LA Times Crossword 21 Jun 20, Sunday

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Constructed by: C.C. Burnikel
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Back to Basics

Themed answers each include the letter sequence ABC, rendered BACKWARDS, and hidden inside:

  • 114D Basics appearing in reverse in eight puzzle answers : ABCS
  • 23 “Match Game” host : ALEC BALDWIN
  • 29 The mariachi’s guitarrón is one : ACOUSTIC BASS
  • 45 Whole Foods fruit : ORGANIC BANANAS
  • 66 Pollution concerns : PLASTIC BAGS
  • 72 Stretchable loop : ELASTIC BAND
  • 92 Widespread adverse reaction, as to a new policy : PUBLIC BACKLASH
  • 108 Item in Manet’s “Luncheon on the Grass” : PICNIC BASKET
  • 118 Pungent deli choice : GARLIC BAGEL

Bill’s time: 13m 28s

Bill’s errors: 2

  • TAG END (rag end)
  • RATT (Ratr)

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 “True Detective,” e.g. : DRAMA

“True Detective” is a crime drama made by HBO that has an interesting format. Each series has its own narrative and cast. The show seems to be attracting some great actors. The first season was led by Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson, and the second by Colin Farrell and Rachel McAdams.

6 Worshippers of the sun god Inti : INCAS

Inti was the sun god worshiped by the Incas. Images depicting Inti are featured on the national flags of several nations, including Argentina and Uruguay.

11 Chinese smartphone brand : OPPO

Oppo is a Chinese manufacturer of consumer electronics that is best known for its smartphones. In recent years, Oppo has been regularly ranked as the leading smartphone supplier in China.

15 Organization with an ElderWatch program : AARP

AARP’s Elderwatch program is designed to help older consumers avoid financial exploitation.

19 Dollar, to Enterprise : RIVAL

Enterprise Rent-A-Car was established in 1957 by Jack. C. Taylor in St. Louis, Missouri, where the company is still headquartered today. The company was originally called Executive Leasing Company. The name was changed in 1962 in honor of the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise, on which Taylor served during WWII.

Dollar Rent A Car was founded in 1965. Chrysler acquired the company in 1990 and merged it with Thrifty Car Rental, which Chrysler had purchased a year earlier.

20 Snookums : DEARY

The term of endearment “snookums” comes from the family name “Snooks”. Snooks was a name used in Britain in the 1800s for some hypothetical, unknown individual (as we would use the name “Joe Blow” today).

23 “Match Game” host : ALEC BALDWIN

“Match Game” is a television game show that had many incarnations. The original run was from 1962 until 1969, and it came back in varying formats several times after that. The best-known host of the show was Gene Rayburn. The most recent is Alec Baldwin, starting in 2016.

25 Arenal Volcano home : COSTA RICA

Arenal Volcano is an active volcano in north-western Costa Rica that last erupted in 1968, when it destroyed the nearby town of Tabacón.

28 Blonde __ : ALE

Blonde ales are a loosely-related group of beers that share a very pale color. I’d guess that the most famous of the genre in North America are Belgian blondes.

29 The mariachi’s guitarrón is one : ACOUSTIC BASS

A guitarrón mexicano is a large guitar that is traditionally played in mariachi bands. “Guitarrón” is Spanish for “big guitar”.

The name “mariachi”, used for a typically Mexican popular band, is said to be a corruption of the French word for “marriage” (i.e. “mariage”). This perhaps dates back to the times of Napoleon II when France had political and cultural influence over Spain.

31 Settled on a papasan, say : SAT

A papasan chair is a bowl-shaped chair lined with a removable, stuffed cushion. A traditional piece of furniture from the Philippines and Japan, the papasan chair became popular in the US when service members brought them home after serving in the Pacific in WWII. A double-seated version was introduced in the 1950s, and is known as a mamasan chair.

33 Senegalese-American actress __ Rae : ISSA

Issa Rae is a Stanford University graduate who created a YouTube web series called “The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl”. Rae also plays the title role in the series, a young lady named “J”. “Awkward Black Girl” was adapted into an HBO comedy-drama called “Insecure”, in which Issa Rae stars.

39 Taste in kombu kelp : UMAMI

Umami is one of the five basic tastes, along with sweet, sour, bitter and salty. “Umami” is a Japanese word used to describe “a pleasant savory taste”. Umami was proposed as a basic taste in 1908, but it wasn’t until 1985 that the scientific community finally accepted it as such.

Kombu is an edible kelp that is used in East Asian cuisine, especially in Japanese dishes.

42 Team to play in SoFi Stadium : LA RAMS

SoFi Stadium is an arena that is under construction in Inglewood, California just a few miles from Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). It is destined to be the home of two NFL teams: the LA Rams and the LA Chargers.

