LA Times Crossword 6 Aug 20, Thursday

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Constructed by: John Lampkin
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Just Desserts

Themed answers each start with JUST a DESSERT:

  • 62A Appropriate reward, as often misspelled … and what the starts of the answers to starred clues might be : JUST DESSERTS
  • 18A *Scout leader’s unit : BROWNIE TROOP
  • 35A *Ragtime pianist’s number : CAKEWALK
  • 44A *Analyst’s infographic : PIE CHART
  • 12D *Arbitrary error allowance : FUDGE FACTOR
  • 26D *Boot sole material : CREPE RUBBER

Bill’s time: 6m 24s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Spirited French commune? : COGNAC

Cognac is a famous variety of brandy named after the commune of Cognac in the very west of France. To be called “cognac”, the brandy must be distilled twice in copper pot stills and aged at least two years in very specific French oak barrels.

7 Like Wicca, say : PAGAN

A pagan is someone who holds religious beliefs that are different from the main religions of the world, and especially someone who believes in polytheism. In classical Latin, “paganus” means “villager, rustic”.

Wicca is a relatively new phenomenon. It is a Neopagan religion that developed in the twentieth century. Typically, followers of Wicca worship one goddess and one god, namely the Moon Goddess and the Horned God. A follower of Wicca is called a Wiccan or a Witch.

15 Dawn goddess : AURORA

Aurora was the Roman goddess of the dawn, and was equivalent to the Greek goddess Eos. According to myth, Aurora renewed herself each and every morning and then flew across the sky to announce the rising of the sun.

17 Hagen of the theater : UTA

Uta Hagen was a German-born American actress. Hagen married Jose Ferrer in 1938, but they were divorced ten years later after it was revealed that she was having a long-running affair with Paul Robeson. Her association with Robeson, a prominent civil rights activist, earned her a spot on the Hollywood Blacklist during the McCarthy Era. This forced her away from film, but towards a successful stage career in New York City.

18 *Scout leader’s unit : BROWNIE TROOP

Brownies are members of the Girl Guiding organization who are seven to ten years old. When the group was founded in 1914 by Lord Baden-Powell, they were known as Rosebuds. That name wasn’t popular with the membership and so was changed, taking inspiration from an 1870 story by Juliana Horatia Ewing called “The Brownies”.

Apparently, the first brownies were created for the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893. The recipe was developed by a pastry chef at the city’s Palmer House Hotel. The idea was to produce a cake-like dessert that was small enough and dainty enough to be eaten by ladies as part of a boxed lunch.

20 UPS rival : DHL

Back in the sixties, Larry Hillblom was making pocket money as a Berkeley law student by doing courier runs between San Francisco and Los Angeles. After law school, Hillblom decided to parlay his experience into his own business and set up a courier service flying bills of lading ahead of freight from San Francisco to Honolulu. He brought in two buddies, Adrian Dalsey and Robert Lynn, as partners and the three were soon hopping on and off commercial flights and gradually making more and more money. And DHL was born … D (for Dalsey) H (for Hillblom) L (for Lynn). DHL was acquired by Germany’s Deutsche Post in 2002.

29 Claudius’ successor : NERO

Nero was Emperor of Rome from 54 to 68 CE, and he had quite the family life. When he was just 16-years-old Nero married his step-sister Claudia Octavia. He also had his mother and step-brother executed.

I find Claudius to be the most fascinating of all the Roman Emperors. Claudius had a lot going against him as he walked with a limp and was slightly deaf. He was put in office by the Praetorian Guard (the emperor’s bodyguards) after Caligula was assassinated. Claudius had very little political experience and yet proved to be very forward-thinking and capable.

30 Another, in Acapulco : OTRA

The Mexican city of Acapulco is on the southwest coast of the country, in the state of Guerrero. The name “Acapulco” translates from the local language into “at the big reeds”.

