LA Times Crossword 12 Apr 21, Monday

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Constructed by: Fred Piscop
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: On the Rise

Themed answers each end with a “RISE”:

  • 65A Increasing, and a hint to 17- and 40-Across and 11- and 27-Down : ON THE RISE
  • 17A Place for junk : SCRAPHEAP
  • 40A U.S. Congress, informally : THE HILL
  • 11D Small order of pancakes : SHORT STACK
  • 27D Nuclear reactor : ATOMIC PILE

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 4m 19s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

9 Deep-voiced singer : BASSO

The bass is the lowest male singing voice. A man with such a voice might be called a “basso” (plural “bassi”). In an opera, the villain of the piece is usually played by a basso.

14 Great Lake that stretches from New York to Michigan : ERIE

Lake Erie is the fourth-largest of the five Great Lakes by area (Lake Ontario is the smallest). The lake takes its name from the Erie tribe of Native Americans that used to live along its southern shore. Erie is the smallest of the Great Lakes by volume and the shallowest, something for which nearby residents must be quite grateful. Being relatively shallow, much of Erie freezes over part way through most winters putting an end to most of the lake-effect snow that falls in the snow belt extending from the lake’s edge.

20 “Honey, I’m Home” singer Twain : SHANIA

Shania Twain is a country and pop singer from Windsor, Ontario. Shania’s birth name is “Eileen Edwards”, and this changed to “Eilleen Twain” when her mother remarried. Twain changed her name to Shania in the early 1990s, around the same time that her musical career started to take off.

23 B and B’s, e.g. : INNS

In the US, an intimate inn is a bed & breakfast (B&B). Traditionally, a bed & breakfast back in Ireland is more basic accommodation, and used to be much cheaper than a comparable hotel room.

26 Did a marathon, say : RAN

The marathon commemorates the legendary messenger-run by Pheidippides from the site of the Battle of Marathon back to Athens, and is run over 26 miles and 385 yards. The first modern Olympic marathon races were run over a distance that approximated the length of the modern-day Marathon-Athens highway, although the actual length of the race varied from games to games. For the 1908 Olympics in London, a course starting at Windsor Castle and ending in front of the Royal Box at White City Stadium was defined. That course was 26 miles and 385 yards, the standard length now used at all Olympic Games. Organizers of subsequent games continued to vary the length of the race, until a decision was made in 1921 to adopt the distance used in London in 1908.

28 Relaxation of govt. rules : DEREG

Deregulation (dereg.)

40 U.S. Congress, informally : THE HILL

The designer of Washington D.C., Pierre L’Enfant, chose the crest of a hill as the site for the future Congress House. He called the location “Jenkins Hill” and “Jenkins Heights”. Earlier records show the name as “New Troy”. Today we call it “Capitol Hill”.

43 Web or nanny follower : -CAM

From what I’ve read, it is legal to record video with a hidden camera, at least to monitor the behavior of a caregiver in your home. Apparently there is also a law that prohibits the recording of audio. So, “nanny cams” are sold without audio capability. But (disclaimer) that’s just what I read, so don’t take my word for it!

44 Reef makeup : CORAL

Polyps are tiny sea creatures that are found attached to underwater structures or to other polyps. Polyps have a mouth at one end of a cylindrical “body” that is surrounded by tentacles. Some polyps cluster into groups called stony corals, with stony corals being the building blocks of coral reefs. The structure of the reef comprises calcium carbonate exoskeletons secreted by the coral polyps.

45 Some youth ctrs. : YMCAS

The YMCA (the Y) is a worldwide movement that has its roots in London, England. There, in 1844, the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) was founded with the intent of promoting Christian principles through the development of “a healthy spirit, mind and body”. The founder, George Williams, saw the need to create YMCA facilities for young men who were flocking to the cities as the Industrial Revolution flourished. He saw that these men were frequenting taverns and brothels, and wanted to offer a more wholesome alternative.

47 Cotton gin inventor Whitney : ELI

The term “cotton gin” is a contraction of “cotton eng-ine”. The gin is a machine that mechanically separates cotton fibers from the cotton seed. The modern version of the cotton gin was invented by Eli Whitney in 1793.

