LA Times Crossword 23 May 21, Sunday

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Constructed by: Gary Larson
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Food for Thought

Themed answers are foods with national names. Each is reinterpreted, and reference made to a major city in that that nation:

  • 23A Easy-to-hit pitch in Stockholm? : SWEDISH MEATBALL
  • 45A Minor matter in Manchester? : ENGLISH TRIFLE
  • 96A Argument in Ulaanbaatar? : MONGOLIAN BEEF
  • 123A Rent money in Mumbai? : INDIAN FLATBREAD
  • 17D Medal recipient in Milan? : ITALIAN HERO
  • 33D Worried state in Dublin? : IRISH STEW
  • 60D Dance move in Dijon? : FRENCH DIP
  • 71D Inferior items in Zurich? : SWISS CHEESE

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 16m 10s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Sitcom character originally called Kessler in the pilot episode : KRAMER

Cosmo Kramer is the outrageous character played by Michael Richards on “Seinfeld”. “Seinfeld” co-creator, Larry David, introduced Kramer into the story, basing the character on real-life comedian Kenny Kramer who used to live across the hall from him.

23 Easy-to-hit pitch in Stockholm? : SWEDISH MEATBALL

Stockholm is the capital of Sweden and the most populous city in the country. Over one fifth of all Swedish residents live in Stockholm.

26 Home and nickname of The University of the South : SEWANEE

The University of the South is a private school located in Sewanee, Tennessee. It is owned by a consortium of dioceses of the Episcopal Church.

27 Pet __ : PEEVE

The phrase “pet peeve”, meaning “thing that provokes one most”, seems to be somewhat ironic. A “peeve” is a source of irritation, and the adjective “pet” means “especially cherished”.

29 Anna __, 18th-/19th-century poet called the Swan of Lichfield : SEWARD

Anna Seward was an English poet who was active in the early Romantic Era. She was the daughter of Thomas Seward, a clergyman who lived much of his life with his family in the Bishop’s Palace in Lichfield, Staffordshire. Anna is often referred to as the “Swan of Lichfield”.

32 1973 Judy Blume novel : DEENIE

Judy Blume writes novels for children and young adults. Blume’s novels for teens were groundbreaking when first published, tackling such difficult subjects as racism, divorce and bullying.

37 Johannesburg’s land: Abbr. : RSA

Republic of South Africa (RSA)

Johannesburg is the most populous city in South Africa. The city developed from a prospecting settlement, and was named after two surveyors: Johannes Meyer and Johannes Rissik.

42 Classical and Romantic : ERAS

The Classical era of music is usually defined as the period from about 1730 to 1820. It was preceded by the Baroque and was followed by the Romantic periods. The list of composers most associated with the Classical era includes Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert.

The Romantic era was an artistic and intellectual movement that originated towards the end of the 18th century, and lasted until the mid-19th century. In terms of music, the era is more usually defined as the period between 1800 and 1850. The composers Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven tend to be “pigeon-holed” into the preceding Classical era, with the likes of Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Liszt labeled as Romantic composers.

44 Grass bristle : AWN

“Awn” is the name given to hair- or bristle-like structures found in numerous species of plants. In some species, like barley, the awns can contain photosynthetic tissue.

45 Minor matter in Manchester? : ENGLISH TRIFLE

Manchester is the second-most populous city in the UK, and is located in the northwest of England. Manchester grew in size dramatically during the Industrial Revolution. Home to a thriving textile industry, Manchester is often referred to as the world’s first industrialized city.

54 Shakespearean title city : VERONA

Verona is a city in northern Italy. Famously, William Shakespeare set three of his plays in Verona: “Romeo and Juliet”, “The Two Gentlemen of Verona” and “The Taming of the Shrew”.

“The Two Gentlemen of Verona” is one of William Shakespeare’s comedies. Some scholars think that “Two Gentlemen” is Shakespeare’s first play, and not his best.

55 Caulking materials : SEALANTS

The term “caulk” comes from old Norman French “cauquer”, and described the action of filling gaps with lime. “Caulk” has the same root as our word “chalk”.

