LA Times Crossword 28 Feb 21, Sunday

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Constructed by: Mark McClain
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Start the Music

Themed answers are common phrases that each START with a genre of MUSIC:

  • 26A Summer cottage, perhaps : COUNTRY RETREAT (country music)
  • 48A Prior conviction, e.g. : RAP SHEET ENTRY (rap music)
  • 64A Iberian landmark that’s an insurance company logo : ROCK OF GIBRALTAR (rock music)
  • 84A Personal exam? : SOUL SEARCHING (soul music)
  • 108A Commonsense approach to behavior analysis : FOLK PSYCHOLOGY (folk music)
  • 15D Start celebrating : POP THE CORK
  • 70D Topping for chicken enchiladas : SALSA VERDE

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 14m 06s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Short-legged hopper : TOAD

The “warts” on the skin of a toad have no relation to the viral infection that can occur on human skin. A toad’s warts are colored bumps that are believed to help the animal blend more effectively into its environment.

10 25% of doce : TRES

In Spanish, “tres” (three) is 25% of “doce” (twelve).

18 River in Tuscany : ARNO

The Arno is the principal river in the Tuscany region of Italy, and passes through the cities of Florence and Pisa. Famously the Arno flooded in 1966, the worst flood in the region for centuries. There were numerous deaths and extensive destruction of priceless art treasures, particularly in Florence.

19 Tiny island nation near the equator : PALAU

Palau is a tiny island nation lying 500 miles east of the Philippines, and 2,000 miles south of Japan. Palau was once a Spanish possession and was sold by Spain to Germany in the late 19th century. During WWI, Japan invaded the islands (Japan had declared war on Germany) and was awarded the islands as a territory by the League of Nations at the end of hostilities. In WWII the US took Palau from the Japanese in a bloody battle in 1944. Palau emerged from American administration in 1994 and is now a sovereign state.

20 Slew : HEAP

Our usage of “slew” to mean “large number” has nothing to do with the verb “to slew” meaning “to turn, skid”. The noun “slew” came into English in the early 1800s from the Irish word “sluagh” meaning “host, crowd, multitude”.

22 Fallon predecessor : LENO

“The Tonight Show” has had six permanent hosts so far:

  • Steve Allen (1954-57)
  • Jack Paar (1957-62)
  • Johnny Carson (1962–92)
  • Jay Leno (1992–2009, 2010–14)
  • Conan O’Brien (2009–10)
  • Jimmy Fallon (2014–present)

24 Victor’s wife in “Casablanca” : ILSA

Rick Blaine and Ilsa Lund were played by Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman in the 1942 movie “Casablanca”. I love the words of one critic describing the chemistry between Bogart and Bergman in this film: “She paints his face with her eyes”. Wow …

Victor Laszlo was played by Austrian-born actor Paul Henreid in 1942’s “Casablanca”. Apparently, Henreid didn’t mix well with his co-stars. He referred to Humphrey Bogart as “a mediocre actor”, and Ingrid Bergman referred to Henreid as a “prima donna”.

25 Cobbler fruit : APPLE

The dessert called “cobbler” originated in colonial America when settlers invented it as a substitute for suet pudding as they didn’t have the necessary ingredients to make the more traditional dish. Instead, they stewed fruit and covered it with a layer of uncooked scones or biscuits, creating a surface that resembled a “cobbled” street, hence the name.

30 Fell in pellets : SLEETED

Apparently, “sleet” is a term used to describe two different weather conditions. One is a shower of ice pellets that are smaller than hail, and the second is a mixture of rain and snow, with the snow melting as it falls.

31 Result : AFTERMATH

The suffix “math” evolved from an Old English word meaning “a mowing, cutting of grass”. So, as strange as it seems, an aftermath was a second crop of grass grown after harvesting the first. An aftermath was also known as an aftergrass or an aftercrop. By the 16th century, the term “aftermath” was being used figuratively to mean “period following a ruinous event”, and more generally “consequence, result”. That’s quite a leap …

34 Fitness ratio: Abbr. : BMI

The body mass index (BMI) is the ratio of a person’s height to his or her mass.

