LA Times Crossword 23 Nov 21, Tuesday

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Constructed by: Bruce Venzke
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Spare Change

Themed answers each include the letter sequence “SPARE”, but with the order CHANGED:

  • 59A Coins in one’s pocket … and what literally happens in each set of circles : SPARE CHANGE
  • 18A Spicy condiment : PEPPER SAUCE
  • 23A Astronaut’s milieu : OUTER SPACE
  • 35A Lawn areas lacking grass : BARE SPOTS
  • 53A NYC’s World Financial Center architect : CESAR PELLI

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 5m 45s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 D.C. insider : POL

Politician (pol)

The District of Columbia (DC) was established by the Residence Act in 1790. Article One, Section 8 of the US constitution provides for the establishment of a district outside of the states, over which the federal government has authority. The constitution also specifies that the district cannot exceed an area of ten miles square.

9 “Silent Night” words before calm and bright : ALL IS …

The beautiful Christmas carol “Silent Night” was first performed in Austria in 1818. The words were written by a priest, Father Joseph Mohr, and the melody by an Austrian headmaster, Franz Xaver Gruber. The carol was in German and called “Stille Nacht”. The English translation that we use today was provided to us in 1859 by an American bishop, John Freeman Young from Florida.

14 Actress Gardner : AVA

Ava Gardner is noted for her association with some big movies, but also for her association with some big names when it came to the men in her life. In the world of film, she appeared in the likes of “Mogambo” (1953), “On the Beach” (1959), “The Night of the Iguana” (1964) and “Earthquake” (1974). The men in her life included husbands Mickey Rooney, Artie Shaw and Frank Sinatra.

16 Africa’s Sierra __ : LEONE

The Republic of Sierra Leone is a country in West Africa that lies on the Atlantic Coast. The capital city of Freetown was originally set up as a colony to house the “Black Poor” of London, England. These people were mainly freed British slaves of Caribbean descent who were living a miserable life in the run-down parts of London. Perhaps to help the impoverished souls, perhaps to rid the streets of “a problem”, three ships were chartered in 1787 to transport a group of blacks, with some whites, to a piece of land purchased in Sierra Leone. Those who made the voyage were granted British citizenship and protection. The descendants of these immigrants, and others who made the journey over the next 60 years, make up the ethnic group that’s today called the Sierra Leone Creole.

17 “Star Wars” sequel trilogy heroine : REY

Rey is a central character in the “Star Wars” universe who first appeared in 2015’s “Star Wars: The Force Awakens”. Rey is played by British actress Daisy Ridley.

The main “Star Wars” franchise of films, sometimes referred to as the “Skywalker Saga”, comprises three trilogies:

  1. The prequel trilogy:
    • Episode I – The Phantom Menace
    • Episode II – Attack of the Clones
    • Episode III – Revenge of the Sith
  2. The original trilogy:
    • Episode IV – Star Wars
    • Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back
    • Episode VI – Return of the Jedi
  3. The sequel trilogy:
    • Episode VII – The Force Awakens
    • Episode VIII – The Last Jedi
    • Episode IX – The Rise of Skywalker

23 Astronaut’s milieu : OUTER SPACE

The exploration and use of outer space is governed by the Outer Space Treaty that came into force in 1967. The initial signatories were the US, UK and USSR, and now 102 nations are party to the treaty. For the purposes of the treaty, outer space begins at the Kármán line, a theoretical sphere that lies at an altitude of 100km about the Earth’s sea level.

31 Horne of jazz : LENA

Lena Horne was an American jazz singer, actress, dancer and civil rights activist. Horne started her career as a nightclub singer and then began to get some meaty acting roles in Hollywood. However, she ended up on the blacklist during the McCarthy Era for expressing left wing political views. One of Horne’s starring roles was in the 1943 movie “Stormy Weather” for which she also performed the title song.