59 London classic, with “The” : … SEA-WOLF

“The Sea-Wolf” is a 1904 adventure novel by Jack London. London’s prior publication was 1903’s “The Call of the Wild”. The latter was so popular that “The Sea-Wolf” sold out its first printing before the actual publication date.

Author Jack London is a bit of a local hero in the Bay Area where I live. London was born in San Francisco, and there is a famous Jack London Square in Oakland, California that was named in his honor. London’s most famous works are “The Call of the Wild” and “White Fang”, both of which are set in the Klondike Gold Rush.

61 Gung-ho : RAH-RAH

“Kung ho” is a Chinese expression meaning “work together, cooperate”. The anglicized version “gung-ho” was adopted by Major Evans Carlson as an expression of combined spirit for his 2nd Marine Raider Battalion during WWII. From there the term spread throughout the Marine Corps and back to America where it persists to this day.

62 “Big Little Lies” co-star with Nicole, Shailene, Laura and Zoë : REESE

“Reese” is not actually actress Witherspoon’s given name. She started out life as Laura Jeanne Witherspoon. “Reese” is her mother’s maiden name.

“Big Little Lies” is a 2017 TV miniseries that is based on a 2014 novel of the same name. It stars Nicole Kidman, Reese Witherspoon and Shailene Woodley as three women who, while dealing with their own emotional problems, find themselves involved in a murder investigation. I haven’t seen this one, but hear very good things …

63 How dividends might be paid : PRO RATA

“Pro rata” is a Latin phrase meaning “in proportion”.

66 Dustin’s “Midnight Cowboy” role : RATSO

Enrico Salvatore “Ratso” Rizzo is one of the characters in the groundbreaking 1969 movie “Midnight Cowboy”. Rizzo is a down-and-out con man played by Dustin Hoffman.

68 Toledo’s lake : ERIE

Toledo, Ohio lies in the northwest of the state, at the western end of Lake Erie. Toledo was founded as a result of the prosperity that hit the area when the Miami and Erie Canal was constructed in the 19th century connecting Cincinnati to the Great Lakes. Toledo is known as the Glass City as several glass companies originated there, including Owens Corning and Pilkington North America. There is a large exhibition of glass art at the Toledo Museum of Art.

69 __ facto : IPSO

“Ipso facto” is Latin, meaning “by the fact itself”. Ipso facto describes something that is a direct consequence of a particular act, as opposed to something that is the result of some subsequent event. For example, my father was born in Dublin and was an Irish citizen, ipso facto. My son was born in California and is an Irish citizen by virtue of being the son of an Irish citizen (i.e. “not” ipso facto).

73 Colombian cat : GATO

The South American country of Colombia takes its name from the Italian explorer Christopher Columbus (“Cristoforo Colombo” in Italian).

74 Agile deer : ROES

Roe deer are found mainly in Europe. They would be the deer shown on television and in movies when Robin Hood was out hunting in Sherwood Forest.

75 Fuzzy fruit : KIWI

What we call kiwifruit today (and sometimes just “kiwi”) used to be called a Chinese gooseberry. Marketing folks in the fifties decided to call it a “melonette”, and then New Zealand producers adopted the name “kiwifruit”.

80 __ Isle: Ireland nickname : ERIN’S

“Éire”, is the Irish word for “Ireland”. The related “Erin” is an anglicized version of “Éire” and actually corresponds to “Éirinn”, the dative case of “Éire”.

82 Lindsay’s Broadway writing partner : CROUSE

The writing team comprising Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse went by the name “Lindsay and Crouse”. Their 1939 play “Life with Father” ran for over seven years, and still holds the record for the longest-running non-musical play on Broadway.

84 Brothers of old Hollywood : WARNERS

The Warner Bros. film studio was founded by four Warner brothers, although their original family name was Wonskolaser. The brothers Harry, Albert, Sam and Jack emigrated from Poland as children with their parents, and changed their name when they landed in Baltimore, Maryland in 1889.

