LA Times Crossword 4 Jun 20, Thursday

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Constructed by: Christopher Adams & Michael Sharp
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Hidden Carbs

Themed answers each include “CARB” as a HIDDEN word:

  • 26D Bane of a ketogenic diet, and what three long puzzle answers contain : HIDDEN CARBS
  • 18A Speculation before awards season : OSCAR BUZZ
  • 43A Lima family legumes that yield vanilla : MADAGASCAR BEANS
  • 21D Kids’ furniture that may have checkered-flag sheets : RACE CAR BEDS

Bill’s time: 9m 28s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

13 Nuts : BANANAS

The expression “to go bananas” is one that I would have imagined had a clear etymology but that doesn’t seem to be the case. A further surprise is that we’ve only been “going bananas” since the sixties, in the days of flower power. One apt theory about the hippy roots of the phrase is that there was an unfounded belief that ingesting roasted banana peels had a similar hallucinogenic effect as magic mushrooms.

17 Like some mice : OPTICAL

Thank goodness for the invention of the optical mouse. The old wheeled mouse, although it was a great device in its day, is prone to slipping on the wrong surface and clogs up with dirt. An optical mouse is the next level of technology and uses a light emitting diode and photo-diodes to detect motion.

20 Part of AMPAS : ARTS

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is the organization that gives the annual Academy Awards, also known as the “Oscars”. The root of the name “Oscar” is hotly debated, but what is agreed is that the award was officially named “Oscar” in 1939. The first Academy Awards were presented at a brunch in 1929 with an audience of just 29 people. The Awards ceremony is a slightly bigger event these days …

23 Take by force : USURP

To usurp is to seize and hold by force. The term “usurp” comes to us from Latin via French, from “usus” (a use) and “rapere” (to seize).

24 1975 Wimbledon winner : ASHE

Arthur Ashe was a professional tennis player from Richmond, Virginia. In his youth, Ashe found himself having to travel great distances to play against Caucasian opponents due to the segregation that still existed in his home state. He was rewarded for his dedication by being selected for the 1963 US Davis Cup team, the first African-American player to be so honored. Ashe continued to run into trouble because of his ethnicity though, and in 1968 was denied entry into South Africa to play in the South African Open. In 1979, Ashe suffered a heart attack and had bypass surgery, with follow-up surgery four years later during which he contracted HIV from blood transfusions. Ashe passed away in 1993 due to complications from AIDS. Shortly afterwards, Ashe was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Bill Clinton.

The Wimbledon Championships of tennis are held at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club located in Wimbledon, a district of London. The Wimbledon Championships started in 1877, and have been played on grass since day one.

28 With 28-Across, sad trombone sound effect : WAH(-WAH)

The brass instrument known as a trombone takes its name from the trumpet. The Italian for trumpet is “tromba”, and the suffix “-one” means “big”. So, “trombone” means “big trumpet”.

29 Labyrinth-building king : MINOS

Minos was the King of Crete in Greek mythology, and the son of Zeus and Europa. Minos had an elaborate labyrinth built under the island that was designed by the architect Daedalus and his son Icarus (who famously died trying to escape from the island by “flying” away). In the labyrinth, King Minos kept the Minotaur, a dreadful creature with the head of a bull on the body of a man.

33 __ Plaines: Chicago suburb : DES

Des Plaines is a suburb of Chicago that is located next to O’Hare International Airport. The city is named for the Des Plaines river that runs through the area.

38 Equal rival : SPLENDA

Splenda is a brand name for the artificial sweetener sucralose.

42 American Eagle intimate apparel brand : AERIE

Aerie (stylized as “aerie”) is a retailer of lingerie and general undergarments that was founded in 2006. Aptly enough, Aerie was initially a sub-brand of American Eagle.

43 Lima family legumes that yield vanilla : MADAGASCAR BEANS

The lima bean is also known as the butter bean or madagascar bean. The lima bean was introduced to Europe from the area around Lima, Peru, hence the name.