32 U.K. fliers : RAF

The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the oldest independent air force in the world (i.e. the first air force to become independent of army or navy forces). The RAF was formed during WWI on 1 April 1918, a composite of two earlier forces, the Royal Flying Corps (part of the Army) and the Royal Naval Air Service. The RAF’s “finest hour” was the Battle of Britain, when the vastly outnumbered British fighters fought off the might of the Luftwaffe causing Hitler to delay his plan to cross the English Channel. This outcome prompted Winston Churchill to utter the memorable words

Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.

33 Father’s Day pin : TIE TAC

Father’s Day was added as an official holiday in 1972, although bills to create the holiday had been with Congress since 1913. By rights, the holiday should be called “Fathers’ Day” (note the punctuation), but the bill that was introduced in 1913 used the “Father’s Day” spelling, and that’s the one that has stuck.

35 *Ragtime pianist’s number : CAKEWALK

The Cakewalk is a dance that originated in the African-American community from the “Prize Walk”, in the days of slavery. The Prize Walk was a procession in which couples “walked” with as much style as possible, with the intent of winning the big prize, a large cake. Our term “cakewalk”, meaning something easily accomplished, derives from this tradition. The expression “take the cake” has the same etymology.

39 AOL or MSN : ISP

Internet service provider (ISP)

40 A lot of hooey : CLAPTRAP

“Claptrap” these days means nonsense talk. It was originally a term used on the stage meaning a trick to attract applause, hence the name “clap trap”.

43 Hoodwink : CON

“To hoodwink” has had the meaning “to deceive” since about 1600. Prior to that it meant simply “to blindfold”, and is simply a combination of the words “hood” and “wink”.

44 *Analyst’s infographic : PIE CHART

A pie chart can also be referred to as a circle graph. It is often stated that Florence Nightingale invented the pie chart. While this is not in fact true, she is due credit for popularizing it, and for developing the pie chart variation known as the polar area diagram. The earliest known pie chart appears in a book published in 1801 by Scottish engineer William Playfair.

48 Manta __ : RAY

The manta ray is the largest species of ray, with the largest one recorded at over 25 feet across and weighing 5,100 pounds. It is sometimes referred to as the sea devil.

49 Like some perfume : MUSKY

Musk has such an elegant connotation these days because of its use in the world of perfumery. However, its origin is not quite so glamorous. The original substance called musk, also used in perfumes, was extracted from a gland in the rectal area of the male musk deer. The name “musk” is a Sanskrit word for “testicle”.

53 One of the basic tastes : SOUR

There are 2,000 to 8,000 taste buds on the human tongue, and together they detect five different tastes: salty, sour, bitter, sweet and umami. Taste buds have a short lifetime, and are replaced about every ten days.

55 Sans-serif font : ARIAL

Serifs are details on the ends of characters in some typefaces. Typefaces without serifs are known as sans-serif, using the French word “sans” meaning “without” and “serif” from the Dutch “schreef” meaning “line”. Some people say that serif fonts are easier to read on paper, whereas sans-serif fonts work better on a computer screen. I’m not so sure though …

59 Tibet neighbor : NEPAL

Nepal lies to the northeast of India. Today, the state is known as the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal. In 2008, the Communist Party of Nepal won the country’s general election. Soon after, the Assembly voted to change the form of government, moving away from a monarchy and creating a secular republic.

62 Appropriate reward, as often misspelled … and what the starts of the answers to starred clues might be : JUST DESSERTS

The phrase “just deserts” describes something which is deserved, and in today’s usage that can be something good or bad. The expression has been around a long time, and back in the 14th century it only applied to something bad. I guess the idea is that someone doing something unacceptable got his “just deserts”, the dry and barren expanses fitting to the deed. Over time, the pronunciation of “deserts” changed, with the emphasis on the second syllable, like our word “desserts”. The correct phrase is still spelled “just deserts”, but it is pronounced “just desserts”. As a result, many believe that the phrase is in fact spelled “just desserts”, meaning one is getting what one deserves, sweet endings to one’s meals, as it were. But no, one is getting a dry and arid expanse that sounds like something sweet to eat!

