LA Times Crossword 29 Jan 21, Friday

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Constructed by: Gary Larson
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Flip Book

Themed answers are common phrases that have been FLIPPED and clued as BOOKS:

  • 55A Paperback designed to simulate animation … and a hint to the answers to starred clues : FLIP BOOK
  • 17A *Reference work for canine lovers? : DOG GUIDE (“guide dog” flipped)
  • 21A *Instructional work for expectant mothers? : LABOR MANUAL (“manual labor” flipped)
  • 33A *Fictional work about a pick-up artist? : APPROACH NOVEL (“novel approach” flipped)
  • 49A *Illustrated work for bullpen pitchers? : RELIEF COMIC (“comic relief” flipped)

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 10m 28s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Hybrid cycle : MOPED

The word “moped” was coined in 1952 by a Swedish journalist named Harald Nielsen. The term is a portmanteau of “motor” and “pedal”.

6 Technology that uses polarized light, briefly : LCD

Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs) are the screens that are found in most laptops today, and in flat panel computer screens and some televisions. LCD monitors basically replaced Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) screens, the old television technology.

13 Baba ghanouj ingredient : TAHINI

“Tahini” is the Arabic name for a paste made from ground sesame seeds. Tahini is a major ingredient in hummus, one of my favorite dishes.

Baba ghanoush (also “baba ghanouj”) is an Arab dish with the main ingredient of mashed eggplant. It is sometimes served as a (delicious) dip.

14 Yellowfin tuna : AHI

Yellowfin and bigeye tuna are usually marketed as “ahi”, the Hawaiian name. They are both big fish, with yellowfish tuna often weighing over 300 pounds, and bigeye tuna getting up to 400 pounds.

19 Range in the home, maybe : AMANA

The Amana Corporation takes its name from the location of its original headquarters, in Middle Amana, Iowa. Today, the Amana name is very much associated with household appliances. The company was founded in 1934 to manufacture commercial walk-in coolers.

23 Punk rock offshoot : EMO

The emo musical genre originated in Washington, D.C. in the 80s, and takes its name from “emotional hardcore”. “Emo” is also the name given to the associated subculture. Not my cup of tea …

27 Grunts, so to speak : GIS

The initialism “GI” stands for “Government Issue”, and not “General Infantry” as is widely believed. “GI” was first used in the military to denote equipment made from Galvanized Iron and during WWI, incoming German shells were nicknamed “GI cans”. Soon after, the term GI came to be associated with “Government Issue” and eventually became an adjective to describe anything associated with the Army.

30 Simmons competitor : SERTA

Serta was founded in 1931 when a group of 13 mattress manufacturers came together, essentially forming a cooperative. Today, the Serta company is owned by eight independent licensees in a similar arrangement. Serta advertisements feature the Serta Counting Sheep. Each numbered sheep has a different personality, such as:

  • #1 The Leader of the Flock
  • #½ The Tweener
  • #13 Mr. Bad Luck
  • #53 The Pessimist
  • #86 Benedict Arnold

32 Cork’s place : EIRE

Cork is the second largest city in the Republic of Ireland. Cork has been a major port for many years, and was the last port of call for many, many Irish emigrants to America. When these Irish people reached the US it was common for them to give their point of origin as “Cork”, whereas they may have come from almost anywhere in Ireland. It’s because of this that many descendants of Irish immigrants who had been told they were from a Cork family often find out they were under a misapprehension as their ancestors just sailed from Cork.

38 Requiem Mass word : IRAE

“Dies Irae” is Latin for “Day of Wrath”. It is the name of a famous melody in Gregorian Chant, one that is often used as part of the Roman Catholic Requiem Mass.

44 Beats by __ : DRE

Beats by Dre is a brand of audio products made by Beats Electronics, a company that was co-founded by rapper Dr. Dre. Apple bought Beats for $3 billion in 2014, the largest acquisition by far in the company’s history.