48 Bruins legend : ORR

Bobby Orr is regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time. By the time he retired in 1978 he had undergone over a dozen knee surgeries. At 31 years of age, he concluded that he just couldn’t skate anymore. Reportedly, he was even having trouble walking. While still 31 years old, in 1979, Orr became the youngest person inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. Prior to that, in 1967, Orr became the youngest person named the NHL’s Rookie of the Year.

The Boston Bruins professional ice hockey team goes way back, and has been in existence since 1924. The National Hockey League back then was a Canadian-only league, but was expanded to include the US in 1923. The Bruins were the first US-team in the expanded league.

49 Taunting phrase from internet trolls : U MAD BRO?

In Internet terms, a troll is someone who attempts to disrupt online group activities. The fishing term “troll” is used to describe such a person as he or she throws out off-topic remarks in an attempt to “lure” others into some emotional response. I must admit to feeling sorry for people who have such sad lives …

50 Horned Frogs’ sch. : TCU

The athletic teams of Texas Christian University (TCU) are known as the TCU Horned Frogs. The Texas horned lizard is known colloquially as the “horned frog”.

57 Crystal-filled formation : GEODE

A geode is a rock in which there is a cavity that is lined or filled with crystal formations.

60 Type of computer monitor cable : HDMI

High-Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI)

62 They’re put to paper : NIBS

“Nib” is a Scottish variant of the Old English word “neb”, with both meaning the beak of a bird. This usage of “nib” as a beak dates back to the 14th century, with “nib” meaning the tip of a pen or quill coming a little later, in the early 1600s.

63 Mir launcher: Abbr. : USSR

Russia’s Mir space station was a remarkably successful project. It held the record for the longest continuous human presence in space at just under 10 years, until the International Space Station eclipsed that record in 2010. Towards the end of the space station’s life however, the years began to take their toll. There was a dangerous fire, multiple system failures, and a collision with a resupply ship. The Russian commitment to the International Space Station drained funds for repairs, so Mir was allowed to reenter the Earth’s atmosphere and burn up in 2001. “Mir” is a Russian word meaning “peace” or “world”.

64 Group of associates : POSSE

Our word “posse” comes from an Anglo-Latin term from the early 15th century “posse comitatus” meaning “the force of the county”.

65 Part of MIT: Abbr. : INST

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Down

1 “Doctor Who” network : BBC

The iconic science-fiction television show “Doctor Who” first aired in 1963 on the BBC, and relaunched in 2005. The relaunched series is produced in-house by the BBC in Cardiff in Wales, the location that is the setting of the successful “Doctor Who” spin-off called “Torchwood”. The new show is about the Cardiff branch of the Torchwood Institute which investigates incidents involving extraterrestrials. Why “Torchwood”? Well, “Torchwood” is an anagram of “Doctor Who”.

2 AirPod spot : EAR

AirPods are Apple’s line of bluetooth earpods. When AirPods were introduced in 2016, the market reacted with some skepticism. The left and right AirPods are not connected by any wire, so there was concern that individual earbuds could fall out of the ear, and possibly get lost. Another concern is Apple’s stated intent to abandon the wired headphone socket on new iPhone models.

3 Gasteyer of “Wine Country” : ANA

Ana Gasteyer is an actress best known for being a cast member of “Saturday Night Live” (SNL) from 1996 to 2002. Gasteyer was famous on SNL for playing Martha Stewart … topless!

“Wine Country” is a 2019 comedy movie directed by, produced by and co-starring Amy Poehler. It’s about some women celebrating the 50th birthday of one member of their group by spending a weekend in Napa County’s wine country.

5 Tattoo artist’s array : INKS

The word “tattoo” (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word “tatau” into our “tattoo”. Tattoos are sometimes referred to as “ink”.

6 Friction-reducing substance : TALCUM

Talc is a mineral, hydrated magnesium silicate. Talcum powder is composed of loose talc, although these days “baby powder” is also made from cornstarch.

