LA Times Crossword 30 May 21, Sunday

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Constructed by: Paul Coulter
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: What’s My Line?

Themed answers are job titles reinterpreted:

  • 23A Researcher with an outgoing personality? : SOCIAL SCIENTIST
  • 37A Clergyman who builds cupboards? : CABINET MINISTER
  • 49A Bleep button operator? : CROSS WORD EDITOR
  • 68A Dietitian? : MIDDLE MANAGER
  • 87A Drug kingpin? : TRAFFIC ENGINEER
  • 96A Getaway driver? : FLIGHT ATTENDANT
  • 118A Fishing guide? : CASTING DIRECTOR

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 16m 06s

Bill’s errors: 2

  • FEH! (Fah!)
  • CREWEL (crewal)

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Space station launched in 1973 : SKYLAB

Skylab was sent into orbit by NASA in 1973 and continued to circle the Earth there until 1979. Although it was in orbit for many years, Skylab was only occupied by astronauts for 171 days, in three missions in 1973-1974. Skylab burned up in the Earth’s atmosphere a lot earlier than expected, showering some huge chunks of debris on our friends in Australia.

7 “__, Inc.”: 2001 film : MONSTERS

The animated feature “Monsters, Inc.” was released in 2001, and was Pixar’s fourth full-length movie. It’s about cute monsters, and that’s all I know other than that the voice cast included the likes of John Goodman, Billy Crystal and Steve Buscemi.

15 Commonly green dish : SALAD

Our word “salad” comes from the Latin “salare” meaning “to salt”. The Latin “herba salata” translates as “salted vegetables”, which I guess could be a salad …

20 South American naval force : ARMADA

“Armada” is a Spanish (and Portuguese) word meaning “naval fleet”.

21 Turkey, mostly : ANATOLIA

Asia Minor is also known as Anatolia. It is the geographic part of Asia that protrudes out into the west, towards Europe, and is roughly equivalent to modern-day Turkey.

25 Terry O’Quinn’s “Lost” role : LOCKE

Actor Terry O’Quinn is perhaps best known for portraying John Locke on the TV show “Lost”. He also played serial killer Jerry Blake, the title character in the 1987 film “The Stepfather”.

26 Big bunch : SCAD

The origin of the word “scads”, meaning “lots and lots”, is unclear. That said, “scads” was used to mean “dollars” back in the mid-1800s.

32 Two-time Super Bowl QB Manning : ELI

Eli Manning is a retired footballer who played quarterback for the New York Giants. Eli’s brother Peyton Manning retired from football as the quarterback for the Denver Broncos in 2015. Eli and Peyton’s father is Archie Manning, who was also a successful NFL quarterback. Eli, Peyton and Archie co-authored a book for children titled “Family Huddle” in 2009. It describes the Mannings playing football together as young boys.

34 Country name last used in 1949 : SIAM

Siam was the official name of Thailand up to 1939 (and again from 1945 to 1949).

35 R&B singer’s hyphenated stage name : NE-YO

“Ne-Yo” is the stage name of R&B singer Shaffer Chimere Smith.

44 Links scores : BOGEYS

The golfing term “bogey” originated at the Great Yarmouth Golf Club in England in 1890, and was used to indicate a total round that was one-over-par (and not one-over-par on a particular hole, as it is today). The name “bogey” came from a music hall song of the time “Here Comes the Bogeyman”. In the following years it became popular for players trying to stay at par to be “playing against Colonel Bogey”. Then, during WWI, the marching tune “Colonel Bogey” was written and named after the golfing term. If you don’t recognize the name of the tune, it’s the one that’s whistled by the soldiers marching in the great movie “The Bridge on the River Kwai”.

46 Lena of “Chocolat” : OLIN

Lena Olin is a Swedish actress, and clearly someone who had acting in her blood. Her mother was the actress Britta Holmberg and her father the actor and director Stig Olin. Olin had a very successful career in Sweden, often working with the great Ingmar Bergman. Olin’s breakthrough international and English-speaking role was playing opposite Daniel Day-Lewis in “The Unbearable Lightness of Being” released in 1988. Way back in 1974, Miss Olin was crowned Miss Scandinavia in a beauty pageant for Nordic women held in Helsinki, Finland. Olin’s most famous performance was in “Chocolat” released in 2000, and then she won an Emmy in 2003 for Best Supporting Actress in the TV show “Alias”.

The movie “Chocolat” released in 2000 is a big screen adaption of the novel of the same name by Joanne Harris. “Chocolat” tells the story of a young mother with a six-year-old daughter who opens up a chocolate shop in a French village. The mother is played by the talented Juliette Binoche.

