LA Times Crossword 7 Sep 21, Tuesday

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Constructed by: Rich Proulx
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Shelter in Place

Themed answers are PLACES, and each includes a SHELTER as a hidden word:

  • 51A Way to stay safe … or what each set of circles represents vis-à-vis its answer : SHELTER IN PLACE
  • 20A Street in London’s Brixton Market : ELECTRIC AVENUE (“CAVE” within)
  • 25A Usual way in : FRONT ENTRANCE (“TENT” within)
  • 46A Where it’s hard to make a wrong turn : DEAD END STREET (“DEN” within)

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 6m 03s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

10 Son of Seth who lived to 905, per the Bible : ENOS

Enos was the son of Seth, and therefore the grandson of Adam and Eve, and nephew of Cain and Abel. According to the ancient Jewish work called the Book of Jubilees, Enos married his own sister Noam.

16 __ San Lucas: Baja resort : CABO

Cabo San Lucas is a major tourist destination at the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula in Mexico. “Cabo” is sometimes referred to as the “Fort Lauderdale of Mexico”.

17 Queen dowager of Jordan : NOOR

Queen Noor is the widow of King Hussein of Jordan. She was born Lisa Halaby in Washington, D.C., the daughter of Najeeb Halaby. Her father was appointed by President Kennedy as the head of the Federal Aviation Administration, and later became the CEO of Pan Am. Lisa Halaby met King Hussein in 1977, while working on the design of Jordan’s Queen Alia Airport. The airport was named after King Hussein’s third wife who had been killed that year in a helicopter crash. Halaby and the King were married the next year, in 1978.

Originally, a dowry was money that was set aside by a man for his wife and children, to be used in the event that he passed away. A widow who received said money was known as a dowager. Over time, “dowry” became a term used for the money, goods or estate that a woman brought into a marriage, and “dowager” came to mean an elderly woman with an elevated social position.

19 Singer Redding with two posthumous Grammys : OTIS

Otis Redding is often referred to as the “King of Soul”, and what a voice he had. Like so many of the greats in the world of popular music it seems, Redding was killed in a plane crash, in 1967 when he was just 26 years old. Just three days earlier he had recorded what was to be his biggest hit, “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay”.

20 Street in London’s Brixton Market : ELECTRIC AVENUE (“CAVE” within)

London’s Electric Avenue was so named because it was the first market street to be illuminated with electric lights. Famously, the street was used in the lyrics and for the title of the 1983 Eddy Grant single “Electric Avenue”.

23 Caveman Alley : OOP

“Alley Oop” is a comic strip that ran for four decades starting in 1932. “Alley Oop” was drawn by V. T. Hamlin. The title character lived in the prehistoric kingdom of Moo, although for much of the strip’s life, Alley Oop had access to a time machine. Alley Oop also had a girlfriend called Ooola. I had assumed that Ooola’s name was a play on “hula hoop”, but that little toy wasn’t invented until the 1950s (a kind blog reader informs me) …

25 Usual way in : FRONT ENTRANCE (“TENT” within)

Our word “tent”, describing a fabric shelter”, comes from the Latin “tentus” meaning “stretched”. The idea is that a tent is a portable shelter made from something “stretched” out over a framework.

31 Fair-hiring abbr. : EEO

“Equal Employment Opportunity” (EEO) is a term that has been around since 1964 when the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) was set up by the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Title VII of the Act prohibits employers from discriminating against employees on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin or religion.

32 “Old MacDonald” refrain : E-I-E-I-O

There was an old American version of the English children’s song “Old MacDonald Had a Farm” (E-I-E-I-O) that was around in the days of WWI. The first line of the older US version goes “Old MacDougal had a farm, in Ohio-i-o”.

33 Indian title : SAHIB

“Sahib” is most recognized as a term of address used in India, where it is used in much the same way as we use “mister” in English. The term was also used to address male Europeans in the days of the British Raj. The correct female form of address is “sahiba”, but in the colonial days the address used was “memsahib”, a melding of “ma’am” and “sahib”

40 Travel by Greyhound, say : RIDE

Speaking as someone who lived much of my life outside of the US, I have to say that the Greyhound bus is a real symbol of America. I grew up seeing Greyhound buses in so many old movies. In Ireland the official provincial bus service “stole” the famous logo that gracefully adorns the sides of these buses, but uses a running Irish Setter in place of the iconic greyhound.

41 Three-pointers, in hoops lingo : TREYS

A trey is a three in a deck of cards. The term “trey” can also be used for a domino with three pips, and even for a three-point play in basketball.

Lingo is specialized vocabulary. Journalese and legalese would be good examples.