45 Some tags : IDS

Identity document (ID)

62 “The Spanish Tragedy” dramatist : KYD

Thomas Kyd’s most famous work is “The Spanish Tragedy”, a play written in the mid to late 1580s. Even though Kyd was a recognized dramatist within his own lifetime, he fell foul of the standards of the Privy Council of the day and was imprisoned and tortured for allegedly being an atheist. He died soon after, impoverished.

Down

3 It can be grand : PIANO

A grand piano is one with the frame supported horizontally on three legs. An upright piano has the frame and strings running vertically. Grand pianos come in many sizes. For example, the length of a concert grand is about 9 feet, a parlor grand is about 7 feet, and a baby grand is about 5 feet.

4 Darkroom gear : ENLARGER

I’m an amateur photographer, and I’m old. So, I used to use an enlarger to project images from negatives and transparencies onto photosensitive paper. Happy days …

6 Weighed down : LADEN

The verb “to lade” meaning “to load” comes from an Old English word “hladan”. “Lade” also used to mean “draw water” and indeed gave us our word “ladle”. So “lade” and “ladle” are close cousins.

9 Major work : OPUS

The Latin for “work” is “opus”, with the plural being “opera”. We sometimes use the plural “opuses” in English, but that just annoys me …

11 Mil. roadside hazard : IED

Improvised explosive device (IED)

12 Sweater material source : EWE

Until the early 1880s, the word “sweater” applied to clothing worn specifically for weight reduction by “sweating”.

13 Shades of blue : TEALS

The beautiful color teal takes its name from the duck called a teal, which has dark greenish-blue (teal) markings on its head and wings.

18 River to the Colorado : GILA

The Gila River is a tributary of the Colorado that flows through New Mexico and Arizona. From 1848 to 1853, the Gila marked part of the border between the US and Mexico.

The Colorado River rises in the Rocky Mountains, flows through the southwestern US and northwest Mexico, and empties into the Gulf of California. Famously, it is the Colorado that forms the Grand Canyon. The best known dam on the river is the Hoover Dam, which forms Lake Mead.

22 Barcelona-born surrealist : MIRO

Joan Miró was a Spanish artist. Miro immersed himself in Surrealism, so much so that Andre Breton, the founder of the movement, said that Miró was “the most Surrealist of us all”. There are two museums dedicated to Miró’s work. The Fundació Joan Miró is in his native Barcelona, and the Fundació Miró Mallorca is in Palma de Mallorca, where the artist spent much of his life.

Barcelona is the second largest city in Spain, after the capital Madrid. Barcelona is the largest European city that sits on the Mediterranean coast. It is also the capital city of the autonomous community of Catalonia.

24 Cruciverbalist Reagle of “Wordplay” : MERL

Merl Reagle was a renowned constructor of puzzles in crossword circles. Despite the availability of computer tools Reagle was known for constructing puzzles using pencil and paper. There is an interesting segment in the 2006 movie “ Wordplay” in which we see Reagle in action creating a puzzle for the New York Times. Reagle even made an appearance in a 2008 episode of “The Simpsons”.

“Cruciverbalist” is a term developed in the 1990s to describe crossword enthusiasts. The word comes from the Latin for cross (crux) and word (verbum). “Cruciverbalist” is sometimes limited to those who actually construct the puzzles. Over on the other side of the Atlantic, we often call such people “setters”.

34 Rin Tin Tin autograph, e.g. : PAW PRINT

The original Rin Tin Tin was a real-life dog, a puppy discovered by a GI in a bombed-out kennel in France during WWI. The soldier named the pup Rin Tin Tin, the same name as a puppet given to American soldiers for luck. On returning to the US, “Rinty” was trained by his owner and was spotted doing tricks by a film producer. Rinty featured in some films, eventually getting his first starring role in 1923 in the silent movie “Where the North Begins”. Legend has it that this first Rin Tin Tin died in the arms of actress Jean Harlow. Not a bad way to go …

36 Soft ball material : NERF

Nerf is a soft material used in a whole series of toys designed for “safe” play indoors. The Nerf product is used to make darts, balls and ammunition for toy guns. “NERF” is an acronym, standing for Non-Expanding Recreational Foam.

