pan, Smee is one of Captain Hook’s pirates and is his Hook’s bosun and right-hand man. Smee is described by Barrie as being “Irish” and “a man who stabbed without offence”. Nice guy! Captain Hook and Smee sail on a pirate ship called the Jolly Roger.

69 Leaders of industry : CZARS

The term “czar” (also “tsar”) is a Slavic word that was first used as a title by Simeon I of Bulgaria in 913 AD. “Czar” is derived from the word “caesar”, which was synonymous with “emperor” at that time. We tend to use the “czar” spelling, as opposed to “tsar”, when we describe a person today with great power or authority, e.g. “Drug Czar”.

Down

2 Painter __ de Toulouse-Lautrec : HENRI

The celebrated French painter Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec came from an aristocratic family. This breeding may have made life comfortable for him, but it was the source of his famous disabilities. He had congenital conditions that resulted from the inbreeding that was a tradition in his family (Henri’s parents were first cousins).

4 Jay Powell chairs it : THE FED

The Federal Reserve System is more usually known simply as “the Fed”, and is the central banking system of the US. It was introduced in 1913 in response to a number of financial panics at the beginning of the 20th century. The original role for the Fed was to act as a lender of last resort, in case there was a run on a bank. This can happen as most of the money that is deposited by customers in a bank is reinvested by that bank, so it has very little liquid cash available. If too many customers look for their money at one time, then the bank can be short of cash and this can start a “run”. The Fed’s responsibilities have broadened since those early days …

Jerome “Jay” Powell was appointed chairman of the Federal Reserve by President Donald Trump in 2018. Since then, President Trump hasn’t been a fan.

6 Orchestra sect. : STR

An orchestra (orch.) has a string (str.) section.

9 Amazon crime series based on Michael Connelly novels : BOSCH

“Bosch” is a well-written police drama series produced by Amazon Studios. The title character, detective Harry Bosch, is portrayed by Titus Welliver. Harry Bosch features in a series of novels by Michael Connelly, who is also the TV show’s creator.

10 Satellite communications giant : ECHOSTAR

EchoStar is a giant telecommunications company that used to operate DISH Network, and still operates Hughes Network. EchoStar runs a fleet of satellites that it started launching in 1995.

12 Soft shoes : MOCS

“Moc” is short for “moccasin”, a type of shoe. The moccasin is a traditional form of footwear worn by members of many Native American tribes.

19 Old PC monitors : CRTS

Cathode ray tube (CRT)

23 Adidas rival : FILA

Fila was originally an Italian company, founded in 1911 and now based in South Korea. Fila was started in Piedmont by the Fila brothers, primarily to make underwear that they sold to people living in the Italian Alps. The company started to focus on sportswear in the seventies, using tennis-great Bjorn Borg as their major endorser.

24 Yelp user, say : RATER

yelp.com is a website that provides a local business directory and reviews of services. The site is sort of like Yellow Pages on steroids, and the term “yelp” is derived from “yel-low p-ages”.

26 Brightest star in Lyra : VEGA

Vega is the brightest star in the constellation Lyra. Vega (along with Altair and Deneb from other constellations) is also part of the group of three stars that is called the Summer Triangle. Vega is the star at the right-angle of this triangle.

28 River of Pisa : ARNO

The city of Pisa sits right on the Italian coast, at the mouth of the River Arno. The city is perhaps most famous for its Leaning Tower. The tower is actually the campanile (bell tower) of the city’s cathedral, and it has been leaning since it was completed in 1173. Just shows you how important good foundations are …

29 Gps. with copays : HMOS

Health Maintenance Organization (HMO)

30 Ride-sharing option : LYFT

Lyft is a ridesharing service that is based in San Francisco, as is Uber, Lyft’s biggest competitor.

