LA Times Crossword 11 Dec 21, Saturday

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Constructed by: Beth Rubin & Brad Wilber
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: None

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 15m 12s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Some chocolate purchases : ASSORTMENTS

Chocolate is made from the seeds of the Theobroma cacao tree. The seeds are very bitter and the traditional drink made with the seed was called “xocolatl” by the Aztecs, meaning “bitter water”. Our word “chocolate” comes from “xocolatl”.

12 Inflation fig. : PSI

Pounds per square inch (PSI) is a measure of pressure.

15 Purveyor of fraudulent credentials : DIPLOMA MILL

A “diploma mill” or “degree mill” is a higher education institution that offers degrees and diplomas that aren’t really legitimate, and that can be obtained for a fee.

17 Hair, in many cases : DNA EVIDENCE

I’ve always been fascinated by the fact that the DNA of living things is so very similar across different species. Human DNA is almost exactly the same for every individual (to the degree of 99.9%). However, those small differences are sufficient to distinguish one individual from another, and to determine whether or not individuals are close family relatives.

18 Latin word in many academic mottos : LUX

“Lux” is a Latin word meaning “light”.

23 Pasture palindrome : EWE

The three most famous palindromes in English have to be:

  • Able was I ere I saw Elba
  • A man, a plan, a canal, Panama!
  • Madam, I’m Adam

One of my favorite terms is “Aibohphobia”, although it doesn’t appear in the dictionary and is a joke term. “Aibohphobia” is a great way to describe a fear of palindromes, by creating a palindrome out of the suffix “-phobia”.

24 Wouldn’t share : BOGARTED

“To bogart” is to bully, or it can mean to use without sharing. In the latter sense, a person using marijuana might “bogart a joint”, keeping it to himself or herself and not passing it around. The term is a reference to Hollywood actor Humphrey Bogart, who often played scenes with a cigarette dangling from his lips.

34 Official who sings in Hebrew : CANTOR

“Canto” is the Latin word for “singer”. In some religious traditions, a “cantor” is the person assigned to lead the singing of ecclesiastical music.

36 Leverage provider : CROWBAR

A crowbar is a wonderful tool, one that can be used to pry open things, and to remove nails. The claw at one or both ends of the tool aids in that nail removal, and it is likely this iron claw was said to resemble the claw of a crow, giving us the name “crowbar”. Back in Elizabethan times. the same tool was called an “iron crow”. There’s a line in Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” that reads “Get me an iron crow and bring it straight/Unto my cell.”

37 Where to find “Octopus’s Garden” on “Abbey Road” : SIDE ONE

“Octopus’s Garden” is a song released by the Beatles in 1969, one that was written and performed by drummer Ringo Starr. This was only Ringo’s second musical composition and he gets sole credit for the writing, even though it is well established that George Harrison gave him quite a bit of “help”. The idea for the song came to Ringo while he was on holiday with his family in Sardinia. The captain of the boat on which they were staying told Ringo that an octopus would spend its time traveling the seabed collecting shiny objects with which to make itself a garden. I don’t know how true that is, but Ringo seemed to find it inspiring.

The Abbey Road Studios in London was a large Georgian townhouse built in the 1830s. It became a recording studio in 1931, and you can even see some YouTube videos showing Sir Edward Elgar back then making recordings with the London symphony Orchestra. The studios passed through various owners and by the time the Beatles started their famous recording it was known as EMI Studios. The Beatles recorded practically all of their albums there, between 1962 and 1970. Famously they named a 1969 album after the studio, “Abbey Road”. That’s the one with the cover showing the Fab Four crossing the “zebra crossing” outside the studio.

38 Utah Jazz center Whiteside : HASSAN

Hassan Whiteside started his professional basketball career in 2010 when he was drafted by the Sacramento Kings. He has traveled quite a lot to play his chosen sport. In 2013-14, he played basketball for pro teams in Lebanon and in China.

The Utah Jazz professional basketball team moved to Salt Lake City in 1979. As one might guess from the name, the team originated in New Orleans, but only played there for five seasons. New Orleans was a tough place to be based because venues were hard to come by, and Mardi Gras forced the team to play on the road for a whole month.

