LA Times Crossword 25 Jun 20, Thursday

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Constructed by: Joe Deeney
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer(s): Wide Open

Themed answers include either the letters W-I-D-E OPENED or O-P-E-N arranged WIDELY, so they are shared between the start and finish of the answer:

  • 67A With 64-Across, like a town lacking restrictions … and a hint to 17-, 23- and 32-Across : WIDE (OPEN)
  • 17A Log flume, e.g. : WATER RIDE
  • 23A Connection need at some coffee shops : WIFI CODE
  • 32A Parking ticket holder, perhaps : WIPER BLADE
  • 64A With 67-Across, doctor’s order … and a hint to 40-, 50- and 58-Across : OPEN (WIDE)
  • 40A Cut into : OPERATED ON
  • 50A Late 19th-century smoking establishment : OPIUM DEN
  • 58A Start to turn mushy, maybe : OVERRIPEN

Bill’s time: 7m 00s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Text : PING

In the world of computer science, a “ping” is a test message sent over a network between computers to check for a response and to measure the time of that response. We now use the verb “to ping” more generally, meaning to send someone a message, usually a reminder.

5 Nutmeg spice : MACE

The fruit of the nutmeg tree yields two very different spices. What we call “nutmeg” comes from the seed of the tree. “Mace” is the dried covering of the seed.

9 Newton trio : LAWS

Sir Isaac Newton’s three laws of motion are the basis of classical mechanics. The three laws define the relationship between a body and the forces acting on that body, and its resulting motion.

13 Bahrain bigwig : EMIR

Bahrain is an island nation located off the coast of Saudi Arabia in the Persian Gulf. Bahrain is connected to Saudi Arabia by a series of causeways and bridges that were constructed in the eighties.

14 Norse god : ODIN

In Norse mythology, Odin was the chief of the gods. He is usually depicted as having one eye, reflecting the story of how he gave one of his eyes in exchange for wisdom.

15 Out of the wind : ALEE

Alee is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing aweather.

16 Fur wrap : STOLE

A stole is a narrow shawl. It can be made of quite light decorative material, but also can be heavier if made of fur.

17 Log flume, e.g. : WATER RIDE

A flume is a water-filled, man-made channel that sits above ground and is used for transportation. The water flows due to the flume’s downward slope. Most commonly, flumes are built to transport logs and lumber. Traditional log flumes were operated by flume herders, people stationed along the course of the flume to ensure that water and lumber moved freely. The more daring flume herders would ride along the flume in small boats, a practice that led to our contemporary log flume rides in theme parks.

19 Husky hello : ARF!

The Siberian Husky is one of the oldest breeds of dog, and originated in northern Asia. Siberian Huskies were imported into Alaska in great numbers in the early 1900s for use as sled dogs during the gold rush.

20 Whitman’s “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d,” e.g. : ELEGY

Walt Whitman wrote his famous poem “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d” as an elegy following the violent death of President Lincoln.

23 Connection need at some coffee shops : WI-FI CODE

“Wi-Fi” is nothing more than a trademark, a trademark registered by an association of manufacturers of equipment that use wireless LAN (Local Area Network) technology. A device labeled with “Wi-Fi” has to meet certain defined technical standards, basically meaning that the devices can talk to each other. The name “Wi-Fi” suggests “Wireless Fidelity”, although apparently the term was never intended to mean anything at all.

25 Classic 1953 western : SHANE

The classic 1953 western movie “Shane” is based on the novel of the same name by Jack Schaefer published in 1949. Heading the cast is Alan Ladd in the title role, alongside Jean Arthur and Van Heflin.

27 Telluride automaker : KIA

The Kia Telluride is a mid-size SUV that was launched in 2019. It is named for the Colorado town of Telluride, and is the largest vehicle that Kia ever made for the US market.

30 “Avatar” actress Saldana : ZOE

American actress Zoë Saldana played the Na’vi princess in “Avatar”, and Uhura in the 2009 movie “Star Trek” (and sequels). Saldana seems to pick the right movies, as she is the only actress to have three different films in the top twenty at the box office for three consecutive weeks (“Avatar”, “The Losers” and “Death at a Funeral”).

