LA Times Crossword 24 May 20, Sunday

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Constructed by: Pam Amick Klawitter
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Top to Bottom

Themed clues are common terms that start with “DOWN-”, and that “DOWN” just indicates that the corresponding answer is written in the DOWN-direction:

  • 4D Downwind : KITE-FLYING NECESSITY
  • 5D Downgrade : KINDERGARTEN
  • 10D Downplay : THE CRUCIBLE
  • 19D Downstream : YOUTUBE TRANSMISSION
  • 24D Downward : JUNE CLEAVER’S HUSBAND
  • 67D Downcast : THEATER GROUP
  • 70D Downdraft : ORDER IN A PUB

Bill’s time: 16m 03s

Bill’s errors: 2

  • PEAY (Puoy)
  • PATON (Puton)

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

5 Kin kin : KITH

The word “kith” describes friends and acquaintances, and is used in the phrase “kith and kin” meaning “friends and family”. “Kith” comes from an Old English word meaning “native country, home”, as the expression “kith and kin” was used originally to mean “country and kinsmen”.

17 Morlock prey : ELOI

In the 1895 novella by H. G. Wells called “The Time Machine”, there are two races that the hero encounters in his travels into the future. The Eloi are the “beautiful people” who live on the planet’s surface. The Morlocks are a domineering race living underground who use the Eloi as food.

19 Swift’s brutish race : YAHOOS

Yahoos are brutish creatures introduced by Irish author Jonathan Swift in “Gulliver’s Travels”. Their savage, slovenly ways gave rise to the use of “yahoo” in English to describe a lout or neanderthal.

21 Easter precursor : LENT

In Latin, the Christian season that is now called “Lent” was termed “quadragesima” (meaning “fortieth”), a reference to the forty days that Jesus spent in the desert before beginning his public ministry. When the church began its move in the Middle Ages towards using the vernacular, the term “Lent” was introduced. “Lent” comes from “lenz”, the German word for “spring”.

23 Kind of lead a closer often has to protect : ONE-RUN

That would be baseball.

24 Hop on the bandwagon : JOIN

“Bandwagon” is an American term originally used to describe the large wagon that carried the band in a circus procession. Bandwagons then became popular at political rallies, and so someone “on the bandwagon” was someone attaching himself or herself to a cause that was likely to succeed. The first use of the term “bandwagon” in this sense is supposedly in the writings of Theodore Roosevelt in 1899.

25 People’s 2019 Sexiest Man Alive : LEGEND

“John Legend” is the stage name of singer-songwriter John Stephens. Sorry … I’ve never heard of him outside of the occasional crossword …

There used to be a “People” page in each issue of “Time” magazine. This page was spun-off in 1974 as a publication of its own, which we now call “People” magazine. “People” is noted for its annual special editions with features such as “Best & Worst Dressed” and “Sexiest Man Alive”. The “Sexiest Man Alive” edition now appears at the end of November each year. The first choice for “Sexiest Man” was Mel Gibson, in 1985.

29 Grammy channel : CBS

The first Grammy Awards ceremony was held in 1959 and focused on recognizing outstanding achievement in the recording industry. The idea of a Grammy Award came up when recording executives were working on the Hollywood Walk of Fame project in the fifties. These executives concluded that there were many people in the recording industry deserving of accolades but who would probably never make it to the Walk of Fame. As a result, they founded the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. The Academy considered naming the award the “Eddies” after Thomas Edison, but then opted for “Grammy” after Edison’s invention: the gramophone.

44 Austin __: Tennessee university : PEAY

Austin Peay State University in Clarksville, Tennessee was established in 1927. The school was named for then-Governor Austin Peay. Indeed, the university’s athletic teams go by the name of “Governors”.

45 Conquest for Caesar : GAUL

The Gauls were a Celtic race, with Gaul covering what is now known as France and Belgium. We use the term “Gallic” today, when we refer to something pertaining to France or the French.

47 Osso __ : BUCO

“Osso” is the Italian word for bone, as in the name of the dish “osso buco” (bone with a hole), which features braised veal shanks.

52 1971 New York prison riot site : ATTICA

The Attica Correctional Facility in Attica, New York is used to incarcerate the toughest of the state’s convicts. Famous people who have spent time in Attica include David Berkowitz (Son of Sam) and Mark David Chapman (who killed John Lennon). Attica was the site of a famous riot in 1971 involving almost 1,000 inmates. Control of the prison was restored by the authorities after several days of unrest that left 39 people dead, including ten guards and other prison employees.