45 Whole Foods fruit : ORGANIC BANANAS

The first Whole Foods Market was opened in 1980 by John Mackey and partners in Austin, Texas. For the two years prior to the Whole Foods launch, Mackay was operating his natural foods store that he called “Saferway”, as opposed to “Safeway”. Clever name …

53 Sarge’s boss : LOOIE

A “looie” (lieutenant) has a higher rank than a “noncom” (noncommissioned officer) such as a “sarge” (sergeant).

55 Preliminary race : HEAT

The term “heat”, meaning “qualifying race”, dates back to the 1660s. Originally, a heat was a run given to a horse to prepare it for a race, to “heat” it up.

58 Hungarian town known for its baroque buildings : EGER

Eger is a city in the northeast of Hungary that is noted for its thermal baths and for its wine production. Back in Ireland, I would quite often drink “Bull’s Blood”, which is Hungary’s most famous red wine, and which comes from the Eger wine region.

60 Code creator : MORSE

Samuel Morse was a very accomplished and reputable painter (he was engaged to paint a portrait of President John Adams, for example). In 1825 Morse was in Washington working on a commissioned painting when he received a one-line letter by horse-messenger telling him that his wife was ill. He left immediately for his home in New Haven, Connecticut but by the time that Morse arrived his wife had already died and had been buried. This single event spurred him to move from painting to the development of a rapid means of long distance communication, leading to the single-wire telegraph and Morse code.

63 Actress Vardalos : NIA

Not only is the delightful Nia Vardalos the star of the 2002 hit movie “My Big Fat Greek Wedding”, she also wrote the screenplay. The film never made it to number one at the box office, but it still pulled in more money than any other movie in history that didn’t make it to number one. That record I think reflects the fact that the film wasn’t a blockbuster but rather a so-called “sleeper hit”, a movie that people went to see based on referrals from friends. The big fat mistake came when a spin-off TV show was launched, “My Big Fat Greek Life”. It ran for only 7 episodes. “My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2” hit movie theaters in 2016.

68 Cause of goosebumps, maybe : FEAR

The terms “goose bumps” and “goose flesh” come from the fact that skin which is cold can look like the flesh of a plucked goose.

71 Chip dip, casually : GUAC

Guacamole is one of my favorite dishes. It is prepared by mashing avocados and perhaps adding the likes of tomato, onion and lime juice. The guacamole recipe dates back as early as the 16th century, to the time of the Aztecs. “Guacamole” translates as “avocado sauce”.

80 Bygone space station : MIR

Russia’s Mir space station was a remarkably successful project. It held the record for the longest continuous human presence in space at just under 10 years, until the International Space Station eclipsed that record in 2010. Towards the end of the space station’s life however, the years began to take their toll. There was a dangerous fire, multiple system failures, and a collision with a resupply ship. The Russian commitment to the International Space Station drained funds for repairs, so Mir was allowed to reenter the Earth’s atmosphere and burn up in 2001. “Mir” is a Russian word meaning “peace” or “world”.

82 Wealthy heir : SCION

“Scion” comes from the old French word “sion” or “cion”, meaning “a shoot or a twig”. In botanical terms today, a scion is used in grafting two compatible plants together. In grafting, one plant is selected for its root system (the “rootstock”), and the other plant is selected for its stems, leaves and fruit (the “scion”). The term scion migrated naturally into the world of family history. A scion is simply a descendant, a son or a daughter and therefore a branching point in the family tree.

84 Mötley __ : CRUE

Mötley Crüe is an American rock band from Los Angeles. They’ve been around since 1981, co-founded by the famous drummer Tommy Lee. Tommy Lee is also known for his two celebrated marriages, the first with Heather Locklear and the second with Pamela Anderson. The name “Mötley Crüe” was chosen as someone once described the band members as a “motley looking crew”. The spelling was made to look a little more exotic, with the umlauts added over the “o” and “u” one day, as the band were drinking bottles of “Löwenbräu” beer!

85 Press (down) : TAMP

To tamp is to pack down tightly by tapping. “Tamp” was originally used specifically to describe the action of packing down sand or dirt around an explosive prior to detonation.

87 Paleo __ : DIET

The paleolithic (or “paleo, caveman”) diet is a fad diet that became popular in the 2000s. The idea is to eat wild plants and animals that would have been available to humans during the Paleolithic era (roughly the Stone Age). This period precedes the introduction of agriculture and the domestication of animals. As a result, someone on the diet avoids consuming grains, legumes, dairy and processed foods. The diet consists mainly of lean meat (about 45-65% of the total calorie intake), non-starchy vegetables, fruits, berries and nuts.

88 Classic Ford, familiarly : ‘STANG

The Ford Mustang car was introduced in 1964. Back then the Mustang wasn’t a brand new design, but was based on the Ford Falcon. The Mustang was the first of the “pony cars”, American models that are compact and affordable, as well as sporty in image and performance.

