LA Times Crossword 22 Apr 21, Thursday

Advertisement

Constructed by: Grant Boroughs
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Clue: In the Event of a Freeze …

Themed answers each have the same clue:

  • 17A In the event of a freeze, … : … RESTART COMPUTER
  • 40A In the event of a freeze, … : … WEAR WARM CLOTHES
  • 59A In the event of a “Freeze!,” … : … DON’T MOVE A MUSCLE

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 6m 20s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

6 The universal language, some say : MATH

Here’s another term that catches me out all the time, having done my schooling on the other side of the Atlantic. The term “mathematics” is shortened to “math” in the US, but to “maths” in Britain and Ireland.

10 “Time __ transfix the flourish set on youth”: Shak. : DOTH

Here is the full text of William Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 60”:

Like as the waves make towards the pebbl’d shore,
So do our minutes hasten to their end;
Each changing place with that which goes before,
In sequent toil all forwards do contend.
Nativity, once in the main of light,
Crawls to maturity, wherewith being crown’d,
Crooked eclipses ‘gainst his glory fight,
And Time that gave doth now his gift confound.
Time doth transfix the flourish set on youth
And delves the parallels in beauty’s brow,
Feeds on the rarities of nature’s truth,
And nothing stands but for his scythe to mow:
And yet to times in hope my verse shall stand,
Praising thy worth, despite his cruel hand.

14 Red tide cause : ALGAE

An algal bloom that takes on a red or brown color is commonly referred to as “red tide”. The algae causing the bloom are phytoplankton containing photosynthetic pigments that give the red/brown color. Some red tides are extremely harmful to marine life as there can be a depletion of oxygen dissolved in the seawater. The algae can also contain natural toxins that can kill those creatures that eat it.

15 Bio, in a way, is aptly part of it : OBIT

The letters “B-I-O” appear in the word “obit”.

Our word “obituary” comes from the Latin “obituaris”. The Latin term was used for “record of the death of a person”, although the literal meaning is “pertaining to death”.

16 Most populous Hawaiian island : OAHU

Oahu has been called “The Gathering Place”, although the word “O’ahu” has no translation in Hawaiian. It seems that “O’ahu” is simply the name of the island. One story is that it is named after the son of the Polynesian navigator who first found the islands. The island is made up of two volcanoes, Wai’anae and Ko’olau, joined together by a broad valley, the O’ahu Plain.

17 In the event of a freeze, … : … RESTART COMPUTER

The verb “to boot”, as used in the world of computers, comes from the phrase “pull oneself up by one’s bootstraps”. The idea is that the software that has to be loaded before a computer can do anything useful is called a “bootstrap load”.

20 Little pigs or blind mice : TRIO

The fairy tale about “The Three Little Pigs” has been around for centuries, although it first appeared in print in the 1840s. One little pig built a house using straw and another built one using wood. The cleverest little pig built its house using bricks.

Three blind mice. Three blind mice.
See how they run. See how they run.
They all ran after the farmer’s wife,
Who cut off their tails with a carving knife,
Did you ever see such a sight in your life,
As three blind mice?

21 Smelting residue : SLAG

The better ores are processed in a blast furnace, to extract the metal. The waste from this process is called “slag”. Slag does contain some residual metal and it can be processed further in a slag furnace to extract the balance. Slag furnaces also accept lower-quality ores as a raw material.

Metals are found in ore in the form of oxides. In order to get pure metal from the ore, the ore is heated and the metal oxides within are reduced (i.e. the oxygen is removed) in the chemical process known as smelting. The oxygen is extracted by adding a source of carbon or carbon monoxide which uses up the excess oxygen atoms to make carbon dioxide, a waste product of smelting (and, a greenhouse gas).

25 Title choice on a form : MRS

“Mr.” is an abbreviation for “mister”, and “Mrs.” is an abbreviation for “mistress”.

31 Bitterroot Range st. : IDA

The Bitterroot Range is part of the Rocky Mountains located along the border between Montana and Idaho. The range takes its name from the state flower of Montana: the bitterroot.

36 Rye fungus : ERGOT

Ergots are fungi that cause disease in rye and related plants. If humans eat ergot-contaminated grain, a condition called ergotism can result. Ergotism is the result of consumption of alkaloids produced by the fungi, alkaloids that can cause seizures and manic behavior. It has even been suggested that the hysteria exhibited by the Salem “witches” was perhaps caused by the ingestion of ergot-contaminated rye.

43 Shelter securely : ENSCONCE

To ensconce oneself, one settles securely or comfortably somewhere. Back in the late 1500s, “to ensconce” meant “to cover with a fort” as a “sconce” is a small defensive fort or earthwork.

