LA Times Crossword 10 May 20, Sunday

Advertisement

Constructed by: Paul Coulter
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Trade School

Themed answers are common phrases with a letter X EXCHANGED for a different letter. Those TRADED letters spell out “STUDENT”:

  • 120A Pupil with a phonetic beginning that hints at what the circled letters comprise : X-CHANGE STUDENT
  • 23A This year’s hatchlings? : NEST GENERATION (from “next generation”)
  • 37A Chopin virtuoso’s self-assurance? : ETUDE CONFIDENCE (from “exude confidence”)
  • 50A Greek cross in a company logo? : CORPORATE TAU (from “corporate tax”)
  • 58A Opinion surveys on text changes? : EDIT POLLS (from “exit polls”)
  • 80A Time to honor an aircraft manufacturer? : BOEING DAY (from “Boxing Day”)
  • 91A Shark’s interim appendage? : TEMPORARY FIN (from “temporary fix”)
  • 97A Ripening of a Mediterranean fruit? : OLIVE COMPLETION (from “olive complexion”)

Bill’s time: 17m 31s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Noble, unselfish sort : GALAHAD

Sir Galahad is one of the Knights of the Round Table of Arthurian legend. Galahad is the illegitimate son of Sir Lancelot, so appears a little later in the tales. He is very gallant and noble, and some see him as the embodiment of Jesus in the Arthurian tradition. Indeed, legend has it that his soul was brought to heaven by Joseph of Arimathea, the man who donated his own tomb for the burial of Jesus according to the Gospels.

14 Language of the Quran : ARABIC

The Koran is also known as the “Qur’an” and “Quran” in English. “Qur’an” a transliteration of the Arabic name for the holy text of the Muslim faith. The literal translation of “Koran” is “the recitation”.

20 Magnetite, e.g. : IRON ORE

Iron ore comes in a number of different forms, like magnetite (the most magnetic of all minerals) and hematite (the most-commonly exploited iron ore).

21 Port N of Pittsburgh : ERIE, PA

Erie is a city in the very north of Pennsylvania, sitting on the southern shore of Lake Erie. The city takes its name from the Erie Native American tribe that resided in the area. Erie is nicknamed the Gem City, a reference to the “sparkling” water of Lake Erie.

28 ER workers : RNS

One might find a registered nurse (RN) and a medical doctor (MD) in an emergency room (ER).

30 “Bellefleur” author : OATES

Joyce Carol Oates is a remarkable writer, not just for the quality of her work (her 1969 novel “them” won a National Book Award, for example) but also for how prolific is her output. She published her first book in 1963 and since then has published over fifty novels as well as many other written works.

31 Half a tuba sound : -PAH

The tuba is the lowest-pitched of all the brass instruments, and one of the most recent additions to the modern symphony orchestra (usually there is just one tuba included in an orchestral line-up). “Tuba” is the Latin word for “trumpet, horn”. Oom-pah-pah …

33 Acapulco aunt : TIA

The Mexican city of Acapulco is on the southwest coast of the country, in the state of Guerrero. The name “Acapulco” translates from the local language into “at the big reeds”.

34 Mayo is found in it : ANO

In Spanish, “mayo” (May) is one of the months of the “año” (year).

35 Quarterback Manning : ELI

Eli Manning is a retired footballer who played quarterback for the New York Giants. Eli’s brother Peyton Manning retired from football as the quarterback for the Denver Broncos in 2015. Eli and Peyton’s father is Archie Manning, who was also a successful NFL quarterback. Eli, Peyton and Archie co-authored a book for children titled “Family Huddle” in 2009. It describes the Mannings playing football together as young boys.

37 Chopin virtuoso’s self-assurance? : ETUDE CONFIDENCE (from “exude confidence”)

An étude is a short instrumental composition that is usually quite hard to play and is intended to help the performer master a particular technique. “Étude” is the French word for “study”. Études are commonly performed on the piano.

Frédéric Chopin was a Polish composer who spent most of his life in France. He was most famous for his piano works in the Romantic style. Chopin was a sickly man and died quite young, at 39. For many of his final years he had a celebrated and tempestuous relationship with the French author George Sand (the nom de plume of the Baroness Dudevant). Those years with Sand may have been turbulent, but they were very productive in terms of musical composition.