41 Spirited horse : ARAB

The Arab (also “Arabian”) breed of horse takes its name from its original home, the Arabian Peninsula. Like any animal that humans have over-bred, the horse falls prey to genetic diseases, some of which are fatal and some of which require the horse to be euthanized.

43 “Hang on __”: 1965 #1 hit : SLOOPY

“Hang on Sloopy” was a big hit in 1965 for the McCoys. The song was first recorded a year earlier as “My Girl Sloopy” by the Vibrations.

47 Chanel product : SCENT

The House of Chanel has its origin in a millinery shop in Paris that Gabrielle “CoCo” Chanel opened in 1909. The shop was on the ground floor of the home of socialite Étienne Balsan, of whom Chanel was his mistress. Using her connection to Balsan, Chanel met many women who lived extravagant lifestyles in Paris in those pre-war years, and hence was able to establish her reputation as a hatmaker. Chanel built on that reputation, and within a few years opened her first dress shop in Paris.

53 Duel tool : EPEE

The sword known as an épée has a three-sided blade. The épée is similar to a foil and sabre, although the foil and saber have rectangular cross-sections.The sword known as an épée has a three-sided blade. The épée is similar to a foil and sabre, although the foil and saber have rectangular cross-sections.

56 WC : LOO

It has been suggested that the British term “loo”, meaning “toilet”, comes from “Waterloo” (water closet … water-loo), but no one seems to know for sure. Another suggestion is that the term comes from the card game of “lanterloo”, in which the pot was called the loo!

When I was growing up in Ireland, a bathroom was a room that had a bath and no toilet. The separate room with the commode was called the toilet or sometimes the W.C. (the water closet). Apparently the term “closet” was used because in the 1800s when homeowners started installing toilets indoors they often displaced clothes and linens in a closet, as a closet was the right size to take the commode.

57 Smokey Bear TV spot, for one : PSA

Public service announcement (PSA)

Smokey Bear is the mascot of the US Forest Service. Smokey first appeared in 1944, in an advertising campaign directed towards preventing forest fires.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Hybrid cycle : MOPED
6 Technology that uses polarized light, briefly : LCD
9 Boo-boo : OWIE
13 Baba ghanouj ingredient : TAHINI
14 Yellowfin tuna : AHI
15 “That was close!” : PHEW!
16 Preserve, in a way : EMBALM
17 *Reference work for canine lovers? : DOG GUIDE (“guide dog” flipped)
19 Range in the home, maybe : AMANA
20 Keep going : PERSIST
21 *Instructional work for expectant mothers? : LABOR MANUAL (“manual labor” flipped)
23 Punk rock offshoot : EMO
26 Calculating : SLY
27 Grunts, so to speak : GIS
28 Got going : STARTED
30 Simmons competitor : SERTA
32 Cork’s place : EIRE
33 *Fictional work about a pick-up artist? : APPROACH NOVEL (“novel approach” flipped)
38 Requiem Mass word : IRAE
39 Layers : TIERS
40 There are lots of them : NEW CARS
44 Beats by __ : DRE
45 Some tags : IDS
48 Afternoon refresher : NAP
49 *Illustrated work for bullpen pitchers? : RELIEF COMIC (“comic relief” flipped)
52 Tries to influence, with “with” : REASONS …
54 Worship : ADORE
55 Paperback designed to simulate animation … and a hint to the answers to starred clues : FLIP BOOK
57 Tried and true : PROVEN
58 Choice : A-ONE
59 Parrot : APE
60 Unbending : STRICT
61 Written reminder : NOTE
62 “The Spanish Tragedy” dramatist : KYD
63 Strong point : ASSET