54 Phil Collins’ longtime band : GENESIS

English musician Phil Collins is best known for his work as a drummer with the rock group Genesis, as well as for his solo career. In fact, Collins is often grouped with Paul McCartney and Michael Jackson, two other artists who had tremendous solo success after careers with very well-known bands.

56 First name in student loans : SALLIE

“Sallie Mae” is a nickname for SLM Corporation that was created in 1972 by the US government as the Student Loan Marketing Association. By 2004, the government had severed all its ties with Sallie Mae. Today, SLM is basically a profit-focused lender.

57 Big 12 Cowboy’s rival : SOONER

The University of Oklahoma was founded in 1890 in the city of Norman, as the Norman Territorial University. The school’s sports teams are called the “Sooners”, from the state of Oklahoma’s nickname.

58 Help the bad guys : ABET

The word “abet” comes into English from the Old French “abeter” meaning “to bait” or “to harass with dogs” (it literally means “to make bite”). This sense of encouraging something bad to happen morphed into our modern usage of “abet” meaning to aid or encourage someone in a crime.

61 Twilights, in verse : E’ENS

Twilight is the light experienced when the sun is below the horizon, both in the morning and the evening. The prefix “twi-” seems to come from the sense of “half”, and in “half light”. There appears to be no connection to the word “twice”, despite twilight occurring twice each day.

64 Long border range : URAL

The eastern side of the Ural Mountains in Russia and Kazakhstan is generally regarded as the natural divide between the continents of Europe and Asia.

69 Dundee denials : NAES

The city of Dundee lies on the north bank of the Firth of Tay in Scotland. The origins of the name “Dundee” are a little obscure, although the omnipresent “dùn” in place names all over Scotland and Ireland is the Celtic word for “fort”.

71 Makeshift weapon : SHIV

“Shiv” is a slang term describing a weapon crudely fashioned to resemble a knife. Mostly we hear of shivs that have been fashioned by prison inmates to do harm to others.

72 Luray attraction : CAVERNS

The Luray Caverns are located in the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia. The cave system features are remarkable musical instrument called the Great Stalacpipe Organ. This organ produces sounds when electrically-activated rubber mallets strike stalactites of varying sizes.

75 Burgundy and Weasley : RONS

The title character in the “Anchorman” series of films is Ron Burgundy. Burgundy is a news anchor played by comedian Will Ferrell. Apparently Burgundy loves a glass of scotch, poetry, and his dog Baxter.

Harry Potter, Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger are the principal characters in the “Harry Potter” series of fantasy novels by J. K. Rowling. The three are the best of friends. As the stories progress, the friendship between Ron and Hermione developed to the point that they became husband and wife and had two children together.

80 Novelist Waugh : ALEC

Alec Waugh was an older brother of the more famous Evelyn Waugh. Both were successful novelists (Evelyn of “Brideshead Revisited” fame), but what I like about Alec is that he supposedly invented the cocktail party. He invited his friends around “for tea” in the twenties, and served them all rum swizzles instead!

81 Ref. whose recent updates include “chillax” and “whatev” : OED

Oxford English Dictionary (OED)

83 Ward of “FBI” : SELA

Actress Sela Ward turns up in crosswords a lot. Ward played Teddy Reed in the TV show “Sisters” in the nineties, and was in “Once and Again” from 1999-2002. I don’t know either show, but I do know Ward from the medical drama “House” in which she played the hospital’s lawyer and Greg House’s ex-partner. That was a fun role, I thought. More recently, Ward played a lead role on “CSI: NY” and was a very welcome and much-needed addition to the cast. And, Ward played Dr. Richard Kimble’s murdered wife in the 1993 film version of “The Fugitive”.

85 Prefix with cortical : ADRENO-

The adrenal cortex is the outer part of the adrenal glands that sit just above our kidneys. The adrenal cortex produces two very important hormones:

  • Cortisol helps regulate metabolism, and is used in the body’s response to stress.
  • Aldosterone helps control blood pressure.