68 Pianist Rubinstein : ARTUR

The great Arthur (sometimes “Artur”) Rubinstein was a classical pianist from Poland who became a naturalized American citizen in 1946. Rubenstein was particularly respected as a performer of Chopin’s repertoire.

69 Comparable to a pin : AS NEAT

Apparently, the idiom “neat as a pin” arose in the early 1800s, with the advent of mass production. Up until that time, pins were handmade and so were irregular and relatively flawed. Mass-produced pins were uniform and of consistent quality. So, something that was uniform and of consistent quality came to be described as “neat as a pin”.

71 Many a Bob Marley fan : RASTA

I must admit that I don’t really know much about Rastafarianism. I do know that a “Rasta”, such as Bob Marley, is a follower of the movement. Some say that Rastafarianism is a religion, some not. I also know that it involves the worship of Emperor Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia.

Bob Marley was the most widely-known reggae performer, with big hits such as “I Shot the Sheriff”, “No Woman, No Cry” and “One Love”. A little sadly perhaps, Marley’s best-selling album was released three years after he died. That album would be the “legendary” album called “Legend”.

Down

1 Popular red : CAB

The cabernet sauvignon (often just “cab”) grape has been around since the 17th century, and is the result of a chance crossing in southwestern France of the cabernet franc and sauvignon blanc grapes.

5 Golf icon Palmer : ARNIE

Arnold Palmer was one of the greats of the world of golf. He was very popular with many fans of the game, and his followers were usually referred to as “Arnie’s Army”. Off the course, Palmer was an avid pilot until his latter years. He resided in Latrobe, Pennsylvania for much of the year and the local airport is named in his honor: Arnold Palmer Regional Airport.

6 Genesis farmer : CAIN

According to the Bible’s Book of Genesis, after Cain murdered his brother Abel, he fled to the “Land of Nod” located “east of Eden” (from which John Steinbeck got the title for his celebrated novel “East of Eden”).

8 Flight info abbr. : ARR

Arrival (arr.)

9 Michelin rival : GOODYEAR

The Goodyear tire company was founded in 1898. The company was named for Charles Goodyear, the man who invented vulcanized rubber in 1839. Despite the Goodyear name, Charles Goodyear himself had no connection with the company. Sadly, he never really reaped a financial reward for his inventions.

10 Love, in Pisa : AMORE

The city of Pisa sits right on the Italian coast, at the mouth of the River Arno. The city is perhaps most famous for its Leaning Tower. The tower is actually the campanile (bell tower) of the city’s cathedral, and it has been leaning since it was completed in 1173. Just shows you how important good foundations are …

11 Source of much 1-Down : NAPA
(1D Popular red : CAB)

The first commercial winery in Napa Valley, California was established way back in 1858. However, premium wine production only dates back to the 1960s, with the region really hitting the big time after its success at the Paris Wine Tasting of 1976. The story of that famous blind wine tasting is told in the entertaining 2008 film “Bottle Shock”.

13 Bygone anesthetic : ETHER

Ethers are a whole class of organic compounds, but in the vernacular “ether” is specifically diethyl ether. Diethyl ether was once very popular as a general anesthetic.

14 Guy found in kids’ books : WALDO

The series of children’s illustrated books called “Where’s Waldo?” were originally titled “Where’s Wally?” in Britain, where the books originated. The book contains page after page of illustrations with crowds of people surrounding famous landmarks from around the world. The challenge is to find Waldo/Wally, who is hidden in the crowd.

25 Formal “Just me” : IT IS I

The much debated statement “it is I” is grammatically correct, and should not be “corrected” to “it is me”. Traditionally, pronouns following linking verbs, such as “is”, “appear” and “seem”, are written in the nominative case. Examples are:

  • It is I (who called)
  • It was he (who did it)
  • It is we (who care)

31 Pac-12 team : UCLA

The UCLA Bruins’ mascots are Joe and Josephine Bruin, characters that have evolved over the years. There used to be “mean” Bruin mascots but they weren’t very popular with the fans, so now there are only “happy” Bruin mascots at the games.