36 Lake south of London : ERIE

The settlement that became the Ontario city of London was envisioned in 1793 as the future capital of the Province of Upper Canada, hence the choice of the name “London”. That vision was never realized, but the name persisted. The same rationale led to the naming of the Thames River that runs through the city.

40 Oklahoma’s top crop : WHEAT

More of the world’s land is devoted to the production of wheat than any other food crop.

46 Dairy-based quaff : NOG

It’s not really clear where the term “nog” (as in “eggnog”) comes from although it might derive from the word “noggin”, which was originally a small wooden cup that was long associated with alcoholic drinks.

“Quaff” is both a verb and a noun. One “quaffs” (takes a hearty drink) of a “quaff” (a hearty drink).

47 Phobia lead-in : ACRO-

Our prefix “acro-” comes from the Greek “akros” meaning “at the top”. Examples are “acrophobia” (fear of heights) and “Acropolis” (“city at the top”).

48 Prior conviction, e.g. : RAP SHEET ENTRY (rap music)

A rap sheet is a criminal record. “Rap” is a slang term dating back to the 1700s that means “blame, responsibility” as in “to take the rap”, “bad rap” and “to beat the rap”. This usage morphed into “rap sheet” in the early 1900s.

52 One of the ones that “say so much,” in an Elton John hit : SAD SONG

“Sad Songs (Say So Much)” is a 1984 Elton John hit. The lyrics advise someone who is feeling “sad” to listen to “sad songs”, as they can help improve the mood.

56 Peachy-keen : A-OK

Our term “A-OK” is supposedly an abbreviation for “A(ll systems are) OK”, and arose at NASA in the sixties during the space program.

58 Coronary chambers : ATRIA

The heart has four chambers. The two upper chambers (the atria) accept deoxygenated blood from the body and oxygenated blood from the lungs. The atria squeeze those blood supplies into the two lower chambers of the heart (the ventricles), “priming” the pump, as it were. One ventricle pumps deoxygenated blood to the lungs, and the other pumps oxygenated blood to the rest of the body.

59 Name of the Baltimore Ravens’ mascot : POE

The name of the Baltimore Ravens football team has a literary derivation. Baltimore was the home of the writer Edgar Allan Poe, and so the team took its moniker from his most famous poem, “The Raven”. The name was selected in a fan contest. Baltimore’s mascot is a raven named Poe. Prior to the 2008 season, the Raven’s had a trio of avian mascots: Edgar, Allan and Poe.

64 Iberian landmark that’s an insurance company logo : ROCK OF GIBRALTAR (rock music)

Gibraltar is a small British territory on the Mediterranean coast just south of Spain. The British gained control of the area, which is just 2.6 square miles, during the War of the Spanish Succession in 1704. The ownership of Gibraltar is contested by the Spanish, but successive UK governments refuse to cede the territory as it is a major base for the Royal Navy. Gibraltar sits at the narrow entrance to the Mediterranean from the Atlantic. Most of the territory is taken up by a limestone monolith known as the Rock of Gibraltar, at the foot of which reside almost all of the territory’s population.

The Prudential Insurance company was started in 1875 as The Widows and Orphans Friendly Society. The company’s first product was simply burial insurance. Prudential has been using the very memorable Rock of Gibraltar logo since the 1890s.

72 Half a game fish : MAHI

“Mahi-mahi” (meaning “very strong”) is the Hawaiian name for the dolphinfish, which is also called the dorado. The mahi-mahi is an ugly looking creature if ever I saw one …

88 Zugspitze, e.g. : ALP

The Zugspitze is an Alpine peak, and the highest mountain in Germany.

90 With full force : AMAIN

“Amain” is an old term meaning “at great speed” or “of great strength”.