47 Lennon’s love : ONO

John Lennon and Yoko Ono had a very public honeymoon in a hotel in Amsterdam and then Montreal, when they staged their famous “bed-in” for peace. In answering questions from reporters Lennon found himself often repeating the words “give peace a chance”. While still in bed, he composed his famous song “Give Peace a Chance” and even made the original recording of the song in the Montreal hotel room, with reporters present, and with a whole bunch of friends. The song was released later in 1969 and became a smash hit. Writing credit was initially given to Lennon-McCartney, as was the agreement between John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Later versions of the song were credited just to Lennon, even though Lennon stated that Yoko Ono actually wrote the song with him.

48 Fall Out Boy genre : EMO

“Emo” is short for “emotional hardcore”.

Fall Out Boy is a rock band from Chicago that formed in 2001.

53 __ boom : SONIC

Supersonic transports (SSTs) like the Concorde broke Mach 1, the speed of sound. As a plane flies through the air, it creates pressure waves in front (and behind) rather like the bow and stern waves of a boat. These pressure waves travel at the speed of sound, so as an aircraft itself accelerates towards the speed of sound it catches up with the pressure waves until they cannot “get out of the way”. When the aircraft reaches the speed of sound, the compressed waves merge into one single shock wave, creating a sonic boom.

55 “Elder” or “Younger” Roman statesman : CATO

Cato the Elder was a Roman statesman, known historically as “the elder” in order to distinguish him from his great-grandson, Cato the Younger. Cato the Elder’s ultimate position within Roman society was that of Censor, making him responsible for maintaining the census, and for supervising public morality.

Cato the Younger was a politician in the late Roman Republic. He was noted for his moral integrity, and his ability as an orator. He is also remembered for an extended conflict that he had with Julius Caesar.

57 Charlemagne’s realm: Abbr. : HRE

Charlemagne was the first king to use the title “Holy Roman Emperor”, even though the Holy Roman Empire (HRE) was not actually founded per se until over a century later when Otto I was crowned Emperor. Otto was the first of an unbroken line of Holy Roman Emperors who ruled Central Europe from 962 until 1806.

58 Marine snail : WHELK

“Whelk” is a name given to various sea snails. The actual usage, and its application to various species depends on where you are in the world.

59 Home of Hercules’ lion : NEMEA

“The Twelve Labors of Hercules” is actually a Greek myth, although Hercules is the Roman name for the hero that the Greeks called “Heracles”. The first of these labors was to slay the Nemean lion, a monster that lived in a cave near Nemea. Hercules had a tough job as the lion’s golden fur was impenetrable to normal weapons. One version of the story is that Hercules killed the lion by shooting an arrow into its mouth. Another version says that Hercules stunned the monster with a club and then strangled him with his bare hands.

61 Loafer, e.g. : SHOE

The loafer slip-on shoe dates back to 1939. “Loafer” was originally a brand name introduced by Fortnum and Mason’s store in London. The derivative term “penny loafer” arose in the late fifties or early sixties, although the exact etymology seems unclear.

64 Mikey, Mouth or Chunk, in an ’85 film : GOONIE

“The Goonies” is a 1985 movie based on a story written by Steven Spielberg. It is an adventure film, with the title characters being a group of young treasure hunters from the fictional Goon Docks neighborhood of Astoria, Oregon (hence the movie’s title). I haven’t seen this one …

65 TV monitoring org. : FCC

TV broadcasting is monitored by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The FCC has been around since 1934, when it replaced the Federal Radio Commission.

73 Friend of Athos : ARAMIS

Alexandre Dumas’ “Three Musketeers” are Athos, Porthos and Aramis, although the hero of the novel is the trio’s young protégé D’Artagnan. A musketeer was an infantry soldier who was equipped with a musket. Funnily enough, the three “musketeers” really don’t use their muskets, and are better known for prowess with their swords.

75 Big name in pet food : IAMS

Iams dog food was introduced by animal nutritionist Paul Iams. He felt that household pets were suffering somewhat by being fed a diet of table scraps, so he developed a dry dog food that he felt was more nutritious and suitable for pet dogs. He founded the Iams company, now part of Procter & Gamble, in 1946.

76 Hard-to-ride horse : BRONC

A bronco (also “bronc”) is a horse that is untamed. In Mexican Spanish “bronco” is a word for “horse”, and in the original Spanish “bronco” means “rough, rude”.

81 Old apple spray : ALAR

The chemical name for Alar, a plant growth regulator and color enhancer, is “daminozide”. Alar was primarily used on apples but was withdrawn from the market when it was linked to cancer.

