LA Times Crossword 3 May 21, Monday

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Constructed by: Gail Grabowski & Bruce Venzke
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: R and B

Themed answers each comprise two words beginning with the letters R and B:

  • 69A Ray Charles’ genre, and a hint to the answers to starred clues : R AND B
  • 17A *Dilapidated car : RUST BUCKET
  • 27A *Bowling alley’s “start over” device : RESET BUTTON
  • 46A *Unscrupulous 19th-century tycoon : ROBBER BARON
  • 62A *High-fiber cereal with dried fruit : RAISIN BRAN

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 5m 35s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Quench, as thirst : SLAKE

To slake is to satisfy a craving, as in “slaking one’s thirst”.

10 Osbourne of heavy metal : OZZY

English singer Ozzy Osbourne became famous in the seventies as the lead singer of the heavy metal band Black Sabbath. His level of success soared again in the early 2000s when he appeared in an MTV reality show called “The Osbournes”, along with his wife Sharon and two of his three children, Kelly and Jack. Ozzy and Sharon’s eldest child, Aimee, refused to sign up for the show, opting instead for some level of privacy.

14 Item sold in reams : PAPER

A ream is 500 sheets of paper. As there were 24 sheets in a quire, and 20 quires made up a ream, there used to be 480 sheets in a ream. Ever since the standard was changed to 500, a 480-sheet packet of paper has been called a “short ream”. We also use the term “reams” to mean a great amount, evolving from the idea of a lot of printed material.

15 Nevada city : ELKO

The city of Elko, Nevada came into being in 1868 as a settlement built around the eastern end of a railway line that was constructed from California and that was destined for Utah. When that section of the line was completed, the construction crews moved on towards the Nevada/Utah border, and the settlement was left behind to eventually form the city of Elko

16 London lavs : LOOS

It has been suggested that the British term “loo”, meaning “toilet”, comes from “Waterloo” (water closet … water-loo), but no one seems to know for sure. Another suggestion is that the term comes from the card game of “lanterloo”, in which the pot was called the loo!

20 __-Z: classic Camaro : IROC

The IROC-Z is a model of Camaro that was introduced by Chevrolet in 1978. The IROC-Z takes its name from a famous stock car race, the International Race of Champions.

21 Lively Irish dance : REEL

The reel is a Scottish country dance that is also extremely popular in Ireland.

27 *Bowling alley’s “start over” device : RESET BUTTON

A pinsetter is a mechanical device that puts bowling pins into position, returns balls, and clears fallen pins. Prior to the invention of the pinsetting machine, young men known as “pinboys” used to reset the pins by hand.

44 Butts, in slang : TUSHES

“Tush”, a word meaning “backside”, is an abbreviation of “tochus” that comes from the Yiddish “tokhes”.

46 *Unscrupulous 19th-century tycoon : ROBBER BARON

“Robber baron” is a derogatory term used to describe a late-19th century industrialist known to use unscrupulous methods to expand their wealth. The list of those labelled with the term includes many famous, if not infamous, characters, including John Jacob Astor, Andrew Carnegie, J. P. Morgan, William Randolph Hearst, John D. Rockefeller and Cornelius Venderbilt.

48 Early Olds auto : REO

Ransom Eli Olds was a pioneer in the automotive industry, and the founder of the Oldsmobile and REO brands. Olds introduced the first modern “stationary” assembly line (Henry Ford’s famous innovation was the “moving” assembly line). As a result, it can be argued that the Oldsmobile Curved Dash was the first mass-produced, low-priced automobile, rather than the Ford’s Model T.

54 Anglo-__ : SAXON

Germanic tribes invaded Great Britain from the early 5th century and created the nation that we now call England. The Anglo-Saxons (sometimes simply “Saxons”), as these tribes came to be called, held sway in the country until the Norman Conquest in 1066. The Anglo-Saxons were descendants of three Germanic tribes:

  • The Angles, from Angeln in Northern Germany (and the tribe that gave the name “England”).
  • The Saxons, from Lower Saxony and Holland.
  • The Jutes, from the Jutland peninsula in Denmark.

58 Mark Harmon CBS series : NCIS

NCIS is the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, which investigates crimes in the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. The service gives its name to the CBS TV show “NCIS”, a spin-off drama from “JAG” in which the main “NCIS” characters were first introduced. The big star in “NCIS” is the actor Mark Harmon. “NCIS” is now a franchise, with spin-off shows “NCIS: Los Angeles” and “NCIS: New Orleans”.