45 Highland hillsides : BRAES

“Brae” is a lowland Scots word for the slope or brow of a hill.

47 Attorney general after Sessions : BARR

William Barr was US Attorney General for two years in the administration of President George H. W. Bush before being appointed Attorney General by President Donald Trump in 2019. When not working, Barr is a very enthusiastic player of the Scottish bagpipes.

Jeff Sessions is a politician from Alabama who served as US Attorney-General in the Trump administration from 2017 to 2018. Born in Selma, Alabama, his full name is Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III. He was named after his grandfather, who in turn was named after the president of the Confederate State Jefferson Davis, and after Confederate General Pierre-Gustave Toutant de Beauregard.

49 Coal carrier : HOD

A hod is a 3-sided box on the end of a long handle used for carrying bricks (and sometimes mortar) at a construction site, usually up and down ladders.

50 Greek cross in a company logo? : CORPORATE TAU (from “corporate tax”)

Tau is the 19th letter of the Greek alphabet, and the letter which gave rise to our Roman “T”. Both the letters tau (T) and chi (X) have long been symbolically associated with the cross.

55 Diva deliveries : SOLI

“Soli” (the plural of “solo”) are pieces of music performed by one artist, whereas “tutti” are pieces performed by all of the artists.

57 Ancient assembly areas : AGORAS

In early Greece, an agora was a place of assembly. The assemblies held there were often quite formal, perhaps for the reading of a proclamation. Later in Greek history, things became less formal as the agora evolved into a marketplace. Our contemporary word “agoraphobia” comes from these agorae, in the sense that an agoraphobe has a fear of open spaces, a fear of “public meeting places”.

60 Extend People : RENEW

There used to be a “People” page in each issue of “Time” magazine. This page was spun-off in 1974 as a publication of its own, which we now call “People” magazine. “People” is noted for its annual special editions with features such as “Best & Worst Dressed” and “Sexiest Man Alive”. The “Sexiest Man Alive” edition now appears at the end of November each year. The first choice for “Sexiest Man” was Mel Gibson, in 1985.

62 Santa feature : BEARD

The Santa Claus with whom we are familiar today largely comes from the description in the 1823 poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas”, and from the 1863 caricature created by the political cartoonist Thomas Nast. Nast is also responsible for locating Santa’s workshop at the North Magnetic Pole, a fact that he revealed to the world in a series of drawings in 1879.

64 Kids’ song refrain : E-I-E-I-O

There was an old American version of the English children’s song “Old MacDonald Had a Farm” (E-I-E-I-O) that was around in the days of WWI. The first line of the older US version goes “Old MacDougal had a farm, in Ohio-i-o”.

65 Some QB protectors : RGS

Right guard (RG)

68 Alpine peasant dress : DIRNDL

The traditional dress worn by females in Austria and southern Germany is called a “dirndl”. The dirndl originated as a hard-wearing dress worn by domestic workers in Austria in the 1800s. It was adopted as a fashionable item worn by upper classes in the 1870s.

74 Skateboarding move : OLLIE

An ollie is a skateboarding trick invented in 1976 by Alan “Ollie” Gelfand. Apparently it’s a way of lifting the board off the ground, while standing on it, without touching the board with one’s hands. Yeah, I could do that …

78 Lover of Silvio in “Pagliacci” : NEDDA

“Pagliacci” (“ Clowns” in English) is an opera by Ruggero Leoncavallo that premiered in 1892 in Milan. Included in the opera is one of the most famous arias of all time, “Vesti la giubba” (“put on the costume”).

80 Time to honor an aircraft manufacturer? : BOEING DAY (from “Boxing Day”)

The Boeing Company was founded in Seattle in 1916 by aviation pioneer William Boeing, with the enterprise’s first name being “Pacific Aero Products Co.” Boeing had worked in the timber industry and set up his aircraft company in the Pacific Northwest to take advantage of the local supply of spruce wood.

Boxing Day is a holiday observed in some parts of the world, for example in the UK, Ireland and Canada. Boxing Day is the day after Christmas, and is traditionally when servants and tradespeople would be given gifts known as “Christmas boxes”.

85 Buckwheat noodle : SOBA

Soba is a thin Japanese noodle made from buckwheat flour. In Japan, the word “soba” tends to describe any thin noodle, in contrast with the thicker noodle called “udon”.

