LA Times Crossword 13 Jan 22, Thursday

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Constructed by: George Jasper
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Gate Change

Themed answers each include the letter sequence “GATE”, but with the order CHANGED:

  • 56A Airport annoyance, and a literal hint to the answers to starred clues : GATE CHANGE
  • 17A *It’s hard to put down : PAGE-TURNER
  • 23A *Bond, for one : SECRET AGENT
  • 36A *One of about 50 orbiting the Milky Way : SATELLITE GALAXY
  • 47A *Put the pedal to the metal : GO GREAT GUNS

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 7m 07s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Assurance on some menus : NO MSG

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the sodium salt of a naturally-occurring,non-essential amino acid called glutamic acid. It is used widely as a flavor enhancer, particularly in many Asian cuisines. Whether or not it is harmful seems to be still under debate. I say that something produced in a test tube shouldn’t be in our food …

10 Crawled? : SWAM

The front crawl swimming stroke is also known as the Australian crawl or American crawl. It is the fastest of the front strokes, and is invariably used for freestyle competition, in which competitors can choose any stroke. As such, the front crawl is often referred to as “freestyle”.

15 Outback option : RARE

Outback Steakhouse is a chain of restaurants that was established in 1987, with the first Outback opening in Tampa, Florida. Outback serves largely American food in an Australian-themed dining locale.

16 Head light : HALO

The Greek word “halos” is the name given to the ring of light around the sun or moon, which gives us our word “halo” that is used for a radiant light depicted above the head of a saintly person.

20 Middle of Cannes? : ENS

The middle of the word “Cannes” is a pair of letters N (ens).

23 *Bond, for one : SECRET AGENT

The character James Bond was the creation of writer Ian Fleming. Fleming “stole” the James Bond name from an American ornithologist. The number “007” was “stolen” from the real-life, 16th-century English spy named John Dee. Dee would sign his reports to Queen Elizabeth I with a stylized “007” to indicate that the reports were for “her eyes only”. There’s an entertaining miniseries that aired on BBC America called “Fleming: The Man Who Would Be Bond” that details Ian Fleming’s military career, and draws some nice parallels between Fleming’s experiences and aspirations and those of his hero James Bond. Recommended …

31 Low point : NADIR

The nadir is the direction pointing immediately below a particular location (through to the other side of the Earth for example). The opposite direction, that pointing immediately above, is called the zenith. We use the terms “nadir” and “zenith” figuratively to mean the low and high points in a person’s fortunes.

36 *One of about 50 orbiting the Milky Way : SATELLITE GALAXY

Our galaxy, the Milky Way, is of such a size that about fifty smaller galaxies orbit it. In a sense, this system of gravitationally bound galaxies is analogous to the planets of our solar system orbiting the Sun. The orbiting galaxies are referred to as satellite galaxies, and the Milky Way as the primary galaxy.

42 Qwirkle piece : TILE

Qwirkle is a game in which one must place tiles on a board, and so has some similarity with Scrabble. It was introduced by MindWare in 2006. I’ve never played, but it sounds like a lot of fun to me …

43 Colonial diplomat Silas : DEANE

Silas Deane was a member of the Continental Congress. When Deane was dispatched to Paris by the Congress, he became America’s first foreign diplomat. His amazing story is told in Joel Richard Paul’s book titled “Unlikely Allies”.

45 Julia of “Ozark” : GARNER

Actress Julia Garner is perhaps best known for playing the very strong female character Ruth Langmore in the excellent TV drama “Ozark”. I also remember her from “The Americans” and “Dirty John”, two more excellent drama shows on television.

50 Toyota since 1982 : CAMRY

The Toyota Camry takes its name from the Japanese word for “crown”. Toyota management likes the idea of naming their cars after the word “crown”, as they did with the Toyota Crown, followed by the Toyota Corona (Latin for “crown”) and the Toyota Corolla (Latin for “small crown”).