89 Stuffs to the gills : SATES

“Sate” is a variant of the older word “satiate”. Both terms can mean either to satisfy an appetite fully, or to eat to excess.

95 Off the mark : ERRANT

Someone described as errant is roving around, especially in search of adventure, as in “knight-errant”.The term “errant” has come to mean “behaving wrongly” and “straying outside the bounds”.

98 Major artery : AORTA

The aorta originates in the heart and extends down into the abdomen. It is the largest artery in the body.

100 Iris rings : AREOLAS

An areola (sometimes “areole”) in anatomy is a small ring of color, as in the areola surrounding the nipple, and the areola surrounding the pupil of the eye. “Areola” (plural “areolae”) comes from Latin, meaning “small open space”, and is a diminutive of the Latin word “area”, meaning “open space”.

The iris is the colored part of the eye. It has an aperture in the center that can open or close depending on the level of light hitting the eye.

103 Beyoncé, to the BeyHive : IDOL

Beyoncé Knowles established herself in the entertainment industry as the lead singer with the R&B group Destiny’s Child. She launched her solo singing career in 2003, two years after making her first appearance as an actor. In 2006 she played the lead in the very successful movie adaptation of the Broadway musical “Dreamgirls”. Beyoncé is married to rap star Jay-Z. She is also referred to affectionately as “Queen Bey”, a play on the phrase “the queen bee”. Her fan base goes by the name “Beyhive”.

108 Item in Manet’s “Luncheon on the Grass” : PICNIC BASKET

“Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe” (The Luncheon on the Grass) is a famous painting that Édouard Manet created between 1862 and 1863. The work features a naked woman sitting with two fully-clothed men, with a partially clothed woman in the background. Many find the image jarring, as the female nude stares at the viewer, while the two men converse, apparently ignoring the naked females in their midst. The original painting can be seen in the Musée d’Orsay in Paris.

Édouard Manet was a French painter whose works are mainly classified as Realist. Manet was friends with Impressionists masters like Edgar Degas, Claude Monet and Pierre-Auguste Renoir and greatly influenced the Impressionist movement. The list of Manet’s marvelous paintings includes “Le Déjeuner sur l’Herbe”, “Le Repose” and “A Bar at the Folies-Bergère”.

113 Hamm from Alabama : MIA

Mia Hamm is a retired American soccer player. She played as a forward on the US national team that won the FIFA Women’s World Cup in 1991. Hamm scored 158 international goals, which was more than any other player in the world, male or female, until the record was broken in 2013. Amazingly, Hamm was born with a clubfoot, and so had to wear corrective shoes when she was growing up.

115 Black widow’s creation : WEB

“Widow spider” is a common name given to several species of spider in the genus Latrodectus. The name comes from the reported behavior of the female eating the male after the pair have mated. The female wins the battle with the male largely because the female’s venom is three-times as potent as that of the male. The most notorious widow spider is the “black widow”. The female black widow’s venom glands are unusually large and the bite can be quite harmful to humans.

123 Thickener in Asian desserts : AGAR

Agar (also “agar-agar”) is a jelly extracted from seaweed that has many uses. Agar is found in Japanese desserts, and can also be used as a food thickener or even as a laxative. In the world of science, it is the most common medium used for growing bacteria in Petri dishes.

125 Beckoning elision : C’MERE

“Elision” is a linguistic term describing the omission of a sound or sounds in a word or phrase. Examples of elisions are found in “bo’s’n”, “Will-o’-the-wisp” and “‘Enry” (Eliza Dolittle’s “Henry”).

126 “Watermark” musician : ENYA

Enya’s real name is Eithne Ní Bhraonáin, which can translate from Irish into Enya Brennan. Her Donegal family (in the northwest of Ireland) formed a band called Clannad, which included Enya. In 1980 Enya launched her very successful solo career, eventually becoming Ireland’s best-selling solo musician. And, she sure does turn up a lot in crosswords!

127 Parks in American history : ROSA

Rosa Parks was one of a few brave women in days gone by who refused to give up their seats on a bus to white women. It was the stand taken by Rosa Parks on December 1, 1955 that sparked the Montgomery, Alabama Bus Boycott. President Clinton presented Ms. Parks with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1996. When she died in 2005, Rosa Parks became the first ever woman to have her body lie in honor in the US Capitol Rotunda.

Down

3 Minnesota-based cosmetics company : AVEDA

Horst Rechelbacher was travelling in India in 1970 when he was introduced to the Hindu science of longevity called Ayurveda, which inspired him to set up his own company of skin and hair care products that he called Aveda. The company opened its doors in 1978 and is based in Blaine, Minnesota.

4 Big __ : MAC

The iconic Big Mac sandwich was introduced nationally by McDonald’s in 1967. It was the creation of a Pittsburgh franchisee who offered it on the menu as a response to the very similar “Big Boy” sandwich offered by the competing Big Boy restaurant chain.