89 U.K. honors : OBES

The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is an order of chivalry in the UK that was established in 1917 by King George V. There are five classes within the order, which are in descending seniority:

  • Knight Grand Cross (GBE)
  • Knight Commander (KBE)
  • Commander (CBE)
  • Officer (OBE)
  • Member (MBE)

90 Faller of 2001 : MIR

Russia’s Mir space station was a remarkably successful project. It held the record for the longest continuous human presence in space at just under 10 years, until the International Space Station eclipsed that record in 2010. Towards the end of the space station’s life however, the years began to take their toll. There was a dangerous fire, multiple system failures, and a collision with a resupply ship. The Russian commitment to the International Space Station drained funds for repairs, so Mir was allowed to reenter the Earth’s atmosphere and burn up in 2001. “Mir” is a Russian word meaning “peace” or “world”.

91 Shark’s interim appendage? : TEMPORARY FIN (from “temporary fix”)

Shark finning is a cruel fishing practice driven by the demand for Chinese shark fin soup. Millions of sharks every year are captured, have their fins sliced off at sea and are then thrown back into the ocean still alive. The mutilated sharks don’t last very long and are usually eaten because they cannot maneuver very easily without their dorsal fins.

95 Q.E.D. word : ERAT

The initialism “QED” is used at the end of a mathematical proof or a philosophical argument. QED stands for the Latin “quod erat demonstrandum” meaning “that which was to be demonstrated”.

103 UFO crew, in theory : ETS

One might speculate that an unidentified flying object (UFO) is flown by an extraterrestrial (ET).

104 “One Mic” rapper : NAS

“One Mic” is a 2002 song recorded by rap singer Nas. Nas is a big fan of singer Phil Collins, and sampled the Collins song “In the Air Tonight” for “One Mic”.

105 Anaheim MLB team, in crawl lines : LAA

The Anaheim Angels baseball team is today more correctly called the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (LAA). The “Angels” name dates back to 1961 when the team was founded in the “City of Angels”, Los Angeles. When the franchise moved to Anaheim in 1965 they were known as the California Angels, then the Anaheim Angels, and most recently the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. The Angels are also known as “the Halos”.

108 Film buff’s channel : TCM

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is one of my favorite television channels as it delivers just what its name promises, i.e. classic movies.

111 Typical hole-in-one, e.g. : EAGLE

The following terms are routinely used in golf for scores relative to par:

  • Bogey: one over par
  • Par
  • Birdie: one under par
  • Eagle: two under par
  • Albatross (also “double eagle”): three under par
  • Condor: four under par

No one has ever recorded a condor during a professional tournament.

113 Triage ctrs. : ERS

Triage is the process of prioritizing patients for treatment, especially on the battlefield. The term “triage” is French and means “sorting”.

114 Piggies’ protector : BOOTIE

When talking to a little child, one might refer to his or her toes as “little piggies”.

117 “… __ saw Elba” : ERE I

The three most famous palindromes in English have to be:

  • Able was I ere I saw Elba
  • A man, a plan, a canal, Panama!
  • Madam, I’m Adam

One of my favorite terms is “Aibohphobia”, although it doesn’t appear in the dictionary and is a joke term. “Aibohphobia” is a great way to describe a fear of palindromes, by creating a palindrome out of the suffix “-phobia”.

118 White rat, e.g. : ALBINO

An albino is an organism lacking normal pigmentation. The term “albino” comes from “albus”, Latin for “white”.

127 Heavy hammer : SLEDGE

A sledgehammer is a big hammer, one used to apply a lot of force. The word “sledgehammer” comes from the Anglo Saxon “Slaegan” meaning “to strike violently”. “Slaegan” is also the root of the words “slag”, “slay” and “slog”.

128 High houses : SENATES

The US Congress is described as “bicameral” in that it is divided into two separate assemblies, namely the Senate and the House of Representatives. The term “bicameral” comes from the prefix “bi-” meaning “two”, and the Latin “camera” meaning “chamber”.

Down

1 Generate : GIN UP

“To gin up” is slang meaning “to enliven, excite”. The term probably derives from the older “to ginger up”. Gingering up was the rather nasty practice of putting ginger up inside a horse to make it lively and move with a high tail.

4 Queen’s offspring : ANTS

The queen ant of some species can live to a ripe old age of 30 years, which is one of the longest lifespans in the insect world.