49 Brown brew : ALE

The many, many different styles of beer can generally be sorted into two groups: ales and lagers. Ales are fermented at relatively warm temperatures for relatively short periods of time, and use top-fermenting yeasts, i.e. yeasts that float on top of the beer as it ferments. Lagers ferment at relatively low temperatures and for relatively long periods of time. Lagers use bottom-fermenting yeasts, i.e. yeasts that fall to the bottom of the beer as it ferments.

52 Parker’s wind : SAX

Charlie Parker was a jazz saxophonist who was often just called “Bird” or “Yardbird”. He was a leader in the development of the style of jazz called “bebop”, which gained popularity in the forties. Parker had a rough life outside of music. He was a heroin addict, and a heavy drinker. When he died, the coroner who performed his autopsy estimated his age as between 50 and 60 years old based on the appearance of his body and condition of his organs. Charlie Parker was actually 34-years-old when he died in a New York City hotel room in 1955.

53 Ice cream brand : EDY’S

Dreyer’s ice cream sells its products under the name Dreyer’s in the Western United States, and Edy’s in the Eastern states. The company’s founders were William Dreyer and Joseph Edy.

54 Farm skyline sight : SILO

“Silo” is a Spanish word that we absorbed into English. The term ultimately derives from the Greek “siros”, which described a pit in which one kept corn.

67 Michael Douglas’ middle name : KIRK

Megastar Kirk Douglas was born Issur Danielovitch in Upstate New York. One of Douglas’ coups was to purchase the film-making rights to the play “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”, in which he starred on Broadway in the mid-sixties. He gave those rights to his son, actor Michael Douglas, who made it into the magnificent movie of the same name. Kirk Douglas passed away in 2020 at the age of 103.

Actor Michael Douglas is the son of Hollywood legend Kirk Douglas. Michael’s big career break came on television when he played alongside Karl Malden in the police drama “The Streets of San Francisco”. He married Welsh actress Catherine Zeta-Jones in 2000. Michael and Catherine share the same birthday (September 25th), although there’s a 25-year gap in their ages.

69 Sky and Storm org. : WNBA

The Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) includes the Connecticut Sun, San Antonio Stars, Seattle Storm and the Chicago Sky.

70 Mid-month day : IDES

There were three important days in each month of the old Roman calendar. These days originally depended on the cycles of the moon but were eventually “fixed” by law. “Kalendae” were the first days of each month, originally the days of the new moon. “Nonae” were originally the days of the half moon. And “idus” (the ides) was originally the day of the full moon, eventually fixed at the 15th day of a month. Well, actually the ides were the 15th day of March, May, July and October. For all other months, the ides fell on the 13th. Go figure …

71 Turkey neighbor : SYRIA

The modern state that we know as Syria was established after WWI as a French mandate. Syria was granted independence from France in 1946.

Down

3 Old British sports cars : MGS

My neighbor used to keep his MG Midget roadster in my garage (away from his kids!) back in Ireland many moons ago. The Midget was produced by the MG division of the British Motor Corporation from 1961 to 1979, with the MG initialism standing for “Morris Garages”.

5 Orbital period : YEAR

A year is defined as the time it takes for the Earth to orbit the Sun. The other planets in our solar system take varying lengths of time to complete their orbits:

  1. Mercury: ~ 3 Earth months
  2. Venus: ~ 7 Earth months
  3. Earth: 1 Earth year
  4. Mars: ~ 2 Earth years
  5. Jupiter: ~ 12 Earth years
  6. Saturn: ~ 30 Earth years
  7. Uranus: ~ 84 Earth years
  8. Neptune: ~ 165 Earth years

8 Spanish relatives : TIOS

In Spanish, a “tio” (uncle) is the “hermano del padre o de la madre” (brother of the father or the mother).

9 Web page standard : HTML

The initialism “HTML” stands for HyperText Markup Language. HTML is the language used to write most Internet web pages (including this one).

13 “Ben-__” : HUR

The celebrated 1959 Charlton Heston movie “Ben-Hur” is a dramatization of a book published in 1880 by Lew Wallace titled “Ben-Hur: A Tale of Christ”. The 1959 epic film won a record 11 Academy Awards, a feat that has been equaled since then but never beaten. The other winners of 11 Oscars are “Titanic” (1997) and “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the Rings” (2003).

19 Faux __ : PAS

The term “faux pas” is French in origin, and translates literally as “false step” (or “false steps”, as the plural has the same spelling in French).