34 Oktober endings : -FESTS

Oktoberfest is a 16-day beer festival in Munich that actually starts in September. About six million people attend every year, making it the largest fair in the world. I’ve attended twice, and it really is a remarkable party …

39 Perth __, NJ : AMBOY

The city of Perth Amboy in New Jersey is part of the New York metropolitan area. The Arthur Kill tidal strait lies to the east of the city, and separates Perth Amboy from the New York borough of Staten Island. The strait is spanned by a cantilever bridge called the Outerbridge Crossing.

42 LBJ’s boy beagle : HIM

Him and Her were two beagles owned by President Johnson and his family while they were living in the White House. Her died after only a year when she swallowed a stone. Him died at three years of age, when he was hit by a car while chasing a squirrel across the White House lawn.

43 Big brass : TUBA

The tuba is the lowest-pitched of all brass instruments, and one of the most recent additions to the modern symphony orchestra (usually there is just one tuba included in an orchestral line-up). “Tuba” is the Latin word for “trumpet, horn”. Oom-pah-pah …

50 Features of some cruise ships : CASINOS

The term “casino” originated in the 1700s, then describing a public room for music or dancing. “Casino” is a diminutive of “casa” meaning “house”.

53 NYC’s World Financial Center architect : CESAR PELLI

César Pelli was an American architect from Argentina. He was most renowned for designing some of the world’s tallest buildings. The projects bearing the César Pelli name include Brookfield Place (previously “World Financial Center”) in Manhattan, and the stunning Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur.

58 ’90s candidate __ Perot : H ROSS

Ross Perot graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1953, as president of his class. Perot served his 4-year commitment but then resigned his commission, apparently having become somewhat disillusioned with the navy. He was ranked number 101 on the Forbes 400 List of Richest Americans in 2012, and at that time was worth about $3.5 billion. Back in 1992, Perot ran as an independent candidate for US president. He founded the Reform Party in 1995, and ran as the Reform Party candidate for president in 1996.

62 When doubled, a Latin dance : CHA

The cha-cha-cha (often simplified to “cha-cha”) is a Latin dance with origins in Cuba, where it was introduced by composer Enrique Jorrin in 1953.

64 Knighted composer Edward : ELGAR

Sir Edward Elgar was the quintessential English composer. He is inextricably associated with his “Pomp and Circumstance Marches” (including “Land of Hope and Glory”) and the “Enigma Variations”.

Sir Edward Elgar’s “Pomp and Circumstance Marches” is a work that takes its name from a line in William Shakespeare’s “Othello”.

Farewell the neighing steed and the shrill trump,
The spirit-stirring drum, th’ear-piercing fife,
The royal banner, and all quality,
Pride, pomp, and circumstance of glorious war!

The most famous part of the whole work is the trio section of March No. 1, also known as “Land of Hope and Glory”. Here in the US, that trio section is often referred to simply as “Pomp and Circumstance”, or sometimes as “The Graduation March” as it is a staple at school graduations across the country.

65 Showy pond fish : KOI

Koi are fish that are also known as Japanese carp. Koi have been bred for decorative purposes and there are now some very brightly colored examples found in Japanese water gardens.

66 Stacks like Tupperware : NESTS

Back in the 1930s, Earl Tupper was working at the DuPont Chemical Company, and from DuPont obtained inflexible pieces of polyethylene slag. Tupper purified the slag and shaped it into unbreakable containers. He added airtight lids with a “burping seal” that provided tight seals similar to that provided by the lids on paint cans. He called his new product Tupperware.

68 Vicious with a bass : SID

Sid Vicious was a famous English musician and the best-known member of the seventies punk rock group called the Sex Pistols. In 1978, Vicious woke up out of a drugged stupor in his hotel room in New York, to find his girlfriend stabbed to death in the bathroom. Vicious was charged with the murder, and ten days later sliced his wrist in a suicide attempt. Vicious made bail a few months later and at a celebratory party his own mother supplied him with heroin on which Vicious overdosed and died, at the age of 21.