6 Mountain ridge : ARETE

An arete is a ridge of rock defining the border between two parallel valleys that have been formed by glaciation. If this ridge is rounded, it is called a “col”. However if it is “sharpened”, with rock falling away due to successive freezing and thawing, then it is called an “arete”. “Arête“ is the French word for “fish bone”.

9 Seriously shrunken sea : ARAL

The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad …

10 Baptism, for one : RITE

Baptism is a rite, in many Christian traditions, in which a candidate is admitted to the Church. The ceremony usually uses water as a sign of purification. Water may be poured on the head, or the candidate may be totally immersed.

11 Outdoor gear brand : REI

REI is a sporting goods store, with the initialism standing for Recreational Equipment Inc. REI was founded in Seattle by Lloyd and Mary Anderson in 1938 as a cooperative that supplies quality climbing gear to outdoor enthusiasts. The first full-time employee hired by the Andersons was Jim Whittaker, who was the first American to climb Mount Everest.

12 Portugal’s second-largest city : OPORTO

In Portuguese, “Lisboa” (Lisbon) and “Porto” (Oporto) are the two largest cities in Portugal.

13 Astringent in red wine : TANNIN

The terms “tannic acid” and “tannin” are often used interchangeably, but strictly speaking this usage is incorrect. Tannic acid is a specific type of tannin, a tannin that doesn’t occur naturally in wines to any significant amount. Tannic acid can be added to wines as a clarifying agent, color stabilizer or even taste enhancer.

An astringent is a chemical compound that tends to shrink or constrict body tissues.

14 “Tarzan” critter : APE

In the stories by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan of the Apes was actually Englishman John Clayton, Viscount Greystoke.

16 French satellite launcher : ARIANE

Ariane is a launch vehicle used by European space agencies. The Ariane rocket is launched from French Guiana in the northern part of South America.

17 Grabbed for a chat : BUTTONHOLED

To buttonhole someone is to hold a person in conversation against his or her will. The verb “buttonhole” evolved from “buttonhold”, so the original concept was to detain someone by grabbing a coat-button.

19 Prefix with pit : CESS-

A cesspit (also “cesspool”) is a covered tank or pit used for the disposal of human waste. The term can be used figuratively to describe a corrupt place or situation.

29 Apple browser : SAFARI

“Safari” is a Swahili word meaning “journey” or “expedition”.

32 Japanese soup : MISO

Miso is the name of the seasoning that makes miso soup. Basic miso seasoning is made by fermenting rice, barley and soybeans with salt and a fungus to produce a paste. The paste can be added to stock to make miso soup, or perhaps to flavor tofu.

36 Sufferer healed by Jesus : LEPER

The horrible disease known as leprosy is also called Hansen’s disease, named after the Norwegian physician famous for isolating the bacterium that causes the disease. We can use the term “leper” to mean someone in general who is shunned by society.

39 Like some artifacts, thanks to radiocarbon : DATABLE

Carbon-14 is a radioactive isotope of carbon that is found in nature in small amounts. Carbon-14 is used in the technique known as radiocarbon dating, a relatively accurate way of determining the age of something up to about 60,000 years old. When an organism is alive, the amount of radioactive carbon-14 it has compared to the amount of regular carbon-12, is a fixed ratio. After the organism dies, it is no longer exchanging carbon with the atmosphere through metabolism. So, the stable carbon-12 stays in the body as it rots but the radioactive carbon-14 gradually decays, causing the ratio of carbon-14 to carbon-12 to fall. Scientists can determine the age of remains by measuring this carbon-14/carbon-12 ratio.

41 French vineyard : CRU

“Cru” is a term used in the French wine industry that means “growth place”. So, “cru” is the name of the location where the grapes are grown, as opposed to the name of a specific vineyard. The terms “premier cru” and “grand cru” are also used, but the usage depends on the specific wine region. Generally it is a classification awarded to specific vineyards denoting their potential for producing great wines. “Grand cru” is reserved for the very best vineyards, with “premier cru” the level just below.

43 Border __ : COLLIE

The collie isn’t actually a breed of dog, but rather the name given to a group of herding dogs that originated in Scotland and Northern England. An obvious (and wonderful) example would be the border collie. Many dogs classed as collies don’t have the word “collie” in the name of the breed, for example the Old English sheepdog and the Shetland Sheepdog.