51 31-Down competitor : OLAY
(31D Skin care brand : NIVEA)

Oil of Olay was developed in South Africa in 1952. When Oil of Olay was introduced internationally, it was given slightly different brand names designed to appeal in the different geographies. In Ireland we know it as Oil of Ulay, for example, and in France it is Oil of Olaz.

52 Anthem author : KEY

Here are the words (and punctuation) of the poem “The Star-Spangled Banner” penned by Francis Scott Key in 1814:

O say can you see, by the dawn’s early light,
What so proudly we hail’d at the twilight’s last gleaming,
Whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous fight
O’er the ramparts we watch’d were so gallantly streaming?
And the rocket’s red glare, the bomb bursting in air,
Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there,
O say does that star-spangled banner yet wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

On the shore dimly seen through the mists of the deep
Where the foe’s haughty host in dread silence reposes,
What is that which the breeze, o’er the towering steep,
As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?
Now it catches the gleam of the morning’s first beam,
In full glory reflected now shines in the stream,
Tis the star-spangled banner – O long may it wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

And where is that band who so vauntingly swore,
That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion
A home and a Country should leave us no more?
Their blood has wash’d out their foul footstep’s pollution.
No refuge could save the hireling and slave
From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave,
And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

O thus be it ever when freemen shall stand
Between their lov’d home and the war’s desolation!
Blest with vict’ry and peace may the heav’n rescued land
Praise the power that hath made and preserv’d us a nation!
Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,
And this be our motto – “In God is our trust,”
And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

55 Component of 53-Down : OBIE
(53D Showbiz “grand slam” acronym : EGOT)

The Obies are the Off-Broadway Theater Awards. The Obies have been presented annually since 1956. The recipients used to be chosen by “The Village Voice” newspaper, but now are jointly administered with the American Theatre Wing.

59 Slips on : DONS

One doffs one’s hat, usually as a mark of respect. To doff is to take off, with “doff” being a contraction of “do off”. The opposite of “doff” is “don”, meaning “to put on”.

60 Appearance : MIEN

One’s mien is one’s bearing or manner. “Mien” shares the same etymological root as our word “demeanor”.

61 Bagel flavor : ONION

The bagel was invented in the Polish city of Kraków in the 16th century. Bagels were brought to this country by Jewish immigrants from Poland who mainly established homes in and around New York City.

62 Genesis grandson : ENOS

Enos was the son of Seth, and therefore the grandson of Adam and Eve, and nephew of Cain and Abel. According to the ancient Jewish work called the Book of Jubilees, Enos married his own sister Noam.

63 Shaw’s “__ and the Man” : ARMS

“Arms and the Man” is a play by George Bernard Shaw, a comedy that was first staged in 1894 in London. Shaw came up with the title from the opening words of Virgil’s “Aeneid”, which translates as “Of arms and man I sing”.

George Bernard Shaw (GBS) was a very successful Irish playwright. Shaw is the only person to have been awarded both a Nobel Prize for Literature, and an Oscar. He won his Oscar for adapting his own play “Pygmalion” for the 1938 film of the same name starring Leslie Howard and Wendy Hiller. Most people are more likely to have seen the musical adaptation of “Pygmalion” that goes by the title “My Fair Lady”.

64 Units of power : WATTS

James Watt was a Scottish inventor. He figured prominently in the Industrial Revolution in Britain, largely due to the improvements he made to the fledgling steam engine. The SI unit of power is called the watt, and was named in his honor.

Down

2 Algerian coastal city : ORAN

Oran lies on the Algerian coast, and is famous for being the port where the French Navy was largely destroyed by the British during WWII in order to avoid the French vessels falling into the hands of Nazi Germany after France surrendered. This decisive and unexpected unilateral action by the British sent a very strong message around the world that Britain was willing to fight alone against the axis powers if necessary.

3 Time and Money, briefly : MAGS

“Time” magazine was first published in 1923 in New York City, making it the nation’s first weekly news magazine.

“Money” magazine is a sister publication of “Time”, and focuses on personal finance.