Down

4 Last word of Kansas’ motto : … ASPERA

The motto of the State of Kansas is “ad astra per aspera”, a Latin expression meaning “to the stars through difficulties”. Kansas shares the same motto with quite a few other institutions, including an English grammar school, an Australian high school, and even Starfleet, the service to which the USS Enterprise belongs in the “Star Trek” series.

5 Macduff rebuff : NAE

Thanes were Scottish aristocrats. The most famous thanes have to be the Shakespearean characters Macbeth (Thane of Glamis, later “Thane of Cawdor”, and still later “King of Scotland”) and MacDuff (Thane of Fife). Other thanes in “Macbeth” are Ross, Lennox and Angus, as well as Menteith and Caithness.

6 Econ. measure : GNP

A country’s Gross National Product (GNP) is the value of all services and products produced by its residents in a particular year. GNP includes all production wherever it is in the world, as long as the business is owned by residents of the country concerned. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is different, although related, and is the value of all services and goods produced within the borders of the country for that year.

7 Old photo hue : SEPIA

Sepia is that rich, brown-grey color so common in old photographs. “Sepia” is the Latinized version of the Greek word for cuttlefish, as sepia pigment is derived from the ink sac of the cuttlefish. Sepia ink was commonly used for writing and drawing as far back as ancient Rome and ancient Greece. The “sepia tone” of old photographs is not the result of deterioration over time. Rather, it is the result of a deliberate preservation process which converts the metallic silver in the photographic image to a more stable silver sulfide. Prints that have been sepia-toned can last in excess of 150 years.

10 Norman who created Archie and Edith Bunker : LEAR

Norman Lear wrote and produced some great television shows, including “All in the Family”, “Sanford and Son” and “The Jeffersons”. He also did some film work, including writing and producing the great 1967 movie “Divorce American Style”.

Archie Bunker’s wife Edith was played by Jean Stapleton on the 1970s sitcom “All in the Family”. By 1980, Stapleton was growing tired of playing the role and appeared in fewer and fewer episodes. When the show’s spin-off series “Archie Bunker’s Place” premiered, the storyline revealed that Archie Bunker had just lost his wife, setting the tone for the new show.

11 French pilgrimage site : LOURDES

Bernadette Soubirous was a 14-year-old peasant girl who reported visions of the Virgin Mary in a cave near the town of Lourdes in the southwest of France. There were sixteen apparitions in total, all occurring in 1858. The Roman Catholic Church declared the visions authentic in 1862, and since then, the site of the apparitions has become a major pilgrimage destination, with about 5 million people visiting every year. Bernadette was declared a saint by Pope Pius XI in 1933.

19 Prefix with stat : RHEO-

A rheostat is an electrical device that can offer a varying degree of resistance to current flow. The English physicist Sir Charles Wheatstone first coined the term, using the Greek “rheos” meaning “flowing stream” and “stat” meaning “regulating device”.

25 Soccer standout : PELE

“Pelé” is the nickname of Edson de Nascimento, a soccer player who has used the name “Pelé” for most of his life. Pelé is now retired, and for my money was the world’s greatest ever player of the game. He is the only person to have been a member of three World Cup winning squads (1958, 1962 and 1970), and is a national treasure in his native Brazil. One of Pele’s nicknames is “O Rei do Futebol” (the King of Football).

30 More irritable : TESTIER

Somebody described as testy is touchy, irritably impatient. The term “testy” comes into English from Old French, ultimately deriving from “testu” meaning “stubborn, headstrong”, literally “heady”. So, our word “testy” comes from the same root as the French word “tête” meaning “head”.

37 12-point type : PICA

Both “pica” and “elite” are types. Pica is a 12-point type, having about 10 characters per inch. Elite is 10-point type, with about 12 characters per inch.

38 Actor Epps : OMAR

Omar Epps is the actor who played Eric Foreman on the excellent television series “House”. Prior to playing Dr. Foreman, Epps had a recurring role playing Dr. Dennis Gant on “ER”. And, in another link to the world of medicine, Epps was born in Savannah, Georgia to single mom, Dr. Bonnie Epps.