44 Inventor of an early stock ticker : EDISON

Stock price information used to be transmitted over telegraph lines by “stock tickers” that produced the famous “ticker tape”, a paper tape with stock symbols and prices printed on it. The “ticker” got its name from the noise it created when it was printing. Even though ticker tape is no longer used, the concept lives on in the scrolling electronic tickers that stream across the bottom of a television screen when there’s a financial program airing.

45 Discreetly send a dupe email to : BCC

A blind carbon copy (bcc) is a copy of a document or message that is sent to someone without other recipients of the message knowing about that extra copy.

46 “Vive le __!” : ROI

“Vive le roi!” is French for “Long live the king!” “À bas le roi!” is French for “Down with the king!”, which was a phrase often heard during the French Revolution.

51 Eastern royal : RANI

A ranee (also “rani”) is an Indian queen or princess, and the female equivalent of a raja.

52 New __ : AGER

The New Age Movement is a western philosophy with roots that date back to the early 1800s. The movement focuses on achieving the highest human potential as an individual and embraces many traditionally eastern spiritual practices, but eschews all religious doctrines. New Age music is composed with the intent of supporting this philosophy. It tends to be very minimalistic, very tonal and harmonic. It is often used as a backdrop for relaxation or meditation.

53 Limo service vehicle : TOWN CAR

The word “limousine” derives from the name of the French city of Limoges. The area around Limoges is called the Limousin, and it gave its name to a cloak hood worn by local shepherds. In early motor cars, a driver would sit outside in the weather while the passengers would sit in the covered compartment. The driver would often wear a limousin-style protective hood, giving rise to that type of transportation being called a “limousine”. Well, that’s how the story goes …

58 Coastal flier : ERN

The ern (sometimes “erne”) is also known as the white-tailed eagle or the sea eagle.

61 Sistine Chapel mural setting : EDEN

The Sistine Chapel is located in the Pope’s residence in Rome. The chapel takes its name from Pope Sixtus IV, who was responsible for restoring the old Capella Magna in the 15th century. It was about a century later (1508-1512) that Michelangelo painted the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel under the patronage of Pope Julius II.

63 Quaint coin-op eatery : AUTOMAT

An automat is a fast-food restaurant that was popular in the first half of the 20th century. The original automat was established in Berlin, but the concept took off in the US. However, our modern fast food restaurants virtually wiped out automats starting in the fifties.

65 Surname in a 1983 Styx hit : ROBOTO

“Mr Roboto” is a song on the 1983 album “Kilroy Was Here” by the Chicago band Styx. The first lines of the song are:

Domo arigato, Mr. Roboto,
Mata ah-oo hima de
Domo arigato, Mr. Roboto,
Himitsu wo shiri tai

which translates as:

Thank you very much, Mr. Robot
Until the day (we) meet again
Thank you very much, Mr. Robot
I want to know your secret

72 Historic Icelandic work : EDDA

The “Poetic Edda” and “Prose Edda” are two ancient works that are the source for much of Norse mythology. Both Eddas were written in the 13th century in Iceland.

75 “__ for Innocent”: Grafton novel : I IS

Sue Grafton wrote detective novels, and her “alphabet series” feature the private investigator Kinsey Millhone. She started off with “’A’ Is for Alibi” in 1982 and worked her way up to “‘Y’ is for Yesterday” before she passed away in 2017.

77 Sex educator Hite : SHERE

Shere Hite is a German sex educator, although she was born in the US. She married German concert pianist Friedrich Höricke in 1985 and renounced her US citizenship in favor of German nationality in the mid-nineties. Hite’s work focuses on sexual experience and what meaning it holds for an individual.

81 2008 TARP beneficiary renamed Ally Financial : GMAC

“GMAC” stands for “General Motors Acceptance Corporation”. General Motors has only a small stake in GMAC now, and indeed the name has been officially changed to Ally Financial. You and I, we are the biggest shareholders in GMAC/Ally today, since the US government gave the bank $12.5 billion to bail it out in 2008-2009.

82 Simple radio antenna : DIPOLE

When German physicist Heinrich Hertz first demonstrated radio waves in 1887, he used the simplest form of antenna, namely a dipole antenna. A dipole antenna comprises two metal rods that are usually pointing away from each other. Ideally, the length of each rod is one half of the wavelength off the signal to be received.