22 Nielsen ratings units : VIEWERS

Arthur Nielsen founded his Nielsen Media Research company to track brand advertising. He quickly moved into market analysis of radio audiences in the thirties, and today the company is famous for tracking television audiences. I remember watching the last episode of the TV series “Becker”, in which Ted Danson played a doctor. Given that the show had been ordered off the air due to declining viewership, there’s a great line in the last episode when Becker asks for the chart of a patient called “Nielsen”. He looks at the lab results and announces “I don’t know what everyone is talking about … these numbers aren’t so bad!” Great stuff …

23 Epinephrine-producing gland : ADRENAL

The naturally occurring hormone adrenaline is also known as epinephrine. Adrenaline takes its name from the adrenal glands that produce the hormone. The glands themselves take their name from their location in the body, right on the kidneys (“ad-renes” meaning “near or at the kidneys” in Latin). The alternative name of epinephrine has a similar root (“epi-nephros” meaning “upon the kidney” in Greek).

24 “Cooking With Power” author : LAGASSE

Emeril Lagasse is an American chef who was born in Massachusetts. Lagasse first achieved celebrity as executive chef in Commander’s Palace in New Orleans. Now famous for his television shows, his cuisine still showcases New Orleans ingredients and influences. Lagasse started using his famous “Bam!” catchphrase in order to keep his crew awake during repeated tapings of his show.

28 Member of a league in a Sherlock Holmes title : REDHEAD

“The Red-Headed League” is an 1891 short story by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle that features his hero Sherlock Holmes. According to the author, “The Red-Headed League” was one of his favorite Holmes stories.

32 “Love on __-way Street”: 1970 hit : A TWO

“Love on a Two-Way Street” was a hit in 1970 for the Moments R&B vocal group. The Moments changed their name to Ray, Goodman & Brown (the band members’ family names) in 1978 as a result of a legal dispute.

34 Non-native speaker’s subj. : ESL

English as a Second Language (ESL) is sometimes referred to as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL).

42 Electronics pioneer : RCA

During WWI, the US government actively discouraged the loss of certain technologies to other countries, including allies. The developing wireless technologies were considered to be particularly important by the army and navy. The government prevented the General Electric Company from selling equipment to the British Marconi Company, and instead facilitated the purchase by GE of the American Marconi subsidiary. This purchase led to GE forming the Radio Corporation of America that we know today as RCA.

47 Vessels with a cockpit : KAYAKS

There is a type of boat used by Inuit people called a “kayak”. The term “kayak” means “man’s boat”, whereas “umiak” means “woman’s boat”.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the original “cockpit” was a “pit” used for fighting “cocks”. The term was then applied nautically, as the name for the compartment below decks used as living quarters by midshipmen. The cockpit of a boat today, usually on a smaller vessel, is a sunken area towards the stern in which sits the helmsman and others (who can fit!). The usage extended to aircraft in the 1910s and to cars in the 1930s.

51 Kipling title orphan : KIM

“Kim” is a novel by Rudyard Kipling that was first published in serial form, from 1900 to 1901. The title character, whose full name is Kimball O’Hara, is the orphaned son of an Irish soldier who lives like a vagabond in India during the days of the British Raj. The boy grows up to become a spy working for the British.

Rudyard Kipling was a British poet and writer famous for his tales of the British Raj, the rule of the British Empire in India. Kipling was actually born in Bombay, but returned with his family to England when he was very young. After being educated in England, he returned to India and from there traveled the world. Kipling’s most famous works are the stories “The Jungle Book”, “Just So Stories”, “The Man Who Would Be King”, and the poems “Mandalay”, “Gunga Din” and “If-”.

55 Norse prankster : LOKI

Loki is a god appearing in Norse mythology. In one story about Loki, he was punished by other gods for having caused the death of Baldr, the god of light and beauty. Loki is bound to a sharp rock using the entrails of one of his sons. A serpent drips venom which is collected in a bowl, and then his wife must empty the venom onto Loki when the bowl is full. The venom causes Loki great pain, and his writhing results in what we poor mortals experience as earthquakes.

56 Poet banished by Augustus : OVID

For some reason, the Roman poet Ovid fell into disfavor with Emperor Augustus. As a result, Ovid was banished to the island of Tomis in the Black Sea, where he spent the last years of his life. While in exile, Ovid wrote a large collection of poetic letters known as the “Tristia” (also “Sorrows” or “Lamentations”). In the work, Ovid is basically lamenting his situation in exile.

As the first Emperor of Rome, Octavian was given the name Caesar Augustus. The month of August, originally called “Sextilis” in Latin, was renamed in honor of Augustus.

58 Baby seals : PUPS

Male seals are called bulls, females are cows, and babies are pups. A group of seals comprising one or two males, with several females and their offspring, is known as a harem.

61 State east of Wyo. : NEB

The state of Nebraska got its “Cornhusker State” nickname from the University of Nebraska athletic teams (and not the other way round). In turn, the university teams’ name comes from the prevalence of corn as a crop, and the harvesting process known as “cornhusking”, removal of the outer husk from the ear of corn.

