LA Times Crossword 3 May 20, Sunday

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Constructed by: Pam Amick Klawitter
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Get Moving

Themed clues are verbs describing a type of MOVEMENT, but each has been interpreted as a noun:

  • 22A LEAP : ABRUPT PASSAGE
  • 36A DASH : RECIPE AMOUNT
  • 68A BOLT : ROLL OF CLOTH
  • 98A HOP : FIFTIES DANCE
  • 16D VAULT : ARCHED STRUCTURE
  • 44D RUN : PANTYHOSE MISHAP

Bill’s time: 18m 23s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

7 Absolute : ARRANT

“Arrant” means “out-and-out, complete”, and is a variant of “errant”.

19 Louisiana cuisine : CREOLE

In the US, the term “Creole” is usually a reference to the people descended from the colonial French and colonial Spanish people who settled in the Louisiana region before it became part of the United States with the Louisiana Purchase of 1803.

21 Tapas bar libation : SANGRIA

Sangria is a red wine punch that is usually associated with Portugal and Spain. Recipes for sangria vary, but almost all include a robust red wine, sliced fruit, something sweet (e.g. orange juice, sugar), a spirit (e.g. brandy, triple sec), carbonated water or perhaps 7up, and ice. The drink is named for its color, as “sangre” is the Spanish for blood.

“Tapa” is the Spanish word for “lid”, and there is no clear rationale for why this word came to be used for an appetizer. There are lots of explanations cited, all of which seem to involve the temporary covering of one’s glass of wine with a plate or item of food to either preserve the wine or give one extra space at the table.

26 Glitterati groups : A-LISTS

“Glitterati” is a melding of the words “glitter” and “literati”.

27 Film studio VIP : DIR

Direction (dir.)

29 Eccentric sort : GEEZER

“Geezer”, “codger” and “coot” are all not-so-nice terms meaning “old man”.

32 God, in Genoa : DIO

Genoa is a seaport in the very north of Italy, in the region known as Liguria. One of Genoa’s most famous sons was Christopher Columbus. Another was the violinist Niccolò Paganini.

36 DASH : RECIPE AMOUNT

In cooking, the terms “dash”, “pinch” and “smidgen” can all be used for a very small measure, one that is often undefined. However, you can in fact buy some measuring spoons that define these amounts as follows:

  • a dash is 1/8 teaspoon
  • a pinch is 1/16 teaspoon
  • a smidgen is 1/32 teaspoon

46 Portable Asian shelter : YURT

A yurt is a wood-framed dwelling that is used by nomads in the steppes of Central Asia. Although a yurt is a substantial structure, it is also extremely portable.

47 Elliott of hip-hop : MISSY

Melissa “Missy” Elliott is a rap artist who was childhood friends with fellow rapper Timbaland.

48 Half a frozen potato brand : IDA

Ore-Ida frozen foods are all made using potatoes. The company is located in Oregon, just across the border from Idaho. “Ore-Ida” is a melding of the two state names.

49 Keyboards with stops : ORGANS

A stop is a component of a pipe organ that admits a flow of air to a specific set of organ pipes. The organ player can allow air to flow, or can “stop” it (hence the name “stop”). Stops are classified according to the group of pipes that are controlled, with stops often being named for the sounds imitated by those pipes. So, for example, there are flute stops, string stops and reed stops.

52 Forensic analysts, briefly : CSI’S

Crime scene investigator (CSI)

59 It may be fake : TAN

The most effective fake tans available today are not dyes or stains. Instead, they are sprays with the active ingredient dihydroxyacetone (DHA). DHA reacts chemically with amino acids in the dead layer of skin on the surface of the body. Sounds a little risky to me …

61 Speed Wagon make : REO

The REO Speed Wagon was a light truck introduced in 1915, and a precursor to the modern pickup truck. The rock band REO Speedwagon is named for the truck, but note the difference between the spelling of Speedwagon (the band) and Speed Wagon (the truck).

62 Some saxes : ALTOS

The saxophone was invented by Belgian musician Adolphe Sax. Sax developed lip cancer at one point in his life, and one has to wonder if his affliction was related to his saxophone playing (I am sure not!). I had the privilege of visiting Sax’s grave in the Cemetery of Montmartre in Paris a few years ago.

63 Instrument in a piano trio : CELLO

A piano trio is an ensemble comprising a piano and two other instruments, usually a cello and a violin. The music composed for such a group can also be termed “piano trio”.