82 Dept. of Labor arm : OSHA

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created in 1970 during the Nixon administration. OSHA regulates workplaces in the private sector and regulates just one government agency, namely the US Postal Service.

86 Football’s Terrell, nicknamed “T.O.” : OWENS

Terrell “T.O.” Owens is a retired NFL player. Owens was known for some pretty flamboyant celebrations after he scored touchdowns. A few of those celebrations earned him fines from the NFL.

87 Drug kingpin? : TRAFFIC ENGINEER

The word “kingpin” is mainly used figuratively these days, to describe the most prominent member of a group. Back at the start of the 19th century, a kingpin was the largest pin in a bowling game called “kayles”. As a result, the term “kingpin” is also used sometimes in ten-pin bowling to describe the 5-pin, the pin in the center of the triangular array.

93 Bank offering, for short : IRA

Individual retirement account (IRA)

95 Ancient ascetic : ESSENE

The Essenes were a Jewish religious group who are most noted these days perhaps as the authors of the Dead Sea Scrolls. The Essenes led simple lives devoted to poverty.

102 Former Fords : LTDS

There has been a lot of speculation about what the abbreviation “LTD” stands for in the car model known as “Ford LTD”. Many say it is an initialism standing for “Luxury Trim Decor”, and others say that it is short for “limited”. Although the car was produced in Australia with the initialism meaning “Lincoln Type Design”, it seems that “LTD” was originally chosen as just three meaningless letters that sound well together.

103 Mmes., in Madrid : SRAS

Madrid is the most populous city in Spain, and is the nation’s capital. It is located very close to the geographical center of the country. Madrid is the second-largest city in the European Union by population, after Berlin. People from Madrid called themselves Madrileños.

104 CVS pickups : RXS

There seems to be some uncertainty about the origin of the symbol “Rx” that’s used for a medical prescription. One explanation is that it comes from the astrological sign for Jupiter, a symbol put on prescriptions in days of old to invoke Jupiter’s blessing to help a patient recover.

The name of the drugstore chain CVS once stood for “Consumer Value Stores”, although these days the company uses the initialism to denote “Convenience, Value and Service”.

105 Conger catcher : EELER

Conger eels can grow to be very, very large, perhaps up to 10 feet in length.

107 Chopper blade : ROTOR

Our term “helicopter” was absorbed from the French word “hélicoptère” that was coined by Gustave Ponton d’Amécourt in 1861. d’Amécourt envisioned aircraft that could fly vertically using rotating wings that “screwed” into the air. He combined the Greek terms “helix” meaning “spiral, whirl” and “pteron” meaning “wing” to give us “helicopter”.

109 __ Beach, composer of the first symphony composed by an American woman : AMY

Amy Beach was an American pianist and composer. In 1896, the Boston Symphony Orchestra premiered her “Gaelis Symphony”, which was the first symphony composed and published by a female American composer. Beach had already established herself as a successful classical composer, most notably perhaps with the first performance of her “Mass in E-flat major” in 1892.

113 “To be” is one, poetically : IAMB

An iamb is a metrical foot containing an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable. The lines in Robert Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” use four sequential iambs, e.g. “Whose woods / these are / I think / I know”. With that sequence of four iambs, the poem’s structure is described as iambic tetrameter.

127 1980 TV series with the episode “Harmony of the Worlds” : COSMOS

“Cosmos: A Personal Journey” is a TV show co-written and presented by astronomer Carl Sagan. Originally airing in 1980, it was the most-watched series in the history of public television until Ken Burns started to produce his documentaries a decade later. Sagan’s opening words for the series are:

The Cosmos is all that is or was or ever will be. Our feeblest contemplations of the Cosmos stir us — there is a tingling in the spine, a catch in the voice, a faint sensation, as if a distant memory, of falling from a height. We know we are approaching the greatest of mysteries.

Down

2 Fast food magnate who once owned the San Diego Padres : KROC

The original McDonald’s restaurant was opened in 1940 by Richard and Maurice McDonald as a barbecue restaurant. The brothers then moved into fast food hamburgers, eventually selling out to one of their franchise agents, Ray Kroc. It was Ray Kroc who really led the company to its worldwide success. He was played by Michael Keaton in the movie about Ray Kroc’s business life called “The Founder”.

3 Pool site, often : YMCA

The YMCA (the Y) is a worldwide movement that has its roots in London, England. There, in 1844, the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) was founded with the intent of promoting Christian principles through the development of “a healthy spirit, mind and body”. The founder, George Williams, saw the need to create YMCA facilities for young men who were flocking to the cities as the Industrial Revolution flourished. He saw that these men were frequenting taverns and brothels, and wanted to offer a more wholesome alternative.