32 Early movie mogul : LOEW

The Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) film studio was founded in 1924 by Marcus Loew. Loew was already a successful movie theater owner when he purchased Metro Pictures Corporation in 1919, and then Goldwyn Pictures in 1924. Later in 1924, Loew also purchased Louis B. Mayer Pictures, mainly so that Louis B. Mayer could merge all three studios and run them himself as Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

33 Gaelic language : ERSE

There are actually three Erse languages: Irish, Manx (spoken on the Isle of Man) and Scots Gaelic. In their own tongues, these would be “Gaeilge” (in Ireland), “Gaelg” (on the Isle of Man) and “Gaidhlig” (in Scotland).

36 Island rings : LEIS

“Lei” is a Hawaiian word meaning “garland, wreath”, although in more general terms a lei is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

39 Fox River, in TV’s “Prison Break” : STATE PEN

“Prison Break” is a TV drama that originally aired from 2005 until 2009. The storyline revolves around Lincoln Burrows, a convicted felon who is wrongfully charged with murder, and Michael Scofield, Lincoln’s brother who is devoted to getting his brother out of jail.

41 Spot of wine? : ASTI

Asti is a city in the Piedmont region of northwest Italy. The region is perhaps most famous for its Asti Spumante sparkling white wine.

44 Source of a homeopathic oil : TEA TREE

Tea tree oil is an essential oil that is extracted from the leaves of several species known as “tea tree”, all of which are in the myrtle family. The oil is used as a folk remedy for several skin conditions, including acne, nail fungus and athlete’s foot and dandruff. We are warned that tree oil is poisonous when taken internally, and may cause skin irritation when used externally.

47 They may be fake : TANS

The most effective fake tans available today are not dyes or stains. Instead, they are sprays with the active ingredient dihydroxyacetone (DHA). DHA reacts chemically with amino acids in the dead layer of skin on the surface of the body. Sounds a little risky to me …

49 Slangy nose : SCHNOZ

“Schnoz(z)” is a slang term for a nose, particularly a large one.

52 Church song : PSALM

The Greek word “psalmoi” originally meant “songs sung to a harp”, and gave us the word “psalms”. In the Jewish and Western Christian traditions, the Book of Psalms contains 150 individual psalms, divided into five sections.

54 Passport producer : HONDA

The Honda Passport SUV was basically the same car as the Isuzu Rodeo. Honda desperately needed an entry into the growing SUV market in the early nineties and so made a deal with Isuzu to use their existing design.

55 Willow twig : OSIER

Most willows (trees and shrubs of the genus Salix) are called just that, “willows”. Some of the broad-leaved shrub varieties are called “sallow”, and the narrow-leaved shrubs are called “osier”. Osier is commonly used in basketry, as osier twigs are very flexible. The strong and flexible willow stems are sometimes referred to as withies.

56 Lively dances : REELS

The reel is a Scottish country dance that is also extremely popular in Ireland.

57 “The Birth of a Nation” actress __ Naomi King : AJA

Aja Naomi King is an actress from Southern California who plays Michaela Pratt on the legal drama “How to Get Away with Murder”.

“The Birth of a Nation” is a 2016 biopic about Nat Turner, the enslaved African-Merican preacher who led a four-day revolt in Virginia in 1831. Actor Nate Parker directed the film, and portrayed Turner. The film uses the same title as the controversial 1915 silent movie that served as propaganda for the Klu Klux Klan.

58 A deadly sin : LUST

The cardinal sins of Christian ethics are also known as the seven deadly sins. The seven sins are:

  • Wrath
  • Greed
  • Sloth
  • Pride
  • Lust
  • Envy
  • Gluttony

59 “If u ask me” : IMHO

In my humble opinion (IMHO)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Egyptian god with an ibis head : THOTH
6 One who crosses the line : SCAB
10 Blight-stricken tree : ELM
13 “Donnie Brasco” actress Anne : HECHE
14 Flap : TO-DO
15 Corp. leaders : CEOS
17 Lay to rest : INTER
18 With 42-Across, part of a psychologist’s battery : RORSCHACH …
20 Seven-time Wimbledon winner : GRAF
21 Wisconsin city on the Mississippi : LA CROSSE
22 HDTV part, for short : HI-DEF
24 They may be civil : RIGHTS
25 Singing stars : DIVAS
27 “60 Minutes” regular : STAHL
31 Strong brew : ALE
34 Deadly : LETHAL
37 West Point team : ARMY
38 Prom adornment : CORSAGE
40 Hear about : LEARN OF
42 See 18-Across : … TEST
43 Stella __: Belgian beer : ARTOIS
45 Düsseldorf direction : OST
46 Hard work : SWEAT
48 Bridge seats : EASTS
50 __ Zee: Hudson River area : TAPPAN
53 Divine fluid : ICHOR
57 Laszlo Kreizler, in a Caleb Carr novel : ALIENIST
60 Nylons : HOSE
61 Scream-evoking horror film technique … and a hint to what’s hiding in five puzzle rows : JUMP SCARE
63 Broadway orphan : ANNIE
64 US Open stadium namesake : ASHE
65 Surrealist Paul : KLEE
66 Paragon : MODEL
67 It may be gross : TON
68 Barrie pirate : SMEE
69 Leaders of industry : CZARS

Down

1 Fried chicken choice : THIGH
2 Painter __ de Toulouse-Lautrec : HENRI
3 Two quartets : OCTAD
4 Jay Powell chairs it : THE FED
5 That girl : HER
6 Orchestra sect. : STR
7 Not very friendly : COOLISH
8 “What __”: “Ho-hum” : A DRAG
9 Amazon crime series based on Michael Connelly novels : BOSCH
10 Satellite communications giant : ECHOSTAR
11 Grazing sites : LEAS
12 Soft shoes : MOCS
16 That girl : SHE
19 Old PC monitors : CRTS
23 Adidas rival : FILA
24 Yelp user, say : RATER
26 Brightest star in Lyra : VEGA
28 River of Pisa : ARNO
29 Gps. with copays : HMOS
30 Ride-sharing option : LYFT
31 Ballet divisions : ACTS
32 Early movie mogul : LOEW
33 Gaelic language : ERSE
35 Take out __ : A LOAN
36 Island rings : LEIS
39 Fox River, in TV’s “Prison Break” : STATE PEN
41 Spot of wine? : ASTI
44 Source of a homeopathic oil : TEA TREE
47 They may be fake : TANS
49 Slangy nose : SCHNOZ
51 Chooses : PICKS
52 Church song : PSALM
54 Passport producer : HONDA
55 Willow twig : OSIER
56 Lively dances : REELS
57 “The Birth of a Nation” actress __ Naomi King : AJA
58 A deadly sin : LUST
59 “If u ask me” : IMHO

28 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 2 Apr 20, Thursday”

  1. Congrats to Bill for recognizing one of the most convoluted themes i have ever seen. I would have figured that out and used it to solve clues sometime in the 22nd century!

    57D had Aba instead of Aja, giving Bumpscare instead of Jumpscare. I was not familiar with the actress.

    Apologies for the irony and stay safe and healthy.

  2. Wow, what a fright. I got done with the puzzle and was very unsure of my answers or what the theme was!!! Ironically, I got the words right with a lot of help from crosses… But jumpscare??? I never ‘jumped’ to any conclusions. A few words I was unfamiliar with. I caught myself staring at this way too long. Like some sort of OPART that was going to jump out at me…

    1. Also, in the same entry, it’s “African-American” (which I would not have noticed if @Wayne had not posted his correction).

  3. I got most of the puzzle but still didn’t get the theme. Thoth was ridiculous…. as was jump scare.

    Who is Aja Naomi King?

    I don’t mind difficult clues but what’s the point of obscure ones.