65 River craft for early French explorers : BATEAU

“Bateau” is a French word meaning “boat”. The term can be used in English to describe any small craft, but in particular in North America to describe a flat-bottomed boat with a shallow draft that was especially popular in the colonial period.

67 Husband-and-wife creators of Curious George : REYS

Curious George is a character in a series of children’s books written by husband and wife Hans Augusto and Margret Rey. The couple wrote the original stories in Paris, taking the manuscripts with them as they fled from the city ahead of the Nazi invasion in 1940.

68 BOLT : ROLL OF CLOTH

“Bolt” is the name given to a roll of cloth of specific length, especially one coming directly off a loom.

74 They may precede bat flips : HOMERS

That would be baseball.

77 Chips on the table : KITTY

The pot in a card game has been referred to as “the kitty” since the 1880s. It’s not certain how the name “kitty” evolved but possibly it comes from “kit”, the necessary equipment for the game.

78 Love of Lennon’s life : ONO

Yoko Ono is an avant-garde artist. Ono actually met her future husband John Lennon for the first time while she was preparing her conceptual art exhibit called “Hammer a Nail”. Visitors were encouraged to hammer in a nail into a wooden board, creating the artwork. Lennon wanted to hammer in the first nail, but Ono stopped him as the exhibition had not yet opened. Apparently Ono relented when Lennon paid her an imaginary five shillings to hammer an imaginary nail into the wood.

81 DKNY label creator : KARAN

Donna Karan is an American fashion designer, creator of the Donna Karan New York (DKNY) clothing label. Karan was very much raised in the fashion industry, as her mother was a model and her stepfather a tailor.

86 Sermon subjects : SINS

Our word “sermon” comes from the Latin “sermonem” meaning “discourse, talk”. The literal translation of “sermonem” is “a stringing together of words”, from the Latin “serere” meaning “to join”, as in the related word “series”.

91 Turncoat : RAT

A turncoat is a traitor. The concept behind the term is that a traitor might “turn” his or her “coat” inside-out, to hide a badge or uniform that identifies loyalty or fealty.

92 Billy Joel’s songwriting daughter : ALEXA

Singer-songwriter Alexa Joel is the daughter of Billy Joel and Christie Brinkley.

93 Thesis: Abbr. : DISS

Dissertation (diss.)

95 Ávila aunts : TIAS

Ávila is famous for the walled defenses around the old city that date back to 1090. They were constructed out of brown granite, and are still in excellent repair. There are nine gateways and eighty-towers in all. Even the cathedral built between the 12th and 14th centuries is part of the city’s defenses, so it looks like an imposing fortress.

96 EMT destinations : ERS

An emergency medical technician (EMT) usually takes a patient to an emergency room (ER).

97 Dorm diet staple : RAMEN

Ramen is a noodle dish composed of Chinese-style wheat noodles in a meat or fish broth flavored with soy or miso sauce. Ramen is usually topped with sliced pork and dried seaweed. The term “ramen” is also used for precooked, instant noodles that come in single-serving, solid blocks.

98 HOP : FIFTIES DANCE

Sock hops were high school dances typically held in the school gym or cafeteria. The term “sock hop” arose because the dancers were often required to remove their shoes to protect the varnished floor in the gym.

108 More, in Mazatlán : MAS

Mazatlán is a city in Mexico on the Pacific coast sitting right opposite the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula.

110 URL ending : ORG

The .org domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:

  • .com (commercial enterprise)
  • .net (entity involved in network infrastructure e.g. an ISP)
  • .mil (US military)
  • .org (not-for-profit organization)
  • .gov (US federal government entity)
  • .edu (college-level educational institution)

111 “Being and Nothingness” author : SARTRE

Jean-Paul Sartre wrote the philosophical treatise “L’Etre et le néant” in 1943. The title translates as “Being and Nothingness”.

121 Sir __, nickname for the NBA’s Barkley : CHARLES

Former pro-basketball player Charles Barkley was nicknamed “Sir Charles” as well as “The Round Mound of Rebound”. Now that Barkley is retired he spends some of his time commenting on games for Turner Network Television (TNT) on the show “Inside the NBA”. He also has expressed interest in getting into politics and pondered a 2014 run for Governor of Alabama.

122 Safer on TV : MORLEY

Morley Safer was a broadcaster and journalist best known as the longest-serving reporter on the news program “60 Minutes”. Safer announced his retirement from the show in 2016, after 46 seasons with the show. Tragically, Safer passed away just eight days after making the announcement.