88 Stitch temporarily : BASTE

To baste is to sew loosely, just holding a join in a fabric together temporarily using large running stitches.

93 @@@@ : ATS

The “at symbol” (@) originated in the commercial word, as shorthand for “each at, per” and similar phrases. I suppose we see the symbol most commonly these days as part of email addresses.

94 Fish often fried : COD

In Britain and Ireland, the most common fish that is used in traditional “fish and chips” is Atlantic cod. Cod has been overfished all over the world, and is now considered to be an endangered species by many international bodies. Confrontations over fishing rights in the North Atlantic led to conflicts called “the Cod Wars” between Iceland and the UK in the 1950s and the 1970s, with fishing fleets being protected by naval vessels and even shots being fired.

96 Argument in Ulaanbaatar? : MONGOLIAN BEEF

The name of Mongolia’s capital city Ulaanbaatar (formerly anglicized as “Ulan Bator”) translates as “the Red Hero”. The “Red Hero” name was chosen in honor of the country’s national hero Damdin Sükhbaatar. Sükhbaatar fought alongside the Soviet Red Army in the fight for liberation from Chinese occupation.

98 IBM competitor : NEC

“NEC” is the name that the Nippon Electric Company chose for itself outside of Japan after a rebranding exercise in 1983.

99 Chicago daily, familiarly : TRIB

“The Chicago Tribune” was first published in 1847. The most famous edition of “The Trib” was probably in 1948 when the headline was “DEWEY DEFEATS TRUMAN”, on the occasion of that year’s presidential election. When it turned out that Truman had actually won, the victor picked up the paper with the erroneous headline and posed for photographs with it … a famous, famous photo, that must have stuck in the craw of the editor at the time.

101 Nair rival, once : NEET

The hair removal product “Neet” was launched in Canada in 1901, and was also sold as “Immac”. Today, it is sold under the name “Veet”.

102 Radical ’60s org. : SDS

Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) was an activist group in the sixties. The SDS organized the largest student strike in the history of the United States on 26 April 1968, with about a million students staying away from class that day. The “Students for a Democratic Society” name was revived in 2006 with the foundation of a new US-based student organization with left wing beliefs. Today’s SDS was founded by a pair of high school students from Greenwich Village, New York.

103 Tennis immortal : ASHE

The great American tennis player Arthur Ashe spent the last years of his life writing his memoir called “Days of Grace”. He finished the manuscript just a few days before he passed away, dying from AIDS caused by a tainted blood transfusion.

105 Times to remember : EPOCHS

Geological time is divided into a number of units of varying lengths. These are, starting from the largest:

  • supereon
  • eon (also “aeon”)
  • era
  • period
  • epoch
  • age

109 Pioneer 35mm cameras : LEICAS

Leica is a German optics company that is famous for production of lenses and cameras. The 1913 Leica was the first practical camera that could use 35mm film, a size chosen because it was already the standard for film used in motion pictures.

113 Outback birds : EMUS

The emu has had a tough time in Australia since man settled there. There was even an “Emu War” in Western Australia in 1932 when migrating emus competed with livestock for water and food. Soldiers were sent in and used machine guns in an unsuccessful attempt to drive off the “invading force”. The emus were clever, breaking their usual formations and adopting guerrilla tactics, operating as smaller units. After 50 days of “war”, the military withdrew. Subsequent requests for military help for the farmers were ignored. The emus had emerged victorious …

117 121-Across maker : NABISCO
121 Sandwich cookies : OREOS

If you take a close look at the embossed design on the front and back of an Oreo cookie, you’ll spot the main elements of the Nabisco logo. Those elements are an oval with a cross on top, a cross with two bars. Usually the company name “Nabisco” is inside the oval, but for the cookie it’s the brand name “Oreo”. The current embossed design was introduced in 1952.

123 Rent money in Mumbai? : INDIAN FLATBREAD

Mumbai is the most populous city in India, and the second most populous city in the world (after Shanghai). The name of the city was changed from Bombay to Mumbai in 1995.