54 Game room missile : DART

Darts is a game that’s often played in English and Irish pubs, even over here in America. The scoring in a traditional game of darts is difficult to describe in a sentence or two, but the game of darts called “Round the Clock” is simply hitting the numbers 1 through 20 on the dartboard in sequence.

56 From Tokyo, say : JAPANESE

The Greater Tokyo Area is the most populous metropolitan area on the planet. 51 of the Fortune Global 500 companies are headquartered in Tokyo. And the residents of Tokyo eat very well. Michelin has awarded more Michelin stars to Tokyo than any other city in the world.

67 Distance runner : MILER

The 4-minute barrier for the mile run was first broken in 1954 by Roger Bannister, when he finished in just over 3m 59s. If you plan on running a 4-minute mile, you should probably be warned that this means you have to run the whole race at an average speed of over 15 mph (do the math!).

69 “Enchanted” movie girl played by Anne Hathaway : ELLA

“Ella Enchanted” is a fantasy novel written by Gail Carson Levine, and published in 1997. It is a retelling of the story of Cinderella, with lots of mythical creatures added. A film adaptation was released in 2004 that features Anne Hathaway in the title role.

Actress Anne Hathaway is a favorite of mine, I must say. She starred in “The Devil Wears Prada” in 2006 and in 2007’s “Becoming Jane”, a film that I particularly enjoyed. And yes, baby Anne was named after Anne Hathaway, the wife of William Shakespeare.

70 Arterial implant : STENT

In the world of surgical medicine, a stent is an artificial tube inserted inside a vessel in the body, say an artery, in order to reduce the effects of a local restriction in the body’s conduit.

72 Doe or stag : DEER

A male deer is usually called a buck, and a female is a doe. However, the male red deer is usually referred to as a stag. The males of even larger species of deer are often called bulls, and females cows. In older English, male deer of over 5 years were called harts, and females of over 3 years were called hinds. The young of small species are known as fawns, and of larger species are called calves. All very confusing …

Down

1 “Porgy and __” : BESS

“Porgy and Bess” is an opera with music by George Gershwin, lyrics by Ira Gershwin, and libretto by DuBose Heyward. The storyline of the opera is based on the novel “Porgy” written by DuBose Heyward and his wife Dorothy. “Porgy and Bess” was first performed in 1935, in New York City, but really wasn’t accepted as legitimate opera until 1976 after a landmark production by the Houston Grand Opera. The most famous song from the piece is probably the wonderful aria “Summertime”.

2 Half a McDonald’s logo : ARCH

The McDonald’s fast-food chain uses a stylized letter M as a logo, with the logo going by the name “Golden Arches”. Those Golden Arches are commonly integrated into the architecture of purpose-built McDonald’s restaurants.

3 Old Italian money : LIRA

The word “lira” is used in a number of countries for currency. “Lira” comes from the Latin for “pound” and is derived from a British pound sterling, the value of a Troy pound of silver. For example, the lira (plural “lire”) was the official currency of Italy before the country changed over to the euro in 2002.

7 Venetian blind piece : SLAT

Venetian blinds probably did not originate in Venice, and rather were brought to Europe from Persia by Venetian traders. Apparently, the French haven’t forgotten the true origins of the design as they call Venetian blinds “Les Persiennes”.

9 Italian lawn bowling : BOCCE

The Italian bowling game of “bocce” (often anglicized as “bocci” or “boccie”) is based on a game played in ancient Rome. “Bocce” is the plural of the Italian word “boccia” meaning “bowl”.

10 Book of maps : ATLAS

The famous Flemish geographer Gerardus Mercator published his first collection of maps in 1578. Mercator’s collection contained a frontispiece with an image of Atlas the Titan from Greek mythology holding up the world on his shoulders. That image gave us our term “atlas” that is used for a book of maps.

12 FedExed, say : SENT

FedEx began operations in 1973 as Federal Express, but now operates very successfully under it’s more catchy, abbreviated name. Headquartered in Memphis with its “SuperHub” at Memphis International Airport, FedEx is the world’s largest airline in terms of tons of freight flown. And due to the presence of FedEx, Memphis Airport has the largest-volume cargo operation of any airport worldwide.