5 The Honest Company co-founder Jessica : ALBA

Actress Jessica Alba got her big break when she was cast in the Fox science fiction show “Dark Angel”. Alba had a tough life growing up as she spent a lot of time in hospital and so found it difficult to develop friendships. As a youngster she twice had a collapsed lung, frequently caught pneumonia, suffered from asthma, had a ruptured appendix and a tonsillar cyst. On top of all that, Alba acknowledges that she suffered from obsessive-compulsive disorder as a child.

The Honest Company is a retailer that specializes in supplying products that are exceptionally safe and eco-friendly. The enterprise was founded in 2011 by actress Jessica Alba, who “created The Honest Company because you shouldn’t have to choose between what works and what’s good for you.”

6 Lollygags : IDLES

To lollygag (also “lallygag”) is to dawdle, to dally.

7 “Game of Thrones” patriarch Stark : NED

Ned Stark is the protagonist in George R. R. Martin’s fantasy novel “A Game of Thrones”, although his character doesn’t exactly come out on top by the end of the story. Stark is played by actor Sean Bean in the HBO television adaptation of the novel.

8 Cornfield cry : CAW!

Ravens and crows are very similar species, and it can be difficult to tell them apart. Ravens are a little larger and often travel in pairs, whereas crows are a little smaller are are usually seen in larger groups. Crows make a cawing sound, while the raven’s call is more like a croak.

9 Diva’s time to shine : ARIA

The term “diva” comes to us from Latin via Italian. “Diva” is the feminine form of “divus” meaning “divine one”. The word is used in Italy to mean “goddess” or “fine lady”, and especially is applied to the prima donna in an opera. We often use the term to describe a singer with a big ego.

14 Kia sedan : OPTIMA

The Kia Optima was sold for a while in Canada and Europe as the Kia Magentis.

15 Bus stopper : AIR BRAKE

Automobiles tend to use hydraulic brakes, a system in which hydraulic fluid transfers pressure from the brake pedal to the brake shoes. Heavy vehicles, like trucks and buses, typically use air brakes, a system in which the braking pressure is transferred by compressed air.

16 Iraq is about 1% of it : ASIA

The largest countries in Asia by land area are:

  1. Russia
  2. China
  3. India
  4. Kazakhstan
  5. Saudi Arabia

17 Suggestions, for short : RECS

Recommendation (rec.)

18 Samosa veggies : PEAS

A samosa is quite a tasty appetizer. It is usually a triangular-shaped savory that often has a vegetarian filling. The word “samosa” is primarily used on Indian menus, and the name comes from “sanbosag”, the name for the dish in Persia.

24 Excuse in court : ALIBI

“Alibi” is the Latin word for “elsewhere” as in, “I claim that I was ‘elsewhere’ when the crime was committed … I have an ‘alibi’”.

26 Taiwanese laptops : ACERS

Acer is a Taiwanese company that I visited a couple of times when I was in the electronics business. I was very impressed back then with the company’s dedication to quality, although I have heard that things haven’t gone so well in recent years …

30 Father of Thor : ODIN

In Norse mythology, Thor was the son of Odin. Thor wielded a mighty hammer and was the god of thunder, lightning and storms. Our contemporary word “Thursday” comes from “Thor’s Day”.

32 Office newbies : TRAINEES

In Norse mythology, Odin was the chief of the gods. He is usually depicted as having one eye, reflecting the story of how he gave one of his eyes in exchange for wisdom.

34 Legacy creator : SUBARU

Japanese automaker Subaru has been producing the Legacy midsize car since 1989. It is sold as the Liberty in Australia. The alternative name was chosen as the term “Legacy” is closely associated with Legacy Australia, a charity looking after families of soldiers killed in action. Many of those soldiers died fighting Japanese forces during WWII.

38 Number of Scrabble X-tiles : ONE

The game of Scrabble has been produced in many international versions, and each of these editions has its own tile distribution to suit the local language. For example, in English we have two tiles worth ten points: one “Q” and one “Z”. If you play the game in French then there are five tiles worth ten points: one “K”, one “W”, one “X”, one “Y” and one “Z”.

41 Star Wars Day month : MAY

The Force is a metaphysical power much cited in all of the “Star Wars” movies. We may even hear someone in real life say “May the Force be with you”. Fans of the movie franchise even celebrate May 4th every year as Star Wars Day, using the pun “May the 4th be with you”!

43 805-year-old document : MAGNA CARTA

The Magna Carta is a landmark document issued in England in 1215. It represents the first time that an English king had to submit to the will of his subjects, a group of barons who sought to limit the powers of the monarchy. In particular the Magna Carta calls out that no freeman could be punished except through the law of the land. And famously, the Magna Carta was an inspiration for the United States Constitution.