87 Modicum : BIT

A modicum is a small portion, with “modicum” coming into English from Latin, via Scottish. “Modicum” is Latin for “a little”.

92 Stat start : RHEO-

A rheostat is an electrical device that can offer a varying degree of resistance to current flow. The English physicist Sir Charles Wheatstone first coined the term, using the Greek “rheos” meaning “flowing stream” and “stat” meaning “regulating device”.

98 Carousel traveler : VALISE

“Valise” is a French word meaning “suitcase”.

Apparently, the baggage carousel was developed by a French company. The first installation was in Paris Orly Airport in the 1950s.

99 Funny brothers : MARXES

The five Marx Brothers were born to Minnie and Frenchy Marx in New York City. The more famous older boys were Chico, Harpo and Groucho. Zeppo was the youngest brother, and he appeared in the early Marx Brothers movies. The fifth son was called Gummo, and he decided to pursue a different career off the stage.

100 Programming language named for a mathematician : PASCAL

Pascal is a computer programming language that dates back to 1970. It was named for the French polymath Blaise Pascal.

107 Bristlelike parts : SETAE

Setae (singular “seta”) are bristle-like structures in both plants and animals. “Seta” is the Latin word for “bristle”.

109 Perfume, as at High Mass : CENSE

To cense is to perfume with incense. Such a lovely word …

In the Roman Catholic tradition, a High Mass is more elaborate than a Low Mass. The former is usually a sung Mass and may involve more than one celebrant.

112 Baseball brother : ALOU

Jesus Alou played Major League Baseball, as did his brothers Matty and Felipe, and as did Felipe’s son Moises.

114 Boston or Chicago : BAND

Boston is a rock band from … Boston. Boston’s biggest hit was “Amanda”, released in 1986.

The rock band called Chicago was formed in … Chicago. The band’s biggest hits are “If You Leave Me Now” (1976) and “Hard to Say I’m Sorry” (1982). The band’s lineup has changed a lot over the years. The most tragic reason for a change was in 1978 when Terry Kath, one of the band’s founding members, died from an accidentally self-inflicted gun wound. Kath enjoyed playing with guns and as a joke held a pistol with an empty magazine to his temple and pulled the trigger. A round in the chamber killed him instantly.

115 Blood type, briefly : O-NEG

Here is an approximate distribution of blood types across the US population:

  • O-positive: 38 percent
  • O-negative: 7 percent
  • A-positive: 34 percent
  • A-negative: 6 percent
  • B-positive: 9 percent
  • B-negative: 2 percent
  • AB-positive: 3 percent
  • AB-negative: 1 percent

116 Shrek, for one : OGRE

Before “Shrek” was a successful movie franchise and Broadway musical, it was a children’s picture book called “Shrek!” that was authored and illustrated by William Steig. The title “Shrek!” came from the German/Yiddish word Schreck, meaning “fear” or “terror”.

117 “Giant” author Ferber : EDNA

“Giant” is a 1952 novel by author Edna Ferber. It was adapted into a successful Hollywood movie released in 1956. In the film, Bick Benedict (played by Rock Hudson) marries Leslie (played by Elizabeth Taylor) and takes his new wife home to the family ranch in Texas called Reata. The ranch’s handyman is Jett Rink, played by James Dean. Dean was killed in a car accident before the film was released. Some of Dean’s lines needed work before the film could be released and so another actor had to do that voice-over work.

119 East, in Essen : OST

Essen is a large industrial city located on the River Ruhr in western Germany. The city experienced major population growth in the mid-1800s that was driven by the iron works established by the Krupp family.

