LA Times Crossword 3 Jan 21, Sunday

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Constructed by: Trent H. Evans
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Career Counseling

Themed answers are common expressions reinterpreted as CAREER COUNSELING for someone specified in the clue:

  • 22A Advice to an aspiring preacher? : SPEAK OF THE DEVIL
  • 39A Advice to an aspiring organizer? : DON’T THROW IT ALL AWAY
  • 57A Advice to an aspiring journalist? : DON’T FORGET TO WRITE
  • 83A Advice to an aspiring ballet dancer? : LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP
  • 99A Advice to an aspiring history professor? : THERE’S NO FUTURE IN IT
  • 121A Advice to an aspiring stationer? : PUSH THE ENVELOPE

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 14m 18s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Movers, but hopefully not shakers : VANS

The vehicle we call a “van” takes its name from “caravan”, and is a shortened version of the older term. Back in the 1600s, a caravan was a covered cart. We still use the word “caravan” in Ireland to describe what we call a “mobile home” or “recreational vehicle” here in the US.

5 Hawkeye’s title workplace : M*A*S*H

“M*A*S*H” has only three stars (three asterisks, that is). These asterisks first appeared on the poster for the 1970 movie, but they were omitted in the opening titles. The TV series went on to use the asterisks from the poster.

Hawkeye Pierce is the lead character in the “M*A*S*H” novel, movie and TV series. Hawkeye was originally portrayed by Donald Sutherland in the film, and then by Alan Alda in the television show. Pierce is the only character appearing in all 250 episodes of the groundbreaking TV series.

18 Soprano showpiece : ARIA

The soprano (plural “sopranos” or “soprani”) is the highest singing voice. The term “soprano “ comes from the Italian “sopra” meaning “above”. A male countertenor who is able to sing in the soprano voice range is known as a sopranist. A castrated male who can sing in the same range is known as a “castrato”, and a boy soprano is referred to as a treble.

21 It’s not a bear : KOALA

The koala bear really does look like a little bear, but it’s not even closely related. The koala is an arboreal marsupial and a herbivore, native to the east and south coasts of Australia. Koalas aren’t primates, and are one of the few mammals other than primates who have fingerprints. In fact, it can be very difficult to tell human fingerprints from koala fingerprints, even under an electron microscope. Male koalas are called “bucks”, females are “does”, and young koalas are “joeys”. I’m a little jealous of the koala, as it sleeps up to 20 hours a day …

28 It’s nothing to Caesar : NIHIL

“Nihil” is the Latin word for “nothing, and is a term we’ve absorbed into English. “Nihil” is also the root from which we get our term “nil”. Someone described as “nihilistic” is very skeptical and tends to believe in nothing.

30 Star sometimes eclipsing Venus? : SERENA

Serena Williams is the younger of the two Williams sisters playing professional tennis. Serena has won more prize money in her career than any other female athlete.

44 NFL’s Falcons : ATL

The Atlanta Falcons joined the NFL in 1965. The team name was suggested by a schoolteacher called Miss Julia Elliott. Elliot suggested that “the Falcon is proud and dignified, with great courage and fight. It never drops its prey. It is deadly and has a great sporting tradition.”

47 Vatican farewell : CIAO

Vatican City is a sovereign city-state that is walled off within the city of Rome. Vatican City is about 110 acres in area, and so is the smallest independent state in the world. With about 800 residents, it is also the smallest state in terms of population. Although the Holy See dates back to early Christianity, Vatican City only came into being in 1929. At that time, Prime Minister Benito Mussolini signed a treaty with the Holy See on behalf of the Kingdom of Italy that established the city-state.

50 Dalai Lama’s former home : LHASA

Lhasa is the capital city of Tibet, with the name “Lhasa” translating as “place of the gods”. However, Lhasa used to be called Rasa, a name that translates into the less auspicious “goat’s place”. Lhasa was also once called the “Forbidden City” due to its inaccessible location high in the Himalayas and a traditional hostility exhibited by residents to outsiders. The “forbidden” nature of the city has been reinforced since the Chinese took over Tibet in the early 1950s as it has been difficult for foreigners to get permission to visit Lhasa.

The Dalai Lama is a religious leader in the Gelug branch of Tibetan Buddhism. The current Dalai Lama is the 14th to hold the office. He has indicated that the next Dalai Lama might be found outside of Tibet for the first time, and may even be female.

