LA Times Crossword 2 Jun 20, Tuesday

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Constructed by: Debbie Ellerin
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: A and E

Themed answers each comprise two words, starting with A AND E:

  • 40A “Ghost Hunters” channel suggested by the answers to starred clues : A AND E
  • 17A *The “bush” type is the largest living land animal : AFRICAN ELEPHANT
  • 26A *Dorothy’s female caretaker : AUNTIE EM
  • 47A *Sasha Fierce, for Beyoncé : ALTER EGO
  • 61A *Cardio workout : AEROBIC EXERCISE

Bill’s time: 4m 44s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

6 Type of lamp with a volcanic name : LAVA

The lava lamp was invented in 1960 by a British man, Edward Craven-Walker. The “lava” is a mixture of wax and carbon tetrachloride, floating in a water/glycerol mix. The wax reduces in density as it picks up heat from the incandescent bulb in the lamp’s base. The wax rises, cools, and then sinks to the bottom of the liquid only to be heated again.

10 Magazine for docs : JAMA

The American Medical Association (AMA) has been publishing the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) since 1883.

14 Linney of “Ozark” : LAURA

The wonderfully talented actress Laura Linney is a native New Yorker from Manhattan. The performances of hers that I most admire are in “The Truman Show” and “Love Actually” on the big screen, and in “John Adams” and “Ozark” on the small screen.

“Ozark” is an excellent TV crime show starring Jason Bateman and Laura Linney as a married couple who relocate from Chicago to the Missouri Ozarks. The couple fall foul of Mexican drug lord after a money laundering scheme goes awry. The show is set at a lake resort in the Ozarks, although filming actually takes place at lakes in the Atlanta area in order to take advantage of tax breaks offered by the State of Georgia.

17 *The “bush” type is the largest living land animal : AFRICAN ELEPHANT

There are only three species of elephant living today, with all others being extinct. These are the African bush elephant, the African forest elephant, and the Asian elephant (or “Indian elephant”). As is well known, the African elephant is distinguished from the Asian/Indian elephant by its much larger ears. The African bush elephant is the largest living land animal.

22 Listless feeling : ENNUI

“Ennui” is the French word for “boredom”, and a term that we now use in English. It’s one of the few French words we’ve imported that we haven’t anglicized, and actually pronounce “correctly”.

23 Fa-la link : SOL

The sol-fa syllables are: do, re, mi, fa, sol, la & ti.

24 Eve’s second son : ABEL

According to the Bible, Adam and Eve had several children, although only the first three are mentioned by name: Cain, Abel and Seth.

26 *Dorothy’s female caretaker : AUNTIE EM

In the children’s novel “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” by L. Frank Baum, Dorothy Gale lives with her Aunt Em (and Uncle Henry). In the book, Dorothy’s female caretaker is referred to as “Aunt Em”. In the celebrated 1939 film adaptation, she is referred to as “Auntie Em”, and is played by Clara Blandick.

31 Majors in golf and tennis? : OPENS

Golf’s US Open Championship is held on the third Sunday of every June, which also happens to be Father’s Day. The first US Open was held in 1894. 36 holes were played over one day on a 9-hole course in Newport, Rhode Island.

The US Open is one of the oldest tennis championships in the world, having started out as the US National Championship in 1881. Today, the US Open is the last major tournament in the Grand Slam annual series, following the Australian Open, the French Open and Wimbledon.

37 __ slaw : COLE

The term “coleslaw” is an Anglicized version of the Dutch name “koolsla”, which in itself is a shortened form of “Koolsalade” meaning “cabbage salad”.

39 Teen anti-DWI gp. : SADD

Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) was founded in Massachusetts in 1981. SADD’s aim is to prevent road traffic accidents by urging students to avoid potentially destructive decisions (such as driving under the influence of alcohol).

In some states, there is no longer a legal difference between a DWI (Driving While Intoxicated) and a DUI (Driving Under the Influence). Other states retain that difference, so that by definition a DUI is a lesser offence than a DWI.

40 “Ghost Hunters” channel suggested by the answers to starred clues : A AND E

The A&E television network used to be a favorite of mine, with the “A&E” standing for “arts and entertainment”. A&E started out airing a lot of the old classic dramas, as well as biographies and arts programs. Now there seems to be more reality TV, with one of the flagship programs being “Dog the Bounty Hunter”. A slight change of direction I’d say …

“Ghost Hunters” is a “reality” show on SyFy starring two Roto-Rooter plumbers who clear drains by day and investigate haunted houses by night.