Actor Mark Harmon is best known today for playing the lead in the drama show “NCIS”. Harmon played a similar character for several episodes on “The West Wing”. Mark is the son of a football star Tom Harmon, and was the brother-in-law of rock and roll star Ricky Nelson and automotive executive John DeLorean (through his sisters). Harmon has been married since 1987 to actress Pam Dawber, who played the female title role on “Mork & Mindy”.

62 *High-fiber cereal with dried fruit : RAISIN BRAN

The name of the cereal “Raisin Bran” is not trademark protected. The Skinner Manufacturing Company introduced Raisin Bran in 1926, and did have trademark protection until 1944. At that time, an appeals court ruled that “Raisin-BRAN” should not be considered a trademark as it is merely a description of the cereal’s ingredients.

64 Jai __: court game : ALAI

Even though jai alai is often said to be the fastest sport in the world because of the speed of the ball, golf balls usually get going at a greater clip. Although, as a blog reader once pointed out to me, you don’t have to catch a golf ball …

66 “Whooping” bird : CRANE

The whooping crane is one of only two crane species that is native to North America. Hunting and loss of habitat led to there being only 21 whooping cranes being left on the continent in 1941. Numbers have increased since then, but the species is still endangered. That’s a shame, because the whooping crane is the tallest of all North American birds.

68 Bellicose Greek god : ARES

The Greek god Ares is often referred to as the Olympian god of warfare, but originally he was regarded as the god of bloodlust and slaughter. Ares united with Aphrodite to create several gods, including Phobos (Fear), Deimos (Terror) and Eros (Desire). Ares was the son of Zeus and Hera, and the Roman equivalent to Ares was Mars.

Someone described as bellicose is inclined to favor strife or war. The term “bellicose” comes from “bellum”, the Latin word for “war”.

69 Ray Charles’ genre, and a hint to the answers to starred clues : R AND B

Ray Charles came up with his stage name by dropping the family name from his real moniker “Ray Charles Robinson”. His life was a wild ride, and was well-represented in the excellent 2004 biopic called “Ray” starring Jamie Foxx in the title role. Ray Charles was married twice and fathered 12 children with nine different women. As I said, a wild ride …

Down

2 With 42-Down, Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner in “Marriage Story” : LAURA …
(42D See 2-Down : … DERN)

Actress Laura Dern is the daughter of the actors Bruce Dern and Diane Ladd. Among her many notable roles, Laura Dern played the Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris in the 2008 movie “Recount”, and Dr. Ellie Sattler in the 1993 blockbuster “Jurassic Park”.

“Marriage Story” is a 2019 movie starring Scarlett Johansson and Adam Driver as a couple going through a messy divorce. The critics loved this one. Me, not so much …

3 Lhasa __: Tibetan dogs : APSOS

The Lhasa apso breed of dog originated in Tibet and is named after “Lhasa” (the capital city) and “apso” (a Tibetan word meaning “bearded”). The Lhasa apso has been around since 800 BC and is one of the oldest breeds in the world, one very closely related to the ancestral wolf.

4 Two-masted vessel : KETCH

A ketch is a sailboat with two masts. The most forward mast is the mainmast, and is the taller of the two. The smaller mast is further aft, and is known as the mizzen mast.

5 “Tarzan” creator’s monogram : ERB

Edgar Rice Burroughs (ERB) was an author from Chicago who is best known as the creator of the “Tarzan” series of novels. Burroughs’ daughter Joan ended up marrying James Pierce, the actor who was the fourth to portray Tarzan on film. James and Joan Pierce also worked together, playing Tarzan and Jane on the radio show “Tarzan” from 1932 to 1934.

6 Students’ play period : RECESS

To recess is to go back, to retreat. The use of the noun “recess” to mean “period of stopping from usual work” dates back to the early 1600s. This usage might stem from the action of parliamentarians “recessing” into, returning to private chambers.

7 Sommer of “A Shot in the Dark” : ELKE

Elke Sommer is a German-born actress who was at the height of her success on the silver screen in the sixties. Sommer won a Golden Globe as Most Promising Newcomer Actress for her role opposite Paul Newman in 1964’s “The Prize”. She also sings and has released several albums. Now Sommer focuses on painting, producing artwork that is strongly influenced by the work of Marc Chagall.