53 China’s Zhou __ : ENLAI

Zhou Enlai (also “Chou En-lai”) was the first government leader of the People’s Republic of China and held the office of Premier from 1949 until he died in 1976. Zhou Enlai ran the government for Communist Party Leader Mao Zedong, often striking a more conciliatory tone with the West than that of his boss. He was instrumental, for example, in setting up President Nixon’s famous visit to China in 1972. Zhou Enlai died just a few months before Mao Zedong, with both deaths leading to unrest and a dramatic change in political direction for the country.

62 Head of MI6? : LOO

It has been suggested that the British term “loo”, meaning “toilet”, comes from “Waterloo” (water closet … water-loo), but no one seems to know for sure. Another suggestion is that the term comes from the card game of “lanterloo”, in which the pot was called the loo!

The UK government gets its foreign intelligence through the Secret Intelligence Service, better known as MI6. The moniker “MI6” arose during WWII, and stands for “Military Intelligence, Section 6”. “MI5” is the common name for the UK’s Security Service, the UK’s counter-intelligence and security agency.

63 2020, for many : ORDEAL

You can say that again ….

65 Philly Ivy : PENN

The University of Pennsylvania (also “Penn” and “UPenn”) was founded in 1740 by Benjamin Franklin in Philadelphia. Penn was the first school in the country to offer both graduate and undergraduate courses. Penn’s sports teams are known as the Quakers, and sometimes the Red & Blue.

70 Prairie howlers : COYOTES

The coyote is a canine found in most of Central and North America. The name “coyote” is Mexican Spanish, in which language it means “trickster”. Coyotes can sometimes mate with domestic dogs, creating hybrid animals known as “coydogs”. Coyotes can also mate with wolves, creating a “coywolf”. South Dakota named the coyote its state animal in 1949.

76 Zoom lens? : WEBCAM

Zoom is a videoconferencing app that became remarkably popular in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic. The market deemed Zoom to be the easiest to use of the free videoconferencing apps. I’ve been using it, but really prefer Google’s Meet offering …

78 Seyfried of “Big Love” : AMANDA

Actress Amanda Seyfried’s first film role was in the 2004 teen comedy “Mean Girls”, supporting Lindsay Lohan. Seyfried has quite the voice too, using it to good effect in her leading roles in 2008’s “Mamma Mia!” and 2012’s “Les Misérables”. Seyfried married fellow actor Thomas Sadoski (from “Life in Pieces”) in 2017.

“Big Love” is an absolutely superb HBO drama series about a polygamous man and his three families trying to live a relatively “normal” life in Utah. The male lead is played by the late Bill Paxton, and his three wives are played by Jeanne Tripplehorn, Chloë Sevigny and Ginnifer Goodwin.

82 “We __ Farmer’s, bum ba dum bum bum bum bum” : ARE

Farmers Insurance was set up in 1928 as Farmers Automobile Inter-Insurance Exchange in Los Angeles. The intent was to provide cheaper insurance to farmers and ranchers, a group that the Farmers’ founders believed to be safer drivers.

90 Govt. security : T-NOTE

A Treasury note (T-note) is a government debt that matures in 1-10 years. A T-note has a coupon (interest) payment made every six months. The T-note is purchased at a discount to face value, and at the date of maturity can be redeemed at that face value. A Treasury bill (T-bill) is a similar financial vehicle, but it matures in one year or less, and a T-bond matures in 20-30 years.

91 Unexpected mug shot feature : SMILE

A mug shot is a photograph of a person’s face, one often taken for a police record.

The verb “to mug” means “to make an exaggerated facial expression”. The term comes from mugs used to drink beer (called Toby mugs) that are made in the shape of heads with grotesque expressions. “Mug” can also be a noun meaning “face”.

93 Exec concerned with hacking : CIO

Chief Information Officer (CIO)

A computer hacker is a computer expert, and in particular one who uses that expertise to solve problems with hardware and software. So, the original use of the term “hacking” was very positive. Since the 1980s, the term “hacker” is more commonly used for an expert in subverting computer security.

98 First name in supervillains : LEX

Lex Luthor is the nemesis of Superman in comics. Luthor has been portrayed in a number of guises in the comic world as well in movies and on the small screen. For example, he appeared as Atom Man in the 1950 film series “Atom Man vs. Superman”, and was played by actor Lyle Talbot, opposite Kirk Alyn’s Superman.