18 ATM code : PIN

One enters a Personal Identification Number (PIN) when using an Automated Teller Machine (ATM). Given that the N in PIN stands for “number”, then “PIN number” is a redundant phrase. And, given that the M in ATM stands for “machine”, then “ATM machine” is a redundant phrase as well. Grr …!

22 __-hair pasta : ANGEL

Capellini is a pasta that is like thin spaghetti. An even thinner version of the pasta is known as “capelli d’angelo”, which translates as “angel hair”.

27 Nuclear reactor : ATOMIC PILE

Originally known as an “atomic pile”, a nuclear reactor is a device that initiates and maintains a nuclear fission chain reaction. Most nuclear reactors are used in power plants to generate electricity, or onboard marine vessels to provide propulsion.

32 Greek i’s : IOTAS

Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet, and one that gave rise to our letters I and J. We use the word “iota” to portray something very small, as it is the smallest of all Greek letters.

34 Doily trim : LACE

There was a draper in London in the seventeenth century named Doiley, and he gave his name to the lace fabric that he sold. The fabric in turn gave its name to the ornamental mat that we call a “doily”. I can’t stand doilies …

35 Needing no Rx : OTC

Over-the-counter (OTC) drugs don’t need a prescription (Rx).

41 Lena who sang “Stormy Weather” : HORNE

Lena Horne was an American jazz singer, actress, dancer and civil rights activist. Horne started her career as a nightclub singer and then began to get some meaty acting roles in Hollywood. However, she ended up on the blacklist during the McCarthy Era for expressing left wing political views. One of Horne’s starring roles was in the 1943 movie “Stormy Weather” for which she also performed the title song.

“Stormy Weather” is a 1933 song that is most associated with Lena Horne and Billie Holliday. It was first recorded by Ethel Waters, who debuted the song at the Cotton Club in Harlem, New York City. “Stormy Weather” spawned a 1943 movie of the same name in which Lena Horne starred and performed the title song.

58 Ginger ale or root beer : SODA

The brand most closely associated with ginger ale is Canada Dry. “Canada Dry Pale Ginger Ale” was first formulated in 1904 by a Canadian chemist called John McLoughlin from Ontario. Prohibition in the United States helped sales of the drink as it was particularly effective in masking the taste of illegally-produced, homemade liquor.

Root beer is a beverage that is very North American, and is rarely found elsewhere in the world. Root beer originated in the 1700s and was made from the root of the sassafras plant. The traditional root beer was a beverage with a very low alcohol content, and today there are many versions that contain no alcohol at all. The sassafras root was used as the primary flavor ingredient right up until 1960, when the FDA banned its use as tests determined that it was a carcinogen.

59 “The Catch” actress Mireille __ : ENOS

Mireille Enos is an actress from Kansas City. Enos is perhaps best known for her TV work, playing Sarah Linden on “The Killing” and for playing twins Kathy and JoDean Marquart on “Big Love”. Enos is married to actor Alan Ruck, who I mainly remember playing Cameron Frye in the great movie “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off”.

“The Catch” is a comedy-drama show that originally aired for two seasons from 2016 to 2017. It’s about a private investigator (Mireille Enos) chasing down her former fiancé (Peter Krause), who is a con artist.