5 Nabokov novel : ADA

“Ada” is a 1969 novel by Vladimir Nabokov. The story takes place in the 1800s on Antiterra, an Earth-like planet that has a history similar to ours but with interesting differences. For example, there is a United States, but that country covers all of North and South America. What we call eastern Canada is a French-speaking province called “Canady”, and western Canada is a Russian-speaking province called “Estody”. The storyline is about a man called Van Veen who, when 14 years old, meets for the first time his cousin, 11-year-old Ada. The two cousins eventually have an affair, only to discover later that they are in fact brother and sister.

6 Light wood : BALSA

Balsa is a very fast-growing tree that is native to parts of South America. Even though balsa wood is very soft, it is actually classified as a hardwood, the softest of all the hardwoods (go figure!). Balsa is light and strong, so is commonly used in making model airplanes. Amazingly, in WWII a full-size British plane, the de Havilland Mosquito, was built largely from balsa and plywood. No wonder they called it “The Wooden Wonder” and “The Timber Terror”.

7 Retinal area subject to degeneration : MACULA

The macula is a pigmented area near the center of the retina. The macula has a high density of cone cells, and so plays a role in high-resolution, color vision. Macular degeneration, which typically occurs in older people, can lead to a loss of central vision.

9 Dundee denials : NAES

The city of Dundee lies on the north bank of the Firth of Tay in Scotland. The origins of the name “Dundee” are a little obscure, although the omnipresent “dùn” in place names all over Scotland and Ireland is the Celtic word for “fort”.

10 RR stop : STN

A station (“stn.” or “sta.”) is a railroad (RR) or bus stop.

11 “Sesame Street” watcher : TOT

Back in 1966, the Carnegie Institute allocated money to study the use of television to help young children prepare for school. The institute gave an $8million grant to set up the Children’s Television Workshop with the task of creating an educational TV program for young people. The program began to come together, especially after Jim Henson (of Muppet fame) got involved. The name “Sesame Street” was chosen simply because it was the “least disliked” of all names proposed just before the program went on the air.

15 Short-lived 1979 nuclear treaty : SALT II

There were two rounds of Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT) between the US and the Soviet Union, and two resulting treaties (SALT I & SALT II). The opening round of SALT I talks were held in Helsinki as far back as 1970, with the resulting treaty signed by President Richard Nixon and General Secretary Leonid Brezhnev in 1972. Brezhnev also signed the SALT II treaty, with President Jimmy Carter in 1979.

16 Ancient assembly areas : AGORAS

In early Greece, an agora was a place of assembly. The assemblies held there were often quite formal, perhaps for the reading of a proclamation. Later in Greek history, things became less formal as the agora evolved into a marketplace. Our contemporary word “agoraphobia” comes from these agorae, in the sense that an agoraphobe has a fear of open spaces, a fear of “public meeting places”.

17 Temporary substitute that means “place holder” in Latin : LOCUM TENENS

A locum (from “locum tenens”) is someone who fills in temporarily for another, especially carrying out the duties of a medical professional or a member of the clergy. The phrase “locum tenens” translates to “place holder”, and is similar to the French term “lieutenant” (from Old French “lieu tenant”)

18 Huber of tennis : ANKE

Anke Huber is a retired professional tennis player from Germany. Huber stepped out of the shadow of fellow German star Steffi Graf when Graf retired in 1999, and for the last two years of her playing career Huber enjoyed recognition as Germany’s top player.

24 Bic Clic __ pen : STIC

Société Bic is a company based in Clichy in France. The first product the company produced, more than fifty years ago, was the Bic Cristal ballpoint pen that is still produced today. Bic also makes other disposable products such as lighters and razors.

31 Small dogs : TOYS

The toy group of dogs is made up of the smallest breeds. The smallest of the small breeds are sometimes called teacup breeds.

32 “National Velvet” author Bagnold : ENID

“National Velvet” is a novel by Enid Bagnold that was first published in 1935. The story centers on Velvet Brown, a 14-year-old girl who rides her own horse to victory in the most celebrated of English horse races, the Grand National steeplechase. A famous film adaptation of the story was released in 1944 starring a young Mickey Rooney and 12-year-old Elizabeth Taylor in the title role. After filming was completed, Taylor was given the horse that she rode as a gift for her birthday.