107 Rap caps, perhaps : DO-RAGS

Hip-hoppers might wear do-rags (also “durags”) today, but they have been around for centuries. The etymology of “do-rag” is pretty evident, i.e. a piece of cloth (rag) to hold a hairstyle (do) in place.

113 Cosmic comeuppance : KARMA

Karma is a religious concept with its basis in Indian faiths. Karma embraces the notion of cause and effect. Good deeds have good consequences at some later point in one’s life, one’s future life, or one’s afterlife. And, bad deeds have bad consequences.

121 Advice to an aspiring stationer? : PUSH THE ENVELOPE

“Stationery” is a noun describing writing materials and office supplies, items that are sold by a stationer. Centuries ago, a stationer was someone who sold goods from a shop or a “station”, from a fixed, “stationary” stall.

125 Speed skater Ohno : APOLO

Speed-skater Apolo Ohno has won more Winter Olympics medals than any other American. Ohno also did a great job winning the 2007 season of television’s “Dancing with the Stars”.

126 Some fitness ctrs. : YMCAS

The YMCA (the Y) is a worldwide movement that has its roots in London, England. There, in 1844, the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) was founded with the intent of promoting Christian principles through the development of “a healthy spirit, mind and body”. The founder, George Williams, saw the need to create YMCA facilities for young men who were flocking to the cities as the Industrial Revolution flourished. He saw that these men were frequenting taverns and brothels, and wanted to offer a more wholesome alternative.

127 Hawaiian seafood salad : POKE

Poke is a Native-Hawaiian dish featuring diced raw fish. “Poke” is a Hawaiian word meaning “to slice”.

128 Tolkien trilogy, initially : LOTR

“Lord of the Rings” (LOTR)

J. R. R. Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings” is the second best-selling novel ever written, with only “A Tale of Two Cities” by Charles Dickens having sold more copies around the world. Remarkably I think, the third best-selling novel is “The Hobbit”, which was also written by Tolkien.

130 Kindle display : E INK

E Ink Corporation manufactures what is known as “electronic paper”, a material that is integrated into electronic displays used mainly in e-readers and smartphones. An example is the excellent display that comes with the Amazon Kindle Paperwhite e-reader.

131 Ruth’s sultanate? : SWAT

Baseball legend George Herman Ruth, Jr. had several nicknames, the best known being “Babe”. He was also called “the Bambino” and “the Sultan of Swat”.

132 Greens in regulation, e.g. : STAT

That would be golf.

Down

5 Red Warhol subject? : MAO

Andy Warhol made a famous series of portraits of Chinese Communist leader Mao Zedong in 1973. An exhibition of Warhol’s works toured China in 2012 but the images of Mao were excluded, apparently at the request of the Chinese government.

7 Evil sci-fi order : SITH

The Sith are characters in the “Star Wars” universe who use the “dark side” of “the Force”, and as such are the antithesis of the Jedi Knights. Members of the Sith use the title “Darth” before their name, as in Darth Vader. The last made of the six “Star Wars” movies is called “Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith”.

8 LOL, verbalized : HA HA

Laugh out loud (LOL)

11 Head of MI6? : LAV

Our word “lavatory” (sometimes “lav”) originally referred to a washbasin, and comes from the Latin “lavatorium”, a place for washing. In the 1600s, “lavatory” came to mean a washroom, and in the 1920s a toilet.

The UK government gets its foreign intelligence through the Secret Intelligence Service, better known as MI6. The moniker “MI6” arose during WWII, and stands for “Military Intelligence, Section 6”. “MI5” is the common name for the UK’s Security Service, the UK’s counter-intelligence and security agency.

12 Holy threesome : TRINITY

In the Christian tradition, the Father, Son and Holy Spirit/Holy Ghost are three persons in one divine being, the Holy Trinity.

14 “Old Town Road” rapper Lil __ X : NAS

“Lil Nas X” is the stage name of rapper Montero Lamar Hill. He was born and raised just outside of Atlanta. His first hit was “Old Town Road”, which is classified as country rap.

15 PC shortcut key : ALT

The Alt (alternate) key is found on either side of the space bar on US PC keyboards. The Alt key evolved from what was called a Meta key on old MIT keyboards, although the function has changed somewhat over the years. Alt is equivalent in many ways to the Option key on a Mac keyboard, and indeed the letters “Alt” have been printed on most Mac keyboards starting in the nineties.