7 Infield fly rule flies : POP-UPS

That would be baseball.

8 Big name in crackers : RITZ

I’ve always liked Ritz crackers. They’ve been around since 1934 when they were introduced by Nabisco. The name Ritz was chosen because the marketing folks felt that the association with Ritz-Carlton would evoke images of wealth and the highlife.

9 “Hamilton” role for Tony nominee Phillipa Soo : ELIZA

Phillipa Soo is an actress and singer who is perhaps best known for portraying Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, the title character’s wife in the Broadway production of “Hamilton”.

10 Delt neighbor : PEC

“Pecs” is the familiar name for the chest muscle, which is more correctly known as the pectoralis major muscle. “Pectus” is the Latin word for “breast, chest”.

The deltoid “muscle” is actually a group of muscles, the ones that cover the shoulder and create the roundness under the skin. The deltoids (delts) are triangular in shape resembling the Greek letter delta, hence the name.

11 Hall of Famer Parseghian : ARA

Ara Parseghian coached the Notre Dame football team from 1964 to 1974, a period known as “The Era of Ara”.

12 DKNY competitor : YSL

Yves Saint Laurent (YSL) was an Algerian-born French fashion designer. Saint Laurent started off working as an assistant to Christian Dior at the age of 17. Dior died just four years later, and as a very young man Saint-Laurent was named head of the House of Dior. However, in 1950 Saint Laurent was conscripted into the French Army and ended up in a military hospital after suffering a mental breakdown from the hazing inflicted on him by his fellow soldiers. His treatment included electroshock therapy and administration of sedatives and psychoactive drugs. He was released from hospital, managed to pull his life back together and started his own fashion house. A remarkable story …

Donna Karan is an American fashion designer, creator of the Donna Karan New York (DKNY) clothing label. Karan was very much raised in the fashion industry, as her mother was a model and her stepfather a tailor.

15 Painter known for “happy little trees” : BOB ROSS

Bob Ross was an artist and art instructor. Ross created and appeared in the long-running PBS show “The Joy of Painting”, a show which provided instructions for budding artists.

19 Mysterious letter : RUNE

A rune is a character in an alphabet that is believed to have mysterious powers. In Norse mythology, the runic alphabet was said to have a divine origin.

22 Heart hit song with the lyric “Every second of the night I live another life” : THESE DREAMS

“These Dreams” is a 1986 song from the band Heart that made it to number one in the charts. The song’s lyrics were written by Bernie Taupin, longtime collaborator with Elton John.

Heart is a rock band from Seattle, Washington, founded in the seventies and still going strong. The band has had a changing lineup, except for sisters Ann and Nancy Wilson.

25 “Come On Over” singer : SHANIA TWAIN

Shania Twain is a country and pop singer from Windsor, Ontario. Shania’s birth name is “Eileen Edwards”, and this changed to “Eilleen Twain” when her mother remarried. Twain changed her name to Shania in the early 1990s, around the same time that her musical career started to take off.

26 Bane of a ketogenic diet, and what three long puzzle answers contain : HIDDEN CARBS

A ketogenic diet is a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet. When a body consumes insufficient carbohydrates to meet the need for energy, then the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies in order to make up the energy deficit. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the bloodstream is known as “ketosis”, a term that gives rise to the name “ketogenic diet”. Medical professionals sometimes prescribe a ketogenic diet in order to control epilepsy in children. A condition of ketosis can reduce the frequency of epileptic seizures.

34 “We __ Soldiers”: 2002 Mel Gibson film : WERE

“We Were Soldiers” is an excellent 2002 movie starring Mel Gibson that tells the story of the Battle of la Drang during the Vietnam War. The film is based on the book “We Were Soldiers Once… And Young” that was written by Hal Moore and Joseph L. Galloway, both of whom were present at the battle and who feature in the film. Mel Gibson plays Colonel Hal Moore, and Barry Pepper plays journalist Joseph L. Galloway.