40 Shakespearean last gasp : ET TU

It was Shakespeare who popularized the words “Et tu, Brute?” (meaning “And you, Brutus?”). They appear in his play “Julius Caesar”, although the phrase had been around long before he penned his drama. It’s not known what Julius Caesar actually said in real life (if anything at all) as he was assassinated on the steps of the Senate in Rome.

41 Neologists : COINERS

A neologism is a new word or phrase, or a new meaning or usage for an existing word.

43 Zoom frustrations : TIME LAGS

Zoom is a videoconferencing app that became remarkably popular in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic. The market deemed Zoom to be the easiest to use of the free videoconferencing apps. I’ve been using it, but really prefer Google’s Meet offering …

48 Love of collectibles : VIRTU

“Virtu” are objects of art or curios. The same term is used to describe an interest in and knowledge of such objects. The term comes from the Latin “virtus” meaning “virtue, goodness, manliness”. The idea is that “virtu” is an appreciation for the “goodness” of such art.

50 “__ Kapital” : DAS

“Das Kapital” (entitled “Capital” in English versions) is a book about political economy written by Karl Marx, first published in 1867. The book is in effect an analysis of capitalism, and proffers the opinion that capitalism relies on the exploitation of workers. Marx concludes that the profits from capitalist concerns come from the underpaying of labor.

53 Brown or Rice ending : EDU

Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island is one of the eight Ivy League schools. Brown has been around a long time, founded in 1764, years before America declared independence from England. The university took the name of Brown in 1804 after one Nicholas Brown, Jr. gave a substantial gift to the school. The school’s athletic teams are known as the Brown Bears, and their mascot is Bruno.

Rice University is a private school in Houston, Texas. William Marsh Rice had made a will endowing the funds for the establishment of the school at the time of his death. When he was found dead one morning in his bed, his lawyer announced that his will had been changed, with the bulk of Rice’s estate actually going to the lawyer making the announcement. Upon investigation, it was discovered that the lawyer had paid Rice’s valet to murder his employer using chloroform and a fake will was written. Eventually, the original will was deemed valid and the funds were disbursed so that the school could be built.

54 ’90s-’00s HBO series with lots of therapy sessions : THE SOPRANOS

“The Sopranos” is an outstanding television drama made by HBO that is a story about Italian-American mobsters in New Jersey. “The Sopranos” is regularly cited as one of the best TV series of all time. It’s “must see TV” …

58 Impresario’s contact : TALENT AGENT

An impresario is a stage-art equivalent of television or movie producer. He or she organizes and perhaps finances concerts, plays and operas.

59 Hibachi waste : ASH

The traditional hibachi in Japan is a heating device, often a ceramic bowl or box that holds burning charcoal. This native type of hibachi isn’t used for cooking, but rather as a space heater (a brazier). Here in the US we use the term hibachi to refer to a charcoal grill used as a small cooking stove, which in Japanese would be called a “shichirin”. “Hibachi” is Japanese for “fire pot” coming from “hi” meaning “fire”, and “bachi” meaning “bowl, pot”.

Down

2 Power cord? : SINEW

“Sinew” is another name for “tendon”. Tendons are bands of collagen that connect muscle to bone. Tendons are similar to ligaments and fasciae, which are also connective tissue made out of collagen, but ligaments join bone to bone, and fasciae connect muscle to muscle. We also use the term “sinew” to mean muscular power.

3 Club relative : SPADE

In most trick-taking games, especially bridge, the suits are ranked from highest to lowest, i.e. spades, hearts, diamonds and clubs.

4 First name in film designers : OLEG

French-born American fashion designer Oleg Cassini developed a reputation for designing costumes for films, and dressing numerous film stars. He had two big names particularly associated with his designs. In the sixties he produced the state wardrobe for First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy. He was also the exclusive designer for Hollywood’s Gene Tierney, who was Cassini’s second wife.

6 “Eww! Say no more!” : TMI!

Too much information (TMI)

10 “I Am Jazz” cable channel : TLC

The cable channel TLC started out life as The Learning Channel. Programming on TLC originally focused on educational content, but today there is an emphasis on reality television.

“I Am Jazz” is a reality show centered on transgender woman Jazz Jennings.

13 __-chef : SOUS

The “sous-chef de cuisine” (a French term) is the “under-chef of the kitchen”, the second-in-command.