16 Teslas don’t need it : GAS

Tesla Motors was founded in 2003 as a manufacturer of electric vehicles based in Palo Alto, California. Tesla is noted for producing the first electric sports car, called the Tesla Roadster. The company followed the sports car with a luxury sedan, the Model S. The Model S was the world’s best selling plug-in electric vehicle of 2015. Tesla Motors shortened its name to Tesla in early 2017.

20 “My Fair Lady” lady : ELIZA

Eliza Doolittle is Professor Henry Higgins’ speech student in George Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion”. “Pygmalion” was adapted by Lerner and Loewe to become the Broadway musical “My Fair Lady”. The musical spun off the wonderful 1964 film of the same name starring Audrey Hepburn and Rex Harrison. To cockney Eliza Doolittle, Professor Henry Higgins was “‘Enry ‘Iggins”.

21 Japanese garden fish : KOI

Koi are fish that are also known as Japanese carp. Koi have been bred for decorative purposes and there are now some very brightly colored examples found in Japanese water gardens.

23 Lotto cousin : KENO

The name of the game keno has French or Latin roots, with the French “quine” being a term for five winning numbers, and the Latin “quini” meaning “five each”. The game originated in China and was introduced into the West by Chinese immigrants who were working on the first Transcontinental Railroad in the 1800s.

Originally, lotto was a type of card game, with “lotto” being the Italian for “a lot”. We’ve used “lotto” to mean a gambling game since the late 1700s.

29 Ram’s protection : HELMET

The Los Angeles Rams are the only franchise to have won NFL championships in three different cities, i.e. Cleveland (1945), Los Angeles (1951) and St. Louis (1999). The Rams were based in Cleveland from 1936 to 1945, in Los Angeles from 1946 to 1994, in St. Louis from 1995 to 2015, and returned to Los Angeles in 2016.

31 Mandela’s org. : ANC

The African National Congress (ANC) started out as the South African Native National Congress in 1912 with the goal of improving the lot of black South Africans. After years of turmoil, the ANC came to power in the first open election in 1964.

As a young man, Nelson Mandela led the armed wing of the African National Congress (ANC). Mandela was eventually arrested and admitted to charges of sabotage and was sentenced to life in prison in 1964. He remained behind bars for 27 years, mainly in the infamous prison on Robben Island. As the years progressed, Mandela became a symbol of the fight against apartheid. He was released in 1990, and immediately declared his commitment to peace and reconciliation with South Africa’s white minority population. Mandela was elected president of the Republic of South Africa (RSA) in 1994, an office that he held until 1999. Nelson Mandela passed away on December 5, 2013.

37 Vietnam War hot spot : SAIGON

Hanoi (“Hà Nội” in Vietnamese) was the capital of North Vietnam, and Saigon the capital of South Vietnam. After the Vietnam War, Hanoi was made capital of the reunified state. Saigon, the larger metropolis, was renamed to Ho Chi Minh City. Hanoi is located in the delta of the Red River, and is just over 50 miles from the Gulf of Tonkin in the South China Sea.

By some definitions, the official involvement of Americans in the Vietnam War started in 1955. At that time, President Eisenhower deployed a Military Assistance Advisory Group to assist in the training of the South Vietnamese Army. American involvement in the conflict officially ended in 1973, with the signing of an agreement that came out of the Paris Peace Accords.

38 Mogul : TYCOON

Our term “tycoon” meaning powerful business person was originally used by foreigners to describe the shogun of Japan. “Tycoon” is an anglicization of the Japanese “taikun” meaning “great lord or prince”.

A mogul is a person with power. The term comes from the Mughal emperors of India and South Asia.

41 Drink mix made famous by NASA : TANG

Tang is a fruity drink that is sold in powdered form. The sales of Tang “took off” when John Glenn took Tang on his Mercury flight. However, it is a common misconception that Tang was invented for the space program. That’s not true, although it was included in the payload of many missions.

42 Tiger’s target : HOLE

Golfer Tiger Woods’ real name is Eldrick Tont Woods. “Tont” is a traditional Thai name. Tiger’s father Earl Woods met his second wife Kultida Punsawad in 1966, while on a tour of duty with the US Army in Thailand.

43 Harp relative : LYRE

The lyre is a stringed instrument that is most closely associated with ancient Greece, and with the gods Hermes and Apollo in particular. According to myth, Hermes slaughtered a cow from a sacred herd belonging to Apollo and offered it to the gods but kept the entrails. Hermes used the entrails to make strings that he stretched across the shell of a tortoise, creating the first lyre. Apollo liked the sound from the lyre and agreed to accept it as a trade for his herd of cattle.