127 Devotions : FEALTIES

“Fealty” is an old word that means “fidelity”. Often, a vassal was required to swear an oath of fealty to his feudal lord.

128 Honduras hundred : CIENTO

Honduras is a country in Central America that used to be known as Spanish Honduras, in order to differentiate it from British Honduras that is now called Belize. “Honduras” is the Spanish word for “the depths”, which is probably a reference to deep coastal waters.

129 Rough suit fabric : TWEED

Tweed is a rough woolen fabric that is very much associated with Scotland in the UK, and with County Donegal in Ireland. The cloth was originally called “tweel”, the Scots word for “twill”. Apparently a London merchant misinterpreted some handwriting in the early 1800s and assumed the fabric was called “tweed”, a reference to the Scottish River Tweed, and the name stuck …

130 In a bind? : CORSETED

A corset is a close-fitting undergarment that is stiffened with a material such as whalebone. Corsets are more usually worn by women, to shape the body. The word “corset” is a diminutive of the Old French “cors” meaning “body”.

131 Dave of “Storage Wars” : HESTER

“Storage Wars” is a reality TV show about buyers looking for great deals when storage lockers are opened and the contents auctioned off due to non-payment of rent.

Down

2 Investment firm T. __ Price : ROWE

T. Rowe Price is an investment company based in Baltimore that was founded in 1937 by Thomas Rowe Price, Jr.

4 King with a gilt complex? : MIDAS

King Midas of Greek mythology might be termed an alchemist as he had the power to turn everything he touched into gold i.e. the Midas touch. That power became a curse, as everything he touched turned to gold, including his food and drink, and even his children.

5 Web mag : E-ZINE

Online magazines are variously referred to as webzines, e-zines, cyberzines, hyperzines or maybe e-magazines.

7 “Mystic River” Oscar winner Robbins : TIM

Tim Robbins is a Hollywood actor, director and producer. I’d say that Robbins’ best-known roles are the leads in “The Shawshank Redemption” and “The Player”. Robbins also wrote, produced and directed the 1995 movie “Dead Man Walking” starring Susan Sarandon and Sean Penn. Robbins was married for almost thirty years to Susan Sarandon, although they split up in 2009.

“Mystic River” is a 2003 drama film based on a novel of the same name by Dennis Lehane. The movie was directed by Clint Eastwood and stars Sean Penn, Tim Robbins and Kevin Bacon. The film has quite a dark storyline and deals with the difficult subject of pedophilia.

11 “Tiny Alice” playwright : ALBEE

“Tiny Alice” is a play by Edward Albee that premiered on Broadway in 1964. The play deals with the corruption that can arise with the mixing of religion and money.

12 Emulate Silas Marner : WEAVE

“Silas Marner: The Weaver of Raveloe” is a novel written by George Eliot and first published in 1861. There’s an excellent BBC TV version of the tale (shown on PBS) starring Ben Kingsley in the title role, with Patsy Kensit playing Eppie, the young orphaned child that Marner takes under his wing.

13 Garfield’s gal pal : ARLENE

Arlene is a pink stray cat who is fond of the title character in the “Garfield” comic strip by Jim Davis. Garfield is pretty rude to Arlene though, and often makes fun of the gap in her teeth.

14 Fashion initials : YSL

Yves Saint Laurent (YSL)

15 Gallic girlfriend : AMIE

The Gauls were a Celtic race, with Gaul covering what is now known as France and Belgium. We use the term “Gallic” today, when we refer to something pertaining to France or the French.

16 Staples supply : PAPER

Staples is an office supply chain store based in Framingham, Massachusetts. Some of the company’s stores have a Staples EasyTech department that provides computer repair and upgrade services.

17 Medal recipient in Milan? : ITALIAN HERO

Milan (“Milano” in Italian) is Italy’s second largest city, second only to Rome. Milan is a European fashion capital, the headquarters for the big Italian fashion houses of Valentino, Gucci, Versace, Armani, Prada and others. Mario Prada was even born in Milan, and helped establish the city’s reputation in the world of fashion.