32 Default takeback : REPO

Repossession (repo)

36 Singer Perry : KATY

Katy Perry is an American singer who grew up listening to and singing gospel music, as she was the daughter of two Christian pastors. In fact, her first musical release was a gospel album in 2001. She has branched out since then. Her first successful single was “Ur so Gay”, followed by “I Kissed A Girl”. She was married (for only a year) to the British comedian Russell Brand, until 2012.

45 Novelist Caleb : CARR

One of Caleb Carr’s novels is a latter-day Sherlock Holmes mystery called “The Italian Secretary”. The novel was written as a homage to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (using the Holmes character with the permission of the Doyle estate). I am a big fan of Sherlock Holmes stories, so I must put this one on my reading list …

50 Oh of “Killing Eve” : SANDRA

Canadian actress Sandra Oh is very much associated with the role of Dr. Cristina Yang on “Grey’s Anatomy”, and more recently with the role of Eve Polastri on “Killing Eve” . However, my favorite of Oh’s performances are in the movies “Under the Tuscan Sun” and “Sideways”.

“Killing Eve” is a spy thriller series about an MI5 agent on the trail of a female assassin. The agent is played by Canadian actress Sandra Oh, and the assassin by English actress Jodie Comer. The storyline comes from a series of novellas titled “Codename Villanelle” by British author Luke Jennings.

51 “Cat and Bird” artist : KLEE

Artist Paul Klee was born in Switzerland, but studied art in Munich in Germany. We can see many of Klee’s works in the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. If you get to Bern in Switzerland, even more of them can be seen at the Zentrum Paul Klee that was opened in 2005. Klee’s most celebrated work is his pointillist painting from 1932 called “Ad Parnassum”, which is owned by the Kunstmuseum, also located in Bern.

54 Nebraska city : OMAHA

Omaha is the largest city in the state of Nebraska. It is located on the Missouri River, about 10 miles north of the mouth of the Platte River. When Nebraska was still a territory Omaha was its capital, but when Nebraska achieved statehood the capital was moved to the city of Lincoln.

55 High-end Honda : ACURA

Acura is the luxury brand of the Honda Motor Company. As an aside, Infiniti is the equivalent luxury brand for the Nissan Motor Company, and Lexus is the more luxurious version of Toyota’s models.

56 Cowboy rope : LASSO

Our English word “lasso” comes from the Spanish “lazo”, and ultimately from the Latin “laqueum” meaning “noose, snare”.

58 Slightly open : AJAR

Our word “ajar” is thought to come from Scottish dialect, in which “a char” means “slightly open”.

60 Exam for jrs. : PSAT

Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT)

64 “The Crying Game” actor Stephen : REA

Stephen Rea is an Irish actor from Belfast. Rea’s most successful role was Fergus in 1992’s “The Crying Game”, for which performance he was nominated for the Best Actor Oscar. In “The Crying Game”, Fergus was a member of the IRA. In real life, Rea was married to IRA bomber and hunger striker Dolours Price at the time he made the movie.

“The Crying Game” is a fascinating film that made quite a splash when it was released in 1992. Although it was set in Ireland and the UK, it didn’t do well in cinemas in either country yet made a lot of money over here in the US. I think the politics of the movie were a bit raw for Irish and UK audiences back then. It’s an unusual plot, blending Irish political issues with some raw sexuality questions. I won’t tell you about the “surprise scene”, just in case you haven’t seen it and want to do so.

65 1960-’61 chess champ : TAL

Mikhail Tal truly was a chess legend. Tal holds the record for the longest unbeaten streak in competition chess. And the second longest winning streak? Well, that also was by Tal.