“A Shot in the Dark” is the second of “The Pink Panther” series of films, and was released in 1964. The main character is Inspector Jacques Clouseau, played brilliantly by Peter Sellers. This one is a lot of fun …

10 Word often seen before “shoppe” : OLDE

The word “olde” wasn’t actually used much earlier than the 1920s. “Olde” was introduced to give a quaint antique feel to brand names, shop names etc. as in “Ye Olde Shoppe”.

11 __ suit: ’40s apparel : ZOOT

A zoot suit has pants that are fairly loose fitting, except around the cuff at the bottom of the leg. The pants also have a high waist. The jacket of the suit has wide lapels and wide padded shoulders. Zoot suits were popular in the US in the thirties and forties, and were often associated with the African American, Latino American and Italian American ethnic groups. Over in the UK, the zoot suit was worn by the “Teddy boys” of the fifties and sixties. “Zoot” is probably just a slang iteration of the word “suit”.

12 The “Z” in ZIP Code : ZONE

ZIP codes were introduced in 1963. The acronym “ZIP” stands for “Zone Improvement Plan”, a name indicating that mail travels more efficiently when the codes are included in the postal address.

13 Belgian river : YSER

The Yser river flows into the North Sea at Nieuwpoort in the Flemish province of West Flanders in Belgium.

22 The “D” in FDA : DRUG

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has its roots in the Division of Chemistry (later “Bureau of Chemistry”) that was part of the US Department of Agriculture. President Theodore Roosevelt gave responsibility for examination of food and drugs to the Bureau of Chemistry with the signing of the Pure Food and Drug Act. The Bureau’s name was changed to the Food, Drug and Insecticide Organization in 1927, and to the Food and Drug Administration in 1930.

24 Lode load : ORE

A lode is a metal ore deposit that’s found between two layers of rock or in a fissure. The mother lode is the principal deposit in a mine, usually of gold or silver. “Mother lode” is probably a translation of “veta madre”, an expression used in mining in Mexico.

26 __ Dhabi : ABU

Abu Dhabi is one of the seven Emirates that make up the federation known as the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The two largest members of the UAE (geographically) are Dubai and Abu Dhabi, the only two of the seven members that have veto power over UAE policy. Before 1971, the UAE was a British Protectorate, a collection of sheikdoms. The sheikdoms entered into a maritime truce with Britain in 1835, after which they became known as the Trucial States, derived from the word “truce”.

28 1974 pension plan legislation : ERISA

ERISA is the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, which was enacted in 1974. ERISA regulates the operation of a pension plan once it has been established. However, ERISA does not require that a pension plan be offered by an employer. ERISA is also the legislation that introduced what is now referred to a traditional IRA (individual retirement account).

30 It measures rpm : TACH

The tachometer takes its name from the Greek word “tachos” meaning “speed”. A tachometer in a car measures engine revolutions per minute (rpm).

31 Curved molding : OGEE

An ogee is a type of S-curve. Specifically, it is a figure consisting of two arcs that curve in opposite directions (like an S) but both ends of the curve end up parallel to each other (which is not necessarily true for an S).

32 Monster’s loch : NESS

The Loch Ness monster has been talked about for centuries, but modern interest started in 1933 when a spate of sightings was reported. Those sightings don’t seem to have stopped, with photographs really sparking the imagination.

34 Rifle range rounds : AMMO

The word “munitions” describes materials and equipment used in war. The term derives from the Latin “munitionem” meaning “fortification, defensive wall”. Back in the 17th century, French soldiers referred to such materials as “la munition”, a Middle French term. This was misheard as “l’ammunition”, and as a result we ended up importing the word “ammunition” (often shortened to “ammo”), a term that we now use mainly to describe the material fired from a weapon.

35 Bee Gees surname : GIBB

The Brothers Gibb (hence, the name “Bee Gees”) were born in England but grew up and started their musical careers in Australia. They moved back to Manchester in the north of England as youths, and there hit the big time.

39 Sophisticated and charming : DEBONAIR

Someone described as debonair is very courteous and gracious. The term comes into English via the French “debonaire”, which itself is derived from “de bon’ aire” meaning “of good race”, a phrase that originally applied to the breeding of hawks.

44 Body trunks : TORSI

“Torso” (plural “torsi”) is an Italian word meaning the “trunk of a statue”, and is a term that we imported into English.