24 “The Return of the Native” setting : HEATH

Thomas Hardy set most of his novels and short stories in the south and southwest of England, in an area that he called “Wessex”. Even though the name “Wessex” was not used officially during Hardy’s lifetime, Wessex was an Anglo-Saxon kingdom that existed in that part of the island during the Middle Ages. A favorite spot within Hardy’s Wessex is Egdon Heath, a sparsely inhabited moorland that features in the author’s “The Return of the Native”, “The Mayor of Casterbridge” and “The Withered Arm”.

“The Return of the Native” is a novel by English author Thomas Hardy. The storyline deals with illicit sexual relations and created quite a stir when it was published in Victorian England.

33 Worried state in Dublin? : IRISH STEW

The city of Dublin, the capital of Ireland, is known as “Baile Átha Cliath” in Irish (“town of the hurdled ford”). The English name “Dublin” is an anglicized form of the older Irish name for the city “Dubh Linn”, meaning “black pool”.

35 Two-time Tony winner Kurtz : SWOOSIE

Actress Swoosie Kurtz’s father was quite a guy. He was a medal-winning Olympic diver, and colleague of Olympic swimmer and actor Johnny Weissmuller. He was a decorated pilot during WWII, and flew in a B-17 known as “The Swoose”. That particular plane was the only B-17 to fly from the beginning of the war to the end. WhenKurtz and his wife had a child in 1944, they chose the name “Swoosie” in honor of the plane.

36 Menu heading : ENTREES

“Entrée” means “entry” in French. An entrée can be something that helps one get “a way in”, an interview for example perhaps helped along by a recommendation letter. In Europe, even in English-speaking countries, the entrée is the name for the “entry” to the meal, the first course. I found the ordering of meals to be very confusing when I first came to America!

39 Uttar Pradesh tourist city : AGRA

The nation of India comprises 29 states and 7 union territories. The largest state by area is Rajasthan, in the northwest of the country. The most populous state is the neighboring Uttar Pradesh.

48 Strauss opera : SALOME

Richard Strauss’s opera “Salome” was based on the play of the same name by Oscar Wilde. The opera created quite a fuss in its early performances due to its erotic “Dance of the Seven Veils”.

49 Where St. Pete is : FLA

Saint Petersburg, Florida is often referred to as “St. Pete” by locals and visitors alike. Located on a peninsula lying between Tampa Bay and the Gulf of Mexico, St. Pete was founded in 1888 and named for Saint Petersburg in Russia. The co-founders were Russian immigrant Peter Demens and Detroit native John C. Williams. The pair tossed a coin for the privilege of naming the new city, and Demens won. Williams lost, but did get to name the city’s first hostelry “The Detroit Hotel”.

50 First actor who sang “If I Were King of the Forest” : LAHR

The Cowardly Lion in L. Frank Baum’s “Land of Oz” books was portrayed by Bert Lahr in the celebrated 1939 movie “The Wizard of Oz”. The costume that Lahr wore in the film was made from real lion fur, and weighed a whopping 60 pounds.

60 Dance move in Dijon? : FRENCH DIP

Dijon is a city in eastern France in the Burgundy region. Dijon is famous for its mustard, a particularly strong variation of the condiment. The European Union doesn’t protect the name “Dijon” so anyone can use it on a label. That seems fair enough to me, given that 90% of the mustard made in and around Dijon is produced using mustard seed imported from Canada!

64 Greek marketplace : AGORA

In early Greece, an agora was a place of assembly. The assemblies held there were often quite formal, perhaps for the reading of a proclamation. Later in Greek history, things became less formal as the agora evolved into a marketplace. Our contemporary word “agoraphobia” comes from these agorae, in the sense that an agoraphobe has a fear of open spaces, a fear of “public meeting places”.

69 Japanese floral art : IKEBANA

The Japanese art of flower arranging is very much focused on minimalism, the use of a minimum number of blooms arranged among a few stalks and leaves. The Japanese name for the art is “ikebana”, which can be translated as “making flowers alive”.