4 Abbr. in some vineyard names : STE

“Sainte” (ste.) is French for “saint”, when referring to a “femme” (woman).

7 Italy’s “Supreme Poet” : DANTE

Dante Alighieri, the Italian poet famous for writing his “Divine Comedy”, is known in his native Italy as “the Supreme Poet” (il Sommo Poeta), or simply “il Poeta”.

8 Titled rapper : DRE

“Dr. Dre” is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. Dr. Dre is known for his own singing career as well as for producing records and starting the careers of others such as Snoop Dogg, Eminem and 50 Cent.

9 “__ Blues”: “White Album” track : YER

“Yer Blues” is a John Lennon song, credited to Lennon and McCartney, that is a track on “The White Album”, recorded in 1968. Lennon recorded the song while the band was on retreat in Rishikesh, India, and while Lennon was “trying to reach God and feeling suicidal”.

13 Rock’s Depeche __ : MODE

Depeche Mode is an electronic music band from England that formed in 1980. Apparently, Depeche Mode are the most successful electronic music band ever. The band’s name is the title of a French fashion magazine “Dépêche mode”, which translates as “Fashion Update”.

18 Lines at the checkout counter? : UPCS

The initialism “UPC” stands for Universal Price Code or Universal Product Code. The first ever UPC-marked item to get scanned in a store was on June 26, 1974 at 08:01 a.m. at Marsh’s supermarket in Troy, Ohio. It was a 10-pack of Wrigley’s Juicy Fruit chewing gum.

22 Greek marketplace : AGORA

In early Greece, an agora was a place of assembly. The assemblies held there were often quite formal, perhaps for the reading of a proclamation. Later in Greek history, things became less formal as the agora evolved into a marketplace. Our contemporary word “agoraphobia” comes from these agorae, in the sense that an agoraphobe has a fear of open spaces, a fear of “public meeting places”.

24 Oceans’ motions : TIDES

Tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon on the oceans. At neap tide, the smaller gravitational effect of the sun cancels out some of the moon’s effect. At spring tide, the sun and the moon’s gravitational forces act in concert causing more extreme movement of the oceans.

25 Sacha Baron Cohen persona : ALI G

“Da Ali G Show” is a satirical TV series featuring English comedian Sacha Baron Cohen. I wouldn’t be a big fan …

26 Rae of “Insecure” : ISSA

Issa Rae is a Stanford University graduate who created a YouTube web series called “The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl”. Rae also plays the title role in the series, a young lady named “J”. “Awkward Black Girl” was adapted into an HBO comedy-drama called “Insecure”, in which Issa Rae stars.

27 Christmas poem opener : ‘TWAS

The poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas” was published anonymously in 1823, and is better known today by its first line “‘Twas the night before Christmas”. Most scholars believe that the poem was written by Clement Clarke Moore, a theologian from New York City. Others say that it was written by Henry Livingston, Jr., a poet from Upstate New York.

28 Inaugural Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee : FATS DOMINO

Antoine “Fats” Domino was born and raised in New Orleans, with Creole as his first language. He made it into the big time in 1949 when he recorded an early rock and roll record called “The Fat Man”. That record sold over a million copies, the first rock and roll record to achieve that milestone.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame can be visited on the shores of Lake Erie in Cleveland, Ohio. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation was created in 1983 and started inducting artists in 1986. The Foundation didn’t get a home until the museum was dedicated in Cleveland in 1995. I had the great privilege of visiting the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame some years ago and really enjoyed myself. The magnificent building was designed by famed architect I. M. Pei.

31 Skin care brand : NIVEA

Nivea is a brand name of skin-care products from Germany. The Latin word “nivea” means “snow-white”.

35 One skilled at giving hints? : DYER

That would be a “hint” of color.

37 “Rescue Me” actor Denis : LEARY

Actor Denis Leary started his career as a standup comedian working in Boston. One of his more famous roles on the big screen was Detective Michael McCann in the 1999 version of “The Thomas Crown Affair”. On the small screen, Leary was co-creator and star of “Rescue Me”, a comedy drama about New York City firefighters that ran from 2004 till 2011.