44 “Shrek!” author William : STEIG

Before “Shrek” was a successful movie franchise and Broadway musical, it was a children’s picture book called “Shrek!” that was authored and illustrated by William Steig. The title “Shrek!” came from the German/Yiddish word Schreck, meaning “fear” or “terror”.

45 Paella pot : OLLA

An olla is a traditional clay pot used for the making of stews. “Olla” was the Latin word used in ancient Rome to describe a similar type of pot.

Paella is sometimes referred to as the Spanish national dish, but not by Spaniards. In Spain, paella is regarded as a typical regional dish from Valencia.

46 Place for solar panels : ROOF

Solar panels are arrays of solar cells that make use of what’s known as the photovoltaic effect. We are more likely to have learned about the photoelectric effect in school, in which electrons were ejected from the surface of some materials when it was exposed to light or other forms of radiation. The photovoltaic effect is related but different. Instead of being electrons ejected from the surface, in the photovoltaic effect electrons move around in the material creating a difference in voltage.

47 Billy’s caretaker : GOAT FARMER

Male goats are bucks or billies, although castrated males are known as wethers. Female goats are does or nannies, and young goats are referred to as kids.

48 High-fashion shoemaker Jimmy : CHOO

Jimmy Choo is a designer of handmade women’s shoes who was born in Malaysia but grew up and was educated in London. Choo sold the 50% stake that he had in his shoe manufacturing company in 2001, for 10 million pounds.

56 Winter hrs. in Halifax : AST

Atlantic Standard Time (AST) is four hours behind Greenwich Mean Time and one hour ahead of Eastern Standard Time. The list of locations that use AST includes Puerto Rico, Bermuda and the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia.

Halifax is the capital of the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. The original Canadian Town of Halifax was established in 1749 and was named for the British Earl of Halifax. The Earl of Halifax peerage was named for the town in West Yorkshire in the North of England.

57 “Lip Sync Battle” commentator Chrissy : TEIGEN

Chrissy Tiegen is a model who has appeared twice in the “Sports Illustrated” Swimsuit Issue, in 2010 and 2014. She co-hosts the reality TV show “Lip Sync Battle” with rap artist LL Cool J. Teigen married singer John Legend in 2013.

60 Numerous : MYRIAD

The term “myriad”, meaning “innumerable”, comes from the Greek “muraid”, meaning “ten thousand”. “Myriad” is one of those words that sparks heated debate about the correct usage in English. “Myriad” can be used both as an adjective and a noun. One can have “a myriad of” engagements around the holidays, for example, or “myriad” engagements around those same holidays.

61 A.L. Central team : CLE

The Cleveland baseball franchise started out in 1869 as the Forest Citys, named after Forest City, the nickname for Cleveland. After a number of transitions, in 1914 the team took on the name “Indians”. The media came up with the name “Indians” after being asked for suggestions by the team owners. “Indians” was inspired by the successful Boston team of the day, the Boston Braves.

62 Fish commonly known as a porgy : SCUP

The scup is a saltwater fish that is also known as the porgy. Native to the Atlantic coast of the US, records suggest that the scup was the most readily available catch in colonial times.

65 Band named for a rodent : RATT

Ratt is a heavy metal band based in Los Angeles. Ratt was formed out of a San Diego group called Mickey Ratt. Mickey Ratt was named for an underground comic called “Mickey Rat”, which in turn was named as a parody of Mickey Mouse.

69 Language group including Zulu : BANTU

There are hundreds of Bantu languages, which are mainly spoken in central, east and southern Africa. The most commonly spoken Bantu language is Swahili, with Zulu coming in second.

72 Defib experts : EMTS

A defibrillator (defib) might be operated by an emergency medical technician (EMT).

73 “Big Little Lies” novelist Moriarty : LIANE

Liane Moriarty is an author from Sydney, Australia. Her most famous work is a 2014 novel titled “Big Little Lies”, which was adapted into a very successful TV series starring Reese Witherspoon, Nicole Kidman, Shailene Woodley, Laura Dern, and Zoë Kravitz.

74 Sci-fi film FX : CGI

Computer-generated imagery (CGI)

The abbreviation “FX” stands for “effects”, as in “special effects”. “Special effects” can also be shortened to “SFX”.

76 Mythical mariner : SINBAD

Sinbad is the hero of a set of fictional tales from the Middle East. Sinbad comes from the port city of Basra and had fantastic adventures on voyages throughout the sea east of Africa and south of Asia.

77 Forum wrap : TOGA

In ancient Rome, the classical attire known as a toga (plural “togae” or “togas”) was usually worn over a tunic. The tunic was made from linen, and the toga itself was a piece of cloth about twenty feet long made from wool. The toga could only be worn by men, and only if those men were Roman citizens. The female equivalent of the toga was called a “stola”.

The Latin “forum” (plural “fora”) translates as “marketplace, town square”. “The Roman Forum” is the most famous example of such a space. The Forum at the heart of the city of Rome is surrounded by the ruins of several ancient government buildings, and has been referred to as the most celebrated meeting place in the world.

