LA Times Crossword 12 Aug 20, Wednesday

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Constructed by: Gabrielle Friedman
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Center Court

Themed answers each include a type of COURT as a hidden word:

  • 59A Site of a tennis focus match … and a hint to what’s hidden in 16-, 30- and 45-Across? : CENTER COURT
  • 16A Go off without a hiccup : RUN SMOOTHLY (“moot” court)
  • 30A Paranormal power : PSYCHOMETRY (“home” court)
  • 45A London-based credit brand : BARCLAYCARD (“clay” court)

Bill’s time: 12m 43s (stuck in the northeast)!

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 “The Boy Who Cried Wolf,” e.g. : FABLE

“The Boy Who Cried Wolf” is one of Aesop’s fables, and the tale that gives rise to our phrase “to cry wolf” meaning “to give a false alarm”. In the fable, a shepherd boy is in the habit of tricking nearby villagers into thinking a wolf is attacking his flock by crying “Wolf!”. When an actual attack is made, the villages assume it’s another false alarm and the sheep are eaten by the wolf.

6 __ bean : NAVY

A navy bean is a white bean, and is the bean commonly found in the dish known as “baked beans”. It can also be called a haricot bean. The term “navy bean” is used because haricot beans were a staple for sailors in the 19th-century US Navy.

10 “Gee whiz!” : OMG!

“OMG” is text-speak for “Oh My Gosh!” “Oh My Goodness!” or any other G-words you might care to use …

13 Name on a sweetener packet : EQUAL

Equal was the first aspartame-based artificial sweetener to hit the market, and did so in the early eighties. Up to that point, the only artificial sweetener available was saccharin.

14 Après-ski drink : COCOA

The beverages hot cocoa and hot chocolate differ from each other in that the latter contains cocoa butter, whereas the former does not.

“Après-ski” is a French term meaning “after skiing”. It refers to the good times to be had after coming off the slopes.

15 IOC country two before NZL, alphabetically : NOR

In the list of IOC country codes, NOR (Norway) comes just before NRU (Nauru), which in turn comes just before NZL (New Zealand).

16 Go off without a hiccup : RUN SMOOTHLY (“moot” court)

A moot court is a simulated court proceeding engaged in by law students. A moot court is similar to a mock trial, with the former simulating an appellate court or arbitral case, and the latter simulating a jury trial or bench trial. In Anglo-Saxon times, a “moot” was a gathering of prominent men to discuss matters of local importance.

Hiccups is a series of forced intakes of breath, caused by spasms in the muscles of the chest and throat. The most common cause of hiccups is some sort of irritation to the stomach or oesophagus, usually taking place while eating. Apparently, we don’t really understand the reason why we hiccup, but a favored suggestion is that it may be something that we inherited from our ancestors of long ago who didn’t stand up quite as straight as we do. Gravity helps us swallow our food, but animals who walk on all fours don’t have that advantage as the food moves horizontally down the throat and into the stomach. Such beasts are in greater need of an involuntary hiccup should some food get stuck. Just a theory …

20 WSJ headline topic : IPO

An initial public offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually).

“The Wall Street Journal” (WSJ) is a daily newspaper with a business bent that is published in New York City by Dow Jones & Company. The WSJ has a larger US circulation than any other newspaper, with “USA Today” coming in a close second place.

21 Tobacco plug : CHAW

“Chaw” is a slang term for “chew”, a plug of tobacco.

22 Singapore makeup : ISLANDS

The city-state of Singapore comprises one main island (Singapore Island or Mainland Singapore) and 63 outlying islands. Only two of the outlying islands are inhabited, i.e. Sentosa (mainly a resort island) and Ubin (a rural island with a small village population).

27 PC corner key : ESC

The escape key (Esc) was originally used to control computer peripherals. It was a key that allowed the computer operator to stop what the peripheral was doing (cancel a print job, for example). Nowadays the escape key is used for all sorts of things, especially in gaming programs.

30 Paranormal power : PSYCHOMETRY (“home” court)

Psychometry is a form of extrasensory perception in which a person claims to be able to detect the history of an object by touching it.