36 “That reminds me …,” e.g. : SEGUE

A segue is a transition from one topic to the next. “Segue” is an Italian word that literally means “now follows”. It was first used in musical scores directing the performer to play into the next movement without a break. The oft-used term “segway” is given the same meaning, although the word “segway” doesn’t really exist. It is a misspelling of “segue” that has been popularized by its use as the name of the personal transporter known as a Segway.

37 Mild cheese : EDAM

Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

39 “The Incredibles” family name : PARR

“The Incredibles” is a 2004 animated feature from Pixar, and not a great movie if you ask me. But asking me probably isn’t a good idea, as the film won two Oscars …

40 Simon of Duran Duran : LE BON

Simon Le Bon is lead singer with the English band Duran Duran. Le Bon is a passionate sailor and garnered a lot of attention when his yacht lost its keel in the 1985 Fastnet race. Before Le Bon and his crew could be rescued, they spent 40 minutes trapped underwater inside the hull. The incident didn’t deter Le Bon from sailing though, and not long after he came third in the 1985-1986 Whitbread Round the World Race.

Duran Duran is a new-wave band from Birmingham in England. Duran Duran’s success was partially driven by some well-received MTV music videos in the 1980s. The band also worked hard on their image and paid a lot of money for very fashionable clothes in which they performed. As a result, one of Duran Duran’s nicknames is “the prettiest boys in rock”.

43 Chinese pork dish : MOO SHU

Moo shu pork (also “mu shu pork”) is a traditional dish from northern China, with the main ingredients being shredded pork and scrambled egg. In North America, the dish is served with tortilla-like wrappers that are sometimes referred to as “moo shu pancakes”.

44 Seattle’s former __ Field : SAFECO

T-Mobile Park (formerly “Safeco Field”) is the home stadium of the Seattle Mariners. Safeco Insurance was the highest bidder when it came to christening the new stadium opened in 1999, paying $40m for a 20-year contract. T-Mobile took over the naming rights in 2019, after signing a 25-year contract.

45 Data media : CD-ROMS

“CD-ROM” stands for “compact disc read only memory”. The name indicates that you can read information from the disc (like a standard music CD for example), but you cannot write to it. You can also buy a CD-RW, which stands for “compact disc – rewritable”, with which you can read data and also write over it multiple times using a suitable CD drive.

46 Quarters : ABODES

We use the term “quarters” for a place of abode, especially housing for military personnel. Back in the late 16th century, quarters were a portion (quarter) of a town reserved for a military force.

52 Swizzle : STIR

“Swizzle” drinks date back to the early 1800s. The drink gave rise to the verb “to swizzle” to mean “to stir” from the mid-1800s. The drink also gave the name to the swizzle stick, which was introduced in cocktails in 1933. I drank a rum swizzle or two on the island of Bermuda many years ago, and very nice they are too. They are so popular in Bermuda that the swizzle is often called the island’s national drink.

55 Old Dodge : OMNI

The Dodge Omni is basically the same car as the Plymouth Horizon, and was produced by Chrysler from 1978-90. The Omni is a front-wheel drive hatchback, the first in a long line of front-wheel drive cars that were very successful for Chrysler. The Omni was actually developed in France, by Chrysler’s Simca division. When production was stopped in the US in 1990, the tooling was sold to an Indian company that continued production for the Asian market for several years.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Order to go : BEAT IT!
7 Settle early : PREPAY
13 Nuts : BANANAS
15 Heat sources : BOILERS
16 Fireplace sound : CRACKLE
17 Like some mice : OPTICAL
18 Speculation before awards season : OSCAR BUZZ
20 Part of AMPAS : ARTS
23 Take by force : USURP
24 1975 Wimbledon winner : ASHE
28 With 28-Across, sad trombone sound effect : WAH(-WAH)
29 Labyrinth-building king : MINOS
30 Friendly exchanges : HIS
31 Crushed, as a final : ACED
33 __ Plaines: Chicago suburb : DES
34 Fistfuls of dollars : WADS
35 “That makes sense now” : YES I SEE
38 Equal rival : SPLENDA
41 Surrendered : CEDED
42 American Eagle intimate apparel brand : AERIE
43 Lima family legumes that yield vanilla : MADAGASCAR BEANS
48 Bruins legend : ORR
49 Taunting phrase from internet trolls : U MAD BRO?
50 Horned Frogs’ sch. : TCU
51 Past pudgy : OBESE
53 Back again : FRO
54 Pacifist’s demand : NO WAR
56 Candidate’s goal : SEAT
57 Crystal-filled formation : GEODE
59 Stable parent : MARE
60 Type of computer monitor cable : HDMI
61 High points : ACMES
62 They’re put to paper : NIBS
63 Mir launcher: Abbr. : USSR
64 Group of associates : POSSE
65 Part of MIT: Abbr. : INST