Down

1 Cat, say : MAMMAL
2 “Yowza!” : OH BABY!
3 It can be grand : PIANO
4 Darkroom gear : ENLARGER
5 Skeptical, as a view : DIM
6 Weighed down : LADEN
7 Group that blends well : CHORUS
8 Tries to unearth : DIGS AT
9 Major work : OPUS
10 Formal wear : WHITE TIE
11 Mil. roadside hazard : IED
12 Sweater material source : EWE
13 Shades of blue : TEALS
18 River to the Colorado : GILA
20 Noodles : PASTA
22 Barcelona-born surrealist : MIRO
24 Cruciverbalist Reagle of “Wordplay” : MERL
25 Words of praise : ODE
29 Guns : REVS
30 What many writers work on : SPEC
31 Be in a cast : ACT
33 Specialty : AREA
34 Rin Tin Tin autograph, e.g. : PAW PRINT
35 Leather sources : HIDES
36 Soft ball material : NERF
37 Mine vehicles : ORE CARTS
38 Keeper’s concern : INN
41 Spirited horse : ARAB
42 Saturate again : RESOAK
43 “Hang on __”: 1965 #1 hit : SLOOPY
45 Apple video-editing app : IMOVIE
46 Run : DIRECT
47 Chanel product : SCENT
50 Signed : INKED
51 Dinnertime draws : ODORS
53 Duel tool : EPEE
55 __ club : FAN
56 WC : LOO
57 Smokey Bear TV spot, for one : PSA

12 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 29 Jan 21, Friday”

  1. No errors. Was stuck for an eternity on 49A RELIEF COMIC. I could not get COMIC. I was sure 37D was ORE TRAMS but I couldn’t get my crosses to fall. What a trick on 47D, SCENT? I was thinking some fancy perfume … then 45D is out of my wheelhouse.. PROVEN and STRICT finally fell and then it was CARTS!!! Arrgghh…

    @FITZ from Thursday. Loved the Rita Moreno memory.. what a hoot. I can’t imagine what that must have been like to not only get to meet her but get a peck on the cheek. Did you win the game or do you even remember?

  2. 10:50, no errors. Didn’t really understand the theme until about a minute after I finished. A decent puzzle.

  3. No errors, but I had to look up the Apple app clue because not having a
    smartphone, I wasn’t familiar with the term. The rest of the puzzle was a
    lot of fun.

  4. 8:58 no errors

    Felt like I was flying blind towards the end, like I didn’t know where this puzzle was going. I knew I wanted types of books in the theme answers, but I didn’t get the flip until after I was done.

  5. 8:48, with no errors but like others, I didn’t “get” the theme until after I was finished, other than they all had to do with types of books.

    The northwest was the hardest for me, mostly because I dashed in FELINE for the cat, and when that wasn’t working out, said “aha!” and changed it to ANIMAL, which worked a little better but still was wrong, and that took a while to unravel.

    Most of the rest was straightforward… this is a little better than average time for me on a Friday.

  6. @Anon Mike… Game? Was there some sort of game beingplayed? All I remember is walking to the mound toward an eye-popping beauty who put her hands on my shoulders and bent down to kiss my cheek and then I just stood in awe as she walked away. As a 9 year old, I believe that was when I first realized that the opposite sex was something special.

  7. 12 minutes, 36 seconds, no errors. If anything was labored it was this theme. Plus some really **weak** clues. Surely we can do better than this.

  8. Better than my usual Friday. Getting FLIPBOOK early on and guessing on DOGGUIDE helped me figure out the other starred clues. Beat by —-? almost did me in. So glad Dr. Dre should never have to worry abt where his next meal is coming from, if he’s careful. The rewards of his work are so much more pleasant than Thomas Kyd’s.

  9. Slightly tough Friday for me; took 28:36 with two errors after a “grid check” at the end. I had PetPRINT instead of PAW…sigh!! I did get the theme about 2/3 of the way through and that sped things up a quite a bit. Spent about 5-8 minutes in the middle W section and still muffed it.

    re Hang on Sloopy – I made the front page of the Santa Cruz Sentinel sometime in 1985 or 86 when I was part of a large crowd playing the song to help set a new record. My dorm/apt mates flipped out and I never guessed they were taking a picture of me. 🙂

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