86 College URL ending : DOT EDU

The .edu domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:

  • .com (commercial enterprise)
  • .net (entity involved in network infrastructure e.g. an ISP)
  • .mil (US military)
  • .org (not-for-profit organization)
  • .gov (US federal government entity)
  • .edu (college-level educational institution)

89 Madison in “Splash,” e.g. : MERMAID

“Splash” is a 1984 comedy movie directed by Ron Howard, and starring Tom Hanks and Daryl Hannah. Hanks plays a guy who falls for a mysterious woman (Hannah), who turns out to be a mermaid. One thing notable about “Splash” is that it was the first film to be released under Walt Disney’s “Touchstone Pictures” label.

93 “… kissed thee __ killed thee”: Othello : ERE I

“I kissed thee ere I killed thee, no way but this, Killing myself, to die upon a kiss.” is a line from Shakespeare’s “Othello”. The words are spoken by Othello as he kisses his wife Desdemona, whom he has just strangled, and then takes his own life in repentance.

110 Thurman of “Pulp Fiction” : UMA

Robert Thurman was the first westerner to be ordained a Tibetan Buddhist monk. Robert raised his children in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition and called his daughter “Uma” as it is a phonetic spelling of the Buddhist name “Dbuma”. Uma’s big break in the movies came with her starring role in Quentin Tarantino’s 1994 hit “Pulp Fiction”. My favorite Uma Thurman film is the wonderful 1996 romantic comedy “The Truth About Cats and Dogs”.

I’m not a big fan of director Quentin Tarantino. His movies are too violent for me, and the size of his ego just turns me right off. Having said that, I think “Pulp Fiction” is a remarkable film. If you can look past the violence, it’s really well written. And what a legacy it has. John Travolta’s career was on the rocks and he did the film for practically no money, and it turned out to be a re-launch for him. Uma Thurman became a top celebrity overnight from her role. Even Bruce Willis got some good out of it, putting an end to a string of poorly-received performances.

112 Maker of BILLY bookcases : IKEA

The IKEA furniture chain was founded by Ingvar Kamprad in 1943, when he was just 17-years-old. IKEA is an acronym standing for Ingvar Kamprad Elmtaryd Agunnaryd (don’t forget now!). Elmtaryd was the name of the farm where Ingvar Kamprad grew up, and Agunnaryd is his home parish in Sweden.

114 Outback offering : RIB EYE

Outback Steakhouse is a chain of restaurants that was established in 1987, with the first Outback opening in Tampa, Florida. Outback serves largely American food in an Australian-themed dining locale.

118 Small craft : DORY

A dory is a small boat that’s around 20 feet long with a shallow draft, a flat bottom and a sharp bow. Dories are commonly used for fishing.

121 Folksy Guthrie : ARLO

Arlo Guthrie is the son of Woody Guthrie. Both father and son are renowned for singing protest songs about social injustice. Arlo is most famous for his epic “Alice’s Restaurant Massacree”, a song that lasts a full 18m 34s. In the song Guthrie tells how, after being drafted, he was rejected for service in the Vietnam War based on his criminal record. He had only one incident on his public record, a Thanksgiving Day arrest for littering and being a public nuisance when he was 18-years-old.

123 Gator tails? : -ADES

Gatorade was developed at the University of Florida by a team of researchers at the request of the school’s football team. And so, Gatorade is named after the Gators football team.

124 “Great” primate : APE

The tailless primates known as apes (also “hominoids”) are divided into two main branches: gibbons (lesser apes) and hominids (great apes). The hominids are the great apes, and belong to the family of primates called Hominidae. Extant genera that make up the family Hominidae are:

  • chimpanzees
  • gorillas
  • humans
  • orangutans

126 “Forbidden” perfume : TABU

Tabu is a whole line of cosmetics and perfumes produced by the House of Dana. The company’s brand names were purchased by a Florida company called Dana Classic Fragrances in 1999.

127 One of a seagoing trio : NINA

Famously, Christopher Columbus used three ships in his first voyage across the Atlantic: the Santa Maria, the Niña and the Pinta. The Pinta was the fastest of the three, and it was from the Pinta that the New World was first spotted by a sailor named Rodrigo de Triana who was a lookout on the fateful day. Pinta was a nickname for the ship that translated as “the painted one”. The Pinta’s real name has been lost in the mists of time.

128 Beethoven’s “__ Adieux” Sonata : LES

Ludwig van Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 26 in E-flat major goes by the name “Les Adieux”, meaning “The Farewells”. There is a suggestion that the sonata was written on the occasion of Beethoven’s patron Archduke Rudolph quitting Vienna after the French attack led by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1809.