Down

1 “Doctor Who” network : BBC
2 AirPod spot : EAR
3 Gasteyer of “Wine Country” : ANA
4 Stuffed shells : TACOS
5 Tattoo artist’s array : INKS
6 Friction-reducing substance : TALCUM
7 Infield fly rule flies : POP-UPS
8 Big name in crackers : RITZ
9 “Hamilton” role for Tony nominee Phillipa Soo : ELIZA
10 Delt neighbor : PEC
11 Hall of Famer Parseghian : ARA
12 DKNY competitor : YSL
14 Boardwalk location : SEASIDE
15 Painter known for “happy little trees” : BOB ROSS
19 Mysterious letter : RUNE
20 Not home : AWAY
21 Kids’ furniture that may have checkered-flag sheets : RACE CAR BEDS
22 Heart hit song with the lyric “Every second of the night I live another life” : THESE DREAMS
25 “Come On Over” singer : SHANIA TWAIN
26 Bane of a ketogenic diet, and what three long puzzle answers contain : HIDDEN CARBS
27 She, in Italy : ESSA
32 __ double take : DID A
34 “We __ Soldiers”: 2002 Mel Gibson film : WERE
36 “That reminds me …,” e.g. : SEGUE
37 Mild cheese : EDAM
39 “The Incredibles” family name : PARR
40 Simon of Duran Duran : LE BON
43 Chinese pork dish : MOO SHU
44 Seattle’s former __ Field : SAFECO
45 Data media : CD-ROMS
46 Quarters : ABODES
47 Like the best bet : SUREST
52 Swizzle : STIR
55 Old Dodge : OMNI
57 Break : GAP
58 Minneapolis-to-Milwaukee dir. : ESE

31 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 4 Jun 20, Thursday”

  1. Wasn’t too bad for me, though I suspect being familiar with the phrase “U mad bro?” and the song “These Dreams” had something to do with that. Had penS before NIBS and EllA before ESSA.

  2. 5:18, no errors. Gotta love a polished well-done grid. I wonder if this Michael Sharp and the one that calls himself “Rex Parker” is one and the same?

    @Mike
    About everyone does things their own way. WSJ grids are generally more well done, IMO, so I’ve stuck there for something harder (Wed-Sat is generally harder there than here) when I started wanting something different and stopped doing Universal and didn’t have a NYT source at all. Notably though, I’m finding a lot of the online-only stuff a lot more interesting and well-made than the NYT or LAT in general.

    If/when I get employment, I’ll probably just start cherry-picking interesting grids from all sources instead of doing most all of them like I do now.

  3. 2 dumb errors. Had TALCUP for 6D so 29A was PINOS.. DOH!! Never heard of UMADBRO.. the cluing seemed a bit to the ‘left’ of center. Like my head was tilted with a “huh?”. It was fun.
    @glen.. I really don’t do online. I enjoy immensely getting away from the screen and doing pen and paper. After 30 plus years sitting in front of CRTs and various screens, it’s a relief.. I bought of bunch of LATIMES and NYTIMES crosswords (100 and 200 puzzle books) at Barns and Noble years ago so I’m good. They keep me occupied. I don’t even know if I can get a printed version anymore.. Don’t even know if Barns and Noble is even open.