45 Crazy Eights cousin : UNO

In my youth I remember being taught a great card game by a German acquaintance of mine, a game called Mau Mau. Years later I discovered that UNO is basically the same game, but played with a purpose-printed deck instead of the regular deck of playing cards that’s used for Mau Mau. I hear that Mau Mau is derived from the game called Crazy Eights.

The card game called Crazy Eights is named for the former military designation “Section 8”. Section 8 referred to a category of discharge from the US military, reserved for personnel deemed mentally unfit for duty.

50 Planetary shadow : UMBRA

A shadow usually has three distinct parts called the umbra, penumbra and antumbra, with the terms most often used with reference to the shadows cast by celestial bodies. The terms can also be used to describe the levels of darkness in sunspots. The umbra (Latin for “shadow”) is the innermost, darkest part of a shadow. The penumbra (“almost shadow”, from Latin) is a lighter part of a shadow, where part of the light source “leaks” around the body casting the shadow. The antumbra phenomenon is experienced when the object casting the shadow is sufficiently far away from the viewer so that it appears smaller than the light source, with an annular ring around it. When the eye is in the shadow cast by an object that has light passing around it, the eye is in the antumbra.

51 Cling wrap brand : SARAN

What’s known as plastic wrap in America, we call cling-film in Ireland. The brand name “Saran” is often used generically in the US, while “Glad” wrap is common down under. Plastic wrap was one of those unintended inventions, a byproduct of a development program to create a hard plastic cover for cars.

52 African antelope : ELAND

The eland (plural “eland, elands”) is a large African antelope, in fact the largest antelope on the planet. Both male and female eland have horns, and those horns have a steady spiral ridge along their length.

53 Huge star in Cygnus : DENEB

Deneb is the brightest star in the constellation Cygnus, the Swan. The name “Deneb” comes from the Arabic word “dhaneb” meaning “tail”, as it lies at the tail of the swan.

56 Dec. 25 : XMAS

The abbreviation “Xmas” that is used for “Christmas” comes from the Greek letter chi (X), which is the first letter of the Greek word for “Christ” (“Χριστός”).

57 Closing words? : OBIT

Our word “obituary” comes from the Latin “obituaris”. The Latin term was used for “record of the death of a person”, although the literal meaning is “pertaining to death”.

62 Cellular messenger : RNA

Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

63 ATM maker : NCR

NCR is an American company that has been in business since 1884 and was originally called the National Cash Register Company. The company has done well in a market where new technologies seem to be constantly disrupting the status quo. NCR is a leading supplier of automated teller machines (ATMs) and barcode scanners.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Quench, as thirst : SLAKE
6 Musical pause : REST
10 Osbourne of heavy metal : OZZY
14 Item sold in reams : PAPER
15 Nevada city : ELKO
16 London lavs : LOOS
17 *Dilapidated car : RUST BUCKET
19 Cooked just right : DONE
20 __-Z: classic Camaro : IROC
21 Lively Irish dance : REEL
22 Discourage : DETER
23 Fuel-eating cars : GAS HOGS
25 Listening organ : EAR
27 *Bowling alley’s “start over” device : RESET BUTTON
33 Irregularly sharp-edged : JAGGED
37 Fiber source : ROUGHAGE
38 Man’s name that’s a green fruit spelled backwards : EMIL
39 Persistent noise : DIN
40 Assures, as a win : ICES
41 Personifies : EMBODIES
44 Butts, in slang : TUSHES
46 *Unscrupulous 19th-century tycoon : ROBBER BARON
48 Early Olds auto : REO
49 Very excited : AROUSED
54 Anglo-__ : SAXON
58 Mark Harmon CBS series : NCIS
60 Bull or ram : MALE
61 Tree branch : LIMB
62 *High-fiber cereal with dried fruit : RAISIN BRAN
64 Jai __: court game : ALAI
65 Late evening, informally : NITE
66 “Whooping” bird : CRANE
67 Attention-getting whisper : PSST!
68 Bellicose Greek god : ARES
69 Ray Charles’ genre, and a hint to the answers to starred clues : R AND B