33 Filmmaker Riefenstahl : LENI

Leni Riefenstahl was a German film director, actress and dancer. She was a noted figure moving in Adolf Hitler’s circle, and her most famous film was a propaganda piece called “Triumph of the Will”. “Triumph of the Will” documents the 1934 Nazi Party Congress in Nuremberg. We’ve all probably seen many excerpts, shots of huge crowds, Nazis marching with flags, and frenzied speeches from Hitler. Riefenstahl was arrested after the war and detained for a number of years but never found guilty of any crime. She lived a long life, a very long life. She was married for the second time in 2003, at the age of 101 years. She died just a few weeks later, as she had been suffering from cancer.

34 __-cone : SNO

A sno-cone (also “snow cone”) is just a paper cone filled with crushed ice and topped with flavored water. Italian ice is similar, but different. Whereas the flavoring is added on top of the ice to make a sno-cone, Italian ice is made with water that is flavored before it is frozen.

35 “A Doll’s House” heroine : NORA

“A Doll’s House” is probably the most famous play by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. The play deals with the feminist awakening of the lead character, Nora Helmer. “A Doll’s House” is sometimes referred to as the “first true feminist play”.

36 Awards acronym : EGOT

The acronym “EGOT” stands for “Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, Tony”, and is a reference to performers who have won all four awards.

39 Martinique, e.g. : ILE

The island of Martinique in the eastern Caribbean is actually a part of France, and is referred to as an “overseas department”. As such, Martinique is part of the European Union and even uses the euro as its currency. The island is fully represented in the French National Assembly and Senate, just like any department within France. It’s sort of like the status of Hawaii within the US.

41 About, on a memo : IN RE

The term “in re” is Latin, and is derived from “in” (in) and “res” (thing, matter). “In re” literally means “in the matter”, and is used to mean “in regard to” or “in the matter of”.

42 __ Barzini, Vito’s rival in “The Godfather” : EMILIO

Emilio Barzini (aka “the Wolf”) is the main antagonist in Mario Puzo’s “The Godfather”. In the film adaptation, Barzini is played by actor Richard Conte.

Mario Puzo created the Corleone Mafia family in his 1969 novel “The Godfather”. The head of the family is Vito Corleone (whose birth name was Vito Andolini), a native of Corleone in Sicily. He was given the name Corleone by immigration officers at Ellis Island. Don Corleone was played so very memorably, with a distinctive rasping voice, by Marlon Brando in the 1972 movie adaptation directed by Francis Ford Coppola.

44 Discreetly send a dupe email to : BCC

A blind carbon copy (bcc) is a copy of a document or message that is sent to someone without other recipients of the message knowing about that extra copy.

45 Hindu teachers : SWAMIS

A swami is a religious teacher in the Hindu tradition. The word “swami” can also mean “husband” in the Bengali and Malay languages.

50 Was shy? : OWED

To be shy is to be short, lacking. This use of “shy” originated as gambling slang meaning “owe money to the pot”.

61 Last word of “America the Beautiful” : … SEA!

When she was 33 years old, Katharine Lee Bates took a train ride from Massachusetts to Colorado Springs. She was so inspired by many of the beautiful sights she saw on her journey that she wrote a poem she called “Pikes Peak”. Upon publication the poem became quite a hit, and several musical works were adapted to the words of the poem, the most popular being a hymn tune composed by Samuel Ward. Bates’s poem and Ward’s tune were published together for the first time in 1910, and given the title “America the Beautiful”.

63 Allied gp. since 1948 : OAS

The Organization of American States (OAS) was founded in 1948, and has its headquarters in Washington, D.C. Not all of the independent states in the Americas are members. Cuba was barred from participation in the organization after a vote in 1962. Honduras had her membership suspended after the country’s 2009 coup.

64 “Seinfeld” friend : GEORGE

In “Seinfeld”, Jerry’s friend George was the son of Frank and Estelle Costanza. George was portrayed by Jason Alexander, and the character was loosely based on the show’s co-creator Larry David. The character’s name came from Jerry Seinfeld’s real-life friend Mike Costanza. George’s parents were played by the great Jerry Stiller and Estelle Harris.

66 Embroidery yarn : CREWEL

Crewelwork is a type of embroidery using wool thread. The oldest surviving example of crewelwork is the celebrated Bayeux Tapestry. As such, the Bayeux “Tapestry” isn’t a tapestry at all.

69 When repeated, Cult Jam vocalist : LISA

Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam was a band that was active in the late eighties and early nineties. Lisa Lisa is the stage name of musician Lisa Velez.

80 Fall preceder? : PRAT-

“Prat” is a relatively new word for me, and is a slang term for the buttocks. A “prat-fall” is when someone falls and lands on the buttocks.