43 “Amadeus” director Forman : MILOS

Miloš Forman is a film director from former Czechoslovakia, where he learned his craft. Since starting to work in Hollywood in 1968, Forman has been at the helm of some memorable films including: “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”, “Amadeus” and “The People vs. Larry Flynt”.

The magnificent 1984 film “Amadeus” is an adaptation of Peter Shaffer’s 1979 stage play of the same name. Tom Hulce played Mozart, and F. Murray Abraham played Mozart’s rival, Antonio Salieri. Both Hulce and Abraham were nominated for that season’s Best Actor Oscar, with the award going to the latter. There hasn’t been a movie since “Amadeus” that garnered two Best Actor nominations.

46 Where it’s hard to make a wrong turn : DEAD END STREET (“DEN” within)

Even though “cul-de-sac” can indeed mean “bottom-of-the-bag” in French, the term “cul-de-sac” is of English origin (the use of “cul” in French is actually quite rude). The term was introduced in aristocratic circles at a time when it was considered very fashionable to speak French. Dead-end streets in France are usually signposted with just a symbol and no accompanying words, but if words are included they are “voie sans issue”, meaning “way without exit”.

49 When “light through yonder window breaks” in “Romeo and Juliet” : ACT II

There’s a famous couplet in William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” spoken by Romeo as he spots Juliet above him at a window or on a balcony:

But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks?
It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.

Romeo continues with:

Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon,
Who is already sick and pale with grief,
That thou, her maid, art far more fair than she.

I reckon Romeo is smitten …

50 Poker pot paper : IOU

I owe you (IOU)

58 Mall smooching, etc., initially : PDAS

Public display of affection (PDA)

61 Legal wrong : TORT

“Tort” is a French word meaning “mischief, injury or wrong”. In common law, a tort is a civil wrong that results in the injured party suffering loss or harm, and the injuring party having a legal liability. Tort law differs from criminal law in that torts may result from negligence and not just intentional actions. Also, tort lawsuits may be decided on a preponderance of evidence, without the need of proof beyond a reasonable doubt.

62 Desert respites : OASES

An isolated area of vegetation in a desert is called an oasis (plural “oases”). As water is needed for plant growth, an oasis might also include a spring, pond or small lake. We often use the term “oasis” more generally to describe a haven, a place of rest.

63 Use a scythe on : REAP

I guess there are several designs of scythe, e.g. English scythes and Austrian scythes. The two main components of any scythe are the blade and the handle known as a snaith.

Down

1 Frank with a diary : ANNE

Anne Frank has to be one of the most famous victims of the Holocaust. This is largely because the story of this young girl lives on in her widely published diary, and in adaptations of the diary for stage and screen. Anne Frank was a German until she lost her nationality in 1941 when the Nazis came to power. By this time she was living with her family in Amsterdam, as the Franks chose to flee Germany in 1933. When the Germans occupied the Netherlands, the family went into hiding in rooms concealed behind a bookcase in Otto Frank’s office building (Otto was Anne’s father). There the family hid for two whole years until they were betrayed. The family was split up, and Anne and her sister died from typhus in a concentration camp in 1945.

2 Hammer or sickle : TOOL

Sickles and scythes are similar tools that are used for reaping crops. A sickle has a short handle, forcing the user to stoop down. A scythe has a long handle, allowing it to be used while standing erect.

3 Midwest native : OTOE

The Otoe (also “Oto”) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestward, ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

4 Alphabetically last birthstone : ZIRCON

The mineral zircon is a silicate of zirconium, and is a source of the metallic element. Transparent zircon is used as a semi-precious gemstone. In fact, it is the heaviest known gemstone.

Here is the “official” list of birthstones, by month, that we tend to use today:

  • January: Garnet
  • February: Amethyst
  • March: Bloodstone or Aquamarine
  • April: Diamond
  • May: Emerald
  • June: Pearl or Moonstone
  • July: Ruby
  • August: Sardonyx or Peridot
  • September: Sapphire or Lapis Lazuli
  • October: Opal or Pink Tourmaline
  • November: Topaz or Citrine
  • December: Turquoise or Zircon (also now, Tanzanite)

5 Wrinkly dogs : SHAR-PEIS

The shar-pei breed of dog is one with a wrinkly face and really dark tongue. The breed originated in China, with “shar-pei” being the British spelling of the Cantonese name.

6 “Cornflake Girl” singer __ Amos : TORI

“Cornflake Girl” is a 1994 song written and recorded by Tori Amos. Amos uses the term “cornflake girl” to describe someone who is apt to hurt you despite being a close friend.

7 With, on le menu : AVEC

In French, “avec” (with) and “sans” (without) are opposites.