92 Pioneering TV brand : RCA

RCA was founded in 1919 as the Radio Corporation of America, and as a wholly-owned subsidiary of General Electric (GE). GE divested RCA in 1932, and then reacquired the company in 1986. Today, RCA is just a brand name.

93 One covering the bases : TARP

That would be baseball.

Originally, tarpaulins were made from canvas covered in tar that rendered the material waterproof. The word “tarpaulin” comes from “tar” and “palling”, with “pall” meaning “heavy cloth covering”.

95 Online notes : IMS

Even though instant messaging (sending and receiving IMs) has been around since the 1960s, it was AOL who popularized the term “instant message” in the eighties and nineties. The “AOL Instant Message” service was known as AIM.

96 Symbolic uncle : SAM

The Uncle Sam personification of the United States was first used during the War of 1812. The “Uncle Sam” term was so widely accepted that even the Germans used it during WWII, choosing the code word “Samland” for “America” in intelligence communiques.

98 The other way around : VICE VERSA

“Vice versa” is a Latin phrase meaning “with position turned”. We always pronounce this term “incorrectly”. In Latin, a “c” is a hard sound, and a “v” is pronounced like a “w”. The pronunciation should be something like “wee-kay wehr-sa”.

102 Port alternative : MADEIRA

Madeira is a Portuguese-owned archipelago that lies to the southwest of mainland Portugal. Madeira is famous for its fortified wine, which is known as Madeira wine.

113 Credit union seizure : REPO

A credit union is a member-owned financial cooperative that focuses on providing credit to those members. One comparison of credit unions to regular banks is the credit unions had a five times lower failure rate during the global financial crisis of 2007-2008.

115 Concerning : IN RE

The term “in re” is Latin, and is derived from “in” (in) and “res” (thing, matter). “In re” literally means “in the matter”, and is used to mean “in regard to” or “in the matter of”.

116 “Let Me Ride” Grammy winner : DR DRE

“Dr. Dre” is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. Dr. Dre is known for his own singing career as well as for producing records and starting the careers of others such as Snoop Dogg, Eminem and 50 Cent.

117 Champagne spec : BRUT

Sparkling wines can be classified according to sweetness. These classifications are, from driest to sweetest:

  • Brut Nature
  • Extra Brut
  • Brut
  • Extra Dry
  • Dry
  • Semi-Dry
  • Sweet

119 Yemeni city : ADEN

Aden is a seaport in Yemen that is located on the Gulf of Aden by the eastern approach to the Red Sea. Aden has a long history of British rule, from 1838 until a very messy withdrawal in 1967. A native of Aden is known as an Adeni. Some believe that Cain and Abel are buried in the city.

120 Leave in : STET

“Stet” is a Latin word meaning “let it stand”. In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word “stet” and then underscoring that change with a line of dots or dashes.

121 AOL and Comcast : ISPS

An Internet service provider (ISP) is just what the name indicates, a company that provides its customers with access to the Internet. One way that ISPs differentiate themselves from each other is in the way in which end users are connected to the ISP’s network. So, there are cable ISPs, DSL ISPs, dial-up ISPs and satellite ISPs.

122 “Beau __” : GESTE

“Beau Geste” is a 1924 novel by the British writer P. C. Wren. The hero of the piece is Michael “Beau” Geste, an upper-class Englishman who joins the French Foreign Legion and embarks on a life of adventure and intrigue.

Down

1 Barber’s powder : TALC

Talc is a mineral, hydrated magnesium silicate. Talcum powder is composed of loose talc, although these days “baby powder” is also made from cornstarch.

Our term “barber” comes to us via Anglo-French from the Latin “barba” meaning “beard”. Barbers originally offered a wide range of services, including surgery. Henry VIII restricted barbers to just haircutting … and dentistry!