32 Hawaiian Congresswoman Gabbard : TULSI

Tulsi Gabbard was elected to the US House of Representatives in 2012, and so became the first Hindo member of Congress. She was born in American Samoa, and relocated with her family at a very young age to Hawaii. Gabbard enlisted in the Hawaii Army National Guard in 2003, served a tour of duty in Iraq, and continues in the service at the rank of major. She is a Democrat, and campaigned to become the party’s nominee for US president in the 2020 election.

34 50 minutes on a couch, say : SESSION

The use of the term “shrink” to describe a psychiatrist is first attested in 1966. “Shrink” is diminutive of “head-shrinker”.

44 Big name in insurance : AETNA

When the healthcare management and insurance company known as Aetna was founded, the name was chosen to evoke images of Mount Etna, the Italian volcano.

45 London-based credit brand : BARCLAYCARD (“clay” court)

A “barclaycard” is a credit card issued by Barclays bank, which is based in the UK. The barclaycard was the first UK-based credit card issued in Britain, back in 1967.

49 “A Death in the Family” author James : AGEE

James Agee was a noted American film critic and screenwriter. Agee wrote an autobiographical novel “A Death in the Family” that won him his Pulitzer in 1958, albeit posthumously. He was also one of the screenwriters for the 1951 classic movie “The African Queen”.

52 Comic Foxx : REDD

“Redd Foxx” was the stage name of John Elroy Sanford, best known for starring in “Sanford and Son”. “Sanford and Son” was an American version of a celebrated hit BBC sitcom that I grew up with in Ireland called “Steptoe and Son”.

53 New Deal agcy. : NRA

The National Recovery Administration (NRA) was one of the first agencies set up under President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal program. On the one hand the NRA help set minimum wages and maximum working hours for workers in industry, and on the other hand it helped set minimum prices for goods produced by companies. The NRA was very popular with the public, and businesses that didn’t opt to participate in the program found themselves boycotted. The NRA didn’t survive for long though, as after two years of operation it was deemed to be unconstitutional by the US Supreme Court and so it ceased operations in 1935.

The New Deal was the series of economic programs championed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in response to the Great Depression. The New Deal was focused on three objectives, the “3 Rs”:

  1. Relief for the unemployed and poor
  2. Recovery of the economy to normal levels
  3. Reform of the financial system to prevent a repeat depression

54 Baseball’s Rose : PETE

Pete Rose was a talented baseball player who holds the record for all-time Major League hits. Rose’s nickname was “Charlie Hustle”. In recent years, his reputation has been tarnished by admissions that he bet on games in which he played and managed.

63 The Cyclones of the Big 12 Conf. : ISU

Iowa State University of Science and Technology (ISU) is located in Ames, Iowa. Among many other notable milestones, ISU created the country’s first school of veterinary medicine, in 1879. The sports teams of ISU are known as the Cyclones.

66 Lifesaver, briefly : EMT

Emergency medical technician (EMT)

67 Water ___ : POLO

The sport of water polo is thought to have originated in Scotland, where it was a feature of fairs and festivals. Men’s water polo was introduced into the Olympic Games in 1900, making it one of the oldest team sports in the Games.

Down

1 Stepbrother of Phineas on a Disney animated series : FERB

“Phineas and Ferb” is an animated TV series on the Disney channel. The lead characters are Phineas Flynn and his stepbrother Ferb Fletcher.

3 Hit close to home? : BUNT

To bunt in baseball is to barely hit the ball, just enough to have it roll slowly in front of the infielders.

4 Indian yogurt drink : LASSI

Lassi is a yogurt-based drink from India. Popular variants are namkeen lassi (which is salty), sweet lassi and mango lassi. There is even a bhang lassi, which is infused with a liquid derivative of cannabis.

5 Nightmare street : ELM

“A Nightmare on Elm Street” is a Wes Craven slasher-horror film that was released in 1984. As I don’t do “slasher” or “horror”, I was surprised to learn that Johnny Depp was in the movie, making his feature film debut.

7 “Bah!” in Bavaria : ACH!

Bavaria in southeast Germany is the largest state in the country. The capital and largest city in Bavaria is Munich.

8 Tennessee athlete, briefly : VOL

The Tennessee Volunteers (the Vols) is the name given to the men’s sports teams at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. The women’s teams are called the Lady Volunteers.

11 Sweater material : MOHAIR

The Angora goat produces the wool known as mohair. On the other hand, Angora wool comes from the Angora rabbit. Both rabbit and goat are named for Turkey’s capital Ankara, which was known as “Angora” in many European languages.