14 “Need You Tonight” band : INXS

INXS (pronounced “in excess”) was a rock band from Australia. The band formed in 1977 in Sydney as the Farriss Brothers, as three of the original lineups were indeed brothers.

26 Premise in many John Grisham novels : LAWSUIT

John Grisham is a lawyer and an incredibly successful author best known for his legal thrillers. After graduating from law school, Grisham practiced law for about ten years and then went into politics. He served in the Mississippi House of Representatives for six years, during which time he wrote his first novel, “A Time to Kill”.

27 Idris of “The Jungle Book” : ELBA

English actor Idris Elba plays the drug lord Stringer Bell in the marvelous HBO drama series “The Wire”, and played the title character in the 2013 film “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom”. Off the screen, Elba occasionally appears as a disk jockey using the name “DJ Big Driis”.

“The Jungle Book” is a 2016, live-action Disney film based on Rudyard Kipling’s collection of stories with the same title. The impressive voice cast includes Bill Murray as Baloo, Ben Kingsley as Bagheera, Idris Elba as Shere Khan, Scarlett Johnsson as Kaa, and Christopher Walkenb as King Louis. The film was a big success, and for a while held the record for the most successful remake of all time (it was a remake of the 1967 animated feature “The Jungle Book”).

29 Actress Gaye of “Ali” : NONA

Actress Nona Gaye is best known for playing the character Zee in the last two of “The Matrix” series of films. Nona is the only daughter of singer Marvin Gaye.

“Ali” is a 2001 biographical movie about Muhammad Ali, with Will Smith in the title role. Among other things, the film is noted for its realistic fight scenes. The scenes were realistic because Smith was really being hit, as hard as his opponents could manage.

30 Novelist Iles : GREG

Author Greg Iles was born in Germany but raised in Mississippi, where many of his novels are set.

31 Reason to call a chiropractor : ACHE

Chiropractic is a type of alternative medicine that largely involves the adjustment of the spinal column. The term “chiropractic” was coined in the US in the late 1800s and comes from the Latinized Greek “chiro-” meaning “hand” and “praktikos” meaning “practical”.

32 Nit, to a Brit : PRAT

“Prat” is a slang term for the buttocks. A “prat-fall” is when someone falls and lands on the buttocks. The term “prat” is also British slang for “contemptible person”.

33 Like a situation in which emotional persuasion trumps factual accuracy : POST TRUTH

The term “post-truth” was coined by playwright Steve Tesich in an essay in “The Nation”. Referencing Watergate, Iran-Contra and the Persian Gulf War, Tesich said “we, as a free people, have freely decided that we want to live in some post-truth world.” The derivative phrase “post-truth era” was introduced by author Ralph Keyes when he used it for the title of a 2004 book “The Post-Truth Era: Dishonesty and Deception in Contemporary Life”.

35 Purim month : ADAR

Adar is the twelfth month of the Hebrew ecclesiastical calendar. Adar is equivalent to February-March in the Gregorian calendar.

Purim is a festival commemorating the deliverance of the Jewish people from a plot to wipe them out by Haman the Agagite, as recorded in the Book of Esther.

37 Voice used for “Humpty Dumpty,” say : SING-SONG

Humpty Dumpty is a character in a nursery rhyme. He is usually depicted as an egg, although that isn’t specifically called out in the original rhyme:

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall,
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall.
All the king’s horses and all the king’s men
Couldn’t put Humpty together again.

39 Crime novelist Carl : HIAASEN

Carl Hiaasen is an investigative journalist, columnist and novelist from Fort Lauderdale, Florida who works for the “Miami Herald”.

42 Yale sobriquet : OLD ELI

Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut was founded in 1701, making it the third-oldest university in the US. Originally called the Collegiate School, it was renamed to Yale University in honor of retired merchant Elihu Yale, who made generous contributions to the institution. Yale University’s nickname is “Old Eli”, in a nod to the benefactor.

A sobriquet is an affectionate nickname. The term “sobriquet” is French, in which language it has the same meaning.

44 Crosses at obedience school? : MUTTS

The original use of the term “mutt” was for a foolish person, and was probably short for “muttonhead”. The usage evolved into today’s “mongrel dog”.