4 Lorna of Brit Lit : DOONE

The novel “Lorna Doone: A Romance of Exmoor” was written by Richard Doddridge Blackmore. R. D. Blackmore was an English novelist, very celebrated and in demand in his day (the late 1800s). His romantic story “Lorna Doone” was by no means a personal favorite of his, and yet it is the only one of his works still in print.

5 Peloponnesian city-state : SPARTA

Sparta was a city-state in ancient Greece that was famous for her military might. Spartan children had a tough upbringing, and newborn babies were bathed in wine to see if the child was strong enough to survive. Every child was presented to a council of elders that decided if the baby was suitable for rearing. Those children deemed too puny were executed by tossing them into a chasm. We’ve been using the term “spartan” to describe something self-disciplined or austere since the 1600s.

The Peloponnese is a peninsula in southern Greece that was once home to the ancient city-state Sparta. Technically, the Peloponnese has been an island since 1893 when the Corinth Canal was completed, separating the peninsula from the mainland.

6 Many a Grisham hero : LAWYER

John Grisham is a lawyer and an incredibly successful author best known for his legal thrillers. After graduating from law school, Grisham practiced law for about ten years and then went into politics. He served in the Mississippi House of Representatives for six years, during which time he wrote his first novel, “A Time to Kill”.

14 Mar. honoree : ST PAT

The first Saint Patrick’s Day celebration in the US was held in 1600, in St. Augustine, Florida. There is some evidence that the first St. Paddy’s Day parade was held the following year, in the same locale. The annual parade in Boston dates back to 1737, in New York City dates back to 1762, and in Chicago dates back to 1843.

16 1968 album containing “The Motorcycle Song” : ARLO

Arlo Guthrie is the son of Woody Guthrie. Both father and son are renowned for singing protest songs about social injustice. Arlo is most famous for his epic “Alice’s Restaurant Massacree”, a song that lasts a full 18m 34s. In the song Guthrie tells how, after being drafted, he was rejected for service in the Vietnam War based on his criminal record. He had only one incident on his public record, a Thanksgiving Day arrest for littering and being a public nuisance when he was 18-years-old.

21 __ Lee : SARA

In 1935, businessman Charles Lubin bought a chain of three bakeries in Chicago called Community Bake Shops, and soon expanded the operation into seven stores. Lubin introduced a cream cheesecake that he named after his daughter who was only 8-years-old at the time, Sara Lee Lubin. The cheesecake was a hit and he renamed the bakeries to Kitchen of Sara Lee. The business was bought out by Consolidated foods in 1956, but the brand name Sara Lee persists to this day, as does Ms. Sara Lee herself who now goes by the name Sara Lee Schupf.

28 Bonnie with 10 Grammys : RAITT

Bonnie Raitt is a blues singer who is originally from Burbank, California. Raitt has won nine Grammys for her work, but she is perhaps as well known for her political activism as she is for her music. She was no fan of President George W. Bush while he was in office, and she sure did show it.

29 Luxury watch : OMEGA

Omega is a manufacturer of high-end watches based in Switzerland. An Omega watch was the first portable timepiece to make it to the moon, Perhaps even more impressive is the fact that James Bond has been wearing an Omega watch in the movies since 1995.

32 Jamaica’s Ocho __ : RIOS

If you ever take a cruise ship to Jamaica, you will likely disembark in Ocho Rios, a major port of call for the cruise lines. “Ocho rios” is Spanish for “eight rivers”.

34 Bud, for one : BEER

The American beer called Budweiser (often shortened to “Bud”) is named for the Czech town of Budweis (“České Budějovice” in Czech). The name is the subject of a dispute as here is an original Czech beer with a similar name, Budweiser Budvar. American Budweiser is sold in most European countries as “Bud”.

38 Immortal army leader : ARNIE

Arnold Palmer was one of the greats of the world of golf. He was very popular with many fans of the game, and his followers were usually referred to as “Arnie’s Army”. Off the course, Palmer was an avid pilot until his latter years. He resided in Latrobe, Pennsylvania for much of the year and the local airport is named in his honor: Arnold Palmer Regional Airport.