“Rescue Me” is a television drama made for the FX Network. Star of the show is Denis Leary who plays a veteran New York City firefighter.

39 USPS deliveries : LTRS

Letter (ltr.)

The US Postal Service (USPS) is a remarkable agency in many ways. For starters, the government’s right and responsibility to establish the Post Office is specifically called out in Article One of the US constitution. Also, the first postmaster general was none other than Benjamin Franklin. And, the USPS operates over 200,000 vehicles, which is the largest vehicle fleet in the world.

45 Short dip? : GUAC

Guacamole is one of my favorite dishes. It is prepared by mashing avocados and perhaps adding the likes of tomato, onion and lime juice. The guacamole recipe dates back as early as the 16th century, to the time of the Aztecs. “Guacamole” translates as “avocado sauce”.

47 Cameroon neighbor : GABON

The nation of Gabon lies on the west coast of Central Africa. Since it became independent from France in 1960, Gabon has become one of the most prosperous countries on the continent, by making use of the abundant natural resources and willing foreign investment.

The Republic of Cameroon is on the west coast of Africa. One of Cameroon’s claims to fame is having a great national soccer team, one that often seems to do well in the FIFA World Cup.

48 __ pole : TOTEM

“Totem” is a word used to describe any entity that watches over a group of people. As such, totems are usually the subjects of worship. Totem poles are really misnamed, as they are not intended to represent figures to be worshiped, but rather are heraldic in nature, and often celebrating the legends or notable events in the history of a tribe.

53 Showbiz “grand slam” acronym : EGOT

The acronym “EGOT” stands for “Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, Tony”, and is a reference to performers who have won all four awards. Also known as the “Showbiz Award Grand Slam”, there are relatively few individuals who have been so honored. The first five to do so were:

  1. Richard Rodgers in 1962
  2. Helen Hayes in 1977
  3. Rita Moreno in 1977
  4. John Gielgud in 1991
  5. Audrey Hepburn in 1994 (posthumously)

54 Itches : YENS

The word “yen”, meaning “urge”, has been around in English since the very early 1900s. It comes from the earlier word “yin” imported from Chinese, which was used in English to describe an intense craving for opium.

56 Morning TV fare, initially : GMA

“Good Morning America” (GMA) is ABC’s morning show, and has been since 1975. There was even a spin-off show called “Good Afternoon America”, although that only lasted for a few months in 2012.

57 Word before France or Jordan : AIR …

Air France is my favorite airline (okay … after Aer Lingus, the Irish airline). I used to fly Air France a lot (I lived in France for a while), but haven’t done so since the company merged with KLM in 2004. Back in 2008, Air France-KLM was the world’s largest airline in terms of revenue.

Air Jordan is a Nike brand of shoe (and other apparel) endorsed by NBA great Michael Jordan. The silhouette of a basketball player that features on Air Jordans is known as the “Jumpman” logo.

58 CNN anchor Cabrera : ANA

Ana Cabrera is a journalist from Denver who joined CNN in 2013. She took over as anchor of CNN’s weekend show “CNN Newsroom” in 2017.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Assurance on some menus : NO MSG
6 Current event : EDDY
10 Crawled? : SWAM
14 Have the floor : ORATE
15 Outback option : RARE
16 Head light : HALO
17 *It’s hard to put down : PAGE-TURNER
19 Like much cheese : AGED
20 Middle of Cannes? : ENS
21 Lend, informally, as money : SPOT
22 Think the world of : ADORE
23 *Bond, for one : SECRET AGENT
26 Clothing buyer’s pleased words : IT FITS
29 Also-ran’s terse summary : I LOST
30 Buzzer beater? : SWAT
31 Low point : NADIR
33 “Awesome, dude!” : RAD!
36 *One of about 50 orbiting the Milky Way : SATELLITE GALAXY
40 Saddlebag carrier : ASS
41 Roof features : EAVES
42 Qwirkle piece : TILE
43 Colonial diplomat Silas : DEANE
45 Julia of “Ozark” : GARNER
47 *Put the pedal to the metal : GO GREAT GUNS
50 Toyota since 1982 : CAMRY
51 31-Down competitor : OLAY
52 Anthem author : KEY
55 Component of 53-Down : OBIE
56 Airport annoyance, and a literal hint to the answers to starred clues : GATE CHANGE
59 Slips on : DONS
60 Appearance : MIEN
61 Bagel flavor : ONION
62 Genesis grandson : ENOS
63 Shaw’s “__ and the Man” : ARMS
64 Units of power : WATTS