70 Hook and Silver : PIRATES

Captain Hook is the bad guy in “Peter Pan”, the famous play by J. M. Barrie. Hook is Peter Pan’s sworn enemy, as Pan had cut off Hook’s hand causing it to be replaced by a “hook”. It is implied in the play that Hook attended Eton College, just outside London. Hook’s last words are “Floreat Etona”, which is Eton College’s motto. Barrie openly acknowledged that the Hook character is based on Herman Melville’s Captain Ahab from the novel “Moby Dick”.

Long John Silver is a character in the novella “Treasure Island” by Robert Louis Stevenson (RLS). Long John is a pirate with a peg leg.

71 Inferior items in Zurich? : SWISS CHEESE

Zurich is located in the German-speaking part of Switzerland, and is the largest city in the country.

79 Scientology founder Hubbard : L RON

L. Ron Hubbard wrote a self-improvement book in 1950 called “Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health”. A few years later, he used the concepts in the book as he founded his Church of Scientology.

83 Prefix with fuel : SYN-

Synthetic fuel (synfuel)

87 Sunscreen nos. : SPFS

In theory, the sun protection factor (SPF) is a calibrated measure of the effectiveness of a sunscreen in protecting the skin from harmful UV rays. The idea is that if you wear a lotion with say SPF 20, then it takes 20 times as much UV radiation to cause the skin to burn than it would take without protection. I say just stay out of the sun …

90 Caroling standard : NOEL

“Noël” is the French word for the Christmas season, and ultimately comes from the Latin word for “birth” (natalis). “Noel” has come to be used as an alternative for “Christmas carol”.

91 __ club : GLEE

A glee club is a choir group, usually of males, that sings short songs known as “glees”. A glee is a song scored for three or more voices that is performed unaccompanied.

97 Book that spawned the film “What’s Love Got to Do With It” : I, TINA

“I, Tina” is a 1986 autobiography by Tina Turner. The book was so successful it was adapted into a movie called “What’s Love Got to Do With It?” The film version was released in 1993 and stars Angela Bassett as Tina Turner.

100 Island administered by three countries : BORNEO

The official name of Brunei is the Nation of Brunei, the Abode of Peace. Brunei is situated in the island of Borneo, almost completely surrounded by Malaysia. Brunei’s government is dictated by the constitution adopted in 1959, and is ruled by a sultan with full executive authority. The main language spoken in the country is “Melayu Brunei” (Brunei Malay), with the official language being Malay. Apparently Malay and Brunei Malay are quite different from each other, with native speakers finding it difficult to understand each other.

106 Moth-repellent wood : CEDAR

Cedar is used for the manufacture of some wardrobes and chests as it has long been believed that the fragrant oil in the wood is a moth-repellent. However, whether or not cedar oil is actually effective at keeping moths away seems to be in doubt.

111 Yippie Hoffman : ABBIE

Abbie Hoffman was the founder of the Yippies, an activist group that had violent clashes with the police during the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. Hoffman, along with six other defendants, were eventually brought up on charges related to the protests and became known collectively as the Chicago Seven.

112 Stud farm residents : SIRES

The word “stud”, meaning “male horse kept for breeding”, is derived from the Old English word “stod”, which described a whole herd of horses. The term “stud” can be used figuratively for a “ladies’ man”.

119 Blanchett of “Elizabeth” : CATE

Cate Blanchett is a great actress from Australia, and a winner of an Academy Award for playing Katherine Hepburn in “The Aviator”. Winning for that role made Blanchett the first person to win an Academy Award for playing an actor (Hepburn) who had also won an Oscar. Now that, that is trivial information …

122 __ bar : RAW

Almost all of the shellfish consumed at a raw bar is not only uncooked, it is also still alive.

123 “Portlandia” network : IFC

“Portlandia” is a satirical sketch show that airs on the Independent Film Channel (IFC). The show is set in Portland, Oregon and takes its name from a statue called “Portlandia” which sits above the entrance to a building in downtown Portland. The statue is a copper repoussé work, and is second in size in the US only to the Statue of Liberty.