44 Big name in footwear : ALDO

ALDO is a chain of shoe stores that was founded in Montreal in 1972 by Moroccan-born Canadian Aldo Bensadoun. Bensadoun is the son of a retailer of shoes in Morocco and France, and the grandchild of a cobbler. A man with shoe leather in his blood …

45 Son of Odin : THOR

In Norse mythology, Thor was the son of Odin. Thor wielded a mighty hammer and was the god of thunder, lightning and storms. Our contemporary word “Thursday” comes from “Thor’s Day”.

55 Olympic skating medalist Midori : ITO

Midori Ito is a Japanese figure skater. Ito was the first woman to land a triple/triple jump and a triple axel in competition. In fact, she landed her first triple jump in training when she was only 8 years old. Ito won Olympic silver in 1992, and was chosen as the person to light the Olympic cauldron at the commencement of the 1998 Winter Games in Nagano, Japan.

56 Kermit’s greeting : HI-HO

Kermit has to be the most readily recognized puppet character created by the late great Jim Henson. Henson came up with Kermit way back in 1955 when he appeared on a puppet show called “Sam and Friends” that aired in Washington, D.C. Kermit is loved so much that he even has his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

58 Praise for a torero : OLE!

The term “torero” is used to describe all bullfighters. The term “matador” is reserved for the bullfighter whose job is to make the final kill. Aptly enough, “matador” is Spanish for “killer”.

61 Rob __ : ROY

Rob Roy was a folk hero in Scotland from the 18th century. He was a sort of Scottish Robin Hood, an outlaw who had the support of the populace. Rob Roy’s full name was Robert Roy MacGregor, itself an anglicization of the Scottish Raibeart Ruadh. He gave his name to a famous cocktail called a Rob Roy, which is a relative of a Manhattan but made with Scotch instead of bourbon.

65 One of a biblical 150 : PSALM

The Greek word “psalmoi” originally meant “songs sung to a harp”, and gave us the word “psalms”. In the Jewish and Western Christian traditions, the Book of Psalms contains 150 individual psalms, divided into five sections.

67 Jefferson bills : TWOS

The US two-dollar bill features a portrait of Thomas Jefferson. The bill was introduced in 1862, and withdrawn in 1966. It was reintroduced in 1976, and is still legal tender. That said, there are relatively few two-dollar bills in circulation. Some people even hold that possession of a two-dollar bill is bad luck.

68 “OMG, a mouse!” : EEK!

“OMG” is text-speak for “Oh My Gosh!” “Oh My Goodness!” or any other G-words you might care to use …

71 Eastern “way” : TAO

The name of the Chinese character “tao” translates as “path”, but the concept of Taoism signifies the true nature of the world.

72 Birds that boom and grunt : EMUS

The large flightless birds called emus make sounds by manipulating inflatable neck-sacs. The sac is about a foot long, has a thin wall and allows the bird to emit a booming sound. The type of sound emitted is the easiest way to differentiate between male and female emus.

73 Channel that provided coverage of the New Horizons Pluto flyby : NASA TV

The NASA TV television service was launched (pun!) in the 1980s to provide NASA personnel with live video feeds of space missions. Over time, the service was made available to the public, with extra educational programming added for a more general audience.

NASA’s New Horizons space probe was launched in 2006 with the primary mission of flying by and studying Pluto. As New Horizons launched, Pluto was officially classified as a planet, but a few months later it was downgraded to a dwarf planet. New Horizons achieved its primary mission in 2015, and is now headed towards a large object in the Kuiper Belt, scheduled to arrive there in 2019.

74 Respectful singer? : ARETHA

“Respect” is a song by Otis Redding, and one that he recorded himself in 1965. It became a hit when Aretha Franklin made her famous cover version in 1967. The Redding and Franklin versions have different storylines though, and different musical “feels”.

79 Scientist __ deGrasse Tyson : NEIL

Neil deGrasse Tyson is an astrophysicist who is noted for his ability to communicate science to the masses. Tyson is well known for his appearances on the great PBS show “Nova”.

83 Like the Texas flag’s star : LONE

The single star on the state flag of Texas is a reminder of the “lone star” on the 1836 National Standard of Texas. The single white star on a blue background symbolizes Texas as an independent republic and its struggle for independence from Mexico.