81 Court records : ACTA

Actum (plural “acta”) is the Latin word for “deed”. “Acta” is used in English to describe many official records, including minutes, proceedings etc.

84 Coop group : HENS

The Old English word “cypa”, meaning “basket”, evolved in the 14th century to the word “coop” to describe a small cage for poultry. We still use “coop” today.

90 Not Rep. or Dem. : IND

In the world of politics, an Independent (Ind.) is neither Republican (Rep.) nor Democrat (Dem.)

91 “Cast Away” setting : ISLE

“Cast Away” is a very entertaining adventure film released in 2000 starring Tom Hanks as a castaway on a South Pacific island. The Hanks character ends up on the island after a FedEx plane crashes, leaving him marooned there for four years before he manages to escape on a raft. The film had to be filmed in two sessions. For the first session, Hanks gained 50 pounds to make himself look pudgy for the early scenes. The crew had to wait a whole year for Hanks to lose the weight so that they could film the “cast away” scenes.

93 Part of TGIF : IT’S

“Thank God It’s Friday” (TGIF) is a relatively new expression that apparently originated in Akron, Ohio. It was a catchphrase used first by disk jockey Jerry Healy of WAKR in the early seventies. That said, one blog reader wrote to me to say that he had been using the phrase in the fifties.

98 Susan B. Anthony biographer Ida Husted __ : HARPER

Ida Husted Harper was an author and suffragist. She co-authored the book “History of Woman Suffrage” with Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Matilda Josly Gage. At the request of Anthony, she then wrote “The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony”.

Susan B. Anthony was a social reformer and suffragist, who worked closely with fellow activist Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Famously, Anthony was arrested for voting in the 1872 presidential elections. She was put on trial, convicted, and ordered to pay a fine of $100. Anthony refused to pay up, and the authorities declined to take further action. Anthony and Stanton then drafted a constitutional amendment that would give women the right to vote. The so-called “Susan B. Anthony Amendment” became the Nineteenth Amendment to the US Constitution in 1920, fourteen years after Anthony died.

99 No-tell motel events : TRYSTS

In the most general sense, a tryst is a meeting at an agreed time and place. More usually we consider a tryst to be a pre-arranged meeting between lovers. The term comes from the Old French “triste”, a waiting place designated when hunting. Further, a tryst taking place at lunchtime is sometimes referred to as a nooner.

101 Garr of “Tootsie” : TERI

Actress Teri Garr had a whole host of minor roles in her youth, including appearances in nine Elvis movies. Garr’s big break came with the role of Inga in “Young Frankenstein”, and her supporting role in “Tootsie” earned Garr an Academy Award nomination. Sadly, Teri Garr suffers from multiple sclerosis. She is a National Ambassador for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

“Tootsie” is a hilarious 1982 comedy starring Dustin Hoffman in the title role, a male actor who adopts a female identity in order to land an acting job. Jessica Lange won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her performance in the film. “Tootsie” also provided Geena Davis with her first movie role.

107 Invite request : RSVP

“RSVP” stands for “répondez s’il vous plaît”, which is French for “answer, please”.

108 Turow novel set at Harvard : ONE L

Scott Turow is an author and lawyer from Chicago. Turow has had several bestselling novels including “Presumed Innocent”, “The Burden of Proof” and “Reversible Errors”, all three of which were made into films. He also wrote the autobiographical book “One L: The Turbulent True Story of a First Year at Harvard Law School”.

111 __ Domini : ANNO

The Latin word for year is “annus”. We often see it used in Latin phrases, but usually with a different spelling. In “anno Domini”, the “anno” is the ablative case of “annus” as the phrase means “in the year of the Lord”. Another example is “per annum”, in which “annum” is the accusative case as the literal translation of the phrase is “during the year”.

112 Annual May golf tournaments, familiarly : PGAS

The four major golf competitions in men’s golf are:

  • the Masters Tournament
  • the US Open
  • the Open Championship (aka “the British Open”)
  • the PGA Championship

115 Con __: briskly : MOTO

The musical term “con moto” indicates that a passage should be played quickly, briskly, The term translates from Italian as “with motion”.

119 Shamus : TEC

“Shamus” is a slang term describing a policeman or a private investigator. The experts don’t seem so sure, but there is no doubt in my mind that the term derives from the Irish name “Séamus” (“James” in English). In days past, the stereotypical cop hailed from the Auld Sod.