63 First aid skill, for short : CPR

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has for decades involved the simultaneous compression of the chest to pump blood using the heart, and artificial respiration by blowing air into the lungs. I hear that nowadays, emergency services are placing more emphasis on heart compressions, and less on artificial respiration.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Toddler’s call : MOMMY!
6 The universal language, some say : MATH
10 “Time __ transfix the flourish set on youth”: Shak. : DOTH
14 Red tide cause : ALGAE
15 Bio, in a way, is aptly part of it : OBIT
16 Most populous Hawaiian island : OAHU
17 In the event of a freeze, … : … RESTART COMPUTER
20 Little pigs or blind mice : TRIO
21 Smelting residue : SLAG
22 Lowland : VALE
25 Title choice on a form : MRS
27 Destroy, as files : SHRED
31 Bitterroot Range st. : IDA
32 Take on : ASSUME
35 Close : NEAR
36 Rye fungus : ERGOT
38 Underestimate, say : MISJUDGE
40 In the event of a freeze, … : … WEAR WARM CLOTHES
43 Shelter securely : ENSCONCE
44 Tech support callers : USERS
45 Like those who leap before they look : RASH
46 More evil : DARKER
49 Brown brew : ALE
50 Aerodynamic : SLEEK
52 Parker’s wind : SAX
53 Ice cream brand : EDY’S
54 Farm skyline sight : SILO
57 Sharp barks : YAPS
59 In the event of a “Freeze!,” … : … DON’T MOVE A MUSCLE
66 Jug : EWER
67 Michael Douglas’ middle name : KIRK
68 Daily delivery : PAPER
69 Sky and Storm org. : WNBA
70 Mid-month day : IDES
71 Turkey neighbor : SYRIA

Down

1 Deface : MAR
2 Spanish shout : OLE!
3 Old British sports cars : MGS
4 Finish choice : MATTE
5 Orbital period : YEAR
6 Drives : MOTORS
7 Elementary sequence : ABC
8 Spanish relatives : TIOS
9 Web page standard : HTML
10 Baker’s dozen : DOUGHNUTS
11 Cereal grain : OAT
12 Start of many band names : THE …
13 “Ben-__” : HUR
18 Crater borders : RIMS
19 Faux __ : PAS
22 Nielsen ratings units : VIEWERS
23 Epinephrine-producing gland : ADRENAL
24 “Cooking With Power” author : LAGASSE
26 Seasons in the sun : SUMMERS
28 Member of a league in a Sherlock Holmes title : REDHEAD
29 With enthusiasm : EAGERLY
30 Ballroom attire : DRESSES
32 “Love on __-way Street”: 1970 hit : A TWO
33 Open __ night : MIC
34 Non-native speaker’s subj. : ESL
37 Theater section : ORCHESTRA
39 Soup du __ : JOUR
41 “What else?” : AND?
42 Electronics pioneer : RCA
47 Vessels with a cockpit : KAYAKS
48 Final, say : EXAM
51 Kipling title orphan : KIM
53 A 48-Down may include one : ESSAY
55 Norse prankster : LOKI
56 Poet banished by Augustus : OVID
58 Baby seals : PUPS
59 Beads on blades : DEW
60 Have title to : OWN
61 State east of Wyo. : NEB
62 Afore : ERE
63 First aid skill, for short : CPR
64 16-Across garland : LEI
65 Timeline section : ERA

10 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 22 Apr 21, Thursday”

  1. No errors. Shout out to the great state of Nebraska on 61D. State shucking contest is still held. Youth to Golden age group. The national contest will be held in nebraska this year also.

  2. 7:29 1 error

    Fun theme. A few weeks ago it would have been really timely. Today it’s just windy that makes it cold enough to feel like it’s freezing.

  3. 24:22 no errors…this seemed like a Monday puzzle after working that horrid NYT0318 from my paper today👍
    Stay safe😀

  4. 13 mins, 10 sec and required Check Grid help to correct 6 fills. A few esoteric fills in here, like ERGOT (who the hell knows the names of rye fungi??) and ENSCONSE, not to mention a Shakespearean “DOTH”.

  5. Had an error, or bad guess – had NEv crosses WNvA. Never heard of Bitterroot range and thought WNvA was a station. Also, didn’t know LAGASSE. and thought THE was lame. Finally, MGS should be indicated as abbrev.
    I know about ERGOT in reference to the Salem witch trials; and, in my lifetime, it was used as an abortive. Anyway, who the hell knows the names of all these sports teams, let alone the sports??

  6. Slightly tricky Thursday for me; took 27:13 with a Check-grid to find 4 errors. I also had trouble with ERGOT (not ARGOT), ENSCONCE and VALE (not DALE) and H from REDHEAD. It would have greatly helped if I would’ve gotten VIEWERS.

    Giants – tied for 2nd best in all of MLB

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.