129 Horses originally developed in a desert climate : ARABS

The Arab (also “Arabian”) breed of horse takes its name from its original home, the Arabian Peninsula. Like any animal that humans have over-bred, the horse falls prey to genetic diseases, some of which are fatal and some of which require the horse to be euthanized.

131 He played Ricky in early TV : DESI

In the hit television show “I Love Lucy”, Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz play Lucy and Ricky Ricardo. The Ricardos’ best friends are also their landlords, Fred and Ethel Mertz. The Mertzes are played by William Frawley and Vivian Vance.

Down

2 Sheltered, at sea : ALEE

Alee is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing aweather.

5 Downgrade : KINDERGARTEN

“Kindergarten” is a German term, one translating as “children’s garden”. The term was coined by the German education authority Friedrich Fröbel in 1837, when he used it as the name for his play and activity institute that he created for young children to use before they headed off to school. His thought was that children should be nourished educationally, like plants in a garden.

8 One that usually leaves the park : HOMER

That would be baseball.

9 __ Salvador : SAN

San Salvador is the capital of El Salvador. The city was founded by the Spanish 1525, although it was moved on two occasions early on, in 1528 and 1545. The name “San Salvador” translates as “Holy Savior”.

10 Downplay : THE CRUCIBLE

“The Crucible” is a 1952 play by Arthur Miller that tells the story of the Salem witch trials. Miller wrote it as an allegory for the House Committee on Un-American Activities hearings that were being chaired by Senator Joe McCarthy around that time. Miller was called before the Committee himself, and was convicted of contempt of Congress for refusing to “name names”.

13 Phishing target, briefly : SSN

Phishing is the online practice of stealing usernames, passwords and credit card details by creating a site that deceptively looks reliable and trustworthy. Phishers often send out safe-looking emails or instant messages that direct someone to an equally safe-looking website where the person might inadvertently enter sensitive information. “Phishing” is a play on the word “fishing”, as in “fishing for passwords, PIN numbers etc.”

16 Fit as a fiddle : TONED

Someone who is as fit as a fiddle is very fit, very well. When the idiom “as fit as a fiddle” was coined around 1600, the phrase meant “suitable for purpose” as “fit” was more often used in that sense.

19 Downstream : YOUTUBE TRANSMISSION

YouTube is a video-sharing website that was launched in 2005 by three ex-PayPal employees. Google bought YouTube in 2006 for $1.65 billion. Yep, $1.65 billion, less than two years after it was founded …

24 Downward : JUNE CLEAVER’S HUSBAND

Ward Cleaver and his wife June were the parents of Wally Cleaver and his younger brother “The Beaver”. The four family members appeared in the fifties sitcom “Leave It to Beaver”.

28 Cardinals, e.g.: Abbr. : NOS

Cardinal numbers are the whole numbers starting with zero, i.e. 0, 1, 2, 3, etc.

30 Skin care brand : NIVEA

Nivea is a brand name of skin-care products from Germany. The Latin word “nivea” means “snow-white”.

37 Bridge call : I PASS

The version of the card game bridge that is played mostly today is contract bridge. Auction bridge is a similar game, and is a precursor to contract bridge.

38 Anti-harassment movement : ME TOO

The use of the #MeToo hashtag initially was encouraged by actress Alyssa Milano in 2017 to draw attention to sexual assault and sexual harassment. Milano was acting in response to the growing number of allegations against film producer Harvey Weinstein. The use of the phrase “Me Too” in the context of sexual misconduct dates back to 2006. Social activist Tarana Burke started to use the phrase on the Myspace social network after a 13-year-old girl told her that she had been sexually assaulted. Apparently, Burke had no response at the time the girl confided in her, but later wished she had responded, “Me too”.

39 Anti-apartheid author Alan : PATON

Alan Paton was a South African author and an outspoken opponent of apartheid. His most successful novel is “Cry, the Beloved Country”.

42 Prepare for a selfie : POSE

A selfie is a self-portrait, one usually taken with a digital camera or cell phone. A “group selfie” is sometimes referred to as a “groufie” or “wefie”. A “couple selfie” is known as an “usie” or “ussie”, although those terms are sometimes also used for a group picture.