61 Liver secretion : BILE

The human liver has many functions, one of which is to store vital substances. The list of substances stored in the liver includes glucose (as glycogen), vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin B12, vitamin K, iron and copper. Another function of the liver is to produce bile, a substance stored in the gallbladder that aids in the digestion of fats.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Soothing ointment : BALM
5 Criticize harshly : BASH
9 Deep-voiced singer : BASSO
14 Great Lake that stretches from New York to Michigan : ERIE
15 Every 12 mos. : YRLY
16 Significant __: partner : OTHER
17 Place for junk : SCRAPHEAP
19 Genetic twin : CLONE
20 “Honey, I’m Home” singer Twain : SHANIA
21 Wagons at midday socials : TEA CARTS
23 B and B’s, e.g. : INNS
25 Home of twigs : NEST
26 Did a marathon, say : RAN
28 Relaxation of govt. rules : DEREG
31 Skip, with “out” : SIT …
34 Turn loose : LET GO
36 Annoys : VEXES
38 Oft-stubbed digit : TOE
39 In time gone by : AGO
40 U.S. Congress, informally : THE HILL
42 Enjoyed a meal : ATE
43 Web or nanny follower : -CAM
44 Reef makeup : CORAL
45 Some youth ctrs. : YMCAS
47 Cotton gin inventor Whitney : ELI
48 Defy authority : REBEL
50 Approves : OKS
51 Dimpled facial feature, perhaps : CHIN
54 Game room missile : DART
56 From Tokyo, say : JAPANESE
60 Overly large : TOO BIG
64 Still in the game : ALIVE
65 Increasing, and a hint to 17- and 40-Across and 11- and 27-Down : ON THE RISE
67 Distance runner : MILER
68 Prescription amount : DOSE
69 “Enchanted” movie girl played by Anne Hathaway : ELLA
70 Arterial implant : STENT
71 Seeks answers : ASKS

Down

1 “Porgy and __” : BESS
2 Half a McDonald’s logo : ARCH
3 Old Italian money : LIRA
4 Definition : MEANING
5 Manually : BY HAND
6 “__ you comfy?” : ARE
7 Venetian blind piece : SLAT
8 Promote big-time : HYPE
9 Italian lawn bowling : BOCCE
10 Book of maps : ATLAS
11 Small order of pancakes : SHORT STACK
12 FedExed, say : SENT
13 Unrefined minerals : ORES
18 ATM code : PIN
22 __-hair pasta : ANGEL
24 Extremely harsh : SEVERE
26 Fit for a monarch : REGAL
27 Nuclear reactor : ATOMIC PILE
29 Get-well program, briefly : REHAB
30 Banished from one’s country : EXILED
32 Greek i’s : IOTAS
33 Golfer’s pegs : TEES
34 Doily trim : LACE
35 Needing no Rx : OTC
37 Like a fox, it’s said : SLY
41 Lena who sang “Stormy Weather” : HORNE
46 Took a drive : MOTORED
49 Wood-shaping machines : LATHES
52 Place of refuge : HAVEN
53 Chemically nonreactive : INERT
55 Fish eggs : ROE
56 Traffic tie-ups : JAMS
57 Touched down : ALIT
58 Ginger ale or root beer : SODA
59 “The Catch” actress Mireille __ : ENOS
61 Liver secretion : BILE
62 Shipwreck site : ISLE
63 Stick shift choice : GEAR
66 “Shame on you!” : TSK!

14 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 12 Apr 21, Monday”

  1. 5 min 10 sec No errors. That was the easiest crossword in a long time. A gift after a lot of much more difficult puzzles. I enjoy the difficult ones, but once in a great while there are some that are just not fun. Knew just about every answer in this one immediately.

  2. No errors; no lookups. My only problem this morning was squinting
    to see the little numbers, as the newspaper was printed rather lightly…
    and I’m getting old.

  3. 6:15, no errors, any mistakes (e.g., I knee-jerked ALOE instead of BALM for 1A) quickly corrected by crosses

  4. 4:19, no errors. Nothing really consequential past it revealing a lot of my problems in keying in the answers.

  5. 3:58

    So quick, I dared not spend brainpower thinking about the theme.

    9D reminded of the time when we lived half a block from the founding store of Bertucci’s pizza. They had a bocce court downstairs! Too bad we only tried playing the game once.

    Do the TEACARTS in 21A refer to brunch, or dimsum, or both?

  6. Really easy, as everyone else pointed out! But I was momentarily thrown by 1 across, the clue usually revealing aloe as the answer…so had to back-track a bit…still, took me 8 minutes! always astounded by how fast bill goes because even if I were as good as him, I don’t think I could write that fast!

  7. Greetings friends!!!🤗

    Pam!! Impressive time!!👍🏻

    Easy Monday. I also thought ALOE at first. Don’t think I’ve ever heard the term ATOMIC PILE….sounds strange. I kinda remembered BOCCE from other puzzles. 🤔

    Didn’t notice or look for the theme at all.

    Be well ~~⚾️

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