8 Suvari of “American Pie” : MENA

Mena Suvari’s most famous role to date is probably “the beauty” in the 1999 movie “American Beauty”. She played the teenage girl with whom the Kevin Spacey character becomes infatuated. Suvari also plays Heather in the “American Pie” films.

While I found the film “American Beauty” to be an enjoyable and interesting film (loved Annette Bening in it), I also found it very depressing. If you haven’t seen it, the main story is about a man having a midlife crisis (played by Kevin Spacey) and developing an infatuation for his teenage daughter’s flirtatious friend (played by Mena Suvari, and whom I guess is the “American Beauty”). The movie is definitely worth watching, and received huge accolades when released in 1999.

9 Soviet newspaper : PRAVDA

The political newspaper “Pravda” has for about a century been associated with the Communist Party of the Soviet Union and now of the Communist Party of the Russian Federation. “Pravda” was founded just before WWI by Russian revolutionaries. It was closed down after the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was banned by President Boris Yeltsin in 1991, although a group of journalists opened a new paper with the same title just a few weeks later. Eventually, the new “Pravda” was purchased by the Communist Party of the Russian Federation when it emerged as a political force starting in 1996. “Pravda” is Russian for “truth”.

12 Stage awards : OBIES

The Obies are the Off-Broadway Theater Awards. The Obies have been presented annually since 1956. The recipients used to be chosen by “The Village Voice” newspaper, but now are jointly administered with the American Theatre Wing.

13 Shipwreck signal : SOS

The combination of three dots – three dashes – three dots, is a Morse signal first introduced by the German government as a standard distress call in 1905. The sequence is remembered as the letters SOS (three dots – pause – three dashes – pause – three dots). That said, in the emergency signal there is no pause between the dots and dashes, so “SOS” is really only a mnemonic. Similarly, the phrases “Save Our Souls” and “Save Our Ship” are back-formations that were introduced after the SOS signal was adopted.

25 Pool table surface : FELT

The various types of textile known as felt are all made by matting, condensing and pressing fibers together.

30 Wonka creator Dahl : ROALD

Roald Dahl’s name is Norwegian. Dahl’s parents were from Norway, although Dahl himself was Welsh. Dahl became one of the most successful authors of the twentieth century. Two of his most famous titles are “James and the Giant Peach” and “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory”.

Willy Wonka is the lead character in the 1964 novel by Roald Dahl called “Charlie & the Chocolate Factory”. Willy Wonka has been portrayed on the big screen twice. Gene Wilder was a fabulous Wonka in the 1971 version titled “Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory”, and Johnny Depp played him in the Tim Burton movie from 2005 called “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory”. I’m not too fond of Tim Burton movies, so I haven’t seen that one …

34 Romeo’s last words : … I DIE

In Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet”, the last words uttered by Romeo are:

O true apothecary!
They drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die.

Juliet’s last words are:

Yea, noise? then I’ll be brief. O happy dagger! This is thy sheath; there rust, and let me die.

37 Optometrists’ exams : EYE TESTS

Starting in the mid-1700s, a device known as an optometer was used for measuring prescriptions for eyeglasses. Over time, a professional using an optometer came to be known as an optometrist.

47 Same-as-above marks : DITTOS

The word “ditto” was originally used in Italian (from Tuscan dialect) to avoid repetition of the names of months in a series of dates. So, “ditto” is just another wonderful import from that lovely land …

52 The “E” in Q.E.D. : ERAT

The initialism “QED” is used at the end of a mathematical proof or a philosophical argument. QED stands for the Latin “quod erat demonstrandum” meaning “that which was to be demonstrated”.

55 “A Death in the Family” author James : AGEE

James Agee was a noted American film critic and screenwriter. Agee wrote an autobiographical novel “A Death in the Family” that won him his Pulitzer in 1958, albeit posthumously. He was also one of the screenwriters for the 1951 classic movie “The African Queen”.

57 Athlete’s award : ESPY

The ESPY Awards are a creation of the ESPN sports television network. One difference with similarly named awards in the entertainment industry is that ESPY winners are chosen solely based on viewer votes.