45 “Rouen Cathedral” painter : MONET

French artist Claude Monet was one of the founders of the Impressionist movement, and indeed the term “Impressionism” comes from the title of his 1872 painting “Impression, Sunrise”. That work depicts the port of Le Havre, which was Monet’s hometown. Later in his life, Monet purchased a house in Giverny, and famously installed lily ponds and a Japanese bridge in the property’s extensive gardens. He spent two decades painting the water lily ponds, producing his most famous works. I was fortunate enough to visit Monet’s house and gardens in Giverny a few years ago. A beautiful place …

Impressionist Claude Monet produced a series of paintings of Rouen Cathedral in the 1890s. Famously, Monet painted the same subject at varying times of the day and times of the year, with the intention of recording the changes in appearance with differing light. He produced over thirty such paintings of Rouen Cathedral over a two-year period, resulting in one of the artist’s most famous and prized series of works.

46 Thinning layer : OZONE

Ozone gets its name from the Greek word “ozein” meaning “to smell”. It was given this name as ozone’s formation during lightning storms was detected by the gas’s distinctive smell. Famously, there is a relatively high concentration of the gas in the “ozone layer” in the Earth’s stratosphere. This ozone layer provides a vital function for animal life on the planet as it absorbs most of the sun’s UV radiation. A molecule of ozone is made up of three oxygen atoms (O3), whereas a “normal” oxygen (O2) has just two atoms.

48 Chevy named for a star : VEGA

Vega is the brightest star in the constellation Lyra. Vega (along with Altair and Deneb from other constellations) is also part of the group of three stars that is called the Summer Triangle. Vega is the star at the right-angle of said triangle.

The Chevrolet Vega is a small car that was produced by GM in the seventies. The Vega was much lauded at its launch but was plagued by problems with its engineering, reliability and safety.

49 When 40-Across was spoken : IDES
(40A Shakespearean last gasp : ET TU)

In Act I of William Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar”, a soothsayer warns the doomed leader to “beware the ides of March”. Caesar ignores the prophecy and is subsequently killed on the steps of the Capitol by a group of conspirators on that fateful day.

52 Sitar sequence : RAGA

Raga isn’t really a genre of music, but has been described as the “tonal framework” in which Indian classical music is composed. Ravi Shankar was perhaps the most famous raga virtuoso (to us Westerners). Western rock music with a heavy Indian influence might be called raga rock.

The sitar has been around since the Middle Ages. It is a stringed instrument that is played by plucking, and is used most often in Hindustani classical music. In the West we have been exposed to the instrument largely through the performances of Ravi Shankar and some music by George Harrison of the Beatles, a onetime student of Shankar.

56 NBA stat : PTS

Points (pts.)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Some chocolate purchases : ASSORTMENTS
12 Inflation fig. : PSI
15 Purveyor of fraudulent credentials : DIPLOMA MILL
16 Bit of positivity? : ION
17 Hair, in many cases : DNA EVIDENCE
18 Latin word in many academic mottos : LUX
19 Climber’s rest stop : LEDGE
20 Poetic indicator of relative time : ERE
21 Juice extractor : PRESS
23 Pasture palindrome : EWE
24 Wouldn’t share : BOGARTED
26 Imperious dismissal : LEAVE ME!
28 Surfboard damage : DING
31 Shocked big-time : APPALLED
34 Official who sings in Hebrew : CANTOR
36 Leverage provider : CROWBAR
37 Where to find “Octopus’s Garden” on “Abbey Road” : SIDE ONE
38 Utah Jazz center Whiteside : HASSAN
39 Ran into trouble : HIT A SNAG
40 Shakespearean last gasp : ET TU
41 Neologists : COINERS
43 Zoom frustrations : TIME LAGS
45 __ rule : MOB
48 Love of collectibles : VIRTU
50 “__ Kapital” : DAS
51 Succumbed to stage fright : FROZE
53 Brown or Rice ending : EDU
54 ’90s-’00s HBO series with lots of therapy sessions : THE SOPRANOS
57 Comprehend : GET
58 Impresario’s contact : TALENT AGENT
59 Hibachi waste : ASH
60 Election focuses : SWING STATES