66 GPS displays : STS

Street (st.)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Spirited French commune? : COGNAC
7 Like Wicca, say : PAGAN
12 Not many : FEW
15 Dawn goddess : AURORA
16 Coffeehouse draw : AROMA
17 Hagen of the theater : UTA
18 *Scout leader’s unit : BROWNIE TROOP
20 UPS rival : DHL
21 Take top prize for : WIN AT
22 Hauled : DRAGGED
24 Specialized job : NICHE
27 Try a new color on : RE-DYE
29 Claudius’ successor : NERO
30 Another, in Acapulco : OTRA
31 Excessive : UNDUE
32 U.K. fliers : RAF
33 Father’s Day pin : TIE TAC
35 *Ragtime pianist’s number : CAKEWALK
39 AOL or MSN : ISP
40 A lot of hooey : CLAPTRAP
43 Hoodwink : CON
44 *Analyst’s infographic : PIE CHART
46 A bit much : TOO TOO
48 Manta __ : RAY
49 Like some perfume : MUSKY
52 Blog entry : POST
53 One of the basic tastes : SOUR
55 Sans-serif font : ARIAL
56 Tackle box assortment : LURES
57 Warm greeting : EMBRACE
59 Tibet neighbor : NEPAL
61 Capture : NAB
62 Appropriate reward, as often misspelled … and what the starts of the answers to starred clues might be : JUST DESSERTS
67 That yacht : SHE
68 Pianist Rubinstein : ARTUR
69 Comparable to a pin : AS NEAT
70 Bud’s place : EAR
71 Many a Bob Marley fan : RASTA
72 They’re often at the bottoms of columns : TOTALS

Down

1 Popular red : CAB
2 Group possessive : OUR
3 Garden adspeak word : GRO
4 “Another problem?!” : NOW WHAT?!
5 Golf icon Palmer : ARNIE
6 Genesis farmer : CAIN
7 Stroked gently : PATTED
8 Flight info abbr. : ARR
9 Michelin rival : GOODYEAR
10 Love, in Pisa : AMORE
11 Source of much 1-Down : NAPA
12 *Arbitrary error allowance : FUDGE FACTOR
13 Bygone anesthetic : ETHER
14 Guy found in kids’ books : WALDO
19 Bring home : EARN
23 Chew (on) : GNAW
24 Payback for lousy service : NO TIP
25 Formal “Just me” : IT IS I
26 *Boot sole material : CREPE RUBBER
28 Tear dispenser : DUCT
31 Pac-12 team : UCLA
32 Default takeback : REPO
34 Sore from a workout : ACHY
36 Singer Perry : KATY
37 __ cannon : LOOSE
38 Rustic pine features : KNOTS
41 Loveseat sides : ARMRESTS
42 Spitting sound : PTUI!
45 Novelist Caleb : CARR
47 Swank : OPULENT
50 Oh of “Killing Eve” : SANDRA
51 “Cat and Bird” artist : KLEE
53 Taste, for one : SENSE
54 Nebraska city : OMAHA
55 High-end Honda : ACURA
56 Cowboy rope : LASSO
58 Slightly open : AJAR
60 Exam for jrs. : PSAT
63 Tsk relative : TUT
64 “The Crying Game” actor Stephen : REA
65 1960-’61 chess champ : TAL
66 GPS displays : STS

29 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 6 Aug 20, Thursday”

  1. No errors. Typical 15 minutes. CREPE RUBBER? Didn’t know that was a shoe thing. Not sure I’ve seen it. Definitely not on my work boots.

    Be safe

  2. Surprisingly no errors today, although I had to change Kate to Katy
    to allow for the “musky” perfume. There were clues I did not understand but luckily got them from the cross words…like crepe
    rubber.

  3. I never heard of crepe rubber either. But a nice puzzle and theme. Some days l write the answers & l think it’s correct, but then l feel l should check myself anyway. Don’t understand that. Did that alot in this puzzle. I’m a nervous Nellie today. Be safe.

  4. Count me in for not knowing what crepe rubber was. But once I got the theme it was the only thing that made sense. Originally had riata before lasso but Nepal set me straight. A bit tougher than the three previous puzzles but not by much.