14 HMO outlays : COPAYS

Health Maintenance Organization (HMO)

21 Bayou cuisine : CREOLE

In the US, the term “Creole” is usually a reference to the people descended from the colonial French and colonial Spanish people who settled in the Louisiana region before it became part of the United States with the Louisiana Purchase of 1803.

A bayou is a marshy inlet or outlet of a lake or river, usually with stagnant or slow-moving water. The exact origins of the term “bayou” is uncertain, but it is thought perhaps to come from the Choctaw (a Native American people from the southeast) word “bayuk”, meaning “small stream”.

23 Rubylike gemstone : SPINEL

Spinel is a magnesium aluminate mineral that is sometimes used as a gemstone. Two of the more famous gem-quality spinels are the Black Prince’s Ruby and the Timur Ruby, both of which are in the British Crown Jewels collection. Spinels are distinct from rubies, but the rose-tinted variety used to be called Balas rubies.

24 Post-9/11 cabinet agcy. : DHS

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was created in 2002 after the September 11th attacks. Today, the DHS has over 200,000 employees making it the third largest department in the cabinet (the biggest employers are the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs). The formation of the DHS was the biggest government reorganization in US history, with 22 government agencies drawn into a single organization.

25 Slugging Sammy : SOSA

Sammy Sosa was firmly in the public eye in 1998 when he and Mark McGwire were vying to be the first to surpass the home run record held by Roger Maris. McGwire fell out of public favor due to stories of steroid abuse (stories which he later admitted were true) while Sosa fell out of favor when he was found to be using a corked bat in a 2003 game.

27 “The War of the Worlds” villains, for short : ETS

“The War of the Worlds” is a science fiction classic penned by H. G. Wells in 1895-97. This compelling story of Martians invading Earth has been adapted many times into radio dramas, a television series and several movies.

33 Urged to attack, with “on” : SICCED …

“Sic ’em” is an attack order given to a dog, one instructing the animal to growl, bark or even bite. The term dates back to the 1830s, with “sic” being a variation of “seek”.

38 Wile E. Coyote purchase : TNT

“TNT” is an abbreviation for “trinitrotoluene”. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner are two much-loved cartoon characters from Warner Bros. Wile E. Coyote was created first, and Road Runner was invented as someone for Wile E. to play off. I love this cartoon; it’s definitely one of the best …

43 Close-knit groups : CADRES

A cadre is most commonly a group of experienced personnel at the core of a larger organization that the small group trains or heavily influences. “Cadre” is a French word meaning “frame”. We use it in the sense that a cadre is a group that provides a “framework” for the larger organization.

45 She’s a doll : BARBIE

The famous Barbie doll was created by businesswoman Ruth Handler and first appeared on store shelves in 1959. Barbie was based on a German fashion doll called Bild Lilli that was introduced in 1955. Lilli had been a German cartoon character before taking on a three-dimensional form. Prior to the introduction of Bild Lilli and Barbie, children’s dolls were primarily representations of infants.

51 Many, many years : EPOCH

Geological time is divided into a number of units of varying lengths. These are, starting from the largest:

  • supereon
  • eon (also “aeon”)
  • era
  • period
  • epoch
  • age

55 Spanish coin : EURO

The peseta is the former currency of Spain, and the de facto currency of Spain’s neighbor, the Principality of Andorra. The peseta was replaced by the euro in 2002.

57 Flight board listings: Abbr. : ETDS

Estimated time of departure (ETD)

59 Souvenir shop purchase : CAP

A souvenir is a memento, a token of remembrance. We imported the word “souvenir” from French, in which language it has the same meaning. The term comes from the Latin “subvenire” meaning “to come to mind”, or literally “to come up”.