123 Baum’s good witch : GLINDA

In the 1939 movie “The Wizard of Oz”, Glinda is the Good Witch of the North, played by actress Billie Burke. As an aside, Burke was the wife of Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr. who produced the “Ziegfeld Follies” on Broadway. As another aside, Glinda wasn’t the Good Witch of the North in the original L. Frank Baum book, but was the Good Witch of the South.

124 Flower features : SEPALS

In a flower, the sepals are the green, leaf-like structures that are “interleaved” with the petals, providing support. Prior to acting as support for the petals, the sepals protect the flower in bud.

125 Golf course design features : SWALES

A swale is a narrow tract of low-lying land that is usually wet or marshy. It can be naturally-occurring or man-made. One might create a swale to help manage drainage of adjacent land.

126 “Gunsmoke” star : ARNESS

James Arness played the role of Matt Dillon, Marshal of Dodge City, on “Gunsmoke” for twenty years. If you count the occasions when he reprised the role for specials, he actually performed as Matt Dillon over five decades. Did you know that the real name of Peter Graves, the actor who played Jim Phelps on “Mission: Impossible”, was Peter Arness, as he and James were brothers.

“Gunsmoke” is a Western drama series that originally aired on television from 1955 to 1975, with James Arness starring as Marshall Matt Dillon. The TV show was adapted from a radio show of the same name that ran from 1952 to 1961, with William Conrad (who later played TV’s “Cannon”) playing Marshall Dillon.

Down

2 Head honcho : MR BIG

“Honcho” is a slang term meaning “leader”. The word comes to us from Japanese military, in which language a “hancho” is a “squad” (han) “leader” (cho).

3 Suisse capital : BERNE

Bern (sometimes “Berne”, especially in French) is the capital city of Switzerland. The official language of the city is German, but the language most spoken in Bern is a dialect known as Bernese German.

“Suisse” is the French word for “Swiss”, and “la Suisse” is French for “Switzerland”.

5 ’70s supergroup, initially : ELP

Emerson, Lake and Palmer (ELP) were an English supergroup who were popular in the seventies. Keith Emerson had been successful with the Nice, Greg Lake with King Crimson, and Carl Palmer with Atomic Rooster. Given that all three performers had already achieved success prior to the formation of the group, ELP is termed a “supergroup”.

6 Like many AARP mems. : RET

“AARP” is now the official name for the interest group that used to be called the American Association of Retired Persons. The name change reflects the current focus of the group on all Americans aged 50 or over, as opposed to just people who have retired.

7 Depleted sea : ARAL

The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad …

12 “Cats” monogram : TSE

“Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats” is a 1939 collection of poems by T. S. Eliot (TSE). The collection of whimsical poetry was a favorite of composer Andrew Lloyd Webber when he was a child. Webber used Eliot’s poems as inspiration for his megahit musical “Cats”.

13 New Zealand settler : MAORI

The Māori are the indigenous people of New Zealand. They are eastern Polynesian in origin and began arriving in New Zealand relatively recently, starting some time in the late 13th century. The word “māori” simply means “normal”, distinguishing mortal humans from spiritual entities. The Māori refer to New Zealand as “Aotearoa”.

14 Blowup: Abbr. : ENL

Enlargement (enl.)

15 Letters before Fridays : TGI …

T.G.I. Fridays is an American restaurant chain that was founded in 1965 in New York City. Today there are over a thousand T.G.I. Friday’s restaurants in over 50 countries. I think that Fridays has always been particularly successful overseas. I used to visit one a lot with my family when we lived in the Philippines, and I believe the most successful Fridays restaurant anywhere in the world is the one in Haymarket Leicester Square in London in the UK.

18 Postpaid encl. : SASE

An SAE is a “stamped, addressed envelope”. An SASE is a “self-addressed, stamped envelope”.

34 White fur : ERMINE

The stoat has dark brown fur in the summer, and white fur in the winter. Sometimes the term “ermine” is used for the animal during the winter when the fur is white. Ermine skins have long been prized by royalty and are often used for white trim on ceremonial robes.

37 Gp. for good drivers : PGA

The Professional Golfers’ Association (PGA) was founded in 1916 and today has its headquarters (unsurprisingly) in Florida, where so many golfers live. Back in 1916, the PGA was based in New York City.