    Be safe

    1. @Mike
      The trend now is to distribute a lot of puzzles online, and mostly how I get mine. This is what I was referencing. More or less, every setter that’s gotten any notoriety is going to have their own site. I have the capability to solve online, but mostly I just print out things and do them. I’ve gotten a few printed books, but mostly they’re more boutique for specific audiences, older, and are ultimately pretty rare.

  4. Michael Sharp is Rex Parker….. known for slamming every N.Y. Times crossword as inadequate. Today’s puzzle was challenging…. I never would have gotten Madagascar beans if I hadn’t figured out the theme. I also never heard of rune… but live and learn!

  5. Much too cryptic for me. I applaud those who read through the foggy
    questions to finish.

    Stay Safe!
    Eddie

  6. 14:52, no errors. Decent puzzle. I got “U MAD, BRO?” (which is sometimes written “You mad, bro?”) from crosses and checked it out afterwards on Google, but I was aided by having seen the phrase recently on Bill’s NYT blog, where someone used it in addressing a lunatic troll that lurks over there.

  7. Had a rare DNF caused by the convergence of U Mad Bro, Parr and Lebon.

    This followed the introduction to the word “voluntold” meaning the opposite of volunteered. One of my fellow writers in our Vets writing class used the word in his story last night during our Zoom meeting. When I questioned its validity, I found that older people such as me were unaware of it, while youngsters were either aware or had used it.

    Vocabulary keeps evolving and necessarily, so do I!

  8. 31:33…I had RED E for 19D and I don’t understand the clue for 28A but got the answer via crosses.
    Stay safe.

  9. Since I had to Google for a dozen answers, I almost didn’t come here. But you live and learn. Strangely I had MADAGASCAR BEANS because they’re in my favorite Eggos!

    @Glenn -yes, Rex Parker is Michael Sharp, a prof at SUNY Binghamton with a doctorate in Lit. He was Rex Parker >25 yrs ago when my son was a student there.
    @Anon Mike – Barnes & Noble – only for pick up, not browsing.

    One complaint – ESSA means her, Ella means she (Italian).

  10. @John Daigle …

    I tried to send you a private email about an odd (golf-related) object that I found on a recent long walk and that I thought you might have an explanation for, but have heard nothing back. Did you get my email? (If you have no comment on the object, that’s fine, but I’d like to know if you got the pictures I sent.)

    Thanks … 🙂.

    1. I did not get your e-mail, or may have deleted it, but would like to see it so that
      I could try to explain whatever it is.

      As for today’s, some things are better left unsaid.

      I did get the Jumble and Wonderword. No comparison, though.

      Stay safe, everyone.

      1. Okay, thanks, John. I’ll try to send it again. (It’s about that strange golf ball that I found … 😜.)

  11. With upward of 30 PPPs (ask Michael Sharp), a lot of this puzzle offered little in the way of wordplay or cleverness* that a few old issues of People and Adweek couldn’t deliver.
    I began solving down the grid’s Southeastern section. Look at its heart: ASHE to SHANIA TWAIN to SPLENDA to AERIE to LEBON to PARR to TCU (en route to a payoff of … “hidden carbs.”)
    U serious, bro?

    * To be fair: In the print version, the first words of the 28 Across clue were “With 28-Across.” That was, uh … different.

    1. I recently came across a “Rex Parker” (Michael Sharp) review of an NYT puzzle that he denigrated in his usual way but, in the review, he raved about another puzzle that he had recently done, saying that it was far superior to the NYT puzzle. As it happens, I had done both puzzles, basically liked both of them, and saw little difference between them. My conclusion (reinforced by this experience): Rex Parker is highly opinionated, his reviews are entirely subjective, and he has an ax to grind with Will Shortz. IMHO, what he liked about the other puzzle was that it did not appear in the NYT and what he liked about its constructor was that none of the guy’s puzzles had appeared in the NYT.