2009’s epic “Avatar” is a science fiction film from James Cameron, who was the director, writer and producer. It was an expensive movie to make and to promote, but was destined to become the highest-grossing film in the history of cinema. 20th Century Fox made a deal with Cameron to produce four “Avatar” sequels.

32 Parking ticket holder, perhaps : WIPER BLADE

You may have seen the 2008 movie “Flash of Genius”, which outlined the troubles Robert Kearns (played by Greg Kinnear) had in making money from his invention of the intermittent windshield wiper. Well, Mary Anderson developed the original wiper and received a patent in 1903. She didn’t make any money either …

36 Iraqi money : DINAR

The dinar is the official currency in many countries, such as Iraq, Tunisia and Serbia. The gold dinar dates back to the early days of Islam, with the name deriving from the Roman currency called “denarius” meaning “ten times” (as it was originally a coin worth ten asses).

38 Cricket club : BAT

Cricket is the national game of England. The term “cricket” apparently comes from the Old French word “criquet” meaning “goalpost, stick”.

39 That’s a wrap! : SARAN

What’s known as plastic wrap in America, we call cling-film in Ireland. The brand name “Saran” is often used generically in the US, while “Glad” wrap is common down under. Plastic wrap was one of those unintended inventions, a byproduct of a development program to create a hard plastic cover for cars.

43 “The Last Jedi” heroine : REY

Rey is a central character in the “Star Wars” universe. She first appeared in 2015’s “Star Wars: The Force Awakens”. Rey is played by British actress Daisy Ridley.

“Star Wars: The Last Jedi” is a 2017 movie from the “Star Wars” film franchise, and the second installment of the “Star Wars” sequel trilogy. The title character is Luke Skywalker, played by Mark Hamill. Ah, but is Luke in fact the “last Jedi”?

44 Cholesterol letters : HDL

HDL (high-density lipoprotein) is a compound that is used to transport fats around the body. When HDL is combined with (i.e. is transporting) cholesterol, it is often called “good cholesterol”. This is because HDL seems to remove cholesterol from where it should not be, say on the walls of arteries, and transports it to the liver for reuse or disposal. Important stuff …

46 Alias letters : AKA

Also known as (aka)

48 Like proofed dough : RISEN

When baking, proofing (also “proving”) is the resting of a dough made with yeast, allowing it to rise prior to baking.

50 Late 19th-century smoking establishment : OPIUM DEN

The opium poppy produces a latex that can be dried, producing the drug known as opium. The drug has been used since ancient times, and was usually absorbed by smoking it. The latex contains several alkaloids that have a profound effect on human metabolism, including morphine and codeine. Opium’s morphine is particularly significant for the illegal drug trade. The morphine can be extracted from the opium and converted to heroin.

56 Nearly boil : SCALD

In cooking, scalding a liquid is bringing it to just below the boiling point.

57 Wt. units : OZS

The unit of mass that we know today as a pound is descended from the old Roman unit of weight known as a “libra”. That “libra” connection is why we abbreviate “pound” to “lb”. The name “pound” comes from the Latin “pondo” meaning “weight”. Our term “ounce” (abbreviated to “oz.”) comes from the Latin “uncia”, which was 1/12 of a Roman “libra”.

62 Part of CPA: Abbr. : CERT

Certified public accountant (CPA)

65 Olympus neighbor : OSSA

Mount Ossa in Greece is located between Mount Pelion in the south, and the famed Mount Olympus in the north. Mount Ossa is also known as Kissavos.

Mount Olympus is the highest peak in Greece. In Greek mythology, Mount Olympus was home to the gods, and in particular home to the principal gods known as the Twelve Olympians.