41 Greek sandwich : GYRO

A gyro is a traditional Greek dish of meat roasted on a tall vertical spit that is sliced from the spit as required. Gyros are usually served inside a lightly grilled piece of pita bread, along with tomato, onion and tzatziki (a yogurt and cucumber sauce).

42 Bollywood soundtrack strings : SITAR

The sitar has been around since the Middle Ages. It is a stringed instrument that is played by plucking, and is used most often in Hindustani classical music. In the West we have been exposed to the instrument largely through the performances of Ravi Shankar and some music by George Harrison of the Beatles, a onetime student of Shankar.

“Bollywood” is the informal name given to the huge film industry based in Mumbai in India. The term “Bollywood” is a melding of “Bombay” (the former name of Mumbai), and “Hollywood”.

43 Singer with numbered albums : ADELE

“Adele” is the stage name of English singer Adele Adkins. Adele’s debut album is “19”, named after the age she was during the album’s production. Her second album was even more successful than the first. Called “21”, the second album was released three years after the first, when Adele was three years older. Her third studio album “25”, released in 2015, broke the first-week sales records in both the UK and the US.

44 RUN : PANTYHOSE MISHAP

A snag is a pull or a tear in a fabric. A snag, particularly in stockings, might lead to a run. And on the other side of the Atlantic, a “run” is called a “ladder”.

50 Jodie Foster title role : NELL

“Nell” is a thoughtful drama film from 1994 starring Jodie Foster in the title role. Nell is a young woman who had been raised by her mother in isolation, away from all human contact. She is discovered as an untamed child and gradually introduced into society. The movie is a screen adaptation of a play by Mark Handley called “Idioglossia”.

The wonderful actress and director Jodie Foster got her big break in movies early in her life, playing a very young prostitute in Martin Scorsese’s 1976 film “Taxi Driver”. Sadly, her appearance in “Taxi Driver” led to her being stalked by an obsessed John Hinckley, Jr. Hinckley called Foster on the phone, sent her love letters, and followed her on campus while she was attending Yale. In 1981, Hinckley famously shot and wounded President Reagan, claiming that he believed an assassination of the President would impress Foster.

51 Rural skyline feature : SILO

“Silo” is a Spanish word that we absorbed into English. The term ultimately derives from the Greek “siros”, which described a pit in which one kept corn.

60 Part of NCAA: Abbr. : ATH

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) dates back to the Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt. When his son broke his nose playing football at Harvard, President Roosevelt turned his attention to the number of serious injuries and even deaths occurring in college sports. He instigated meetings between the major educational institutions, leading to the formation of the Intercollegiate Athletic Association of the United States (IAAUS) in 1906, which was given the remit of regulating college sports. The IAAUS became the NCAA in 1910. The NCAA has been headquartered in Indianapolis since 1999.

64 37-Down’s Ernie : ELS
(37D Gp. for good drivers : PGA)

Ernie Els is a South African golfer. Els is a big guy but he has an easy fluid golf swing that has earned him the nickname “The Big Easy”. He is a former World No. 1 and has won four majors: the US Open (1994 & 1997) and the British Open (2002 & 2012).

65 Tweet creator, at times : BOT

A Twitterbot is a bot program designed specifically to work on the Twitter microblogging service.

68 Brief sign of status : REP

Reputation (rep.)

70 Place with pins and balls : LANE

Bowling has been around for an awfully long time. The oldest known reference to the game is in Egypt, where pins and balls were found in an ancient tomb that is over 5,000 years old. The first form of the game to come to America was nine-pin bowling, which had been very popular in Europe for centuries. In 1841 in Connecticut, nine-pin bowling was banned due to its association with gambling. Supposedly, an additional pin was added to get around the ban, and ten-pin bowling was born.

72 Rose extract : ATTAR

Attar is a fragrant essential oil obtained from flowers, and the term often particularly refers to attar of roses.

73 Russian rejections : NYETS

The English word “no” translates into Russian as “nyet” and into German as “nein”.

75 Sábado, on viernes : MANANA

In Spanish, the day after “hoy” (today) is “mañana” (tomorrow).

In Spanish (Span.), the days of the week are masculine (masc.) nouns. Unlike in English, the days of the week in Spanish are not capitalized when used in the middle of a sentence:

  • lunes – Monday
  • martes – Tuesday
  • miércoles – Wednesday
  • jueves – Thursday
  • viernes – Friday
  • sábado – Saturday
  • domingo – Sunday

77 Cherry-flavored brandy : KIRSCH

Kirschwasser (more usually “Kirsch”) is a clear brandy made from fermented cherries. “Kirschwasser” is German for “cherry water”.