42 Big name in cosmetics : OLAY

Oil of Olay was developed in South Africa in 1949. When Oil of Olay was introduced internationally, it was given slightly different brand names designed to appeal in the different geographies. In Ireland we know it as Oil of Ulay, for example, and in France it is Oil of Olaz.

47 *Sasha Fierce, for Beyoncé : ALTER EGO

Sasha Fierce is an alter-ego that Beyoncé Knowles has developed for her stage and recording work. Beyoncé describes Sasha as very sensual and aggressive. She released a studio album called “I Am… Sasha Fierce” in 2008.

49 Narc’s coup : BUST

“Narc” and “narco” are slang terms describing a law enforcement officer who tracks down criminals associated with illegal drugs. Both words are short for “narcotics officer”. Narcs might work for the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

51 Binary digit : ONE

Our base-10 numeral system is also known as the decimal (sometimes “denary”) numeral system. Another common numeral system is base-2, which is also known as the binary system.

58 Waze display : MAP

Waze is a navigation app that is similar to Google Maps and Apple Maps. Waze was developed in Israel, and was acquired by Google in 2013.

61 *Cardio workout : AEROBIC EXERCISE

Aerobic exercise is moderate activity designed to be at a low enough intensity that very little anaerobic activity takes place. In other words, the exercise is at a level where oxygen is taken in to burn fat and carbohydrate and to create energy. Anaerobic exercise is more intense and uses carbohydrate (glycogen) in the muscle to provide energy, without the need for oxygen. Aerobics are also called “cardio” as the exercises strengthen the cardiovascular system.

64 Baltic capital : RIGA

Riga is the capital city of Latvia. The historical center of Riga is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, declared as such because of the city’s magnificent examples of Art Nouveau architecture.

The natives of modern day Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia are sometimes referred to as Balts, a reference to the Baltic Sea on which the three countries lie. The term “Balt” is also used for someone who speaks one of the Baltic languages, a group of languages spoken by people mainly residing within the borders of Latvia and Lithuania, as well as in some immigrant communities around the world.

66 Greek column type : IONIC

The Ionic was one of the three classical orders of architecture, the others being the Doric and Corinthian. An Ionic column is relatively ornate. It usually has grooves running up and down its length and at the top there is a “scroll” design called a “volute”. The scroll motif makes Ionic columns popular for the design of academic buildings. The term “Ionic” means “pertaining to Ionia”, with Ionia being an ancient territory that is located in modern-day Turkey.

69 Salon dos : COIFS

A coif is a hairdo. The term “coif” comes from an old French term “coife” describing a skull-cap that was worn under a helmet back in the late 13th century.

Down

2 Barista employer : CAFE

A barista is a person who serves coffee in a coffee shop. “Barista” is Italian for “bartender”.

4 “TGIF!” time: Abbr. : FRI

“Thank God It’s Friday” (TGIF) is a relatively new expression that apparently originated in Akron, Ohio. It was a catchphrase used first by disk jockey Jerry Healy of WAKR in the early seventies. That said, one blog reader wrote to me to say that he had been using the phrase in the fifties.

5 Piece of trivia : FACTOID

Trivia are things of little consequence. “Trivia” is the plural of the Latin word “trivium” which means “a place where three roads meet”. Now that’s what I call a trivial fact …

6 Dunham of “Girls” : LENA

Lena Dunham is a co-star in the HBO series “Girls”, and is also the show’s creator. Dunham garnered a lot of attention for herself during the 2012 US Presidential election cycle as she starred in an ad focused on getting out the youth vote. In the spot, she compared voting for the first time with having sex for the first time.

“Girls” is an HBO comedy-drama series that was created by and stars Lena Dunham. The show follows a group of female friends living their lives in New York City. Good show …

7 Ice skating feat : AXEL

An axel is a forward take-off jump in figure skating. The maneuver was first performed by Norwegian Axel Paulsen at the 1882 World Figure Skating championships.

9 Enjoyed the buffet : ATE

Our word “buffet” comes from the French “bufet” meaning “bench, sideboard”. So, a buffet is a meal served from a “bufet”.