60 Tokyo, formerly : EDO

“Edo” is the former name of the Japanese city of Tokyo. Edo was the seat of the Tokugawa shogunate, a feudal regime that ruled from 1603 until 1868. The shogun lived in the magnificent Edo Castle. Some parts of the original castle remain and today’s Tokyo Imperial Palace, the residence of the Emperor of Japan, was built on its grounds.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 “The Boy Who Cried Wolf,” e.g. : FABLE
6 __ bean : NAVY
10 “Gee whiz!” : OMG!
13 Name on a sweetener packet : EQUAL
14 Après-ski drink : COCOA
15 IOC country two before NZL, alphabetically : NOR
16 Go off without a hiccup : RUN SMOOTHLY (“moot” court)
18 Still, in verse : THO’
19 Needs for 3-Downs : BATS
20 WSJ headline topic : IPO
21 Tobacco plug : CHAW
22 Singapore makeup : ISLANDS
26 Complain (about) : RAIL
27 PC corner key : ESC
30 Paranormal power : PSYCHOMETRY (“home” court)
32 Hawaiian Congresswoman Gabbard : TULSI
34 50 minutes on a couch, say : SESSION
35 Going out with : SEEING
37 Divvies up : ALLOTS
40 Harsh : ACERBIC
44 Big name in insurance : AETNA
45 London-based credit brand : BARCLAYCARD (“clay” court)
48 List-ending abbr. : ETC
49 “A Death in the Family” author James : AGEE
50 Crack shot : DEADEYE
52 Comic Foxx : REDD
53 New Deal agcy. : NRA
54 Baseball’s Rose : PETE
58 One might be under a selfie : BIO
59 Site of a tennis focus match … and a hint to what’s hidden in 16-, 30- and 45-Across? : CENTER COURT
63 The Cyclones of the Big 12 Conf. : ISU
64 Spanish 41-Down : ADIOS
65 Bitter-tasting : ACRID
66 Lifesaver, briefly : EMT
67 Water ___ : POLO
68 Hits hard : WHOPS

Down

1 Stepbrother of Phineas on a Disney animated series : FERB
2 Shade of blue : AQUA
3 Hit close to home? : BUNT
4 Indian yogurt drink : LASSI
5 Nightmare street : ELM
6 Never ever : NOT ONCE
7 “Bah!” in Bavaria : ACH!
8 Tennessee athlete, briefly : VOL
9 Joyous shout : YAY!
10 “Speaking of which … ” : ON THAT NOTE …
11 Sweater material : MOHAIR
12 Guttural : GROWLY
14 HMO outlays : COPAYS
17 Works on walls : OILS
21 Bayou cuisine : CREOLE
23 Rubylike gemstone : SPINEL
24 Post-9/11 cabinet agcy. : DHS
25 Slugging Sammy : SOSA
27 “The War of the Worlds” villains, for short : ETS
28 Bring an action : SUE
29 Decamped, say : CLEARED OUT
31 Address for a noblewoman : MILADY
33 Urged to attack, with “on” : SICCED …
36 Former senior : GRAD
38 Wile E. Coyote purchase : TNT
39 Pouch : SAC
41 English 64-Across : BYE
42 “Just watch me!” : I CAN TOO!
43 Close-knit groups : CADRES
45 She’s a doll : BARBIE
46 Discrimination based on years : AGEISM
47 Raise : REAR
51 Many, many years : EPOCH
55 Spanish coin : EURO
56 Fall lead-in, maybe : TRIP
57 Flight board listings: Abbr. : ETDS
59 Souvenir shop purchase : CAP
60 Tokyo, formerly : EDO
61 Nothing : NIL
62 Crow cry : CAW!

28 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 12 Aug 20, Wednesday”

  1. Huh, so I wasn’t the only one stuck in the NE then. Originally I had NED for the IOC clue and thought about putting a few other N countries. That complicated things in that corner until I remembered Norway and finally saw MOHAIR. Nauru was one of the ones I thought of, but I assumed it would be NAU, not NRU.

  2. 11:06, no errors, no write-overs, no real complaints, but a thoughtful solve throughout (and yes, I finished in the upper right).

    @John Daigle …

    My best game in league bowling was eerily similar to yours: I had nine strikes in a row and then … realizing what was going on, I developed a bad case of the shakes and almost totally screwed up the tenth frame. I think my final score was 252. (Not my favorite memory … 😜.)

    I’m having problems with some kind of arthritis/tendonitis in my feet and hands and have had to curtail various activities, including my walking and my summary of the golf ball saga. (I have a scheduled appointment with my doctor on the 26th; perhaps he’ll be able to tell me what’s going on.) Meanwhile, it hurts to bend over and pick anything up and it hurts to hold this iPad … 😳.

    I have no idea how one would go about making a golf club. I used to play at making little things on a wood lathe, but haven’t touched one in many years now.