78 “A Jug of Wine … ” poet : OMAR

Here are some lines by 11th-century poet Omar Khayyam:

A Book of Verses underneath the Bough,
A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread–and Thou
Beside me singing in the Wilderness–
Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!

79 Animated queen : NALA

In “The Lion King”, Nala is a lioness and the childhood friend of Simba. By the end of the story, Nala and Simba become wedded. “The Lion King” is inspired by William Shakespeare’s “Hamlet”, with Simba representing the title character, and Nala representing Hamlet’s love interest Ophelia.

82 Little helper? : ASST

Assistant (asst.)

85 Yoked pair : OXEN

A yoke is a wooden beam used between a pair of animals so that they are forced to work together.

87 Picking from a mug book : ID’ING

A mug shot is a photograph of a person’s face, one often taken for a police record.

89 Part of LLC: Abbr. : LTD

In Britain and Ireland, the most common type of business (my perception anyway) is one that has private shareholders whose liability is limited to the value of their investment. Such a company is known as a private limited company, and has the abbreviation “Ltd.” after the name. If the shares are publicly traded, then the company is a public limited company, and has the letters “plc” after the name.

A limited liability company (LLC) has a structure that limits the liability of the owner or owners. It is a hybrid structure in the sense that it can be taxed as would an individual or partnership, while also maintaining the liability protection afforded to a corporation.

90 Royal headwear : DIADEM

A diadem is a type of crown that is worn as a sign of royalty. The original diadem wasn’t made of metal and was simply an embroidered silk ribbon that was worn by a king as a symbol of his authority.

94 Rat Pack leader : SINATRA

Frank Sinatra was the only child of Italian immigrants living in Hoboken, New Jersey. Like so many of our heroes, Sinatra had a rough upbringing. His mother was arrested several times and convicted of running an illegal abortion business in the family home. Sinatra never finished high school, as he was expelled for rowdy conduct. He was later arrested as a youth on a morals charge for carrying on with a married woman, which was an offence back then. But Sinatra straightened himself out by the time he was twenty and started singing professionally.

The original Rat Pack from the fifties was a group of actors that centered on Humphrey Bogart, and included a young Frank Sinatra. Supposedly, Bogart’s wife, Lauren Bacall, christened them the Rat Pack after seeing them all return from one of their nights on the town in Las Vegas. The sixties Rat Pack was a reincarnation of the fifties version, with the core group of actors being Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin (Dino), Sammy Davis Jr., Joey Bishop and Peter Lawford.

101 Uses HelloFresh, say : EATS IN

HelloFresh is a Berlin-based company that delivers meal-kits to homes on demand. Meal-kits include all the ingredients for a home-cooked meal, and recipe cards. Actually meal prep is supposed to take just 30-40 minutes. HelloFresh is the largest supplier of meal-kits in the US.

106 Cologne’s river : RHINE

The river running through Europe that we know in English as the Rhine, is called “Rhein” in German, “Rhin” in French and “Rijn” in Dutch.

Cologne is the fourth largest city in Germany, and is known as “Köln” in German.

108 “Big” fast-food orders : MACS

The iconic Big Mac sandwich was introduced nationally by McDonald’s in 1967. It was the creation of a Pittsburgh franchisee who offered it on the menu as a response to the very similar “Big Boy” sandwich offered by the competing Big Boy restaurant chain.

109 Tylenol target : ACHE

Tylenol is a pain-relieving drug with the active ingredient acetaminophen (which is known as “paracetamol” outside of the US).

111 Garbage hauler : SCOW

A scow is a flat-bottomed boat with squared-off ends that’s often used for transportation, usually pushed or pulled by a barge. Often a scow can be seen carrying junk or garbage.

112 Rob __: cocktails : ROYS

Rob Roy was a folk hero in Scotland from the 18th century. He was a sort of Scottish Robin Hood, an outlaw who had the support of the populace. Rob Roy’s full name was Robert Roy MacGregor, itself an anglicization of the Scottish Raibeart Ruadh. He gave his name to a famous cocktail called a Rob Roy, which is a relative of a Manhattan but made with Scotch instead of bourbon.