79 Meeting, casually : SESH

Session (abbreviated to “sess.” formally, and “sesh” informally)

83 Mojave natives : CACTI

The cactus (plural “cacti”) is a member of a family plants that are particularly well-adapted to extremely dry environments. Almost all cacti are native to the Americas, although some succulent plants from the old world are similar in appearance and are often mislabeled as “cacti”.

The Mojave Desert in the southwest is named after the Native-American Mojave tribe. Famous locations within the boundaries of the desert are Death Valley, Las Vegas, Nevada and the ghost town of Calico, California.

86 “Knowing all the facts”: Woody Allen : PARANOIA

Allan Stewart Konigsberg changed his legal name to “Heywood Allen” when he was 17 years old, and soon after started to call himself “Woody Allen”, the name with which he achieved celebrity. Allen won four Academy Awards, three for Best Original Screenplay and one for Best Director. He has more Oscar nominations as a screenwriter than any other writer, but he spurns the Awards ceremony and only attended it once in all his years in the movie business. He broke tradition by turning up at the 2002 ceremony, unannounced, to beg producers to continue filming in his beloved New York City despite the fears created by the 9/11 attacks.

91 “Grant County” crime novelist Slaughter : KARIN

Karin Slaughter is an American author of crime fiction. She has two successful series of novels: the “Grant County” series, and the “Will Trent” series.

93 Lie in the sun : BASK

Our verb “to bask”, meaning “to expose one to pleasant warmth”, is derived from the gruesome, 14th-century term “basken”, meaning “to wallow in blood”. The contemporary usage apparently originated with Shakespeare, who employed “bask” with reference to sunshine in “As You Like It”.

94 Baby’s ailment : COLIC

Baby colic is a condition in which a baby cries for no apparent reason and for extended periods. At least one study has shown that breastfed babies are about half as likely to suffer from colic.

96 Hummingbird food : NECTAR

Hummingbirds are the smallest of all the birds. The bee hummingbird is native to Cuba and weighs less than a tenth of an ounce and is about two inches in length!

97 Island near Trinidad : TOBAGO

Trinidad and Tobago is a republic in the southern Caribbean that largely comprises the two main islands of Trinidad and Tobago. Something related to Trinidad is Trinidadian.

101 “__ Theme”: “Doctor Zhivago” tune : LARA’S

The very lovely “Lara’s Theme” is a leitmotif written by Maurice Jarre for the 1965 movie “Doctor Zhivago”. Lara is the name of the character played by the wonderful Julie Christie. The theme was later incorporated into a hit song with the title “Somewhere My Love”.

“Doctor Zhivago” is an epic novel by Boris Pasternak that was first published in 1957. I haven’t tried to read the book, but the 1965 film version is a must-see, directed by David Lean and starring Omar Sharif in the title role. The story centers on Yuri Zhivago, a doctor and poet, and how he is affected by the Russian Revolution and the Russian Civil War.

102 Stars, to Cicero : ASTRA

Cicero was a very influential senator in ancient Rome,in part due to his renowned ability to deliver a persuasive speech. His full name was Marcus Tullius Cicero.

107 Tractor giant : DEERE

John Deere invented the first commercially successful steel plow in 1837. Prior to Deere’s invention, farmers used an iron or wooden plow that constantly had to be cleaned as rich soil stuck to its surfaces. The cast-steel plow was revolutionary as its smooth sides solved the problem of “stickiness”. The Deere company that John founded uses the slogan “Nothing Runs Like a Deere”, and has a leaping deer as its logo.

112 12 ounces, at Starbucks : TALL

Starbucks introduced us to coffee drinks in a whole range of volumes:

  • Demi … 3 fl oz
  • Short … 8 fl oz
  • Tall … 12 fl oz
  • Grande … 16 fl oz (Italian for “large”)
  • Venti … 20 fl oz (Italian for “twenty”)
  • Trenta … 30 fl oz (Italian for “thirty”)