120 Offline, briefly : IRL

In real life (IRL)

121 Brian of rock : ENO

Brian Eno is a musician, composer and record producer from England who first achieved fame as the synthesizer player with Roxy Music. As a producer, Eno has worked with David Bowie, Devo, Talking Heads and U2.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Space station launched in 1973 : SKYLAB
7 “__, Inc.”: 2001 film : MONSTERS
15 Commonly green dish : SALAD
20 South American naval force : ARMADA
21 Turkey, mostly : ANATOLIA
22 Torment : AGONY
23 Researcher with an outgoing personality? : SOCIAL SCIENTIST
25 Terry O’Quinn’s “Lost” role : LOCKE
26 Big bunch : SCAD
27 Floors : STUNS
28 Clamp shape : CEE
29 Leveled, with “up” : TRUED …
30 Dot-commerce : E-TAIL
32 Two-time Super Bowl QB Manning : ELI
34 Country name last used in 1949 : SIAM
35 R&B singer’s hyphenated stage name : NE-YO
37 Clergyman who builds cupboards? : CABINET MINISTER
44 Links scores : BOGEYS
46 Lena of “Chocolat” : OLIN
47 Lennon’s love : ONO
48 Fall Out Boy genre : EMO
49 Bleep button operator? : CROSS WORD EDITOR
53 __ boom : SONIC
55 “Elder” or “Younger” Roman statesman : CATO
56 Stuns : AWES
57 Charlemagne’s realm: Abbr. : HRE
58 Marine snail : WHELK
59 Home of Hercules’ lion : NEMEA
61 Loafer, e.g. : SHOE
64 Mikey, Mouth or Chunk, in an ’85 film : GOONIE
65 TV monitoring org. : FCC
68 Dietitian? : MIDDLE MANAGER
72 Ground cover : SOD
73 Friend of Athos : ARAMIS
75 Big name in pet food : IAMS
76 Hard-to-ride horse : BRONC
78 Moved to a quieter table, say : RESAT
79 Special __ : OPS
81 Old apple spray : ALAR
82 Dept. of Labor arm : OSHA
86 Football’s Terrell, nicknamed “T.O.” : OWENS
87 Drug kingpin? : TRAFFIC ENGINEER
92 “Yuck!” : FEH!
93 Bank offering, for short : IRA
94 Advanced : LENT
95 Ancient ascetic : ESSENE
96 Getaway driver? : FLIGHT ATTENDANT
102 Former Fords : LTDS
103 Mmes., in Madrid : SRAS
104 CVS pickups : RXS
105 Conger catcher : EELER
107 Chopper blade : ROTOR
109 __ Beach, composer of the first symphony composed by an American woman : AMY
111 Mimic’s talent : APERY
113 “To be” is one, poetically : IAMB
117 Busybody : SNOOP
118 Fishing guide? : CASTING DIRECTOR
122 Liveliness : VERVE
123 Like some hard drives : EXTERNAL
124 Altogether : IN TOTO
125 Tradesperson : PLYER
126 Reveal : DISCLOSE
127 1980 TV series with the episode “Harmony of the Worlds” : COSMOS

Down

1 Undesirable freshness : SASS
2 Fast food magnate who once owned the San Diego Padres : KROC
3 Pool site, often : YMCA
4 Spotted : LAID EYES ON
5 Nabokov novel : ADA
6 Light wood : BALSA
7 Retinal area subject to degeneration : MACULA
8 “Come __!”: “Welcome!” : ON IN
9 Dundee denials : NAES
10 RR stop : STN
11 “Sesame Street” watcher : TOT
12 Bring out : ELICIT
13 Angry reaction : RISE
14 Fill to the max : SATE
15 Short-lived 1979 nuclear treaty : SALT II
16 Ancient assembly areas : AGORAS
17 Temporary substitute that means “place holder” in Latin : LOCUM TENENS
18 Huber of tennis : ANKE
19 Like some blond hair : DYED
24 Bic Clic __ pen : STIC
31 Small dogs : TOYS
32 “National Velvet” author Bagnold : ENID
33 Filmmaker Riefenstahl : LENI
34 __-cone : SNO
35 “A Doll’s House” heroine : NORA
36 Awards acronym : EGOT
38 They’re ripped in gyms : BODS
39 Martinique, e.g. : ILE
40 Anchor : MOOR
41 About, on a memo : IN RE
42 __ Barzini, Vito’s rival in “The Godfather” : EMILIO
43 Disturbed greatly : ROCKED
44 Discreetly send a dupe email to : BCC
45 Hindu teachers : SWAMIS
50 Was shy? : OWED
51 Interpret : READ
52 “Accordingly … ” : THEN …
53 Like much testimony : SWORN
54 “Look here!” : OHO!
60 Gives forth : EMITS
61 Last word of “America the Beautiful” : … SEA
62 “Let’s see … ” : HMM …
63 Allied gp. since 1948 : OAS
64 “Seinfeld” friend : GEORGE
65 Remote : FAR OFF
66 Embroidery yarn : CREWEL
67 Patient record : CASE HISTORY
69 When repeated, Cult Jam vocalist : LISA
70 Competent : ABLE
71 Nana : GRAN
74 “Wow!” : MAN!
77 Negatively affects the flow in : CONSTRICTS
79 Other, to Ortiz : OTRA
80 Fall preceder? : PRAT-
81 Court records : ACTA
83 Schedule competitively, as a tournament : SEED
84 Coop group : HENS
85 Is for a few : ARE
88 Bend : FLEX
89 Marshy areas : FENS
90 Not Rep. or Dem. : IND
91 “Cast Away” setting : ISLE
93 Part of TGIF : IT’S
97 It’s on the record : GROOVE
98 Susan B. Anthony biographer Ida Husted __ : HARPER
99 No-tell motel events : TRYSTS
100 Pine __ : NEEDLE
101 Garr of “Tootsie” : TERI
106 Songlike : LYRIC
107 Invite request : RSVP
108 Turow novel set at Harvard : ONE L
109 Finished perfectly : ACED
110 Dress style : MAXI
111 __ Domini : ANNO
112 Annual May golf tournaments, familiarly : PGAS
114 Tiny bit : ATOM
115 Con __: briskly : MOTO
116 Frat dudes : BROS
119 Shamus : TEC
120 Offline, briefly : IRL
121 Brian of rock : ENO