  4. 9:57, no errors (but, as so often happens on late-night solves, I spaced the theme). I did it after tangling with one of the really hard puzzles I didn’t get to during my recent move and after thoroughly embarrassing myself on today’s NYT crossword and I found it easy compared to them (with nary a single “natty key” in sight 😜).

    About yesterday’s discussion of on-line solves: I have found that many claims concerning their “advantages” come from pen-or-pencil-on-paper solvers. I do use the NYT app on my iPad Mini (which started as an experiment and continues because of its record-keeping aspects), but I use pen and paper for everything else and much prefer it. The Phat Phinger Phenomenon on that tiny virtual keyboard has messed me up more times than I can count. If I had two sets of eyes, I could assign one set to watch my fingers and the other set to watch the grid; sadly, I am stuck with what nature gave me … 😜. (Of course, if I used an actual keyboard on a larger device and became really familiar with it, I might do better … but I somewhat doubt it 😜.)

  5. Well, Mr. DerKazarian, you must feel like one smug constructor after that ludicrous SW quadrant … Birth of a Nation actress? Character in a Carr novel? River in a TV show? All that at the sloggy bottom after coming out of the chute with THOTH! And then JUMPSCARE is the payoff?! Speaking of which, if you made more than lunch money for this puz, you were overpaid, pal.

  6. 26:30 paper and pencil time with no errors…the theme is something I most likely would have never found and after a short search I gave up…just getting the answers right is victory enough for me.

    1. Never heard of the word or phrase “jumpscare.” That being said, the clue for jumpscare refers to the five longest answers. I don’t agree that the five longest answers is correct. The five longest answers were

    2. Never heard of the word or phrase “jumpscare.” That being said, the clue for jumpscare refers to the five longest answers. I don’t agree that the five longest answers is correct. The five longest answers included “Lacrosse,” which doesn’t figure into the theme.

      1. Neither Bill’s explanation nor the clue mentions five “longest” answers:
        “…what’s hiding in five puzzle rows.”

  7. 16:49. Paid no attention to the theme. I really got bogged down in the SE. ICHOR? A golden fluid of the gods? I’m pretty sure it was also carbonated and that we now call it beer.

    HENRI Toulouse Lautrec’s family had inbreeding as a tradition? Maybe I’ll have to think twice the next time I make fun of a millennial.

    ICHOR, ALIENIST, THOTH, JUMPSCARE, AJA.Ouch. Oh well, at least it’s not snowing.

    I stole that last comment. I was at a comedy club while in grad school way back in 1991 and saw a then unknown comedian named Drew Carey. I went with my then girlfriend and her friend. Carey was superb and made fun of our table all through his act. We spoke to him after the show. Nice as could be.

    Two weeks later he debuted on The Tonight Show, and the rest is history. I doubt he remembers us.

    If anyone wants a good laugh in these strange times, here is Carey’s Tonight Show debut in 1991. It was essentially his same act I had seen 2 weeks prior. I forgot that comedians USED to be apolitical. I miss those days. People don’t laugh at comedians anymore; they applaud them. Yikes.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-xjhEdHObpI

    Best –

  8. I never get the ‘clues’. Got the obscure answers by crosses. I usually know [by clues] that the answer is ‘czar’ or ‘tsar’….which leaves my completing the answer until the crosses…just wondering if there is a
    rule for using either spelling as this one comes up a lot!
    (Thanks…I am very appreciative of the daily ‘Comments’).

  9. While I didn’t know the answer my guess of the “j” for jump scare and Aja going down worked out and that finished the grid successfully.

    Now on to the WSJ.

    Hope everyone is well. These are crazy times to be living through. After all the threats from terrorism and the countdown of the doomsday clock for a nuclear holocaust we find ourselves in a battle royal with an invisible invader.

    1. Tony –

      And don’t forget the time a few years ago when there was a shortage of agave, and tequila demand couldn’t be met. I still have nightmares about that crisis.

      Best –

  10. This was an OK day except for 61A. I’ve never heard of “jump scare” as a film technique. And I have some film experience. So, whatever….!