39 Draped garments : TOGAS

In ancient Rome, the classical attire known as a toga (plural “togae” or “togas”) was usually worn over a tunic. The tunic was made from linen, and the toga itself was a piece of cloth about twenty feet long made from wool. The toga could only be worn by men, and only if those men were Roman citizens. The female equivalent of the toga was called a “stola”.

41 Image in a religious painting : HALO

The Greek word “halos” is the name given to the ring of light around the sun or moon, which gives us our word “halo” that is used for a radiant light depicted above the head of a saintly person.

42 Foil alternative : EPEE

The sword known as an épée has a three-sided blade. The épée is similar to a foil and sabre, although the foil and saber have rectangular cross-sections.The sword known as an épée has a three-sided blade. The épée is similar to a foil and sabre, although the foil and saber have rectangular cross-sections.

45 Colgate rival : ORAL-B

The Oral-B toothbrush was introduced to the world in 1950, designed by a California periodontist. The first “model” was the Oral-B 60, a name given to reflect the 60 tufts in the brush. In 1969, the Oral-B was the first toothbrush to get to the moon as it was the toothbrush of choice for the crew of the Apollo 11 spacecraft.

The Colgate company, of toothpaste fame, was started by Englishman William Colgate in 1806 as a soap and candle factory in New York City. As the Colgate family prospered, they spent decades providing financial support to Madison University in Hamilton, New York. In recognition of this support, the school was renamed in 1890 to “Colgate University”.

49 1964 Civil Rts. Act creation : EEOC

“Equal Employment Opportunity” (EEO) is a term that has been around since 1964 when the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) was set up by the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Title VII of the Act prohibits employers from discriminating against employees on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin or religion.

50 “Return of the Jedi” beings : EWOKS

The Ewoks are creatures that live on the moon of Endor in the “Star Wars” universe. First appearing in “Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi”, they’re the cute and cuddly little guys that look like teddy bears.

51 MYOB word : YOUR

Mind your own business (MYOB)

53 __ Lama : DALAI

The Dalai Lama is a religious leader in the Gelug branch of Tibetan Buddhism. The current Dalai Lama is the 14th to hold the office. He has indicated that the next Dalai Lama might be found outside of Tibet for the first time, and may even be female.

57 “The Honeymooners” surname : KRAMDEN

Ralph Kramden is the character played by Jackie Gleason on “The Honeymooners”. The classic sitcom only aired for 39 episodes, with the last being broadcast in September of 1956. However, the sitcom itself was based on a recurring sketch that appeared on “Cavalcade of Stars” and then “The Jackie Gleason Show” from 1951-1955.

60 Popular long shot : LOTTO

Originally, lotto was a type of card game, with “lotto” being the Italian for “a lot”. We’ve used “lotto” to mean a gambling game since the late 1700s.

61 Title for Richard Starkey : SIR

Sir Ringo Starr’s real name is Richard Starkey. Before he joined the Beatles, replacing drummer Pete Best, Starkey played with the Raving Texans. It was with the Raving Texans that he adopted the name “Ringo Starr”, because he wore a lot of rings and he thought it sounded “cowboyish”. Back then his drum solos were billed as “Starr Time”.

62 Montana motto metal : PLATA

“Oro y Plata” means “gold and silver”, and is the state motto of Montana. The motto was written in Spanish, solely because “it had a nice ring to it”.

66 Piazza de Ferrari city : GENOA

Genoa is a seaport in the very north of Italy, in the region known as Liguria. One of Genoa’s most famous sons was Christopher Columbus. Another was the violinist Niccolò Paganini.

The main square in the Italian city of Genoa is called the Piazza De Ferrari. The piazza features a magnificent circular fountain at its center.

67 God with a hammer : THOR

The hammer associated with the Norse god Thor is known as Mjölnir. The name “Mjölnir” translates as “crusher”.