10 “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” author : JOHN LE CARRE

“John le Carré” is the pen name of David Cornwell, an English author who is famous for his spy novels. Cornwell worked for British Intelligence during the fifties and sixties, even as he was writing his spy thrillers. He left MI6 soon after his most famous 1963 novel “The Spy Who Came in from the Cold”, became such a great success.

“Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” is a 1974 spy novel penned by English author John le Carré. The central character is George Smiley, who works tirelessly to uncover a suspected mole in the British Secret Intelligence Service. The story rang true when it was published in the mid-seventies, as in the prior decade the public learned about the infamous Cambridge Five spy ring that passed information from the UK to the Soviet Union. The novel was adapted into a well-received 2011 movie with Gary Oldman portraying Smiley.

11 The first “A” in A.A. Milne : ALAN

Alan Alexander (A.A.) Milne was an English author who is best known for his delightful “Winnie-the-Pooh” series of books. He had only one son, Christopher Robin Milne, born in 1920. The young Milne was the inspiration for the Christopher Robin character in the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. Winnie-the-Pooh was named after Christopher Robin’s real teddy bear, one he called Winnie, who in turn was named after a Canadian black bear called Winnie that the Milnes would visit in London Zoo. The original Winnie teddy bear is on display at the main branch of the New York Public Library in New York.

13 Italian wine hub : ASTI

Asti is a city in the Piedmont region of northwest Italy. The region is perhaps most famous for its Asti Spumante sparkling white wine.

18 Start of a classic palindrome : ABLE

The three most famous palindromes in English have to be:

  • Able was I ere I saw Elba
  • A man, a plan, a canal, Panama!
  • Madam, I’m Adam

One of my favorite terms is “Aibohphobia”, although it doesn’t appear in the dictionary and is a joke term. “Aibohphobia” is a great way to describe a fear of palindromes, by creating a palindrome out of the suffix “-phobia”.

23 Emulate an American attending the Sorbonne, say : STUDY ABROAD

“Sorbonne” is the name usually used for the old University of Paris, and some of the institutions that have succeeded it. The institution was named for French theologian Robert de Sorbonne who founded the original Collège de Sorbonne in 1257. That’s quite a while ago …

25 Humerus, for one : BONE

The humerus is the long bone in the upper arm. The bones in the forearm are the radius and ulna. “Ulna” is the Latin word for “elbow”, and “radius” is Latin for “ray”.

26 Lhasa __: small dog : APSO

The Lhasa apso breed of dog originated in Tibet and is named after “Lhasa” (the capital city) and “apso” (a Tibetan word meaning “bearded”). The Lhasa apso has been around since 800 BC and is one of the oldest breeds in the world, one very closely related to the ancestral wolf.

27 Eurasian border range : URALS

The eastern side of the Ural Mountains in Russia and Kazakhstan is generally regarded as the natural divide between the continents of Europe and Asia.

29 “Dear __ Hansen”: 2017 Best Musical : EVAN

“Dear Evan Hansen” is a 2015 stage musical about a young man with awkward social skills and his efforts to make friends.

30 Ray of the tropics : MANTA

The manta ray is the largest species of ray, with the largest one recorded at over 25 feet across and weighing 5,100 pounds. It is sometimes referred to as the sea devil.

33 Urban Dictionary focus : SLANG

Urban Dictionary is a website that was founded in 1999 by a computer science student at Cal Poly. The site contains definitions of mainly slang terms, and is maintained by the site’s members.

38 Canadian tank filler : ESSO

The Esso brand has its roots in the old Standard Oil company as it uses the initial letters of “Standard” and “Oil” (ESS-O). The Esso brand was replaced by Exxon in the US, but ESSO is still used in many other countries.

48 Drag on a joint : TOKE

“Toke” is a slang term for a puff on a marijuana cigarette, or on a pipe containing the drug.

52 Complain : CARP

The word “carp” used to mean simply “talk” back in the 13th century, with its roots in the Old Norwegian “karpa” meaning “to brag”. A century later, the Latin word “carpere” meaning “to slander” influenced the use of “to carp” so that it came to mean “to find fault with”.

54 Golden Fleece ship : ARGO

The Golden Fleece was the fleece of a winged ram made from pure gold that was held by King Aeëtes in Colchis, a kingdom on the eastern coast of the Black Sea. The fleece is central to the tale of Jason and the Argonauts, who set out on a quest to steal the fleece by order of King Pelias.