58 School fundraising gp. : PTA

Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 All-inclusive : A TO Z
5 Inked indication of approval : STAMP
10 Son of Seth who lived to 905, per the Bible : ENOS
14 “Moi? Never!” : NOT I!
15 Hang in midair : HOVER
16 __ San Lucas: Baja resort : CABO
17 Queen dowager of Jordan : NOOR
18 Sports stadium : ARENA
19 Singer Redding with two posthumous Grammys : OTIS
20 Street in London’s Brixton Market : ELECTRIC AVENUE (“CAVE” within)
23 Caveman Alley : OOP
24 Ways in or out : DOORS
25 Usual way in : FRONT ENTRANCE (“TENT” within)
31 Fair-hiring abbr. : EEO
32 “Old MacDonald” refrain : E-I-E-I-O
33 Indian title : SAHIB
36 Do little : LAZE
38 Take an oath : SWEAR
40 Travel by Greyhound, say : RIDE
41 Three-pointers, in hoops lingo : TREYS
43 “Amadeus” director Forman : MILOS
45 Cuz and sis : KIN
46 Where it’s hard to make a wrong turn : DEAD END STREET (“DEN” within)
49 When “light through yonder window breaks” in “Romeo and Juliet” : ACT II
50 Poker pot paper : IOU
51 Way to stay safe … or what each set of circles represents vis-à-vis its answer : SHELTER IN PLACE
58 Mall smooching, etc., initially : PDAS
59 Lacking originality : TRITE
60 Qualities that make deals difficult : EGOS
61 Legal wrong : TORT
62 Desert respites : OASES
63 Use a scythe on : REAP
64 Targets : AIMS
65 Flower holders : STEMS
66 Hot : SEXY

Down

1 Frank with a diary : ANNE
2 Hammer or sickle : TOOL
3 Midwest native : OTOE
4 Alphabetically last birthstone : ZIRCON
5 Wrinkly dogs : SHAR-PEIS
6 “Cornflake Girl” singer __ Amos : TORI
7 With, on le menu : AVEC
8 Suvari of “American Pie” : MENA
9 Soviet newspaper : PRAVDA
10 Affordable ride : ECONOCAR
11 Enjoying-the-great-outdoors walk : NATURE HIKE
12 Stage awards : OBIES
13 Shipwreck signal : SOS
21 Trade show giveaway : TOTE
22 Very long periods : EONS
25 Pool table surface : FELT
26 Raise, as kids : REAR
27 Was a bit too enchanting : OOZE CHARM
28 Self-transformation result, to the self : NEW ME
29 Advertising link : TIE-IN
30 Wonka creator Dahl : ROALD
34 Romeo’s last words : … I DIE
35 Like a paper clip : BENT
37 Optometrists’ exams : EYE TESTS
39 Optimistic quality : ROSINESS
42 Travel with the wind : SAIL
44 Cease : STOP
47 Same-as-above marks : DITTOS
48 Classroom tools : RULERS
49 “Me too!” : AS DO I!
52 The “E” in Q.E.D. : ERAT
53 Get up : RISE
54 Part of a shopping list : ITEM
55 “A Death in the Family” author James : AGEE
56 Gently persuade : COAX
57 Athlete’s award : ESPY
58 School fundraising gp. : PTA

12 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 7 Sep 21, Tuesday”

  1. No errors. no Googles. Didn’t notice theme, Did not know CABO, TREYS or PDAS.
    We had no Monday paper in these parts, so I’ll have to look it up.

  2. 12:02 with no errors or lookups. Easy theme. Had to change SODOI>ASDOI. Did not know MILOS Forman or MENA Suvari.

    Brixton Market in London looks like an interesting place to visit and shop.

  3. 16:11 – 1 lookup/no errors.

    Didn’t know otOe/noOr cross for Midwest Native/Queen dowager of Jordan.

    Never heard of ELECTRICAVENUE but got the crosses.

    Thought is was challenging (but fun) for a Tuesday. Bill’s 6:03 is really impressive.

    Be well.

    1. Very impressive indeed, Bill.

      As we do, my wife started it. I was about to give up with 90% solved, but got TORT,
      the floodgates opened and I saw the rest. Harder than Monday, but a challenge
      that was fun. I didn’t know all of the words, but got them on crosses. I saw the theme
      one single time in the past. I go by the unfinished words or know them from scratch.
      It has helped my vocabulary a lot. Thanks, LAT.

      Bill, I want my own post.

      Didn’t do as well on the Jumble, took 5 seconds, after getting the words. Having fun here.

      Got the Wonderword pretty easily for a change. I like this one, too.

      Thanks for letting me post on your site, Lou lu.

  4. 7 minutes, 29 seconds, no errors. Not a good start, though, with the always-hard-to-“see” A TO Z the first fill.

  5. 5:21
    The theme helped me find the TENT.

    I only remember making a couple of changes: EEC->EEO, and PEKINESE are not nearly as wrinkly as SHARPEIS.

    I vaguely knew there was a song called “Electric Avenue” but I didn’t know the history behind it. Had no idea it was inspired by the Brixton uprising against police violence.

  6. Mostly easy Tuesday for me; took 10:18 with no errors or peeks. Went as fast as I could but still got slowed down a bit with ROALD/NEWME/DEADEND intersection.

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