121 Charlemagne’s domain: Abbr. : HRE

Charlemagne was the first king to use the title “Holy Roman Emperor”, even though the Holy Roman Empire (HRE) was not actually founded until over a century later when Otto I was crowned Emperor. Otto was the first of an unbroken line of Holy Roman Emperors who ruled Central Europe from 962 until 1806.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Noble, unselfish sort : GALAHAD
8 Copy : PARROT
14 Language of the Quran : ARABIC
20 Magnetite, e.g. : IRON ORE
21 Port N of Pittsburgh : ERIE, PA
22 Examine in detail : PERUSE
23 This year’s hatchlings? : NEST GENERATION (from “next generation”)
25 Influential groups : ELITES
26 Quelques-__: a few, in French : UNES
27 One in a shell : TURTLE
28 ER workers : RNS
30 “Bellefleur” author : OATES
31 Half a tuba sound : -PAH
32 Scrips : MEDS
33 Acapulco aunt : TIA
34 Mayo is found in it : ANO
35 Quarterback Manning : ELI
37 Chopin virtuoso’s self-assurance? : ETUDE CONFIDENCE (from “exude confidence”)
45 Highland hillsides : BRAES
47 Attorney general after Sessions : BARR
48 Tummy muscles : ABS
49 Coal carrier : HOD
50 Greek cross in a company logo? : CORPORATE TAU (from “corporate tax”)
54 Exist : ARE
55 Diva deliveries : SOLI
56 Formally commend : CITE
57 Ancient assembly areas : AGORAS
58 Opinion surveys on text changes? : EDIT POLLS (from “exit polls”)
60 Extend People : RENEW
62 Santa feature : BEARD
64 Kids’ song refrain : E-I-E-I-O
65 Some QB protectors : RGS
68 Alpine peasant dress : DIRNDL
70 Sealed : UNOPEN
73 Animal house : DEN
74 Skateboarding move : OLLIE
76 Peak : CREST
78 Lover of Silvio in “Pagliacci” : NEDDA
80 Time to honor an aircraft manufacturer? : BOEING DAY (from “Boxing Day”)
83 Jeered : HOOTED
85 Buckwheat noodle : SOBA
89 U.K. honors : OBES
90 Faller of 2001 : MIR
91 Shark’s interim appendage? : TEMPORARY FIN (from “temporary fix”)
93 Bug : TAP
94 Knock : RAP
95 Q.E.D. word : ERAT
96 Hoists : HEFTS
97 Ripening of a Mediterranean fruit? : OLIVE COMPLETION (from “olive complexion”)
103 UFO crew, in theory : ETS
104 “One Mic” rapper : NAS
105 Anaheim MLB team, in crawl lines : LAA
106 Meh : SO-SO
108 Film buff’s channel : TCM
111 Typical hole-in-one, e.g. : EAGLE
113 Triage ctrs. : ERS
114 Piggies’ protector : BOOTIE
117 “… __ saw Elba” : ERE I
118 White rat, e.g. : ALBINO
120 Pupil with a phonetic beginning that hints at what the circled letters comprise : X-CHANGE STUDENT
123 Beach locales : COASTS
124 Bread maker : EARNER
125 Heartfelt : EARNEST
126 Most massive : HUGEST
127 Heavy hammer : SLEDGE
128 High houses : SENATES

Down

1 Generate : GIN UP
2 Place to play : ARENA
3 Become discouraged : LOSE HEART
4 Queen’s offspring : ANTS
5 Monopolize : HOG
6 Mountain ridge : ARETE
7 Strip of vegetation : DENUDE
8 Chipper : PERT
9 Seriously shrunken sea : ARAL
10 Baptism, for one : RITE
11 Outdoor gear brand : REI
12 Portugal’s second-largest city : OPORTO
13 Astringent in red wine : TANNIN
14 “Tarzan” critter : APE
15 Puts in more film : RELOADS
16 French satellite launcher : ARIANE
17 Grabbed for a chat : BUTTONHOLED
18 “Of course” : I SEE
19 Prefix with pit : CESS-
24 At one time, at one time : ERST
29 Apple browser : SAFARI
32 Japanese soup : MISO
36 Sufferer healed by Jesus : LEPER
38 Super, slangily : UBER
39 Like some artifacts, thanks to radiocarbon : DATABLE
40 Clear : ERASE
41 French vineyard : CRU
42 “As if” : I BET
43 Border __ : COLLIE
44 Inventor of an early stock ticker : EDISON
45 Discreetly send a dupe email to : BCC
46 “Vive le __!” : ROI
51 Eastern royal : RANI
52 New __ : AGER
53 Limo service vehicle : TOWN CAR
54 Extend : ADD ONTO
55 “… or __ thought” : SO I
58 Coastal flier : ERN
59 Await judgment : PEND
61 Sistine Chapel mural setting : EDEN
63 Quaint coin-op eatery : AUTOMAT
65 Surname in a 1983 Styx hit : ROBOTO
66 Worldwide : GLOBAL
67 Item of camping gear : SLEEPING BAG
69 Arid : DRY
71 Equal : PEER
72 Historic Icelandic work : EDDA
75 “__ for Innocent”: Grafton novel : I IS
77 Sex educator Hite : SHERE
79 So far : AS YET
81 2008 TARP beneficiary renamed Ally Financial : GMAC
82 Simple radio antenna : DIPOLE
84 Eye opener? : OPTI-
86 Like garage parking : OFF-STREET
87 Modicum : BIT
88 Reply to a ques. : ANS
91 Bus. card info : TEL
92 Stat start : RHEO-
94 Is indignant about : RESENTS
98 Carousel traveler : VALISE
99 Funny brothers : MARXES
100 Programming language named for a mathematician : PASCAL
101 Bone: Pref. : OSTE-
102 Sounds : NOISES
107 Bristlelike parts : SETAE
109 Perfume, as at High Mass : CENSE
110 Hands, in slang : MITTS
111 Apiece : EACH
112 Baseball brother : ALOU
114 Boston or Chicago : BAND
115 Blood type, briefly : O-NEG
116 Shrek, for one : OGRE
117 “Giant” author Ferber : EDNA
119 East, in Essen : OST
121 Charlemagne’s domain: Abbr. : HRE
122 Coffee hour vessel : URN