46 Syr. neighbor : LEB

Lebanon lies at the eastern end of the Mediterranean Sea. The nation has a rich cultural history, and was home to the ancient civilization of Phoenicia. The name “Lebanon” derives from the Semitic word “lbn” meaning “white”, and is probably a reference to the snow that caps the mountain range known as Mount Lebanon, which parallels the Mediterranean coast.

49 TVA output : ELEC

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has to be one of America’s great success stories when it comes to economic development. Created in 1933, the TVA spearheaded economic development in the Tennessee Valley at the height of the Great Depression. Central to the success was the federally-funded construction of flood-control and electricity-generation facilities.

51 House mtg. : SESS

A legislative (legis.) meeting of Congress (Cong.) might be called a session (sess.).

53 “Dog Whisperer” Millan : CESAR

“Cesar Millan” is the real name of television’s “Dog Whisperer”. Millan has been working with overly aggressive dogs on his show “Dog Whisperer with Cesar Millan” since 2004. Millan was an illegal immigrant from Mexico in the US back in 1990, became legal in 2000 and then became a US citizen in 2009.

63 Canadian gas : ESSO

The Esso brand has its roots in the old Standard Oil company as it uses the initial letters of “Standard” and “Oil” (ESS-O). The Esso brand was replaced by Exxon in the US, but ESSO is still used in many other countries.

68 127-Across feature : TILDE
(127A One of a seagoing trio : NINA)

The tilde diacritical mark (~) is very much associated with the Spanish language. We use the name “tilde” in English, taking that name from Spanish. Confusingly, the word “tilde” in Spanish is used more generally to mean “accent mark, diacritic”, of which a “~” is just one. What we call a “tilde” in English is usually referred to as a “virgulilla” or “tilde de la eñe” in Spanish.

72 Suffragist Elizabeth __ Stanton : CADY

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was one of the earliest leaders of the women’s rights and women’s suffrage movements in the United States. Notably, she opposed the extension of voting rights to African American men (the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments), even though she was an outspoken abolitionist. She believed that increasing the number of male voters in the country would just make it harder for women to get the vote.

73 Skin soother : ALOE

Aloe vera is a succulent plant that grows in relatively dry climates. The plant’s leaves are full of biologically-active compounds that have been studied extensively. Aloe vera has been used for centuries in herbal medicine, mainly for topical treatment of wounds.

74 November honorees : VETS

Veterans Day used to be known as Armistice Day, and is observed on November 11th each year. This particular date was chosen as the Armistice that ended WWI was signed on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918.

76 Home detector target : RADON

The element radon (Rn) is a radioactive gas, and a byproduct produced when uranium decays naturally in the earth. Radon gas can collect and accumulate in buildings and rooms that are particularly well insulated with very little air exchange. The danger is very real, as radon is listed as the second most frequent cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoke.

82 Part of FEMA: Abbr. : EMER

Federal emergency management has been structured for over 200 years, but what we know today as the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) was created in 1979 in an Executive Order issued by President Jimmy Carter.

84 Rights movement shorthand : LIB

Liberal (lib.)

The concept of left-right politics started in France during the French Revolution. When members of France’s National Assembly convened in 1789, supporters of the King sat to the President’s right, and supporters of the revolution to the President’s left. The political terms “left” and “right” were then coined in the local media and have been used ever since.

87 Maker of Zero-Turn mowers : DEERE

John Deere invented the first commercially successful steel plow in 1837. Prior to Deere’s invention, farmers used an iron or wooden plow that constantly had to be cleaned as rich soil stuck to its surfaces. The cast-steel plow was revolutionary as its smooth sides solved the problem of “stickiness”. The Deere company that John founded uses the slogan “Nothing Runs Like a Deere”, and has a leaping deer as its logo.

90 City that aptly rhymes with “casino” : RENO

The city of Reno’s economy took off when open gambling was legalized in Nevada in 1931. Within a short time, a syndicate had built the Bank Club in Reno, which was the largest casino in the world at the time.

101 __ Fridays : TGI

T.G.I. Fridays is an American restaurant chain that was founded in 1965 in New York City. Today there are over a thousand T.G.I. Friday’s restaurants in over 50 countries. I think that Fridays has always been particularly successful overseas. I used to visit one a lot with my family when we lived in the Philippines, and I believe the most successful Fridays restaurant anywhere in the world is the one in Haymarket Leicester Square in London in the UK.

102 Podium handout : MEDAL

“Podium” (plural “podia”) is the Latin word for “raised platform”.