56 “__ Only Just Begun”: Carpenters hit : WE’VE

The Carpenters’ hit “We’ve Only Just Begun” started out as music for a wedding-themed TV commercial for a bank. Richard Carpenter saw the commercial in 1970, and made arrangements for the Carpenters to record a complete version of “We’ve Only Just Begun” later that year.

The Carpenters were a musical duo comprising brother and sister Richard and Karen Carpenter. Karen had an amazing contralto voice, and played the drums. Richard played the piano, and composed and arranged most of their music. Tragically, Karen Carpenter died in 1983 due to heart failure brought on by an eating disorder. She was only 32 years old.

58 Prefix with bar or car : MINI-

The original mini was a fabulous car, one that I drove all over Ireland in my youth. It had a unique front-wheel-drive layout that took up very little space, allowing for a lot of room (relatively speaking) for passengers and baggage. One space-saving trick was to mount the engine transversely, so it sits rotated 90 degrees from the norm. That engine had a capacity of only 848cc. In 1961, a Mini Cooper model was introduced, which was a sporty version. The Mini Cooper was a phenomenal hit, especially after repeated wins in the Monte Carlo Rally. The Mini marque has been owned by BMW since 1994.

60 They’re above the abs : PECS

“Pecs” is the familiar name for the chest muscle, which is more correctly known as the pectoralis major muscle. “Pectus” is the Latin word for “breast, chest”.

62 Post-op stop : ICU

Intensive care unit (ICU)

63 Dove’s call : COO

Taxonomically, doves and pigeons are the only members of the order Columbidae. The terms “dove” and “pigeon” are often used interchangeably. Scientifically speaking, dove species tend to be smaller than pigeon species. Colloquially though, many refer to doves as the white or nearly white species in the family.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Thumb one’s nose (at) : SCOFF
6 Type of lamp with a volcanic name : LAVA
10 Magazine for docs : JAMA
14 Linney of “Ozark” : LAURA
15 Sign above a door : EXIT
16 Bullfight shouts : OLES
17 *The “bush” type is the largest living land animal : AFRICAN ELEPHANT
20 “For sure!” : YES!
21 Tots’ sport with bases : T-BALL
22 Listless feeling : ENNUI
23 Fa-la link : SOL
24 Eve’s second son : ABEL
26 *Dorothy’s female caretaker : AUNTIE EM
31 Majors in golf and tennis? : OPENS
34 __ as a peacock : PROUD
35 Self-centered : VAIN
37 __ slaw : COLE
39 Teen anti-DWI gp. : SADD
40 “Ghost Hunters” channel suggested by the answers to starred clues : A AND E
41 “Sadly … ” : ALAS …
42 Big name in cosmetics : OLAY
43 Really excited about : INTO
44 Ear-to-ear smiles : GRINS
45 It’s taken by a witness, with “the” : … STAND
47 *Sasha Fierce, for Beyoncé : ALTER EGO
49 Narc’s coup : BUST
51 Binary digit : ONE
52 Cast a spell on : CHARM
55 Up and about : AWAKE
58 Waze display : MAP
61 *Cardio workout : AEROBIC EXERCISE
64 Baltic capital : RIGA
65 Coastal recess : COVE
66 Greek column type : IONIC
67 Poke : PROD
68 Not new : USED
69 Salon dos : COIFS

Down

1 Leave rolling in the aisles : SLAY
2 Barista employer : CAFE
3 Shared between us : OURS
4 “TGIF!” time: Abbr. : FRI
5 Piece of trivia : FACTOID
6 Dunham of “Girls” : LENA
7 Ice skating feat : AXEL
8 Fancy residence : VILLA
9 Enjoyed the buffet : ATE
10 “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” author : JOHN LE CARRE
11 The first “A” in A.A. Milne : ALAN
12 List of options : MENU
13 Italian wine hub : ASTI
18 Start of a classic palindrome : ABLE
19 Tiny bird call : PEEP
23 Emulate an American attending the Sorbonne, say : STUDY ABROAD
25 Humerus, for one : BONE
26 Lhasa __: small dog : APSO
27 Eurasian border range : URALS
28 Greet silently : NOD AT
29 “Dear __ Hansen”: 2017 Best Musical : EVAN
30 Ray of the tropics : MANTA
32 “It’s the truth!” : NO LIE!
33 Urban Dictionary focus : SLANG
36 Pop star : IDOL
38 Canadian tank filler : ESSO
40 Gives a hand : AIDS
44 No-name, as a brand : GENERIC
46 Unfeeling : NUMB
48 Drag on a joint : TOKE
50 Food truck fare : TACOS
52 Complain : CARP
53 Designated survivor : HEIR
54 Golden Fleece ship : ARGO
56 “__ Only Just Begun”: Carpenters hit : WE’VE
57 Canceled abruptly : AXED
58 Prefix with bar or car : MINI-
59 “In your dreams!” : AS IF
60 They’re above the abs : PECS
62 Post-op stop : ICU
63 Dove’s call : COO