114 Some, in San Juan : UNAS

San Juan is the capital of Puerto Rico. The city was founded in 1521 by the Spanish, who called it “Ciudad de Puerto Rico” (Rich Port City).

118 Early hrs. : AMS

The 12-hour clock has been around a long time, and was even used in sundial format in ancient Egypt. Our use of AM and PM dates back to Roman times, with AM standing for Ante Meridiem (before noon) and PM standing for Post Meridiem (after noon). However, the Romans originally used the AM concept a little differently, by counting backwards from noon. So, 2AM to the Romans would be two hours before noon, or 10AM as we would call it today.

119 Franchise-based supermarket chain : IGA

The initialism “IGA” stands for “Independent Grocers Alliance”, and is a chain of supermarkets that extends right around the world. IGA’s headquarters is in Chicago. The company uses the slogan “Hometown Proud Supermarkets”.

120 Photog’s choice : SLR

Single-lens reflex camera (SLR)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 One on a stroll : AMBLER
7 Absolute : ARRANT
13 Some recyclables : METALS
19 Louisiana cuisine : CREOLE
20 Gets the old gang together : REUNES
21 Tapas bar libation : SANGRIA
22 LEAP : ABRUPT PASSAGE
24 Acts as a self-appointed regulator of : POLICES
25 Bit of a jam : BIND
26 Glitterati groups : A-LISTS
27 Film studio VIP : DIR
28 Tint : HUE
29 Eccentric sort : GEEZER
32 God, in Genoa : DIO
33 Accept as true : BELIEVE
36 DASH : RECIPE AMOUNT
39 Make anew, as a trench : RE-DIG
42 Liquid from a trunk : SAP
45 Summoned, in a way : RANG
46 Portable Asian shelter : YURT
47 Elliott of hip-hop : MISSY
48 Half a frozen potato brand : IDA
49 Keyboards with stops : ORGANS
52 Forensic analysts, briefly : CSI’S
54 Prefix with act or play : INTER-
55 Readied for impact : TENSED
57 Figure __ : EIGHT
59 It may be fake : TAN
61 Speed Wagon make : REO
62 Some saxes : ALTOS
63 Instrument in a piano trio : CELLO
65 River craft for early French explorers : BATEAU
67 Husband-and-wife creators of Curious George : REYS
68 BOLT : ROLL OF CLOTH
71 PC virus check : SCAN
74 They may precede bat flips : HOMERS
76 Bring joy to : ELATE
77 Chips on the table : KITTY
78 Love of Lennon’s life : ONO
80 Copy : APE
81 DKNY label creator : KARAN
83 Wee : MINUTE
84 Layer of bricks : MASON
86 Sermon subjects : SINS
88 One carrying a torch : WELDER
91 Turncoat : RAT
92 Billy Joel’s songwriting daughter : ALEXA
93 Thesis: Abbr. : DISS
95 Ávila aunts : TIAS
96 EMT destinations : ERS
97 Dorm diet staple : RAMEN
98 HOP : FIFTIES DANCE
102 Queued up : IN A LINE
104 Butte-to-Helena dir. : NNE
105 E-flat equivalent : D-SHARP
108 More, in Mazatlán : MAS
110 URL ending : ORG
111 “Being and Nothingness” author : SARTRE
113 Drive-__ : THRU
115 Reach : ACHIEVE
118 SKIP : ACT OF OMISSION
121 Sir __, nickname for the NBA’s Barkley : CHARLES
122 Safer on TV : MORLEY
123 Baum’s good witch : GLINDA
124 Flower features : SEPALS
125 Golf course design features : SWALES
126 “Gunsmoke” star : ARNESS