111 Hari of espionage : MATA

“Mata Hari” was the stage name used by Margaretha Geertruida Zelle, born in the Netherlands in 1876. After an unsuccessful and somewhat tragic marriage, Zella moved to Paris in 1903 where she struggled to make a living. By 1905 she was working as an exotic dancer and using the name Mata Hari. She was a successful courtesan, notably moving in various circles of high-ranking military officers. She apparently worked as a double agent, both for the French and the Germans. When Mata Hari was accused by the French of passing information to the enemy, she was tried, found guilty and executed by firing squad at the height of WW1, in 1917.

113 Sea devastated by irrigation projects : ARAL

The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad …

115 Actress Falco : EDIE

Actress Edie Falco won three Emmy Awards for playing Carmela Soprano on HBO’s outstanding drama series called “The Sopranos”. Falco also won an Emmy in 2010 for playing the title role in “Nurse Jackie”, an excellent black comedy.

116 Urges : YENS

The word “yen”, meaning “urge”, has been around in English since the very early 1900s. It comes from the earlier word “yin” imported from Chinese, which was used in English to describe an intense craving for opium.

117 Morales of “Jericho” : ESAI

Actor Esai Morales is best known in the world of film for the 1987 movie “La Bamba”, which depicted the life of Ritchie Valens and his half-brother Bob Morales (played by Esai). On the small screen, Morales plays Lt. Tony Rodriguez on “NYPD Blue” and Joseph Adama on “Caprica”.

“Jericho” is a drama series, initially produced by CBS, that tells of life in the aftermath of nuclear attacks on many cities in the US.

119 Span. title : SRA

The equivalent of “Mrs.” in French is “Mme.” (Madame), in Spanish is “Sra.” (Señora) and in Portuguese is also “Sra.” (Senhora).

120 __-80: old computer : TRS

The TRS-80 was a computer sold by the Tandy Corporation through the company’s Radio Shack outlets. Back in 1977, the “big three” of personal computers were Apple, Commodore and Tandy. Well, at least Apple is still around …

122 Bit of Wall St. news : LBO

A leveraged buyout (LBO) is a transaction in which an investor acquires a controlling volume of stock in a company, but buys that stock with borrowed funds (hence “leveraged”). Often the assets of the acquired company are used as collateral for the borrowed money. There is a special form of LBO known as a management buyout (MBO) in which the company’s own management team purchase the controlling interest.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Dodge a conviction : WALK
5 Kin kin : KITH
9 Amazon review rating units : STARS
14 Gathered dust : SAT
17 Morlock prey : ELOI
18 Logical opening : IDEO-
19 Swift’s brutish race : YAHOOS
20 Backing : PRO
21 Easter precursor : LENT
22 What’s expected : NORM
23 Kind of lead a closer often has to protect : ONE-RUN
24 Hop on the bandwagon : JOIN
25 People’s 2019 Sexiest Man Alive : LEGEND
27 Drop-down item : MENU
29 Grammy channel : CBS
30 Patient person? : NURSE
31 Sense : FEEL
33 Copter topper : ROTOR
35 Tarnished : TAINTED
37 More than just asks : IMPLORES
41 Dawn : SUNUP
43 “Now __ heard it all!” : I’VE
44 Austin __: Tennessee university : PEAY
45 Conquest for Caesar : GAUL
47 Osso __ : BUCO
48 Court break point : RECESS
52 1971 New York prison riot site : ATTICA
54 Phil Collins’ longtime band : GENESIS
56 First name in student loans : SALLIE
57 Big 12 Cowboy’s rival : SOONER
58 Help the bad guys : ABET
59 Buzz creator : BEE
61 Twilights, in verse : E’ENS
62 Vocalist : SONGSTER
64 Long border range : URAL
66 Dives into, as a workload : ATTACKS
69 Dundee denials : NAES
70 Speak with style : ORATE
71 Makeshift weapon : SHIV
72 Luray attraction : CAVERNS
75 Burgundy and Weasley : RONS
76 Landed with a line : REELED IN
80 Novelist Waugh : ALEC
81 Ref. whose recent updates include “chillax” and “whatev” : OED
83 Ward of “FBI” : SELA
85 Prefix with cortical : ADRENO-
86 College URL ending : DOT EDU
89 Madison in “Splash,” e.g. : MERMAID
91 Acorn coats : TESTAE
92 Thumbs-ups : YESSES
93 “… kissed thee __ killed thee”: Othello : ERE I
94 Foreshadow : BODE
96 Cut down : HEWN
97 “Told you so!” : SEE!
98 Laundry cycle : RINSE
100 Furthered the development of : NURTURED
102 Eager beaver’s demand : ME FIRST
106 Leading airplane features? : NOSES
108 Farm gatherings : EGGS
109 Red-carpet honorees : ELITE
110 Thurman of “Pulp Fiction” : UMA
112 Maker of BILLY bookcases : IKEA
114 Outback offering : RIB EYE
118 Small craft : DORY
119 Acknowledge the general : SNAP TO
121 Folksy Guthrie : ARLO
123 Gator tails? : -ADES
124 “Great” primate : APE
125 Post-Christmas event : RETURN
126 “Forbidden” perfume : TABU
127 One of a seagoing trio : NINA
128 Beethoven’s “__ Adieux” Sonata : LES
129 Horses originally developed in a desert climate : ARABS
130 Sty feed : SLOP
131 He played Ricky in early TV : DESI