Down

1 Disorient : ADDLE
2 Power cord? : SINEW
3 Club relative : SPADE
4 First name in film designers : OLEG
5 Wander : ROVE
6 “Eww! Say no more!” : TMI!
7 Redesigned : MADE OVER
8 Popped up : EMERGED
9 Common starting hr. : NINE AM
10 “I Am Jazz” cable channel : TLC
11 Took a day to consider, with “on” : SLEPT …
12 Faulted to excess : PILED IT ON
13 __-chef : SOUS
14 “Need You Tonight” band : INXS
22 Dermatological symptom : REDNESS
24 Yoga asset : BALANCE
25 Reels off : RECITES
26 Premise in many John Grisham novels : LAWSUIT
27 Idris of “The Jungle Book” : ELBA
29 Actress Gaye of “Ali” : NONA
30 Novelist Iles : GREG
31 Reason to call a chiropractor : ACHE
32 Nit, to a Brit : PRAT
33 Like a situation in which emotional persuasion trumps factual accuracy : POST TRUTH
35 Purim month : ADAR
37 Voice used for “Humpty Dumpty,” say : SING-SONG
39 Crime novelist Carl : HIAASEN
42 Yale sobriquet : OLD ELI
44 Crosses at obedience school? : MUTTS
45 “Rouen Cathedral” painter : MONET
46 Thinning layer : OZONE
47 Tops : BESTS
48 Chevy named for a star : VEGA
49 When 40-Across was spoken : IDES
51 Alpha Phi Alpha, e.g. : FRAT
52 Sitar sequence : RAGA
55 Hem partner : HAW
56 NBA stat : PTS

28 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 11 Dec 21, Saturday”

    1. I thought about this more and something a little more removed: I’ve mentioned before that a lot of these Saturday puzzles are likely NYT rejects. But one of these setters here happens to run a weekly themeless crossword contest meant for non-casual solvers. I have to wonder if this had a former life in that contest. So in that sense, it probably wasn’t meant for a general audience at all, especially the average LAT audience. But definitely I know a number of these puzzles that show up are more meant for complete experts (which I am not) than casual solvers. So not always something to feel too bad about if you can’t manage some of these that show up here.

  1. too tough for me… got stuck in several places.. had to do 3 lookups. so DNF…
    words that threw me for a loop VIRTU RAGA SINGSONG BOGARTED POSTTRUTH

    i should have known BOGARTED but that’s after the fact.

    then TALENT AGENT had me going in circles. Had TALENT at the end for a long time. i guess that was the crossword constructors goal.. get turned around..

    Had SLEEP for a long time on 11D and INXE on 14D and then i was stuck with EVAPE for 21A when it was supposed to be PRESS.. boy , was i off…..

    instead of POSTTRUTH (which i’ve never heard of) i had WENT SOUTH for a long time.. thought VIOLA was rare enough? Nope, VIRTU is more “collectible”. i was way off on that section for a long time.

      1. Bill is one of those “very obscure people”
        apparently 😂 I’m new to this blog too
        but as far as I have gathered Bill is the
        Irish gentleman who wakes up early,does
        the puzzle really fast (without errors) and
        throws all this information together for
        us in the wee hours….

        Thank you Bill!

  2. I really enjoyed solving this puzzle although it called for a few lookups…and
    a lot of good guesses. I had never heard of “Bogarted” it was used for this
    puzzle or “prat” for nit…still don’t understand that one. No errors at the
    end. Have a great weekend everybody.

  3. 15:14, which felt like 30:28

    Lots of “what?”, “who?”, and “really?” in this one. The one that bugs me the most is “thinning” OZONE. I thought that trend was reversed twenty years ago, considering that the fight to close the ozone zone is often cited as a rare success of international science and cooperation.

    1. I agree. Wikipedia says … These concerns led to the adoption of the Montreal Protocol in 1987, which bans the production of CFCs, halons, and other ozone-depleting chemicals.

      The ban came into effect in 1989. Ozone levels stabilized by the mid-1990s and began to recover in the 2000s, as the shifting of the jet stream in the southern hemisphere towards the south pole has stopped and might even be reversing.[4] Recovery is projected to continue over the next century, and the ozone hole is expected to reach pre-1980 levels by around 2075.[5] In 2019, NASA reported that the ozone hole was the smallest ever since it was first discovered in 1982.[6][7]

  4. LAT: Almost too tough a puzzle. Kept at it for way too long, “finished” it but with several letter errors because I never heard of the answers. Prat, virtu, Hassan, Greg (I thought the clue was Novelist lies instead of Iles) are just a few of the many obscure ones.