  5. No errors, liked the variety of the answers today.

    @Nonny (from Wednesday)
    Glad you liked “Burden of Dreams”, figured you might. The center of Isaias went over us Tuesday, lost 4 trees. Very weird seeing a 60 ft high Locust in my backyard get pushed down in slow motion over the course of an hour. Then the wind died down to nothing for 30 minutes before starting up again. Spent most of the day Wednesday chopping.

    I think Isaias would be a gold mine for puzzle creators. As a Cat I / TS though, it probably doesn’t rate. (I’ll pass on a bigger one though, thanks.)

  6. Crepe rubber rang a bell with me, but I associated it with Vibram soles, and that wasn’t correct. When I was a young lad there were popular shoes called wallabies that had leather uppers and a light, cream-colored rubber sole. That was crepe rubber. Wikipedia says it’s “coagulated latex”. Sounds yummy, not.

  7. No problems with the LAT’s grid. Pretty straightforward. On the other hand, while I completed the WSJ puzzle I still don’t understand the gimmick after finishing and I had a LOT of staring and muttering time as I struggled with whatever the heck that was. Anyone else here who does the WSJ please chime in. I’d like to know more about what I finished, yet without understanding what that was? And I know what I just wrote doesn’t make any sense, but neither did the puzzle gimmick as far as I could figure out.

    1. @Tony … The WSJ has a sort of double gimmick. The first gimmick is that three squares are rebuses containing the word “DOOR”. The entries at 17-, 26-, and 44-Across are then, respectively, “AT ONE’S (DOOR) NAIL”, “LEFT THE (DOOR) STEP”, and “DEAD AS A (DOOR) OPEN”. The second gimmick is that the last word of each of these has been “teleported” (as suggested by the entry at 59-Across) from its correct position, through one of the DOORs, to a different position. So the original theme entries were actually “AT ONE’S DOORSTEP”, “LEFT THE DOOR OPEN”, and “DEAD AS A DOORNAIL”, and the clues given for them are correct for these original versions of the entries.

      (21:53, no errors, more than a little head-scratching. 😜)

      1. Thanks for that explanation. Completely overlooked the “teleportation” part of the gimmick and that now explains why I was in the deep rough trying to figure out why the long cross answers made no sense to me.

    2. A Nonny Muss gave a good explanation. 17:46, 1 error (66A-60D). Really had to guess at some of the fill outside of the theme entries which I had to go slow on to figure out.

      For those that remember me mentioning Fireball puzzles, this is kind of a mild idea of what one is like. Paul Coulter regularly contributes to those, so I wouldn’t be surprised if this was slated to be one but wasn’t accepted for some reason (I could guess the reason, but I won’t speculate that far).

  8. No Googles, no errors. Did not know CREPE RUBBER, DHL, CARR, TAL.
    CAB should be clued as abbrev.
    I think I should pick up that CARR novel.
    I think DHL might be handled by ShipRite in Utica.
    One of my inmate/students tave me a mnemonic for DESSERT/ desert. The double “s” indicates Strawberry Shortcake, which won’t help you in the sere desert.

  9. 24:10 no errors.
    62A…lnteresting explanation thanks Bill.
    19D… why do setters continue to say what you bring home is what you earn when what you bring home is what you net and what you earn is before deductions and taxes etc ?
    We have had mail delivery once in the last 10 days.
    END OF RANT…STAY SAFE😊

    1. @Jack …

      You’re thinking of wages and salaries, but … an actor may speak of “bringing home” an Oscar that he “earned” by delivering a worthy performance in a particular movie. So … you may count yourself as another hapless victim of a typical crossword puzzle cluing ploy … 😜.

      And I’m also noticing problems with mail delivery … 😳.

  10. 10:01 1 error, resorted to 1 lookup.

    At least I understood the theme in time for it to help.

    I’ve heard of crepe-soled boots, so I guess crepe rubber is a thing.

    @Jack, that’s a good point about earnings and net.