125 Trippy ’60s drug : LSD

The term “psychedelic” was coined in 1956 by British-born psychiatrist Humphry Osmond. He proposed the term to describe the effects of taking the drugs LSD and mescaline. He suggested that “psychedelic” be defined as “mind-manifesting”, from the Greek “psyche” (mind) and “delos” (manifest).

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Sitcom character originally called Kessler in the pilot episode : KRAMER
7 Impounds, maybe : TOWS AWAY
15 Very silly : APISH
20 Charge : IONIZE
21 Asthma sufferers’ aids : INHALERS
22 Not a sparkling finish : MATTE
23 Easy-to-hit pitch in Stockholm? : SWEDISH MEATBALL
25 Apple tablets : IPADS
26 Home and nickname of The University of the South : SEWANEE
27 Pet __ : PEEVE
28 Touch : FEEL
29 Anna __, 18th-/19th-century poet called the Swan of Lichfield : SEWARD
32 1973 Judy Blume novel : DEENIE
34 Swell : RISE
37 Johannesburg’s land: Abbr. : RSA
40 Precisely : TO A T
42 Classical and Romantic : ERAS
44 Grass bristle : AWN
45 Minor matter in Manchester? : ENGLISH TRIFLE
52 Steamed state : IRE
53 “Just kidding!” : NOT!
54 Shakespearean title city : VERONA
55 Caulking materials : SEALANTS
57 More than dislike : ABHOR
59 London classic, with “The” : … SEA-WOLF
61 Gung-ho : RAH-RAH
62 “Big Little Lies” co-star with Nicole, Shailene, Laura and Zoë : REESE
63 How dividends might be paid : PRO RATA
66 Dustin’s “Midnight Cowboy” role : RATSO
68 Toledo’s lake : ERIE
69 __ facto : IPSO
72 PC storage stats : MEGS
73 Colombian cat : GATO
74 Agile deer : ROES
75 Fuzzy fruit : KIWI
76 Online memo : E-NOTE
78 Flips, in a way : RESELLS
80 __ Isle: Ireland nickname : ERIN’S
82 Lindsay’s Broadway writing partner : CROUSE
84 Brothers of old Hollywood : WARNERS
88 Stitch temporarily : BASTE
89 Being a nuisance to : HARRYING
92 Research : LOOK UP
93 @@@@ : ATS
94 Fish often fried : COD
96 Argument in Ulaanbaatar? : MONGOLIAN BEEF
98 IBM competitor : NEC
99 Chicago daily, familiarly : TRIB
101 Nair rival, once : NEET
102 Radical ’60s org. : SDS
103 Tennis immortal : ASHE
105 Times to remember : EPOCHS
109 Pioneer 35mm cameras : LEICAS
113 Outback birds : EMUS
115 Realizes : REAPS
117 121-Across maker : NABISCO
121 Sandwich cookies : OREOS
123 Rent money in Mumbai? : INDIAN FLATBREAD
126 Tomato __ : PASTE
127 Devotions : FEALTIES
128 Honduras hundred : CIENTO
129 Rough suit fabric : TWEED
130 In a bind? : CORSETED
131 Dave of “Storage Wars” : HESTER