66 Sicilian volcano : ETNA

Mount Etna on the island of Sicily is the largest of three active volcanoes in Italy, and indeed the largest of all active volcanoes in Europe. Etna is about 2 1/2 times the height of its equally famous sister, Mt. Vesuvius. Mt. Etna is home to a 110-km long narrow-gauge railway, and two ski resorts. It is sometimes referred to as “Mongibello” in Italian, and as “Mungibeddu” in Sicilian. The English name “Etna” comes from the Greek “aitho” meaning “I eat”.

In the Italian Peninsula in Southern Europe, the “boot” is the mainland of Italy, and the “ball” being kicked by the boot is the island of Sicily.

Down

1 Lab glassware eponym : PETRI

Julius Richard Petri was a German bacteriologist and was the man after whom the Petri dish is named. The petri dish can have an agar gel on the bottom which acts as a nutrient source for the specimen being grown and studied, in which case the dish plus agar is referred to as an “agar plate”.

An eponym is a name for something derived from the name of a person, as in the food item we call a “sandwich”, named after the Earl of Sandwich.

3 Zilch : NIL

We use the term “zilch” to mean “nothing”. Our current usage evolved in the sixties, before which the term was used to describe “meaningless speech”. There was a comic character called Mr. Zilch in the 1930s in “Ballyhoo” magazine. Mr. Zilch’s name probably came from the American college slang “Joe Zilch” that was used in the early 1900s for “an insignificant person”.

4 Aegean country : GREECE

Someone from Greece can be called a Hellene. “Ellas” is the Greek word for “Greece”, the name of the country. Greece is also known as the “Hellenic” Republic.

The Aegean Sea is that part of the Mediterranean that lies between Greece and Turkey. Within the Aegean Sea are found the Aegean Islands, a group that includes Crete and Rhodes.

7 Highway alternative : CITY

Here in the US, an automobile’s fuel economy is usually quoted for city driving, and for highway driving.

9 Insect stage : LARVA

The larva is an intermediate stage in the development of an insect. All four stages are embryo, larva, pupa and imago.

10 Dell gaming brand whose name was inspired by “The X-Files” : ALIENWARE

Alienware is a manufacturer of computer hardware for the gaming community. Founded in 1995 as Sakai of Miami, the “Alienware” name was apparently chosen as a nod to the founders’ fondness of the TV show “The X-Files”. Dell purchased Alienware in 2006.

11 Camel’s favorite time? : WEDNESDAY

The phrase “hump day” is very North American. It refers to Wednesday, which is the middle day (the hump) of a typical work week.

Perhaps the most distinctive feature of a camel is the large deposit of fatty tissue on its back. The dromedary is the most common camel, and has one hump of fatty tissue on its back. The Bactrian camel has two humps, and makes up just 6% of the world’s camel population. Those fatty humps are useful if no food or water is available, as fat can be broken down into water and energy.

21 Movie mogul Marcus : LOEW

Marcus Loew was a New Yorker born into a poor Jewish family. He started out in a penny arcade business and used its profits to buy into a nickelodeon. He built a whole chain of movie theaters, and then moved into the production of films so that he could guarantee supply of features that he could show in his theaters. Eventually he pulled together the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) film production company, and sadly passed away just three years after he inked the deal.

25 Elton John’s title : SIR

Elton John’s real name is Reginald Dwight. Sir Elton was knighted in 1998, not for his music per se, but for his charitable work. He founded his own Elton John AIDS Foundation back in 1992.

27 __ diet: high-fat, low-carb regimen : KETO

A ketogenic diet is a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet. When a body consumes insufficient carbohydrates to meet the need for energy, then the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies in order to make up the energy deficit. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the bloodstream is known as “ketosis”, a term that gives rise to the name “ketogenic diet”. Medical professionals sometimes prescribe a ketogenic diet in order to control epilepsy in children. A condition of ketosis can reduce the frequency of epileptic seizures.

29 Former Chinese Premier __ Jiabao : WEN

Wen Jiabao served as Premier of China from 2003 until 2013. The role of Premier of China is like that of prime minister in some other countries. The President of China serves as head of state.