18 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 2 Jun 20, Tuesday”

  1. 4:48, 1 error. Tried a different way of doing this, didn’t quite work as hot.

    Random topic for discussion: Do you know anyone in your life (not online/in person) that’s into doing crosswords?

    1. @Glenn. Yes. One regularly, 1 or 2 occasionally. Over 60 all. But then . . . Don’t have a lot of younger friends.

  2. 7:29, no errors.

    Re @Chris C’s comment: Curiously, here in Colorado, I was reminded yesterday that I have to call my doctor and reschedule an appointment that was cancelled a month ago due to the pandemic. They’re still only doing “virtual” visits, though. The last one of those (with another doctor) did not go smoothly, due to technical problems. Strange times … 😳.

  3. @ Glen, yes but not like me. I’m alittle ocd with the puzzle, everyday. Today was a fun easy puzzle, good way to start the day. Keep washing those hands y’all. This is really getting on my nerves. 5 months + already. Ugh!

  4. Nice puzzle. Also Alec Guinness Played George Smiley in BBC production. I think he was equally as good as Oldman but the movie had a stronger supporting cast, imho
    Stay safe everyone!

  5. Easy puzzle, easier than yesterday. Only words I didn’t know after finishing were EVAN and MANTA.

    In NYS, doctors are open. Saw my dermatologist yesterday and had a haircut! Dentist next week. Now what I need is my gym.

    We had a peaceful demo in Utica. Cops joined them.

  6. Not much creativity with this puzzle. Abel and able in the same grid…. geez. One, coo, and ate are snoozers. – – – – slaw? Boring. Urals, ESSO and alas in for the millionth time. This puzzle suffered from an overwhelming sense of ENNUI!

  7. 3:35 no errors…just kidding, I always wanted to say something like that.
    Actual time 17:35 no errors.
    Stay safe y’all .

  8. Gentle puzzle with straightforward clues, just what I needed today. I grew up watching my mother and aunt do crossword puzzles every morning, then my first roommate, but the puzzles always escaped me until first first success 9 years ago (it’s taped to the wall in my office). I do the Jumble, Sudoku a xword everyday to get the juices flowing.

    Here in San Jose, we have curfew, 8:300pm-5am. I despair that we are much too tribal to ever get away from racism, at least in my lifetime, and I had such hope with the Civil Rights Act.

  9. 9 minutes, 40 seconds, no errors. And once again, a little typo hid from me at the end, adding a couple of minutes of proofing to find why I didn’t get the completed message.

  10. Not much competition from us; 3 errors. Missed OLAY and NODAT as a result.

    Still enjoyed it.

    Glenn, my son-in-law is very good at puzzles and he does our Saturday LAT’s.
    Glad to see your comments again.

    Stay safe, all and yes, wash those hands. The virus has taken a backseat to
    the violence for now. Kinda poetic there.

  11. Tim Croce’s latest: 4:14:48 (total elapsed time, including walk-aways), no errors. Filled with things that stretched my educated-guessing ability almost to the breaking point, but, when I filled in the final square, I was pretty sure of everything. I then spent some time researching some of the answers drawn from way outside of my experience and I came up with one that I could not explain. (I’ll have to ask Croce about that one … 🤨.)

  12. Aloha!!🦆

    Agree with you, Jane- easier than Monday. No errors. LAURA Linney is indeed excellent in Ozark.

    I LIKE when puzzles have twin words like ABEL and ABLE! Even better when they cross! 🤗

    Glenn, I have two friends who do the LAX puzzle, one daily and one frequently.

    I could hear the demonstrations being dispersed this evening, down Sunset Boulevard. Relatively peaceful in Hollywood compared to the late-hour chaos in Santa Monica over the weekend.

    Be well~~🎵

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