17 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 30 May 21, Sunday”

  1. Just over an hour with 2 wrong letters…I had DOYO for 35A which made 35 & 36D both also wrong …All 3 clues IMO were obscure and as always lumped together which is par for the course but left me with 3 bogeys👎
    Stay safe😀
    BTW I had a hard time finding this blog today.

  2. 27:20 1 error

    Fun theme. Considering the heat they get here, I was most amused by CROSSWORDEDITOR.

    I learned of several interesting words and people today: locum tenens, Amy Beach, Ida Husted Harper.

    If this posts twice, it’s because after leisurely composing it, when I hit “post comment” I got the Slow Down error.

  3. I considered this a nice relaxing Sunday puzzle and was highly amused by it’s theme. Which, BTW, was a tremendous help in my solving efforts.

    Referring to 112D, I find it annoying that the creators need to include superfluous information to misdirect us. I follow golf closely and spent an inordinate amount of time trying to pigeonhole the name of the tournaments held only in “May”. Of course, without the month, maybe the answer would have been too logical.

    1. Fitz,
      I was also initially thrown by the golf tournament clue, but the constructor simply used a typical plural technique in order to get the “s” added to PGA. The usual golf major tournaments schedule is:
      Masters in April
      PGA Championship in May
      US Open in June
      The Open Championship in July

  4. I got the theme, got the ‘normal’ words.
    like others, I was side swiped with LOCUMTENENS, WHELK and FEH..

    @Anonnymus -ref THEMELESS Saturday. I like your advice from yesterday.. however I didn’t see it until after I tried it. Made it halfway through without a lookup.. I’ll sneak up on it next saturday.

  5. 21:21, with 2 errors (P[L]YER just would not come to me), and needed a lot of Check Grid to uncover 10-12 more “typos”…. well, just call ’em what they were, mistakes …. this one had that “tricksy” feeling. Not a favorite by a long stretch.

  6. 12:03, 3 errors, mostly on the double Natick on 25A but a typo thrown in there (don’t know how that happens).

    re Newsday Saturday: It was a lot easier than their previous offerings. 47 minutes , most of that time trying to work out a couple of small spots.

  7. 1:00:45 for me today; learned the same things as Pam, as well as FEH, NEYO, LOCKE. Peeked a bit, but should’ve stuck it out.

    Very interesting info in the LOCUM TENENS explanation on Lieu tenant derivation. I checked out Fall Out Boy…not a big fan.

  8. 41:58 for today, with no “errors”; but had to work out LOCUM TENENS on Google Translate (it’s not a straightforward translation) after first trying LOCUM TEMPUS on 17D because 58A, 64A, 42D, and 43D were unknowns to me until that translation and SONIC were certain (last section to fill in). Was also intrigued by the etymology of lieutenant, and enjoyed the puzzle theme.

    The medical folks are fond of using “x” as an abbreviation as noted by the following:
    Rx = prescription or “recipe”
    Dx = diagnosis
    Tx = treatment
    Hx = history

  9. 119D I don’t get TEC. What’s the link with Shamus and cops. I read the blog. This is an awesome site.

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