69 Computer that was retired in 1955 : ENIAC

The acronym ENIAC stands for Electronic Numerical Integrator and Calculator (although many folks insist that the C was for “Computer”). ENIAC was introduced at the University of Pennsylvania in 1946, at which time it was the first general-purpose electronic computer, and dubbed “Giant Brain” by the press. Its original purpose was the calculation of artillery firing tables, but it ended up being used early on to make calculations necessary for the development of the hydrogen bomb. Given its uses, it’s not surprising to hear that development of ENIAC was funded by the US Army during WWII.

70 Topping for chicken enchiladas : SALSA VERDE

“Salsa verde” is simply Spanish for “green sauce”.

75 Poaching targets : EGGS

Our verb “to poach”, meaning “to cook in liquid”, comes from the Old French verb “pochier”, meaning “to put into a pocket”. The idea is that the yolk of a “poached” egg is “pocketed” in the egg white.

80 Key letter : PHI

Phi Beta Kappa was the first collegiate Greek fraternity in the US, founded in 1776 at the College of William and Mary. The organization served as a model for future collegiate fraternities and sororities, although in the 19th century Phi Beta Kappa distanced itself from the fraternal focus and transformed into the honor society that it is today, recognizing academic excellence. The initials Phi Beta Kappa stand for “philosophia biou kybernētēs”, which translates into “philosophy is the guide of life”. The symbol of the Phi Beta Kappa Society is a golden key.

83 Czech or Serb : SLAV

The Slavic peoples are in the majority in communities covering over half of Europe. This large ethnic group is traditionally broken down into three smaller groups:

  • the West Slavic (including Czechs and Poles)
  • the East Slavic (including Russians and Ukrainians)
  • the South Slavic (including Bulgarians, Croats and Serbs)

85 Inuit craft : UMIAK

There is a type of boat used by Inuit people called an “umiak”. . The term “umiak” means “woman’s boat”, whereas “kayak” means “man’s boat”.

86 Stephen King’s role as the minister in “Pet Sematary,” e.g. : CAMEO

Even in my day, a cameo role was more than just a short appearance in a movie (or other artistic piece). For the appearance to be a cameo, the actor had to play himself or herself, and was instantly recognizable. With this meaning it’s easy to see the etymology of the term, as a cameo brooch is one with the recognizable carving of the silhouette of a person. Nowadays, a cameo is any minor role played by a celebrity or famous actor, regardless of the character played.

“Pet Sematary” is a horror novel by Stephen King that was first published in 1983. King was inspired to write the story after his experiences in a rented house on a busy road. Lots of animals were killed on the road so local children created a pet cemetery in a nearby field. King wrote the screenplay for the 1989 film adaptation of his novel, and he even made a cameo appearance playing a minister.

96 Sweet-smelling pouch : SACHET

A sachet is a small packet of perfumed powder left in perhaps a closet or trunk to scent clothes. The word “sachet” is a diminutive of the French word “sac” meaning “bag”.

103 It ends with the burial of Hector : ILIAD

As described in Homer’s “Iliad”, Hector was a Trojan prince and a great fighter. Hector was slain during the Trojan War, as the Greeks lay siege to Troy. If we are to believe the 2004 film “Troy”, Hector actually died at the hands of Achilles, while fighting a duel. Homer’s “Iliad” is less specific about the circumstances of Hector’s death.

104 Last movement of Beethoven’s “Waldstein” Sonata, e.g. : RONDO

A rondo was often chosen by composers in the classical period for the last movement of a sonata (or symphony or concerto, for that matter). In rondo form there is a principal theme that alternates with a contrasting theme(s). So, the original theme anchors the whole piece in between secondary digressions.

Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 21 is better known as the “Waldstein”. The work takes its nickname from the composer’s patron and friend Count Ferdinand Ernst Gabriel von Waldstein.