Down

1 Parsley or sage piece : SPRIG
2 With 42-Down, Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner in “Marriage Story” : LAURA …
3 Lhasa __: Tibetan dogs : APSOS
4 Two-masted vessel : KETCH
5 “Tarzan” creator’s monogram : ERB
6 Students’ play period : RECESS
7 Sommer of “A Shot in the Dark” : ELKE
8 Bony-looking Halloween costume : SKELETON
9 Tyke on a trike : TOT
10 Word often seen before “shoppe” : OLDE
11 __ suit: ’40s apparel : ZOOT
12 The “Z” in ZIP Code : ZONE
13 Belgian river : YSER
18 More than suggested : URGED
22 The “D” in FDA : DRUG
24 Lode load : ORE
26 __ Dhabi : ABU
28 1974 pension plan legislation : ERISA
29 “What’s __ about?” : THIS
30 It measures rpm : TACH
31 Curved molding : OGEE
32 Monster’s loch : NESS
33 Taunting cry : JEER
34 Rifle range rounds : AMMO
35 Bee Gees surname : GIBB
36 Lump of clay, say : GLOB
39 Sophisticated and charming : DEBONAIR
42 See 2-Down : … DERN
43 Angry feeling : IRE
44 Body trunks : TORSI
45 Crazy Eights cousin : UNO
47 Poker strategies : RAISES
50 Planetary shadow : UMBRA
51 Cling wrap brand : SARAN
52 African antelope : ELAND
53 Huge star in Cygnus : DENEB
54 Open-handed hit : SLAP
55 Is hurting : AILS
56 Dec. 25 : XMAS
57 Closing words? : OBIT
59 Formally commend, as for bravery : CITE
62 Cellular messenger : RNA
63 ATM maker : NCR

10 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 3 May 21, Monday”

  1. Easy Monday puzzle; no errors. Would have been even easier had our
    newspaper not ruined the left hand number column so that the number
    of the clues was unreadable.

  2. 17:07 no errors…a little much for a Monday IMO…my paper does not identify the setter(s) for the LAT puzzle so when I saw 2 setters I then knew why I had a slow time.
    I was a “pin boy” from about age 12 thru 16 and then was a “pin jammer” when the machines first came out…my Dad spent many a year in the duckpin bowling alley management business. (It doesn’t get any more blue collar than that)
    Stay safe😀

    1. I spent my teenage years in Connecticut (not a big state) to go bowling at new duckpin alleys all over the state, entering tournaments, etc. The height of my athletic career was being a Junior National Duckpin Bowling champion (team entry) at the age of 12 – for all of the 6 or so states that had duckpin bowling at the time. It was all downhill from there.

      After college I moved to CA and then Seattle, folks on the W coast had never heard of duckpin bowling.

      Also – I seemed to cruise reasonably well thru this puzzle.

  3. 4:14

    About three-quarters of the way through, it hit me: RB! So when I got to RANDB it made perfect sense.

    I have some comments about shadows. I wouldn’t say a penumbra is caused by light “leaking” around an object blocking the light. The shadow of a solar eclipse is complex because the Sun is not a point light source. Light from the Sun hits the Moon in a narrow range of angles. Thus the zone where sunlight is totally blocked, the umbra, is a cone. Where the point of the umbra touches the Earth’s surface, you can observe a total eclipse. In the penumbra around the cone, light from only some of the Sun reaches you, so it’s a partial eclipse. If the Moon is too far from the Earth for the umbra’s tip to reach the surface, and you are directly under that tip, you can observe an annular eclipse. And you’re at the antumbra, a word I learned today!

  4. Had errors in one section: ICES, TACH, TUSHES, mostly because of ICES, a sports term with which I was unfamiliar (true of most sports terms.)

    Had renO before ELKO.
    I remember when ERISA was defined as:
    Every Ridiculous Idea Since Adam.

  5. 5:13, no errors. Jack, FWIW this isn’t a novice’s puzzle for several reasons, which isn’t what I would call a Monday. So you did well. 🙂

  6. 8 mins 26 sec, no errors. At the very end, I’m reminded of how much I DESPISE entries like RANDB in puzzles. Shorn of spaces and punctuation, they often hide in plain sight.

  7. Greetings!!!🤗

    I found this puzzle quite easy – one of those grids that almost fills itself in. Of course, I was helped along by all the words I only know from doing puzzles, like OGEE, YSER, and ELAND. Didn’t know KETCH but got it via crosses.

    VIDWAN!!! So nice to see your post on Sunday!! I hope you are doing okay 🤗 !!

    Be well ~~⚾️

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