30 Old storage devices : ZIP DRIVES

Zip drives were hugely popular in the late nineties. Made by Iomega, Zip drives and their portable Zip disks were used the same way as standard 3.5-inch floppy drives and disks. But, Zip disks had a much, much higher storage capacity.

35 Calif. NFLer : LA RAM

The St. Louis Rams were based in Cleveland from 1936-45, Los Angeles from 1946-94, St. Louis from 1995 to 2015, and back in Los Angeles from 2016. The Rams have only won the Super Bowl once, i.e. Super Bowl XXXIV at the end of the 1999 season. The Rams defeated the Tennessee Titans 23-16.

36 Cry from Homer : D’OH!

“The Simpsons” is one of the most successful programs produced by the Fox Broadcasting Company. Homer Simpson’s catchphrase is “D’oh!”, which became such a famous exclamation that it has been included in the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) since 2001. “D’oh!” can be translated as “I should have thought of that!”

37 Not family-friendly : RATED R

The Motion Picture Association of America’s (MPAA) film-rating system (PG-13, R, etc.) is purely voluntary and is not backed by any law. Movie theaters agree to abide by the rules that come with the MPAA ratings in exchange for access to new movies.

41 Large load : TON

Here in the US, a ton is equivalent to 2,000 pounds. Over in the UK, a ton is 2,240 pounds. The UK unit is sometimes referred to as an Imperial ton, long ton or gross ton. Folks over there refer to the US ton then as a short ton. To further complicate matters, there is also a metric ton or tonne, which is equivalent to 2,204 pounds. Personally, I wish we’d just stick to kilograms …

47 “Web Therapy” actress Lisa : KUDROW

The character Phoebe Buffay (and her identical twin sister Ursula) is played on the sitcom “Friends” by the actress Lisa Kudrow. Kudrow plays the ditzy member of the troupe of friends, but I’ve always viewed her as the “smartest” of the group of actors in real life, as best I could tell. Kudrow is behind the US version of the British genealogy show “Who Do You Think You Are?” a very entertaining bit of television.

“Web Therapy” is a dark comedy starring Lisa Kudrow that airs online. Kudrow plays a therapist who sees her patients online, hence the title “Web Therapy”.

49 Sleeping giant : SERTA

Serta was founded in 1931 when a group of 13 mattress manufacturers came together, essentially forming a cooperative. Today, the Serta company is owned by eight independent licensees in a similar arrangement. Serta advertisements feature the Serta Counting Sheep. Each numbered sheep has a different personality, such as:

  • #1 The Leader of the Flock
  • #½ The Tweener
  • #13 Mr. Bad Luck
  • #53 The Pessimist
  • #86 Benedict Arnold

50 Heist mastermind of film : OCEAN

“Ocean’s 11” is a great film from 1960, starring Frank Sinatra as Danny Ocean. The original storyline is updated for the excellent 2001 remake, with George Clooney playing the lead. In the 1960 movie, the love interest is a character called Beatrice Ocean, played by Angie Dickinson. In the 2001 version, the love interest gets a new name, Tess Ocean, and is played by Julia Roberts. The 2001 remake (titled “Ocean’s Eleven”, note the spelling) spawned two sequels: “Ocean’s Twelve” in 2004 and “Ocean’s Thirteen” in 2007.

51 Bamboo eater : PANDA

The giant panda is a bear, and so has the digestive system of a carnivore. However, the panda lives exclusively on bamboo, even though its gut is relatively poorly adapted to extract nutrients from plants per se. The panda relies on microbes in its gut to digest cellulose, and consumes 20-30 pounds of bamboo each day to gain enough nourishment.

54 Foreign policy advisory gp. : NSC

The National Security Council (NSC) was created by President Harry S. Truman in 1947. The NSC is chaired by the sitting president and meets in the White House Situation Room.

55 Slightly, in scores : POCO

“Poco” is an Italian word for “little”, and is used in musical notation to mean “a little, slightly”.