13 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 10 May 20, Sunday”

  1. Got a few on Saturday, will not pursue this one. I hate to think how long it would take
    is if Bill and Glenn averaged 15 minutes. That equates to about 3 hours for us. But, I
    still think that we would have a pretty big lead in the Super Seniors Division in the
    race for the Golden Puzzle trophy. May as well try to be positive. It is what it is.

    Hope for better tomorrow.

    Stat safe and well, everybody.

    1. It’s interesting how perspectives can differ: My proudest moment this week occurred upon finishing Friday’s Tim Croce puzzle, eight and a half hours after starting it, with no errors. (And, yes, at least six hours of that was walk-away time … 😜.)

    2. We measure against our own selves, if we do this properly. Like was said, different perspectives. Me, I was shocked at yesterday’s LAT thinking it was inordinately easy compared to its usual average and then seeing Bill’s time. (Don’t care that much about how others do on these things as I don’t see it as a competition, save for trying to get an idea of how difficult they are.) Honestly, I can scare myself sometimes doing these things. Would have never known if I didn’t time. I think having those feelings of things going differently than the usual is what prompted me to time in the first place. Of course, I average about 40 minutes a piece lately on the NYT, so that makes me wonder (can’t say they’re *that* different than these).

      The main thing other than that is actually managing the Saturday Newsday and Croces (for most part) for the last three weeks (that upper right in the last Newsday…still don’t understand all of it even after Googling and all that). My average time is around 2 hours (more time than I should be spending on these), but I’m actually managing it for most part. Though there’s always a moment somewhere that reminds me of how fallible I am at doing these things.

  2. 1:12:05 no errors…I picked up the X part of the theme but missed the STUDENT part.
    For 111A… has anyone, anywhere ever made a CONDOR?…that would be a hole in one on a par 5 hole which would entail a tee shot of at least 450 yards going in the cup. I doubt it.
    Stay safe you all .

    1. Awhile back I saw a long drive champ attempt to drive the hole on a par five. It circled around a lake, so the distance to the hole was much less than 450 yards. He wasn’t successful, but gave it a good ride.

  3. No errors, but that doesn’t mean I understood all of the answers. I got
    the theme pretty quickly or I’d probably still be working at it. Boeing Day was a hoot.

    Got started pretty late in the day, so that’s why this is late.

  4. Got a late start.. Mothers day and all!!! Yeah Moms.. Thought maybe the puzzle would have a little mommish to it. Nope.
    No errors.. Fun time..

    Time to relax and check out a few DIRNDLs…. Ha!!
    Be safe..

  5. 30 mins 20 sec, and needed checker help to finish. I now care less what ARIANE is than before I started the puzzle. Lots of esoterica in here.

  6. Mostly easy Sunday for me; finished in 47:44 with no errors and no red letters. I did run out of energy about 2/3 of the way, which a quick snack helped get me through.

    I figured out the theme about half way through, so when I got to the theme reveal clue, it was just a matter of filling it in. Saw the circled answer almost immediately. MIR/TOWNCAR took a second or two and was the last to fall.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.