Down

1 Competently : WELL
2 Sheltered, at sea : ALEE
3 Time-consuming : LONG
4 Downwind : KITE-FLYING NECESSITY
5 Downgrade : KINDERGARTEN
6 Sworn statement : I DO
7 Stint : TERM
8 One that usually leaves the park : HOMER
9 __ Salvador : SAN
10 Downplay : THE CRUCIBLE
11 Simple choice : A OR B
12 Haul out of bed : ROUST
13 Phishing target, briefly : SSN
14 Wear with pride : SPORT
15 Crop up : ARISE
16 Fit as a fiddle : TONED
19 Downstream : YOUTUBE TRANSMISSION
24 Downward : JUNE CLEAVER’S HUSBAND
26 New start? : NEO-
28 Cardinals, e.g.: Abbr. : NOS
30 Skin care brand : NIVEA
32 Field : LEA
34 Heavy burden : ONUS
36 What some put on to feel better about themselves : AIRS
37 Bridge call : I PASS
38 Anti-harassment movement : ME TOO
39 Anti-apartheid author Alan : PATON
40 Cube makeup : SUGAR
42 Prepare for a selfie : POSE
46 Syr. neighbor : LEB
49 TVA output : ELEC
50 Descend : SINK
51 House mtg. : SESS
53 “Dog Whisperer” Millan : CESAR
55 Surgery opening? : NEURO-
60 Simplify : EASE
63 Canadian gas : ESSO
65 Very confused : AT SEA
67 Downcast : THEATER GROUP
68 127-Across feature : TILDE
70 Downdraft : ORDER IN A PUB
72 Suffragist Elizabeth __ Stanton : CADY
73 Skin soother : ALOE
74 November honorees : VETS
76 Home detector target : RADON
77 Block : DETER
78 Blown away : IN AWE
79 Interminably : NO END
82 Part of FEMA: Abbr. : EMER
84 Rights movement shorthand : LIB
87 Maker of Zero-Turn mowers : DEERE
88 Functions : USES
90 City that aptly rhymes with “casino” : RENO
95 Word on a bill : DUE
99 What a mouse may evoke : EEK!
101 __ Fridays : TGI
102 Podium handout : MEDAL
103 Bolt to tie the knot : ELOPE
104 Sends packing : FIRES
105 One working on pitches : TUNER
107 There aren’t quite enough of them in musical chairs : SEATS
111 Hari of espionage : MATA
113 Sea devastated by irrigation projects : ARAL
115 Actress Falco : EDIE
116 Urges : YENS
117 Morales of “Jericho” : ESAI
119 Span. title : SRA
120 __-80: old computer : TRS
122 Bit of Wall St. news : LBO

23 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 24 May 20, Sunday”

  1. 2 errors . same as bills. I wasn’t sure and guessed wrong. I got others right that I had no idea. How is 51D mortgage a SESS? Oh, it’s not mortgage, it’s a meeting, DOH! Never heard the term KITH . I had STL on 28D for a long time but NOS was the only thing that fit.., thanks Bill for all your dialogue.. I’ve learned much over these many years tagging along here.. For what it’s worth, these would have been DNF’s about 5 years ago for me..

    Be safe!