119 Blini topping : ROE

A blintz (also “blintze” and “blin”, plural “blini”) is a thin pancake similar to a crêpe, although unlike a crêpe, a blintz may contain yeast.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 “True Detective,” e.g. : DRAMA
6 Worshippers of the sun god Inti : INCAS
11 Chinese smartphone brand : OPPO
15 Organization with an ElderWatch program : AARP
19 Dollar, to Enterprise : RIVAL
20 Snookums : DEARY
21 Rice, for one : CROP
22 “That explains it” : I SEE
23 “Match Game” host : ALEC BALDWIN
25 Arenal Volcano home : COSTA RICA
27 Crash site? : BED
28 Blonde __ : ALE
29 The mariachi’s guitarrón is one : ACOUSTIC BASS
31 Settled on a papasan, say : SAT
33 Senegalese-American actress __ Rae : ISSA
36 Idealistic sort : DREAMER
37 Stick up : ROB
39 Taste in kombu kelp : UMAMI
42 Team to play in SoFi Stadium : LA RAMS
45 Whole Foods fruit : ORGANIC BANANAS
51 Do figure eights : SKATE
53 Sarge’s boss : LOOIE
54 Unthinking : HASTY
55 Preliminary race : HEAT
58 Hungarian town known for its baroque buildings : EGER
59 Bank transaction : LOAN
60 Code creator : MORSE
61 Comes to an end : CEASES
63 Actress Vardalos : NIA
64 Polite words while entering : AFTER YOU
66 Pollution concerns : PLASTIC BAGS
68 Cause of goosebumps, maybe : FEAR
69 Called from the flock : BAAED
71 Chip dip, casually : GUAC
72 Stretchable loop : ELASTIC BAND
76 Parents not related by blood : STEPDADS
80 Bygone space station : MIR
81 Last bit : TAG END
82 Wealthy heir : SCION
84 Mötley __ : CRUE
85 Press (down) : TAMP
87 Paleo __ : DIET
88 Classic Ford, familiarly : ‘STANG
89 Stuffs to the gills : SATES
90 Move furtively : SNEAK
92 Widespread adverse reaction, as to a new policy : PUBLIC BACKLASH
95 Off the mark : ERRANT
98 Major artery : AORTA
99 Well resource : OIL
100 Iris rings : AREOLAS
103 Beyoncé, to the BeyHive : IDOL
105 “That’s a shame” : SAD
108 Item in Manet’s “Luncheon on the Grass” : PICNIC BASKET
113 Hamm from Alabama : MIA
115 Black widow’s creation : WEB
117 Savory pastry : ONION TART
118 Pungent deli choice : GARLIC BAGEL
122 Indian flatbread : ROTI
123 Thickener in Asian desserts : AGAR
124 Rub it in : GLOAT
125 Beckoning elision : C’MERE
126 “Watermark” musician : ENYA
127 Parks in American history : ROSA
128 Snow vehicles : SLEDS
129 Moving measurement : SPEED

Down

1 Uninteresting : DRAB
2 Ticks off : RILES
3 Minnesota-based cosmetics company : AVEDA
4 Big __ : MAC
5 The Honest Company co-founder Jessica : ALBA
6 Lollygags : IDLES
7 “Game of Thrones” patriarch Stark : NED
8 Cornfield cry : CAW!
9 Diva’s time to shine : ARIA
10 Good thing for teammates to be in : SYNC
11 Take place : OCCUR
12 Everyday language : PROSE
13 __ Service : POSTAL
14 Kia sedan : OPTIMA
15 Bus stopper : AIR BRAKE
16 Iraq is about 1% of it : ASIA
17 Suggestions, for short : RECS
18 Samosa veggies : PEAS
24 Excuse in court : ALIBI
26 Taiwanese laptops : ACERS
30 Father of Thor : ODIN
32 Office newbies : TRAINEES
34 Legacy creator : SUBARU
35 Stockpile : AMASS
38 Number of Scrabble X-tiles : ONE
40 Initial fee : ANTE
41 Star Wars Day month : MAY
43 805-year-old document : MAGNA CARTA
44 “Shrek!” author William : STEIG
45 Paella pot : OLLA
46 Place for solar panels : ROOF
47 Billy’s caretaker : GOAT FARMER
48 High-fashion shoemaker Jimmy : CHOO
49 Winning : AHEAD
50 They’re often choppy : SEAS
52 Periods of note : ERAS
56 Winter hrs. in Halifax : AST
57 “Lip Sync Battle” commentator Chrissy : TEIGEN
60 Numerous : MYRIAD
61 A.L. Central team : CLE
62 Fish commonly known as a porgy : SCUP
65 Band named for a rodent : RATT
66 Launch site : PAD
67 They might be game changers : BAD CALLS
69 Language group including Zulu : BANTU
70 Furthermore : AND
72 Defib experts : EMTS
73 “Big Little Lies” novelist Moriarty : LIANE
74 Sci-fi film FX : CGI
75 Clown car noise : BEEP
76 Mythical mariner : SINBAD
77 Forum wrap : TOGA
78 Cost of belonging : DUES
79 Meeting, casually : SESH
82 Tend to the sauce : STIR
83 Mojave natives : CACTI
86 “Knowing all the facts”: Woody Allen : PARANOIA
88 __-pitch : SLO
89 Stick in the snow : SKI
91 “Grant County” crime novelist Slaughter : KARIN
93 Lie in the sun : BASK
94 Baby’s ailment : COLIC
96 Hummingbird food : NECTAR
97 Island near Trinidad : TOBAGO
101 “__ Theme”: “Doctor Zhivago” tune : LARA’S
102 Stars, to Cicero : ASTRA
104 Skips : OMITS
106 “Shucks!” : AW GEE!
107 Tractor giant : DEERE
108 Study, with “over” : PORE …
109 Privy to : IN ON
110 __ limits : CITY
111 Breakfast staple : EGGS
112 12 ounces, at Starbucks : TALL
114 Basics appearing in reverse in eight puzzle answers : ABCS
116 Ran : BLED
119 Blini topping : ROE
120 Young chap : LAD
121 Increase, with “up” : AMP …