84 Baby’s outfit : ONESIE

A onesie is a baby’s one-piece bodysuit, and is a common gift at a baby shower.

86 Rock ending? : -ETTE

The famous Rockettes can be seen in Radio City Music Hall. They have an amazing schedule during the Christmas season when they perform five high-kicking shows every day, seven days a week. The troupe has been doing this every Christmas since 1932, until a COVID-19 pandemic hit …

87 Mountain legend : YETI

The yeti, also known as the abominable snowman, is a beast of legend. “Yeti” is a Tibetan term, and the beast is fabled to live in the Himalayan regions of Nepal and Tibet. Our equivalent legend in North America is that of Bigfoot, also known as Sasquatch. The study of animals whose existence have not yet been substantiated is called cryptozoology, and a cryptid is a creature or plant that isn’t recognized by the scientific community, but the existence of which has been suggested.

102 Four Corners state : UTAH

The Four Corners region of the US surrounds the meeting point of the four states of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah. The Four Corners is the only point in the US that is shared by four states.

103 Skye of “Say Anything…” : IONE

Ione Skye is an American actress born in London, England. She is best known for portraying the character Diane Court in the 1989 high school romance movie “Say Anything…”, starring opposite John Cusack. Skye is the daughter of the Scottish folk singer Donovan.

108 On, as Sherlock’s game : AFOOT

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, in writing the “Sherlock Holmes” stories, had his hero use the phrase “the game is afoot” on more than one occasion. Holmes first uttered the expression in “The Adventures of the Abbey Grange”. However, the phrase was used long before Conan Doyle put pen to paper. In William Shakespeare’s “King Henry IV Part I” there is the line “Before the game is afoot, thou let’st slip”.

109 Sanjay of CNN : GUPTA

Sanjay Gupta is an American neurosurgeon who is best known as the CNN’s chief medical correspondent. In 2009, Gupta was offered the post of Surgeon General in the Obama administration, but he declined.

110 Hägar’s dog : SNERT

“Hägar the Horrible” is a comic strip that was created by the late Dik Browne and is now drawn by his son, Chris Browne. “Hägar the Terrible” (not “Horrible”) was the nickname given to Dik by his sons. The strip’s title character is a red-bearded Viking living on the Norwegian coast during the Middle Ages. Hägar lives with his overbearing wife Helga, his sensitive son Hamlet, his pretty daughter Honi, and his clever dog Snert.

116 “My Way” lyricist : ANKA

The song “My Way” has lyrics that were written by Paul Anka in 1969, but the tune itself was composed two years earlier by Claude François and Jacques Revaux. The song had been released with completely different lyrics in France as “Comme d’habitude” (“As Usual”). When Anka heard the song on television in Paris he sought out and obtained the rights to use it himself, for free. Supposedly, “Comme d’habitude” has been recorded in more languages, by more artists than any other song in the contemporary repertoire.

And now, the end is near
And so I face the final curtain
My friend, I’ll say it clear
I’ll state my case, of which I’m certain
I’ve lived a life that’s full
I traveled each and every highway
And more, much more than this, I did it my way

118 Wander (about) : GAD

To gad about is to move around with little purpose. The word “gad” comes from the Middle English “gadden” meaning “to hurry”.

119 Big name in nail polish : OPI

Opi is a manufacturer of nail polish based in North Hollywood, California. One of Opi’s marketing coups was the introduction of a line of Legally Blonde 2 polishes, which featured in the film.

120 Slithery squeezer : BOA

Boa constrictors are members of the Boidae family of snakes, all of which are non-venomous. Interestingly, the female boa is always larger than the male.

123 Frenemy of Lando : HAN

Han Solo is the space smuggler in “Star Wars” played by Harrison Ford. Ford was originally hired by George Lucas just to read lines for actors during auditions for “Star Wars”, but over time Lucas became convinced that Ford was right for the pivotal role of Han Solo.

The character Lando Calrissian was played by actor Billy Dee Williams in two of the “Star Wars” movies.

A frenemy is someone who feigns friendship but who is actually an enemy or competitor.

124 Lab coat checker? : VET

A veterinarian (vet) is a professional who treats animals for disease and injury. The word “veterinary” comes from the Latin “veterinae” meaning “working animals, beasts of burden”.