  2. 119:21 no errors but I had to look up 25 & 44A…It took me a long while to get the theme but my wife and I watch 2 episodes of leave it to beaver every weekday so that helped.
    Stay safe

  3. The Tribune Sunday puzzle is my favorite because of its cleverness. Not this one though. It was a grind. Took me over an hour. Never heard of kith either.

  4. 26:21, no errors. Difficult, I thought. Had trouble getting started, so I ended up starting in the upper right and working my way down along the right side, wondering all the while about J U N E C L E …, until the light came on, and then across the bottom and back up the left side. Finished by putting in the “A” of “PATON” and “PEAY”, both of which I was only semi- (very semi- 😜) sure of. Good puzzle.

    1. Thank you for saying “…the light came on”. Why do so many people say – when they have a great idea – that the “light went off”? A major pet peeve!!!

  5. The “theme” was a hindrance, rather than a help. Having “down” sometimes be part of the meaning and other times simply indicate that the word goes downward (well, duh!) really messed me up.

    1. Sorry, I meant having “down” not actually refer to the word but just show that the single-word clue *could* go with “down” (which is obvious) but in this case actually doesn’t, makes the clue useless until you know that.

  6. So I have a question for the golfers on the blog: During a very long walk yesterday, I came across a golf ball half-buried in a sandy embankment near a road. It’s a perfectly ordinary dimpled “Wilson” golf ball with the labels “Pro Staff” and “2” on it, except that … it’s egg-shaped, rather than spherical! Is this a novelty item for use as a gag gift, the result of a manufacturing defect, or … what?

    1. More … Google tells me that there is a New Zealand game called “golf cross” or “goal golf” that is played with oval (sort of football-shaped) balls. I also found pictures of egg-shaped balls, but with little to no explanation what they’re for.

  7. Finished with a couple of lucky guesses. Tough go, it was one clue at a time and I could never gain any momentum…

  8. Pretty much what Wil said. Dropping the “down” part of all the “themer” clues would change absolutely nothing about the puzzle … Duhmb. Have a fun, safe holiday weekend, all.

  9. Took a long time,, but no errors. It wasn’t until I got June Cleaver to
    start 24down that I finally tumbled to the theme, but it was still a hard
    slog to get to the end. I did look up the “Peay” answer because I never
    heard of that name and some answers I got by lucky guess. Still don’t
    know who “Legend” is. Someone will enlighten me I’m sure.

  10. Picked at the puzzle throughout the day. Took some time but ended up with one error right off the bat. Had “ably” for 1 down, Competently. Could not think of John Legend as sexiest man alive. Once I got that, then put “well” in for 1 down and that corner filled right in.

  11. I had no final errors and just did my usual hunt and peck for quite awhile until the puzzle was maybe 65% complete and then it reached a critical mass in which momentum and finally recognition of the theme seemed to kick in.

    Hey, anyone else watch the Hallmark Mystery channels presentation of back to back “Crossword Mysteries” last night? I recorded both. Will Shortz was one of the producers and actually had a cameo in the first one asking for help to retrieve his table tennis ball from under the feet of the two main characters. Enjoyable and clever, at least to me. And lots of “crossword” talk.

  12. I was thinking mtg=mortgage for the longest time, too. Same with ABLY for 1D, but I knew ELOI was correct in the crosser, so it sat empty for a while. And for some reason, I decided that the most logical answer for NE_RO to the clue “Surgery Opening?” was NECRO-surgery.

    I have heard of ‘kith’ before (though I did originally put in LIKE for 5A)!

  13. So I just finished Croce’s Friday puzzle, which was of a type he characterizes as “Split Decisions Two Ways”, and it only took me 51 hours, 13 minutes, and 36 seconds. (In reality, I may have spent part of that time on other things … 😜 … but it was a damned good workout!)

  14. HIYA folks!🦆

    Accidentally left one space empty! Didn’t realize till I got here. I haven’t done a Sunday in months and there’s so much acreage to review….I missed the A in PEAY/PATON. Probably would have guessed it right. So, no errors with an asterisk, me and Maris.⚾️

    One of these days I should watch Leave It to Beaver. 🤔 I binge a lot of old sitcoms.

    Be safe ~~🍷

  15. I would think “lib” is for liberation, not liberal. The clue is “rights” not “right.” Think women’s liberation, etc.

  16. Got it all after 50 million years. “Feature of (Nina)” had me forever. Tiller? Tiler? And finally …aargh! The long ones had funky defs, imho.

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