40 Marshmallowy treat : MOON PIE

Marshmallow cream was developed in 1927. Soon after, workers in the coal mines around Chattanooga, Tennessee started dipping graham crackers in marshmallow cream as a snack. Then a local baker jumped on the idea, and came up with a sandwich made with a marshmallow filling between two round graham crackers. His young grandson remarked that the popped bubbles in the marshmallow (from baking) looked like moon craters, and the Moon Pie was born. I used to love them as a kid, although we called them “Wagon Wheels” in our part of the world.

41 Little chickens : BANTAMS

Small breeds of poultry might be known as bantam breeds. European sailors found smaller fowl in Southeast Asia that they referred to as “bantam”, using the name of Bantam, an old Indonesian seaport.

45 Russian ballet company : BOLSHOI

The Bolshoi Ballet company is based in Moscow, Russia. The Bolshoi company has over 200 dancers, making it by far the biggest ballet company in the world. I have very fond memories of attending a performance in the beautiful Bolshoi Theater in Moscow, Russia in the late nineties …

46 “Let me reiterate … ” : AS I SAID …

The verb “to iterate” means to repeat over again. The verb “reiterate” means the same thing. One might suspect that “reiterate” is one of those words that has crept into the language due to repeated (reiterated?!) misuse. Well, that’s not quite the case, but close. Back in the 1400s, “iterate” meant “repeat”, and “reiterate” meant “repeat again and again”. We’ve lost the distinction between those two definitions over time.

48 “High Voltage” band : AC/DC

The hard rock band AC/DC recorded two albums titled “High Voltage”. The first was released in 1975, only in their native Australia. The second was released in 1976, but this version of “High Voltage” was marketed internationally. The second album bears little resemblance to the first.

57 Ping-Pong supplies : NETS

Ping-Pong is called table tennis in the UK, where the sport originated in the 1880s. Table tennis started as an after-dinner activity among the elite, and was called “wiff-waff”. To play the game, books were stacked in the center of a table as a “net”, two more books served as “”rackets” and the ball used was actually a golf ball. The game evolved over time with the rackets being upgraded to the lids of cigar boxes and the ball becoming a champagne cork (how snooty is that?). Eventually the game was produced commercially, and the sound of the ball hitting the racket was deemed to be a “ping” and a “pong”, giving the sport its alternative name. The name “Ping-Pong” was trademarked in Britain in 1901, and eventually sold to Parker Brothers in the US.

60 Private aid prog. : NGO

Non-governmental organization (NGO)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 D.C. insider : POL
4 Anxious feeling : ANGST
9 “Silent Night” words before calm and bright : ALL IS …
14 Actress Gardner : AVA
15 More rational : SANER
16 Africa’s Sierra __ : LEONE
17 “Star Wars” sequel trilogy heroine : REY
18 Spicy condiment : PEPPER SAUCE
20 Pay off illicitly : BRIBE
22 How a scary-movie watcher might recoil : IN HORROR
23 Astronaut’s milieu : OUTER SPACE
26 Deserved, as recognition : DUE
27 Keep separate from the rest : ISOLATE
28 Restaurant chain with an owl logo : HOOTERS
31 Horne of jazz : LENA
32 In the manner of : A LA
34 Oktober endings : -FESTS
35 Lawn areas lacking grass : BARE SPOTS
39 Perth __, NJ : AMBOY
42 LBJ’s boy beagle : HIM
43 Big brass : TUBA
47 Greets with guffaws : ROARS AT
50 Features of some cruise ships : CASINOS
52 Heavy weight : TON
53 NYC’s World Financial Center architect : CESAR PELLI
55 Working together as one : IN TANDEM
58 ’90s candidate __ Perot : H ROSS
59 Coins in one’s pocket … and what literally happens in each set of circles : SPARE CHANGE
62 When doubled, a Latin dance : CHA
63 Fix in the crosshairs : AIM AT
64 Knighted composer Edward : ELGAR
65 Showy pond fish : KOI
66 Stacks like Tupperware : NESTS
67 Wed on the sly : ELOPE
68 Vicious with a bass : SID