61 Prefix with center : EPI-

The epicenter is the point on the surface of the Earth that is directly above the focus of an earthquake.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Text : PING
5 Nutmeg spice : MACE
9 Newton trio : LAWS
13 Bahrain bigwig : EMIR
14 Norse god : ODIN
15 Out of the wind : ALEE
16 Fur wrap : STOLE
17 Log flume, e.g. : WATER RIDE
19 Husky hello : ARF!
20 Whitman’s “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d,” e.g. : ELEGY
22 Odds alternative : EVENS
23 Connection need at some coffee shops : WI-FI CODE
25 Classic 1953 western : SHANE
26 Charge : FEE
27 Telluride automaker : KIA
28 Direction opp. 8-Down : WSW
30 “Avatar” actress Saldana : ZOE
32 Parking ticket holder, perhaps : WIPER BLADE
36 Iraqi money : DINAR
38 Cricket club : BAT
39 That’s a wrap! : SARAN
40 Cut into : OPERATED ON
43 “The Last Jedi” heroine : REY
44 Cholesterol letters : HDL
45 Kid : TOT
46 Alias letters : AKA
48 Like proofed dough : RISEN
50 Late 19th-century smoking establishment : OPIUM DEN
55 Ached (for) : PINED
56 Nearly boil : SCALD
57 Wt. units : OZS
58 Start to turn mushy, maybe : OVERRIPEN
60 Artifact : RELIC
62 Part of CPA: Abbr. : CERT
63 Map line : ROAD
64 With 67-Across, doctor’s order … and a hint to 40-, 50- and 58-Across : OPEN
65 Olympus neighbor : OSSA
66 Sicilian volcano : ETNA
67 With 64-Across, like a town lacking restrictions … and a hint to 17-, 23- and 32-Across : WIDE

Down

1 Lab glassware eponym : PETRI
2 “Gotta go!” : I’M OFF!
3 Zilch : NIL
4 Aegean country : GREECE
5 Worked in the yard : MOWED
6 “Opposites attract,” for one : ADAGE
7 Highway alternative : CITY
8 Direction opp. 28-Across : ENE
9 Insect stage : LARVA
10 Dell gaming brand whose name was inspired by “The X-Files” : ALIENWARE
11 Camel’s favorite time? : WEDNESDAY
12 Has eyes on : SEES
16 Toothed tool : SAW
18 Fixes up : REHABS
21 Movie mogul Marcus : LOEW
24 “My concern is … ” : I FEAR …
25 Elton John’s title : SIR
27 __ diet: high-fat, low-carb regimen : KETO
29 Former Chinese Premier __ Jiabao : WEN
30 Old storage devices : ZIP DRIVES
31 Quips : ONE-LINERS
33 “As if!” : I BET!
34 Legal __ : PAD
35 Calif. NFLer : LA RAM
36 Cry from Homer : D’OH!
37 Not family-friendly : RATED R
41 Large load : TON
42 __ salon : NAIL
47 “Web Therapy” actress Lisa : KUDROW
49 Sleeping giant : SERTA
50 Heist mastermind of film : OCEAN
51 Bamboo eater : PANDA
52 Meted (out) : DOLED
53 Internet issue : E-ZINE
54 Foreign policy advisory gp. : NSC
55 Slightly, in scores : POCO
56 Difficult position : SPOT
59 Fury : IRE
61 Prefix with center : EPI-

29 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 25 Jun 20, Thursday”

  1. Interesting double theme going on today. Also, yet another grid with LA RAM as Rich noted yesterday. By coincidence 39A was my last fill.

  2. No errors.. Rather quick fill… And we have the LARAMS once again..

    39A was my last fill also!!

    Didn’t get the theme until I read Bills blog. I was way too deep into the weeds to see the ‘wide open’ forest.

    In reference to old storage devices,.. Found a whole box full of 3.5 inch diskettes in my desk the other day. Why we have them, I don’t know… Anyone remember the Mission Impossible movie when Ethan is accused of going rogue? They had the NOC list on a 3.5 inch diskette? We happened to watch that movie just the other day.. I had to pause when I noticed the label on the disk as they were inserting the disk into a drive. It said 250MB on the label.. I never remember a diskette with that kind of storage capacity., what’s even more funny is the NOC List looked like it might have taken all of 50k.. What a hoot!!