      If you want to learn about Rex Parker, then, by all means, read his blog, but, for me, it’s mostly a waste of time.

      End of rant … 😜.

      1. I know we have a habit of going around on this blog on quality issues in puzzles, but I do have to satisfy my curiousity. Which two puzzles are we talking about?

        1. @Glenn …

          See the following Rex Parker blog page.

          The two puzzles in question are the NYT puzzle for October 9, 2019 (which Rex hated), and an ACVX puzzle by Sid Sivakumar (which he loved). (The latter is one that I sent you, just to see what you thought of it, and you didn’t have much to say about it, except that you didn’t think much of the ACVX puzzles in general. I can’t remember now what brought it to my attention.)

          I continue to be mystified by your likes and dislikes, but I‘ve decided to give up on trying to understand what it is that you (and perhaps Rex) see in them that I don’t.

          Sorry it took me so long to respond: I’ve been running late all day due to a bad reaction to hiking in the heat for too long yesterday and I had misplaced the date of the NYT puzzle, so I had to search for it again.

        2. Actually, I now remember how I came across this. The Sunday Universal puzzle for April 12 was by Sid Sivakumar and I was intrigued by it, so I went looking for information about him, did another puzzle from his web site, and then happened upon Rex Parker’s reference to him.

  12. To quote Kenneth Mick (above): “Had a rare DNF caused by the convergence of U Mad Bro, Parr and Lebon”.
    @Glenn: Is there a list of good on-line puzzles anywhere? I’ve been only solving print versions, since I spent my career staring at screens writing code. However, I would like more variety.

    1. @Lawrence
      Normally I’d point you to my blog list, but I couldn’t justify keeping the little crossword blog I had online. I still have a backup of the site and can reproduce that list. Just need to do it and upload it. Look for a posting either today or tomorrow when I can get it done.

    2. We’ll try this…it’s a list of stuff in my book marks related to crosswords – minus cryptics-only sites. No way that I do all of these at once (you’ll have to ask which ones I regularly do if you want to know), but main thing I wanted to do was catalog all the newspaper sites and a few of the other things I was aware of.

      Puzzle List

      Of course, there’s a whole lot more out there than just that. But mainly, it’s stuff I have experience with.

      1. Glenn, Thanks for the link and effort. I tried to open it in a new tab and Chrome opened the tab, downloaded the linked page and shut the tab in about 1 second. I clicked on the downloaded html filename, and Chrome opened up a new tab and displayed the file as text with clickable links. .. not sure that I have experienced that behavior before.
        That’s enough puzzles to satisfy me for a long time. Thanks again.

  13. After a lot of head-scratching and much guessing, I think I did pretty
    well with one error box. I had Chrome for 45 down and I hadn’t heard
    of umadbro so I had umahbro…

    I guess I have an optical mouse, and got that answer right, but
    didn’t know what it meant until I read Bill’s explanation. When I
    think “mice” I think vermin.

  14. I did wonder about the Madagascar bean. I knew vanilla beans come from madagascar, but I don’t think they are in the lima bean damily. I do love vanilla, though. Not being a sport fan, Safeco eluded me. I had prepit instead of prepay and somehow wads came hard. An enjoyable puzzle, and I appreciated indirect allusion Oscar the Grouch. I never would have gotten umadbro without help.

    1. I wondered about the Madagascar bean thing, too, but forgot to check into it until now. As far as I can tell after lengthy consultation with Dr. Google, the Madagascar lima bean and the Madagascar vanilla bean both exist, but are two completely different plants. So, for once, I believe that a clue is in error!

  15. Moderately difficult Thursday for me; took 33 minutes with no errors, despite a deluge of PPPs. A lot of waiting for crosses in this one followed by educated guesses and gut feels.

    Had to change Does to DIDA and …sWAIN to …TWAIN. Pretty good challenge and kind of fun really.

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