106 Santa Anita numbers : ODDS

Santa Anita Park is a racetrack for horses located in Arcadia, California. The most famous races on the track’s calendar are the Santa Anita Derby and the Santa Anita Handicap.

110 RSVP convenience : SASE

An SAE is a “stamped, addressed envelope”. An SASE is a “self-addressed, stamped envelope”.

“RSVP” stands for “répondez s’il vous plaît”, which is French for “answer, please”.

111 Strong desires : YENS

The word “yen”, meaning “urge”, has been around in English since the very early 1900s. It comes from the earlier word “yin” imported from Chinese, which was used in English to describe an intense craving for opium.

113 MLB stat : RBI

Run batted in (RBI)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Short-legged hopper : TOAD
5 Untidy types : SLOBS
10 25% of doce : TRES
14 Period : SPAN
18 River in Tuscany : ARNO
19 Tiny island nation near the equator : PALAU
20 Slew : HEAP
21 Mom-and-pop business : STORE
22 Fallon predecessor : LENO
23 Became aware of, with “to” : AWOKE …
24 Victor’s wife in “Casablanca” : ILSA
25 Cobbler fruit : APPLE
26 Summer cottage, perhaps : COUNTRY RETREAT (country music)
29 Emotive speaker : ORATOR
30 Fell in pellets : SLEETED
31 Result : AFTERMATH
33 Musician’s gift : EAR
34 Fitness ratio: Abbr. : BMI
36 Lake south of London : ERIE
37 Have something : EAT
40 Oklahoma’s top crop : WHEAT
44 Handle : SEE TO
46 Dairy-based quaff : NOG
47 Phobia lead-in : ACRO-
48 Prior conviction, e.g. : RAP SHEET ENTRY (rap music)
52 One of the ones that “say so much,” in an Elton John hit : SAD SONG
54 Brewpub choices : ALES
55 Pitchers that can’t throw? : EWERS
56 Peachy-keen : A-OK
58 Coronary chambers : ATRIA
59 Name of the Baltimore Ravens’ mascot : POE
60 Programmer’s problem, perhaps : LOOP
61 Drinking noise : SLURP
63 Facebook count : LIKES
64 Iberian landmark that’s an insurance company logo : ROCK OF GIBRALTAR (rock music)
68 Put back to zero : RESET
71 Villainous look : SNEER
72 Half a game fish : MAHI
73 Reverence : AWE
76 Unfitting : INAPT
77 Dusk, poetically : E’EN
78 Not treating nicely : BAD TO
80 Fussbudget : PRIG
81 Some fort components : PILLOWS
84 Personal exam? : SOUL SEARCHING (soul music)
87 One way to rest : EASY
88 Zugspitze, e.g. : ALP
90 With full force : AMAIN
91 Senate staffers : AIDES
92 Pioneering TV brand : RCA
93 One covering the bases : TARP
95 Online notes : IMS
96 Symbolic uncle : SAM
98 The other way around : VICE VERSA
102 Port alternative : MADEIRA
106 Bar accessory : OPENER
108 Commonsense approach to behavior analysis : FOLK PSYCHOLOGY (folk music)
112 Showed the courage : DARED
113 Credit union seizure : REPO
114 Carpenter’s machine : LATHE
115 Concerning : IN RE
116 “Let Me Ride” Grammy winner : DR DRE
117 Champagne spec : BRUT
118 One who shows the way : USHER
119 Yemeni city : ADEN
120 Leave in : STET
121 AOL and Comcast : ISPS
122 “Beau __” : GESTE
123 Moms in a glade : DOES