  11. @Dirk (from yesterday) …

    I enjoyed the YouTube video you posted a link to and, as always, that link led me to others, like this one:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=C8M-Hvjm5ns

    Everything I always wanted to know (and more, in fascinating detail) about the “moon walk” illusion (which, I am quite sure, I will never, ever, be able to master 😜).

  12. Did the puzzle in fairly good time for a Thurs. I don’t actually time these things. I measure more by how much sweat is involved.
    I have a silly joke for y’all.
    I read Analyst as pertaining to Freud. That gave me Psychart, or Psych-art, which seemed possible to me, or Psy (sigh) – chart, which also sounds like the answer to a typical silly clue, and something an psychoanalyst might make.
    Yes, I got it figured out eventually.

  13. Nicely balanced difficulty for amateurs like myself. Gave my age away thinking Perry was Como but corrected. Had my tonsils out under open drop ether. Now abandoned because of explosion possibility.

  14. I also first went with Como, as I’m not sure I have even heard a Katy Perry song, but the crosswords straightened me out. Regarding the mail, I read that the USPS Postmaster General has stopped all overtime, so mail is now piling up. My mailbox is always largely filled with junk mail, so we can now thank all of those advertisers for the delay in mail. Maybe it’s time the USPS rethought their fee schedule for junk mail.

  15. My first two surgeries for tonsils and adenoids were done with ether.

    We had 2 typos and 16 empty squares for 91%, letter basis. I will take
    in the nineties any day past Tuesday. Hope for 100% on M and T.

    I worked in a lab that made rubber for tires, beginning with WW II.
    Latex was the intermediate product that we coagulated and then
    dried to make the bales of rubber. We never called it crepe. It was
    just latex (more than one type).

    Stay safe and well, everyone. Our Parish (Louisiana County, but
    in the Napoleonic Code) has now gone three straight days with
    no new deaths. I hope that we are peaking and will soon be on
    the downslope of our latest curve, if we are not already.

    1. When I was 13 and in a children’s hospital to remove tonsils I was anesthetized with ether. I woke up during the operation, unfortunately.

  16. Mostly easy Thursday for me; took 16:05, with no peeks, before I got the all finished banner.

    re Post Office – Our fearless leader has made one of his donor cronies the Post Master General, and since he is one of their competitors he is embarking on a severe cost-saving program, halting any overtime. This has the added “benefit” of slowing down mail deliveries and inhibiting ballot delivery/returns for the upcoming election. Soooo I would suggest that once you get your ballot, to fill it in and return in post haste. Here in CA I’ve signed up for a ballot tracking – text updates with the registrar in our county to keep me updated.

    Today I heard that a few Congress people have sent a letter to the PM General to get some clarification and updates on the new cost cutting…no idea if it has arrived yet.

    @Carrie – I was wrong on two things yesterday. First it was ’78 Wichita not ’74 and when I looked up Buddy Rich’s drum kit, he has Bass, Snare, Tom and two Floor Toms. I was thinking about the Floor Tom(s), of which I thought he only had one.

    @Nonny – That’s an amazing video isn’t it. Check out “Funky Drummer” too, which is sampled by hundreds of current and recent artists to form the back beat for thousands of songs. Clyde Stubblefield was sadly not compensated or credited for his invaluable contribution to all these samples, save for Melissa Etheridge.

    Still working on my moonwalking…. 🙂

  17. Greetings y’all!!🦆

    No errors, but I dislike deliberate misspellings in crosswords. Theme answers were pretty easy, but I wish the setter hadn’t used a misspelled word to get us there. 🙄

    I’m quite familiar with KATY Perry (don’t like her) but despite that I still also thought first of Como.

    Dirk– and cymbals, presumably!!

    Be well~~⚾️

  18. Oh! And if I may add my two cents about the mail slowdown – it’s very upsetting! It took more than a week for the earthquake insurance company to receive my check. Two more days and my policy would have been canceled! (They don’t do auto pay.) An important document from my doctor took 9 days. Had I known I would have picked it up from the office. It’s affecting millions of people and a lot of small businesses. Not good.

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