    Be safe

  3. 39A/29D was my last fill, which I flubbed as I was looking for a foreign phrase, not the plastic film.
    Do constructors network with each other resulting in the overuse of the same clue in a week?
    My brother had an original IBM PC with the large 8″ floppy disc. You turned it on, put the disc in, it made a continuous noise like “Hmmmpf, Hmmmpf” for about 3 minutes and then finally you were rewarded with something like this on the screen.
    C:/

    1. >Do constructors network with each other resulting in the overuse of the same clue in a week?

      A lot of clues get “overused” in general, so a lot of it is coincidence. If you look at the most common words that appear in crosswords, they’re generally 3-5 character phrases with a lot of vowels (ERA, ORE, etc). But you are far from the first that’s noticed that they have an uncanny way of repeating. Perhaps the editor gets a fancy to a particular phrase or two and then lines up grids that way for a particular week? Hard telling.

  4. 12:38, no errors. Cute idea.

    Even though I made my living as a computer programmer from 1964 to 2009, I was working with “big iron” and missed out on the early days of personal computers. (My reading convinces me that’s a good thing 😜).

  5. No errors, but did not “get” the theme. I had Wednesday for camel’s
    favorite time, but thought the clue was pretty obscure. Didn’t think
    of “hump day”. Duh!

  6. Ok for a Friday puzzle. The theme, meh. Wasn’t thinking anything vaguely disc’s on 30 down, till I started filling in. Maybe we are done with the LARams now. No matter what I may say, I look forward to doing the crossword and reading everyones thoughts on it. You all make my day. Keep staying safe, the numbers are going up again.

  7. 13:01 no errors, after a few missteps in the southwest corner. I got the first three W- words right away, so the theme made sense. Still took a bit of thought to get the O- words.

    Zip drives? Wow, that takes me back!

    I find Saran branded clingwrap to be pretty terrible. Stretchtite is the way to go.

    Like Cathy, I’m glad I stumbled on this site, where I can enjoy others’ reactions to the puzzle.

  8. @Mary, I agree 11d, the clue favorite time, very vague, threw me off. With the double theme, thought something clever would result.

  9. I got the puzzle without the theme because I couldn’t see the connection. So for me the theme failed. But I did get LA RAM!

  10. 22:19 no errors…I didn’t get the theme until the puzzle was finished so no help there…I really wish clues like 8D and 28A were banned…you must rely on fill ins and IMO that’s unfair…also I never heard of 27D.
    @Cathy. I think today is Thursday but I could be wrong.
    Stay safe.

    1. If you see paired clues like that, you know they’re going to have something in common. Then if you read the clues, it says “Direction” and indicates an abbreviation. You know there aren’t going to be that many three character directions, and you know each one will be N, S, E, or W, and very specific combinations of those. So really all it takes is figuring out some of one and it answers the other.

      One of the tricks of doing this – often clues will reveal information about the answer, even if you don’t KNOW the answer immediately.

  11. I’m reminded as the year ticks up by one of a lot of computer equipment I’ve had. I’ve never had a ZIP drive, but I remember them vividly along with a couple 2′ long boxes of 3.5″ floppy discs, and that I ended up with one of the first sound cards, CD-ROM drives, and CD-R drives, along with one of the first thumb drives. Then DOS, Win95, WinME, WinXP, and OS/2. Then things change so much that I have 102x the drive space of my first hard drive now that I can fit in my pocket. I’m not that old!

    I’m also reminded that despite all my PC experiences, including cutting my teeth on programming under DOS, most of my albeit too short (for the moment) professional programming career involved mainframes (ironic huh?). Mainly circumstance, but a lot of democratization of those kind of things to the point that programming really isn’t lucrative anymore. Sad in a way I got more crossword experience lately than I do programming and more people know me as better at that than they do my programming skill.

    Such are the kinds of things that spring to mind when I look back on my life as birthdays are often an occasion to do.