Down

1 Partially cook, as rice : PARBOIL
2 Employ excessively, as muscles : OVERUSE
3 Overdo the flattery : LAY IT ON
4 Last word of Kansas’ motto : … ASPERA
5 Macduff rebuff : NAE
6 Econ. measure : GNP
7 Old photo hue : SEPIA
8 Battlefield furrow : TRENCH
9 “What’s more … ” : ALSO …
10 Norman who created Archie and Edith Bunker : LEAR
11 French pilgrimage site : LOURDES
12 Trying a case, say : IN COURT
13 Prophetic woman : SEERESS
19 Prefix with stat : RHEO-
21 Overdo, as a point : BELABOR
24 Twinkler : STAR
25 Soccer standout : PELE
29 Frequently, to a bard : OFT
30 More irritable : TESTIER
33 Fireplace grate buildup : ASH
36 Shakespearean cries : AYS
37 12-point type : PICA
38 Actor Epps : OMAR
39 Craftsperson : ARTISAN
40 Marshmallowy treat : MOON PIE
41 Little chickens : BANTAMS
44 Disengages the bolt for, as a door : UNLOCKS
45 Russian ballet company : BOLSHOI
46 “Let me reiterate … ” : AS I SAID …
48 “High Voltage” band : AC/DC
49 Far from a guffaw : TEE-HEE
51 Round figure : SPHERE
54 Little : SMALL
56 “I smell __!” : A RAT
57 Ping-Pong supplies : NETS
60 Private aid prog. : NGO
61 Space between outfielders : GAP

17 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 23 Nov 21, Tuesday”

  1. I guess I’m not quite awake. For the clue “Horne of jazz,” I thought it said “Home of Jazz,” so of course I put in Utah. Never heard of Cesar Pelli. Also didn’t know Rey. So a little over 10 minutes.

    1. Dobbies? I assume you’re not referring to a chain of “garden centres” in Great Britain? DOB usually refers to “date of birth”, but I doubt if that’s relevant. Hmm. Nothing in the puzzle threw me nearly as much as your use of this word (if that’s what it is) … 😜. Please explain … 🤨.

    2. Aha! “Dubious” entries!

      (Or maybe a really obscure reference to the Doobie Brothers (a group I was barely aware of)? … 😜)

  2. Monday and had one Natick error: REY crosses PARBOIL. I had nEY crosses pANBOIL. Never attracted to Star Wars, preferring Lost in Space, esp, Jonathan Harris (Dr. Smith), villain and comedian.
    Otherwise, guessed at CESAR PELLI, ASPERA, NGO.

  3. I didn’t get the same puzzle as everyone else, apparently. Must be my local paper that messed up. No wonder it seemed a tad tricky for a Tuesday.

  4. 4:19

    The scrambled circles helped me figure out the theme clue, rather than the other way round.

    It’s neat to see BANTAM and SMALL to the left, and BOLSHOI (meaning “big”) on the right.

    Today, I too learned about CESARPELLI.

  5. 8 mins 56 sec, and DNF with eight fills left incomplete!! Not surprising, they’re all proper names or abbreviations that are not common knowledge. Just disgusted.

  6. The clue for MOON PIE is not an accurate description. I grew up in Chattanooga TN where Moon pies originally were produced. And the expression: an RC cola and a moon pie. You would need the cola to wash down the dry tasteless moon pie. I lived near the factory and only ever attempted to eat one. No second ever. Not a treat. Not marshmallowy.

  7. 12:39 with help on AMBOy/AyS. Methinks “eye” is how Shakespearean actors pronounce it, and I spell that as “aye” ala sailor talk. But, I’ve not perused a script, so cannot say how it’s written.

  8. Slightly tricky Tuesday for me; took 13:03 with no peeks and no errors. Snoozed about 3/4 of the way through a few times due to too few hours of sleep, which slowed my time a bit. Had to wait for a few crosses here and there like around CESARPELLI and ASPERA and GdP, which I quickly fixed. Theme mostly an afterthought.

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