Down

1 Hail __ : A CAB
2 Head honcho : MR BIG
3 Suisse capital : BERNE
4 Call from the back : LOUDER!
5 ’70s supergroup, initially : ELP
6 Like many AARP mems. : RET
7 Depleted sea : ARAL
8 Make a home (in) : RESIDE
9 Cosmonaut’s home : RUSSIA
10 Pre-med subject : ANATOMY
11 Strips in a darkroom, briefly : NEGS
12 “Cats” monogram : TSE
13 New Zealand settler : MAORI
14 Blowup: Abbr. : ENL
15 Letters before Fridays : TGI …
16 VAULT : ARCHED STRUCTURE
17 Place : LIEU
18 Postpaid encl. : SASE
21 Word in a “What’s done is done” proverb : SPILT
23 Kitchen prep job : PARING
27 Teeth: Pref. : DENTI-
30 2/3 of 100? : ZEROES
31 Online greeting : E-CARD
33 Like a ruined balloon : BURST
34 White fur : ERMINE
35 Marble characteristic : VEIN
37 Gp. for good drivers : PGA
38 Cry from a sting : OUCH!
40 “Got it” : I SEE
41 Greek sandwich : GYRO
42 Bollywood soundtrack strings : SITAR
43 Singer with numbered albums : ADELE
44 RUN : PANTYHOSE MISHAP
50 Jodie Foster title role : NELL
51 Rural skyline feature : SILO
53 Orally report : STATE
56 Barely worth mentioning : SO-SO
58 Errand runner : GOFER
60 Part of NCAA: Abbr. : ATH
63 Apple leftovers : CORES
64 37-Down’s Ernie : ELS
65 Tweet creator, at times : BOT
66 A-apple link : AS IN
68 Brief sign of status : REP
69 __ hammer : CLAW
70 Place with pins and balls : LANE
72 Rose extract : ATTAR
73 Russian rejections : NYETS
75 Sábado, on viernes : MANANA
77 Cherry-flavored brandy : KIRSCH
78 “A Jug of Wine … ” poet : OMAR
79 Animated queen : NALA
81 Word with bread or butter : … KNIFE
82 Little helper? : ASST
83 Stands for : MEANS
85 Yoked pair : OXEN
87 Picking from a mug book : ID’ING
89 Part of LLC: Abbr. : LTD
90 Royal headwear : DIADEM
94 Rat Pack leader : SINATRA
98 Sacks : FIRES
99 Sign up : ENROLL
100 Fixed rate : SET FEE
101 Uses HelloFresh, say : EATS IN
103 Can’t get enough of : LOVES
106 Cologne’s river : RHINE
107 Nudges along : PRODS
108 “Big” fast-food orders : MACS
109 Tylenol target : ACHE
111 Garbage hauler : SCOW
112 Rob __: cocktails : ROYS
114 Some, in San Juan : UNAS
116 Nest egg acronym : IRA
117 Bracket shape : ELL
118 Early hrs. : AMS
119 Franchise-based supermarket chain : IGA
120 Photog’s choice : SLR

18 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 3 May 20, Sunday”

  1. 24:57, no errors, no issues.

    Re a discussion from yesterday: Out of curiosity, I did a few searches this morning and found a lot more old crossword puzzles containing the entry SCHERZO than the entry HOLLA (even though, IMO, the combination of letters used in each would suggest that the opposite might be true).

  2. I had a few errors. Did better than I thought. I had in my brain something along the lines of a safe, or bank type vault, for vault. That hung me up for a while. Abrupt passage for LEAP is a stretch. The other main answers were pretty clever.

  3. The sloppily clued NE corner (a common entry point) tainted the entire puzzle. GEEZER is an allusion to age, not eccentricity; nothing indicated an abbreviated answer to 2D. Then ELP, not ELO?! Spare me. And all to support a leap to … ABRUPT PASSAGE. Please, Ms. Klawitter … no MAS.

    1. @Anonymous …

      Well, I should give up, since nobody reads my posts anyway, but look here:

      https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geezer

      where it says this (emphasis mine):

      “Geezer is a slang term for an old man. In the US, the term typically refers to a cranky old man. In the US, it can carry the connotation of either age or eccentricity; see fuddy-duddy. In the UK it is synonymous with the US “Dude”. It is in no way derogatory.”

  4. I had a snag in the NW corner because I answered ELO for 5 down which was confusing until I solved 22 across. I had forgotten about Emerson, Lake, and Palmer until I read Bill’s explanation.

  5. No errors after I, too, had to change ELO to ELP. Though for once
    most of the proper names used came to me without a lot of hassle.
    I still need to know what “Natick” means. I see it often in the comments
    section.

    1. @Mary … Glenn and I responded to your question about “Natick” yesterday. (You should be able to use a link at the bottom of this page to get there.)

  6. I only figured out ‘reunes’ thanks to a crossword earlier in the week which had the same answer (might have been the New Yorker?).

    I also consider parsing LEAP as “abrupt passage” rather tenuous. A leap, if you will.

  7. 32.5 minutes and a DNF; there were just 6 in the top half I had no idea how to fill. Never once heard of ARRANT, and the meaning of “Call from the back” totally escaped me.

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