Down

1 Barber’s powder : TALC
2 Lunch box treats : OREOS
3 Set aside : ANNUL
4 Lorna of Brit Lit : DOONE
5 Peloponnesian city-state : SPARTA
6 Many a Grisham hero : LAWYER
7 Prayer opening : O LORD …
8 Whip up a cake : BAKE
9 Bird feeder cake : SUET
10 Heist figure : THIEF
11 Be empathetic : RELATE
12 NBA’s __ Conference : EASTERN
13 Cruise ship feature : SPA
14 Mar. honoree : ST PAT
15 Start celebrating : POP THE CORK
16 1968 album containing “The Motorcycle Song” : ARLO
17 At no time, in old times : NE’ER
21 __ Lee : SARA
27 Saw things : TEETH
28 Bonnie with 10 Grammys : RAITT
29 Luxury watch : OMEGA
32 Jamaica’s Ocho __ : RIOS
34 Bud, for one : BEER
35 __ wear : MEN’S
38 Immortal army leader : ARNIE
39 Draped garments : TOGAS
40 Sub alternative : WRAP
41 Image in a religious painting : HALO
42 Foil alternative : EPEE
43 Pack animal : ASS
44 Starting point : STEP ONE
45 Colgate rival : ORAL-B
47 Moving around : ASTIR
49 1964 Civil Rts. Act creation : EEOC
50 “Return of the Jedi” beings : EWOKS
51 MYOB word : YOUR
53 __ Lama : DALAI
57 “The Honeymooners” surname : KRAMDEN
60 Popular long shot : LOTTO
61 Title for Richard Starkey : SIR
62 Montana motto metal : PLATA
64 Email option : REPLY
65 Professional charges : FEES
66 Piazza de Ferrari city : GENOA
67 God with a hammer : THOR
68 Redder, perhaps : RIPER
69 Computer that was retired in 1955 : ENIAC
70 Topping for chicken enchiladas : SALSA VERDE
73 Quite dry : ARID
74 Half of a dinner pairing : WINE
75 Poaching targets : EGGS
78 Cartoon explosion sound : BLAM!
79 With no changes : AS IS
80 Key letter : PHI
82 Do a garden chore : WATER
83 Czech or Serb : SLAV
85 Inuit craft : UMIAK
86 Stephen King’s role as the minister in “Pet Sematary,” e.g. : CAMEO
89 Would rather have : PREFERS
94 Support : PROP UP
96 Sweet-smelling pouch : SACHET
97 Hold fast : ADHERE
99 Unmoving : INERT
100 Give up : CEDE
101 Places to put coins : SLOTS
102 Enduring legends : MYTHS
103 It ends with the burial of Hector : ILIAD
104 Last movement of Beethoven’s “Waldstein” Sonata, e.g. : RONDO
105 Come to terms : AGREE
106 Santa Anita numbers : ODDS
107 86-Down, for one : PART
109 Connect, in a way, with “in” : PLUG …
110 RSVP convenience : SASE
111 Strong desires : YENS
113 MLB stat : RBI

12 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 28 Feb 21, Sunday”

  1. Sometimes I just have to laugh at myself. I should know better than to put in things without at least some verification. First, for “bar accessory” I put in “olives”. Sounds good to me! Then for “Carpenter’s machine”, I thought it was a tricky clue, so I put in “piano”. Hahaha. Oh well, it was a fun puzzle.

  2. One second short of 30 minutes, and DNF, with about 14 fills left empty. I used Check Grid, and then was able to complete without errors. But I needed the help, because a decent section in the center of the puzzle just would NOT come to me. I don’t think I was in sync with the setter’s clues for the most part.

  3. No errors. Took awhile. Just a busy Sunday with all the church events. I usually knock the LAT crossword before I leave but I was a bit behind schedule. The NYT Sunday took longer than usual and the Saturday NEWSDAY killed me. Sorry @GLENN, that one really took me for a ride. I got maybe 50% then had to resort to my educational library of sorts. I really got schooled. I tell you what, after a few of those , it makes the Sunday crosswords a joy ride… but I really enjoy Sundays NYT and LAT crosswords. They are like a nice Sunday drive..
    Have a good week all.

  4. Isn’t the 81 across clue in error? It would make more sense if it said “Comfort components” instead of “Some fort components”.

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