The Labrador (Lab) breed of dog has been around at least since 1814, and the chocolate Labrador appeared over a century later in the 1930s. The name “Labrador Retriever” is simply a reference to the breed’s origin and behavior. Labs originally “retrieved” from the “Labrador Sea”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Movers, but hopefully not shakers : VANS
5 Hawkeye’s title workplace : M*A*S*H
9 Global warming word : MELT
13 Stumbling block : SNAG
17 “Are you hurt?” response : I’M OK
18 Soprano showpiece : ARIA
19 Far from clueless : AWARE
21 It’s not a bear : KOALA
22 Advice to an aspiring preacher? : SPEAK OF THE DEVIL
25 Gives the boot : OUSTS
26 Give a lift : ELATE
27 Finger-wagging word : SHAME
28 It’s nothing to Caesar : NIHIL
30 Star sometimes eclipsing Venus? : SERENA
32 Esteem to the extreme : IDOLIZE
35 Support for wind energy? : MAST
39 Advice to an aspiring organizer? : DON’T THROW IT ALL AWAY
44 NFL’s Falcons : ATL
47 Vatican farewell : CIAO
48 Messy place : STY
49 Fictitious : MYTHIC
50 Dalai Lama’s former home : LHASA
53 China’s Zhou __ : ENLAI
56 “Watch me do this!” : HERE I GO!
57 Advice to an aspiring journalist? : DON’T FORGET TO WRITE
62 Head of MI6? : LOO
63 2020, for many : ORDEAL
64 “I know! I know!” : OOH! OOH!
65 Philly Ivy : PENN
66 Middle schooler, probably : PRETEEN
70 Prairie howlers : COYOTES
73 Collars, as a perp : NABS
76 Zoom lens? : WEBCAM
78 Seyfried of “Big Love” : AMANDA
82 “We __ Farmer’s, bum ba dum bum bum bum bum” : ARE
83 Advice to an aspiring ballet dancer? : LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP
88 Salts, say : SEASONS
90 Govt. security : T-NOTE
91 Unexpected mug shot feature : SMILE
92 Bring into harmony : ATTUNE
93 Exec concerned with hacking : CIO
96 “__ girl!” : ATTA
98 First name in supervillains : LEX
99 Advice to an aspiring history professor? : THERE’S NO FUTURE IN IT
105 Simple meteorological tool : VANE
106 Treater’s adamant words : I INSIST
107 Rap caps, perhaps : DO-RAGS
111 Breaks down : WEEPS
113 Cosmic comeuppance : KARMA
117 Devoid of any pleasure : NO FUN
118 Aim high : GO BIG
121 Advice to an aspiring stationer? : PUSH THE ENVELOPE
125 Speed skater Ohno : APOLO
126 Some fitness ctrs. : YMCAS
127 Hawaiian seafood salad : POKE
128 Tolkien trilogy, initially : LOTR
129 Radio piece : DIAL
130 Kindle display : E INK
131 Ruth’s sultanate? : SWAT
132 Greens in regulation, e.g. : STAT