24 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 21 Jun 20, Sunday”

  1. Had GARLIC Bread before GARLIC BAGEL, pLowS before SLEDS, Add before AMP, ulTIMA before OPTIMA. Probably would’ve filled in 23A with “Gene Rayburn” if I didn’t already have some crossing clues filled in.

  2. 14:11, Natick on 66A-44D (hey, “PLASTIC BANS” could be pollution concerns, just as STEIN could be an author!). But yeah, some generally dodgy cluing on this one, as Bill’s error demonstrated. I know that particular band, but I know the Geico commercial that’s running with them too.

    Other news: knocked down a bunch of Fireballs and a 21×21 BEQ themeless. I see the NYT is another chapter in their 21×21 themeless experiments (too bad those aren’t as wide-open or they’d be more fun) – I’ll get to see how that one goes tomorrow after some sleep. Hard puzzles get fun when you can do them and the clues are factually accurate (one particular constructor in mind for that one), at least until they get too easy (some of that too, sadly). Though I have other goals for the easy grids these days, namely trying to be more efficient at getting them knocked out.

  3. I enjoyed it. This is why I like themed puzzles. Once you figure out the theme it helps you finish off the clues, and ties everything together. So much more interesting and clever than a bunch of random words. CC Burnikel is one of my favorite constructors.

  4. I found this puzzle to be relatively easy. I don’t time myself, but I made it through a little faster than normal. I had the same error as Bill. Never heard of the band Ratt.

      1. I don’t know if it’s just me, but Merriam-Webster always seems to be the reference for iffy clues, arcane usages and “almost-never-used” definitions. I personally don’t consider it a valid source anymore.

  5. Know why your question went unanswered, Nolanski? I’m betting it’s because no one ever heard of it. Anyone care to speculate? (CC, if you’re listening …😏)

    1. I’ve not only heard of it; it was a gimme. (Maybe being 77 and actually paying attention all those years was good for something, after all … 😜.)

  6. I enjoyed the puzzle, even though I had an error where “cacti” and
    “stang” crossed. Couldn’t figure what the constructor was aiming for
    and had an “e” that should have been an “a”. I think if I had been
    paying attention and rechecking my answers, maybe I’d have no
    errors. My bad. I tumbled to “c’mere” fast because I’ve heard it
    and said it a lot.

  7. No final errors. I did trip myself up for awhile by quickly inserting “naan” for what finally got figured out to be “roti” and I wasted too much time trying to fit in some type of warning such as TVMA (but with 5 letters – hence the time wasting) for the 1 Across clue of “True Detectives,” e.g. That’s called outwitting yourself for a dead easy clue and making it more difficult than it needed to be for no good reason.

  8. 34:43 – Palindromic time. Realized theme pretty early. Helped in a spot or two. Remembered Goat HERDER from an earlier puzzle this week and that took some fixing. Also started out with Big SUR. Haven’t had a Big MAC in Elephino (See @Jeff comment on NYT puzzle today). RATT also top of the mind from numerous GEICO commercials per @Glenn.

  9. 19:07 4 errors. It felt like a struggle, even though the theme helped. There were two squares at the top I just couldn’t get, until I discovered I had four squares wrong.

    I’m pretty sure you wouldn’t cook paella in a clay olla, but rather a steel paellera, which resembles a shallow wok.

  10. “Ratt” is a pretty well know band. Hard rock. There’s a funny commercial out now on t.v. The family says their house has a rat problem, the band Ratt is playing a song in the kitchen. Two small spelling errors for me. The theme really helped me with the keys phrases.

    Bob in Erie

  11. I cry most foul! The host of Match Game has always been Gene Rayburn–which fits perfectly in here, even lining up with the “A.” If Baldwin has a new version out I can’t imagine it will last long. The guy’s a creep. To intimate that ANYONE but Gene hosted that show is just terrible. He had it for DECADES. If you absolutely MUST include AB in your grid at all, at LEAST don’t clue him that way. 100% unfair.

    Naturally, I could not even begin to solve the entire NW because of this. I like Burnikel, but this was cruel.

  12. I guessed Rayburn too, but didn’t write it down as I assumed it was too antediluvian for the current crop of puzzlers (Although, hmm… what’s the average age of a LAT Sunday puzzler?). Good puzzle. Stuck with naan, confused pour and pore, and therefore no paranoia, Enya. Couple hours or three.

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