    I’m getting cabin fever now. And 28 days to go, hopefully. Lordy, lordy.

  11. Very tough, for any day. DNF, as all the unsolveable naticks coagulated in the bottom right. Took over 20 minutes before I threw in the towel.

    The drought continues…

  12. Didn’t get theme. Had to Google 3x: JUMPSCARE, BOSCH, RATER.
    Didn’t know: AJA, ALIENIST.
    Had nIke before FILA, “order” before A LOAN, weSTS before EASTS,
    CpuS before CRTS, OCTet before OCTAD.
    MOCS should be indicated as an abbrev.
    I disagree that KLEE is called a surrealist. Very little that near to reality. Closer to cubism and colorism, and a little espressionism.

  13. Re: 57A, “Alienist” – Caleb Carr’s novel is superb. I highly recommend it. I was so looking forward to TNT’s TV adaptation. But that was a smarmy, lewd mess. I gave up on it midway through the second episode. What a shame. It coulda been great TV.

    Re: 67A, “Ton” – Bill wishes we’d stick to kilograms. But as far as I know, the only people who’ve ever willingly adopted the metric system, rather than having it forced upon them by government, are drug dealers. 😆

  14. Moderately difficult Thursday for me; took 29 minutes with no errors, although I had plenty of doubts. Since I’ve never heard of any of the actors nor seen any of the shows/movies mentioned, I was doing plenty of waiting for crosses and making educated guesses. Still, the alphabet roll for AJA/JUMPSCARE was tricky and it’s a good thing I’m a big Steely Dan fan. I’m just glad it wasn’t Ada. 🙂

    re Drew Carey – Thanks Jeff, that was a cool video. I liked that Carson called him over after his act.

    re Metric system – Well of course the dealers willingly adopted it, it makes the math so much easier. Taking engineering/physics/chemistry courses, I think I spent a good third of my time converting between silly and metric units.

    1. Imperial weights and measures are based on everyday, real-world things. But the French revolutionaries dictated that everything had to be based on the distance from the north pole to the equator (through Paris, of course). Huh?

      Thankfully, their attempts to decimalize time and the calendar failed miserably. Even la Marseillaise couldn’t change the real-world fact that Earth rotates (about) 365 times between winter solstices. And 12 is too perfect a number – evenly divisible by 2, 3, and 4. So, 12 hours for daytime, 12 for nighttime. No wonder it carried over to 12 months a year (with a little modern diddling for leap-days and leap-seconds).

      Too bad we didn’t evolve with six fingers and toes, instead of five. If everything was base-12, the world would work a whole lot better.

      It was an amusing FUBAR (although expensive) when a Mars satellite went hurtling off into oblivion because one nest of eggheads used Imperial measures, and another nest used metric.

      I always like it in a TV show or a movie, when a science-type rattles off meters, centimeters, grams, kilograms, liters, milliliters, etc., and the regular-guy type says, “What’s that in American?’

  15. HIYA folks!!🦆

    No errors. Didn’t know ICHOR/OSIER; I had manna at first. Also for some reason it took a long time for me to get GRAF, and that’s when I ALREADY had GRA_!! 😆 Was there a tennis player named GRAY??! Yikes…..finally the answer hit me over the head. 🙄

    LA’s Mayor Garcetti has ordered that everyone here who has to go out must wear a mask (doesn’t have to be medical grade but can’t just be a paper towel.) I already wear a mask when I’m out, but it occurred to me today that I have a nice collection of vintage scarves that I rarely wear — those would work! I’ll put a twist-tie at the bridge of the nose to keep it in place. 🤗

    Kay — can’t wait till end of April!! Knowing, tho, that it may be longer….🤔

    Be safe ~~🍷

  16. Thanks for everything you do, Bill!

    LaCrosse,WI is on the extreme western side of the state….just across the river from Minnnesota.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.