Down

1 Tools with jaws : VISES
2 Quite big enough : AMPLE
3 Musical deficiency : NO EAR
4 Got by on one’s reputation alone, perhaps : SKATED
5 Red Warhol subject? : MAO
6 Canine chorus : ARFS
7 Evil sci-fi order : SITH
8 LOL, verbalized : HA HA
9 Used what was available : MADE DO
10 Sheep related to you? : EWE
11 Head of MI6? : LAV
12 Holy threesome : TRINITY
13 The one : SOUL MATE
14 “Old Town Road” rapper Lil __ X : NAS
15 PC shortcut key : ALT
16 Teslas don’t need it : GAS
20 “My Fair Lady” lady : ELIZA
21 Japanese garden fish : KOI
23 Lotto cousin : KENO
24 Gulf States bigwig : EMIR
29 Ram’s protection : HELMET
31 Mandela’s org. : ANC
33 Painful sequence : OWS
34 Illuminated : LIT
36 For a bit : AWHILE
37 Vietnam War hot spot : SAIGON
38 Mogul : TYCOON
40 Cake level : TIER
41 Drink mix made famous by NASA : TANG
42 Tiger’s target : HOLE
43 Harp relative : LYRE
44 Big name in footwear : ALDO
45 Son of Odin : THOR
46 Touch down : LAND
51 Dance moves : STEPS
52 Nowhere close : AFAR
54 Right this minute : AT ONCE
55 Olympic skating medalist Midori : ITO
56 Kermit’s greeting : HI-HO
58 Praise for a torero : OLE!
59 “You can’t be serious” : OH, C’MON
60 Seek the affections of : WOO
61 Rob __ : ROY
65 One of a biblical 150 : PSALM
67 Jefferson bills : TWOS
68 “OMG, a mouse!” : EEK!
69 Ease up : EBB
71 Eastern “way” : TAO
72 Birds that boom and grunt : EMUS
73 Channel that provided coverage of the New Horizons Pluto flyby : NASA TV
74 Respectful singer? : ARETHA
75 Taken down : BEATEN
77 Back on the boat : AFT
79 Scientist __ deGrasse Tyson : NEIL
80 View from a hill : DALE
81 Top of a hill : APEX
83 Like the Texas flag’s star : LONE
84 Baby’s outfit : ONESIE
85 Crowd eruption : ROAR
86 Rock ending? : -ETTE
87 Mountain legend : YETI
89 “You betcha!” : SURE WILL!
93 Take over or take in : CONSUME
94 Hypotheticals : IFS
95 Yes, to Yves : OUI
97 “Your point is?” : AND?
100 Chilly : NIPPY
101 Finger-wagging sound : TSK TSK
102 Four Corners state : UTAH
103 Skye of “Say Anything…” : IONE
104 Fishes, in a way : TROLLS
108 On, as Sherlock’s game : AFOOT
109 Sanjay of CNN : GUPTA
110 Hägar’s dog : SNERT
112 Film director’s challenge : EGO
114 Gym set : REPS
115 “May I have some tuna, please?” : MEOW
116 “My Way” lyricist : ANKA
118 Wander (about) : GAD
119 Big name in nail polish : OPI
120 Slithery squeezer : BOA
122 Bio or chem : SCI
123 Frenemy of Lando : HAN
124 Lab coat checker? : VET

20 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 3 Jan 21, Sunday”

  1. 19:44, no errors. Only write-over: TIBET before LHASA.

    For the third day in a row, my initial post on the NYT blog showed up with no time delay, so I have (faint) hopes for this one. My life would not be complete without a few little mysteries, I guess … 😜.

  2. No errors; all my answers were correct but I didn’t know what some of
    them meant. Like LOTR for 128A and STAT for 132A. I understood LOTR
    after reading Bill’s explanation, but still wonder about STAT . But I’m
    not a golfer, that’s evident.

  3. 40:16 1 lookup, too many errors to count

    Lots of thrashing on the right.

    Thank you, @Tony for the explanation of stat as a golf term.

    1. I think greens in regulation (GIR) is the golf term, and STAT is just short for statistic. According to my Google.

      Glad everyone else seemed to breeze through this one – there was no way I was finishing it without lookups. I liked the theme.

  4. Wonderful blog, review and essay BIll. Respects.

    I dont normally ‘do’ the Sunday puzzles, but I thought it might be a good excersize for the last day of this loong weekend. I couldn’t understand a few clues, so I came here to learn….

    The first one was Greens hit in regulation etc., … STAT. Since I’ve never played golf, this was confusing. I finally googled, and found out that Greens HIT in regulation, is one of the more important stats. Thus, solved my curiosity.

    Thank you for your exhaustive and vivid explanations. You are the Hoyle and Goren of Crosswords ! And thank you always, for your exhaustive explanations, with examples.

    As an aside, I happen to know that most of my indian friends call the Yeti, the ‘abdominable snowman’. because they are apparently not familiar with the original adjective….

    Belated Happy New Year greetings.

  5. HI VIDWAN!!!🤗 Great to see you, and I had a laugh at “abdominable”!!

    Somehow I couldn’t print out the numbers along the left side, so I was lost for most of the across clues. Shoulda challenged myself and tried for all the down clues but I decided to cheat for several answers instead….🙃 Cute theme.

    Happy new year to all!!!

    Be well~~🥂

  6. Decided to do Sunday for a change; took me 43:06 with no errors or peeks. I was stuck on EINK and POKE/VET for a while…guessed right and finally understood when I read Bill’s explanation on VET.

    Theme helped a lot, although I had Pass the envelope for quite a while… 🙂

    A little worried about our democracy tonight and this week…

    1. A little worried about our democracy tonight and this week…

      Yeah, me too … and the orange madman will still have his mindless army behind him when (and if) he vacates the White House … so I will continue to worry, even after the 20th … 😳.

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