Down

1 Contact between two billiard balls : KISS
2 Investment firm T. __ Price : ROWE
3 From square one : ANEW
4 King with a gilt complex? : MIDAS
5 Web mag : E-ZINE
6 Alter, in a way : RESEW
7 “Mystic River” Oscar winner Robbins : TIM
8 Indivisible : ONE
9 Sound of a hit : WHAP!
10 Totally full : SATED
11 “Tiny Alice” playwright : ALBEE
12 Emulate Silas Marner : WEAVE
13 Garfield’s gal pal : ARLENE
14 Fashion initials : YSL
15 Gallic girlfriend : AMIE
16 Staples supply : PAPER
17 Medal recipient in Milan? : ITALIAN HERO
18 Typical: Abbr. : STD
19 Fellows : HES
24 “The Return of the Native” setting : HEATH
28 Sweat : FEAR
30 Goes bad : ROTS
31 Challenge : DARE
33 Worried state in Dublin? : IRISH STEW
35 Two-time Tony winner Kurtz : SWOOSIE
36 Menu heading : ENTREES
37 Guns : REVS
38 Old-time knife : SNEE
39 Uttar Pradesh tourist city : AGRA
41 Princess topper : TIARA
43 Scorch : SEAR
46 Starting place for a comeback : LOW POINT
47 “Are we going __ not?” : IN OR
48 Strauss opera : SALOME
49 Where St. Pete is : FLA
50 First actor who sang “If I Were King of the Forest” : LAHR
51 Tick off : ENRAGE
56 Byes : TA-TAS
58 Brewpub bragger, often : BEER SNOB
60 Dance move in Dijon? : FRENCH DIP
64 Greek marketplace : AGORA
65 Weather forecast shorthand : T-STORM
67 “Fan-cee!” : OO LA LA!
69 Japanese floral art : IKEBANA
70 Hook and Silver : PIRATES
71 Inferior items in Zurich? : SWISS CHEESE
77 German capital : EURO
78 Have the throne : REIGN
79 Scientology founder Hubbard : L RON
81 Religious offshoot : SECT
83 Prefix with fuel : SYN-
85 Squeezes (out) : EKES
86 Wished undone : RUED
87 Sunscreen nos. : SPFS
90 Caroling standard : NOEL
91 __ club : GLEE
95 Metal-yielding minerals : ORES
97 Book that spawned the film “What’s Love Got to Do With It” : I, TINA
100 Island administered by three countries : BORNEO
104 Play too broadly : EMOTE
106 Moth-repellent wood : CEDAR
107 Flags down : HAILS
108 Sudden outpouring : SPATE
110 Trick : CATCH
111 Yippie Hoffman : ABBIE
112 Stud farm residents : SIRES
114 Likely to be discounted : USED
116 Foul mood : SNIT
118 Posted : SENT
119 Blanchett of “Elizabeth” : CATE
120 You may get a whiff of one : ODOR
121 Select : OPT
122 __ bar : RAW
123 “Portlandia” network : IFC
124 Tax prep charge : FEE
125 Trippy ’60s drug : LSD

13 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 23 May 21, Sunday”

  1. A few errors.. went fairly fast .. got the theme ok… it was several “cross” words that I had to guess on.. too many to list. Never heard of them.. my favorite was SWOOSIE.. what a story line!!

    The two I missed were SEAWANEE ( I had EZITE for the cross word) and IKEBANA (I had HASTE for the cross word) now I know BASTE means to temporarily sew??!!

  2. 49:37 no errors…It was a fairly straightforward puzzle with just enough obscure clues to slow down an average solver such as myself…65D & 82A were both IMO obscure and they cross each other GRR 👎👎…it is what it is.
    Stay safe😀

  3. 15:12

    Amusing theme. I particularly liked INDIANFLATBREAD.

    I did not like having to brute-force guess the crossing letter between the two names of REESE and SWOOSIE. At least we learned the stories behind the names.

  4. Like Pam, I chuckled at Indian flatbread. No errors, but did look
    up the spelling of some proper names, notably “Swoosie “.

    Enjoyable. not too difficult puzzle, unlike yesterday’s. I quit on that one
    but will probably go back and try again.

  5. Easiest Sunday grid in quite some time: 21 minutes, 16 seconds, needed Check Grid to help to “fix” HARR[Y]ING/S[Y]N and IKE[B]ANA/[B]ASTE.

  6. 24:23, no errors. Home from a much-anticipated early-morning trip to the mountains. It’s been a long time … 😳.

  7. Nice straight-forward Sunday for me; took 27:58 with a “check-grid” at the end to reveal an error at HEeTER/SIREe. I’m pretty sure I put the correct S there, but I guess my finger slipped. Theme helped make this one pretty easy and I did get a chuckle at …FLATBREAD.

  8. Like others, this was pretty straightforward for me – 30:49 with no errors. The easily-deciphered theme helped a lot. A nice little exercise after the past two days!

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