  5. When Bill took 15 minutes plus I knew I was in trouble….Hiaasen had to fill in and still didn’t look right WOW!!!!

    1. I first ran into Carl Hiaasen when I read “Hoot” with my then preteen son. Then I read an adult fiction, “Skinny Dip”. He has an unusual sense of humour!

  6. I agree with those who felt that the constructors were more into obscurity and misdirection than in providing us a challenging but intelligent puzzle. The time/enjoyment ratio is really warped on this one.

  7. Flubbed the timer and didn’t turn it on, so… untimed. Doesn’t matter anyway, as this was a DNF, with 6 fills unsolved. Too much precious, forced clue phrasing and esoterica like VIRTU, COINERS (and with that “clue”, come ON!), and then, for good measure, fully ruined with a bunch of barely known names. Terrible, terrible puzzle.

  8. Hit a snag on Hiaasen 3 vowels in a row,wow. Otherwise good challenging puzzle. Gotta love the use of “Bogarted” 😂
    No look ups, one error…..

  9. Another 2 setter Saturday puzzle and another DNF…I guess somebody is trying to tell me something and I’m just too stubborn to see it.
    Stay safe😀

  10. Had a good belly laugh at the answer to 24 across when it remined me of that old song with the lyrics, “Dont Bogart that joint, my friend….. Pass it over to me.”

  11. 17:38, no errors, and I guessed correctly that the puzzle would not be a popular one. I did find it pretty thoughtful. VIRTU was new to me, as were HASSAN Whiteside, NONA Gaye, and GREG Iles, but crosses came to my rescue. A Saturday puzzle, to be sure.

    And, just to demonstrate that I can be a harsh critic: Many years ago, at Iowa State University, one of the professors there was a man named Richard E. Robinson. He is now a well-thought-of professor emeritus (of philosophy) at the University of British Columbia and he has recently written a couple of sci-fi novels – one called “37” and another called “37-130”. I found out about them a year ago and recently spent $28.26 on paperback versions from Amazon. If you have a chance to do the same … run … run like the wind! They are written in a way that would get poor marks in a grade school setting. They are awful! Laughably so! The only consideration that prevents me from posting savage reviews of them on Amazon is the compassionate thought that his incompetence in this endeavor may be the result of senility. So, be forewarned … 😳.

  12. Bless Bill, Glenn, Mary S, Nolanski, Pam etal – you people are good!

    Way too tough for a newbie, even with cheats.

    @Glenn – thanks for your comments, takes some of the bite out of it.

    @Jack – I sometimes feel the same way – but then there’s always Monday!

    Be Well

    1. I find it hard to find diplomatic ways to comment on difficulty and explain what is going on, and I’m sure I’m probably wrong on some point somewhere up above, and if I am I apologize to whoever is reading. But all I can really say is the difficulty on LAT Saturday varies pretty wildly lately and often has been featuring things in some cases (LAT Nov 6 comes to mind, which easily is a good example of a typical Newsday Saturday Stumper) that are easily considered as challenges for expert solvers. I almost write on some of these comments something like “if you just solved this you did very well”. I’ll definitely say on this one. If you solved it without help, you rock!

  13. A tough one at 36:46 with no errors or lookups. Like others who commented, there were several clues that I had no reference for: HASSAN, HIASSEN, VIRTU, COINERS, SIDEONE, NONA Gaye, GREG Iles, RAGA. Also, several clues had non-specific context, such as “chocolate purchases,” “fraudulent credentials,” “Shocked,” “Hair,” “Leverage.”

    However, after cogitating and guessing in several places, things started to reveal themselves. Just took a while to get through them all.

  14. Very tough Saturday for me; took 56:29 with, I think 3 or 4 “check-grids,” to get things moving. I actually had the bottom, middle W and NE corner on my own, plus smatterings of the NW and middle E. Once I got SINEW and TLC the NW fell, and NONA, GREG and the “H” from HIAASEN for the middle E. I really knew COINERS, just not when I was doing the puzzle… 🙂

    I too thought of Easy Rider, my second most watched movie, when I saw BOGARTED 🙂
    Didn’t know the band name: Fraternity of Man

    https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&q=don%27t+bogart+that+joint+my+friend+easy+rider

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