    And, last night, while cleaning my teeth, a crown popped off of a back molar, so I’m going to have to see my dentist, which I’d rather not do (but I doubt that she can replace it remotely … 😜).

    1. my father once had a 299 in league bowling. Some got the pin he missed and then bolted it to a chamber pot and presented it as a trophy

  3. 3 errors.. Was definitely stuck in NE corner way too long. CHEW for a long time and trying to force MERINO for a long time. But I certainly couldn’t get PSYCHOMETRY until I solved MOHAIR and whatever 2 before NZL meant. My errors turned up in the SE corner. Had WHAMS for 68A so lead to EURA and TRIM … Completely missed EURO.. Can I TRIM before I fall? Perhaps… And what is a Tennis focus match? Is the word FOCUS important here? this grid felt like a mashup of a Monday thru Friday grid..

    Took me about 30 minutes…

    Be safe

    1. Important matches (e.g., tournament finals) are played on center court where they can be the focus of everyone’s attention. Yeah, I figured that out after the fact; originally I was thinking something along the lines of specially scheduled matches ala Billie Jean King vs Bobby Riggs.

  4. Been away for a few days so I guess I should be happy with only a write-over (ETa/ETD).

    Hey… 53A is always that FDR agency; couldn’t we give a different clue a shot?

    Nonny I recently went to the dentist. The hygienist wore a full-length smock, wrist covering gloves, mask of course, face shield, and goggles so don’t be surprised when you go.

    1. Thanks for the info, Chris. And that’s kind of what I’m hoping for. My appointment is for 8:30 tomorrow morning, which means I have to leave home at 6:30, but that’s okay, because it reduces the chances of being there after someone with the virus has been there. (Paranoia … the new reality … 😳 … 😜.)

    2. My trip included all that and a rather unpleasant (given my exposed nerve) hydrogen peroxide rinse. Sadly, I have a lot of dental problems I can’t do anything about, so it was largely par for the course.

  5. No errors at the end, but , boy did I struggle with the NE corner. In
    that I’m not alone I see. Not until I realized 10A could be OMG, did
    things finally pan out. And I started out with “til” instead of “tho”
    which complicated it even more.

    I would say I’ve never heard of “moot court”, but I figured “smooth”
    was the word they wanted. Worked anyway.

  6. Really nothing beats a nice cold beer after a day on the slopes, followed by a soak in an outdoor hot tub while drinking Champagne! Cheers

  7. A total slog for me. Didn’t get the theme even though I got center court early on. (There’s that word moot again). Didn’t know spinel and ferb. I actually had more trouble with the NW than NE corner. I never use the word psychometry or whops. Took me a while to complete. Other than that, great puzzle!

  8. I made the same miscue as Mary, putting in til for 18 Across before I finally figured out that wasn’t working with the down clues/answers. Once I got tho then mohair became apparent and from that point the NE corner fell into place. I also thought today’s WSJ grid was a fair challenge, (even a bit more difficult than the LAT’s puzzle in my estimation). It was actually heartening to see Bill get stuck for awhile as that seems to hardly ever happen to him, especially on a Wednesday. Bill being human; who’d a thunk it? ;-D>

    1. @Tony … Agree on the WSJ (10:36, no errors, STARS before STATS). The theme was helpful, like having an extra clue for each of the circled letters (whereas I didn’t use the theme for the LAT).

  9. 37:21…I had Tulsa for Tulsi….my paper doesn’t identify the setter on the LAT puzzle but as I was trudging through this one I thought for sure it was Agard or Chen with a partner but I was wrong…1D we all knew that I’m sure…10A is an abbr. and not stated as such…as for 64A & 41D IMO that kind of clueing is totally unfair and doesn’t belong in a puzzle.
    For a Wednesday puzzle my rating is 👎 👎.
    @Nonny…getting old sucks😊

  10. I love your daily explanations but am sometimes left looking up info. to fill in gaps. An example would be today’s (8-12-20) # 27 Down. I assume that ETS means “extra terrestrials,” but that crucial link between the answer and your explanation is missing. Please assume nothing regarding your readers’ previous knowledge–especially when explaining abbreviated answers and acronyms.

    Also, conventionally, commas and periods are placed inside closing quotation marks, even when citing individual words.. This is the format used by the Times itself. So, for example, your explanation for # 59 Down should be punctuated “…mind,” and “…up.”