    1. Hmmm … This was my (possibly-humorous) attempt to respond to a mysterious string of gibberish in a previous post. I guess when Bill deleted the gibberish, my response had nowhere else to go … 😜.

  12. Struggled but finished . Dawdled away the cool of the morning
    doing the puzzle. Too hot to mow the lawn now.

    Eddie

  13. Had to chime in again. You folks brought back some computer memories… I too started my career as a programmer. FORTRAN and PL1 were my go to languages. We were pretty cool nerds with that water cooled 1M of memory IBM 3090 Mainframe… Then one day the PC generation showed up. They were the anti-christ of us mainframers. “They won’t last” was our mantra!!! Ha!

  14. @John Daigle … As instructed by the “consumer” department at Wilson, I “reached out to” their golf department, using an email address they provided, but that department has so far failed to “reach out to” me. I also left a voice mail for the owner of that “Ram” ball that’s advertised on eBay, but he hasn’t “reached out to” me, either. I’m beginning to think that the egg-shaped golf ball I found was the product of some hush-hush, top-secret CIA project and that all information about it is classified … 😜.

  15. I never got past Introduction To Computer Science, so Algol 60 was my first and last language. Anyone remember it?

    1. Did a brief study of ALGOL in the course of doing some technical writing. But haven’t actually coded in it. However, I do code in a couple of languages that were descended from it.

  16. Yet another DNF, but a strong one at 85% solved. Fun and tricky.

    Cathy, it is Thursday where I live as well. I am just jealous because you always solve
    the puzzles and my wife and I seldom do. Keep going good.

    A Nonny, sounds like someone is either awfully busy or pretending to be. Since you
    found the oval ball buried near a road, maybe an 18-wheeler (or larger) ran over a
    round golf ball and converted it into an oval one. Not likely, eh? I have yet to start
    my search. Do keep me posted if you would. Thanks and be well.

    I love puns, but the camel slipped right over my head, also the wrap. I was trying to
    make it part of making a movie. I should have gotten PETRI (dish), since I worked as
    a Chemist for 37 years. Also got the wrong item in the salon, used HAIR instead of
    NAIL.

    And so it goes, first your money and then your clothes.

    Be safe and well, everybody. Remember the most important safeguard.

  17. Accidentally did the Friday on-line (spoiler alert – it’s not that hard) before coming here and realizing that I needed to do the Thursday – so I can certainly understand Cathy. That said, moderately difficult Thursday; took me 18:00 before I got the “all done.” Had to bounce around a bit and finished before figuring out the theme. Only real trouble was with WEDNESDAY and OCEAN, both of which I got with crosses.

    re Coding – I cut my teeth on BASIC and Pascal before moving on to C, C++ and a bit of Java. Never really used a Mainframe but I did have an account on one.

    re Saran Wrap – Amazingly, my last roll, I was able to go through the whole thing without once getting all jammed up and twisted. Not so confident with this next roll…

    @Carrie – I watched all three chases on YouTube last night and I’d still have to say my favorite is the “Bullitt” chase – for the awesome cars, stars and scenery.
    There is also an interview with the “French Connection” director that discusses the chase scene: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YoPI0MRAVB4 pretty scary when you think about it.

  18. Hi everyone !!🦆

    After two months not doing the puzzle daily I’ve REALLY lost my touch! I seem to cheat nearly every day, except Monday and Tuesday. Today was no exception! Peeked at about five answers to finish. 😯

    Didn’t see the theme or even look for it. Again with LA RAM! At least it helped me get SARAN. I had SCENE there for a long time.

    Dirk! Agreed — Bullitt is my fave, and for the same reasons you name. Thanks for the link to the Friedkin interview….I’ll check it out. 🤗

    Baseball maybe!!! YAY!!⚾️

    Be well~~🍷

  19. 15 minutes, 59 seconds, no errors. A tough slog, just not easy at all. The “theme” if you can call it that was all but useless, and totally opaque. Quite literally a “stretch”, and it barely makes any sense when explained.

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