    Thank you for adding fun and closure to my morning sessions with the paper. I love being able to get answers and explanations right after I have hit the wall on completing the puzzle. Keep up the great work!

    1. @Sarah … Bill is from Ireland and, as I recently discovered (much to my delight, since I’ve been purposely doing it “wrong” ever since I was a kid, because it makes a lot more sense to me), the convention in the UK is to put punctuation outside quotation marks. Also, it should be noted that Bill’s blog is a private one, having no official connection with the Los Angeles Times. Bill chooses which clues to discuss and which ones not to discuss; we may not always agree with his choices, but, in general, his method does tend to keep the list shorter and more interesting.

      1. Thank you for the info., A Nonny Muss! I am new to this realm and am happy to gain insights into the blog and crossword subculture. Working on the Times crossword is one good habit I’ve gained from the months of quarantine– though I must say that the completion times posted are certainly intimidating (and inspiring)!

  11. Is this really Wednesday? I had 5 Googles – but they had 8 sports clues! I had no idea what IOC was. Yes Bill, please define the terms.
    Had MadAme before MILADY, cOtton before MOHAIR, “tee” before CAP.
    Usually, theme answers run across two words. In two out of three here, the theme word was totally in just one of the words (MOOT, CLAY).
    Agree with @Chris about the FDR org.
    And the misclued abbrev of the day was GRAD.
    I have a lifetime count of 15 root canals – beat that one. I always blame WWII.
    MOOT COURT is known to lawyers and debaters. It is a debate exercise just for the practice.
    Grumpy – er GROWLY.

  12. 13:36 2 errors

    Got so mired in the NE corners, I forgot to check the crosses in the SE, where my two wrong squares were.

    Haven’t thought about spinel in a long time.

  13. Not a bad effort, but have to settle for a DNF of about 80% solved.
    After seeing the finished product, I knew most of the words, just
    not where to use them. Bummer.

    A Nonny and Anonymous, I thought of another bowling story.
    When I lived in St. Louis for two years, I went to a bowling match
    one night, the Budweisers versus the Falstaffs. The Buds had Don
    Carter, Dick Weber and other super stars. But the Fals had a
    guy that rolled 289 – 300 – 189 = 778 and his team won. When
    his last ball in the second game reached the first floor marker,
    his teammates all rushed up to congratulate him on his perfect
    game. They knew it was good when they saw it roll over that
    first marker on the lane floor. I really enjoyed watching them.

    There is no magic in the making of a golf club. I am pretty non-
    mechanical and I learned to do it. That game is the study of a
    lifetime to me.

    I just finished a book on the life of Arnold Palmer. In his prime,
    he was considered the best driver in the game. I watched him
    win the Baton Rouge Open when I was in college. When he hit
    his tee shot on No. 8, the ball actually squeaked when it came off
    the clubface. He used a Hogan driver and they were not friendly.

  14. Too tough for me today, and on a Wednesday!! Finally gave up on the NE corner after getting CHAW, RAnt, CREOLE and …HA_NOTE.

    Never heard of FERB, LASSI, PSYCHOMETRY or SPINEL (well, vaguely.)

    re Dentist visits – I just went for a cleaning and they had us call from just outside the office and wait there until summoned. Then, I got my temperature checked and my blood oxygen checked (with something that lightly clamped on my thumb.) Then, I could take off my mask an had to swish two different solutions for 1 minute each; although the second I could only take for 30 secs. And, she couldn’t use the ultrasonic thing, because of stuff spraying around, so she just scraped away for an hour….sheesh!

  15. Aloha meine Freunden!!🦆

    I feel better now that I see several of us, even Bill, struggled in that NE corner! I thought I was just being lazy when I cheated for NOR and THO. 🙃

    RE dentists – nowadays if I have to go in for a health thing I call in advance to see what their covid protocols are. Puts my mind at ease. However, ten days ago I had to have a tooth extracted and I specifically asked if they wore face shields as well as masks. They said yes, but when I arrived, no shields!! Gloves and N95 masks of course, but I was kinda bugged. Couldn’t really back out – I’d put off the extraction too long already. My health has been such that I’ve been to more doctors and hospitals in the past 4 months than in the previous 5 years!! (I’m fine now.) Everyone has safety measures in place but I really feel I’ve dodged a bullet not getting covid!

    Be well ~~⚾️

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