Down

1 “Don’t think so” : NOPE
2 Algerian coastal city : ORAN
3 Time and Money, briefly : MAGS
4 Abbr. in some vineyard names : STE
5 Prepare : GET SET
6 Catcher’s interference is charged as one in baseball : ERROR
7 Italy’s “Supreme Poet” : DANTE
8 Titled rapper : DRE
9 “__ Blues”: “White Album” track : YER
10 Nuances : SHADES
11 Old West traveling group : WAGON TRAIN
12 Warn : ALERT
13 Rock’s Depeche __ : MODE
18 Lines at the checkout counter? : UPCS
22 Greek marketplace : AGORA
23 Something to build on : SITE
24 Oceans’ motions : TIDES
25 Sacha Baron Cohen persona : ALI G
26 Rae of “Insecure” : ISSA
27 Christmas poem opener : ‘TWAS
28 Inaugural Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee : FATS DOMINO
31 Skin care brand : NIVEA
32 Bolted down : ATE
34 Bridge toll unit : AXLE
35 One skilled at giving hints? : DYER
37 “Rescue Me” actor Denis : LEARY
38 Road division : LANE
39 USPS deliveries : LTRS
44 Way out : EGRESS
45 Short dip? : GUAC
46 “As I was saying … ” : ANYHOW …
47 Cameroon neighbor : GABON
48 __ pole : TOTEM
49 Secluded locations : GLENS
50 Airport ID, e.g. : CODE
52 Heal, in a way : KNIT
53 Showbiz “grand slam” acronym : EGOT
54 Itches : YENS
56 Morning TV fare, initially : GMA
57 Word before France or Jordan : AIR …
58 CNN anchor Cabrera : ANA

47 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 13 Jan 22, Thursday”

      1. I have never seen this substitution before, and I must insist that it does not make sense. What makes being an EGOT as impressive as it is is that it marks success in four different fields of show business: television (Emmy), recording (Grammy), films (Oscar), and theater (Tony). If one dumps the Oscar and replaces it with the Obie (given for work done off-Broadway), then film is no longer represented, and theater is represented twice. Either the O or the T is now redundant–one might as well simply use the term EGO.

      2. Nope! Show me any reference of EGOT including Obie. The ‘O’ always refers to Oscar. It would be laughable to replace the most visible and celebrated award in show business for an off-broadway award. Makes no sense whatsoever.

      3. Disagree. Would you accept GOAT standing for “Goofiest of all time”. Or SCUBA standing for South Coast Urban Bartenders Assoc.? EGOT stands for the awards that represent recognition for the highest possible achievement in Television, Music, Film and Theater. By definition “Off-Broadway” means NOT having achieved the highest caliber in the theater. Acronyms can’t change to suit people’s purposes.

  1. No errors.. wondered about 55A also…
    Or is it some sort of odd cluing like some of the other groaners.. Crawled? SWAM Head light HALO Bolted down ATE . …. etcetera ..etcetera.

      1. Yes, always. People can use words any way they want, but that doesn’t mean they are using them correctly. There have been only a handful of EGOT winners and the O always stands for Oscar.

  2. Came here to grouse about the OBIE not being one of the awards in EGOT, but I see it’s been amply addressed already. 🙂

    7:56 for me on this one today.

    1. I agree Charley. I also was looking for a way to comment on this. While the Obie is off Broadway award it is not the same as a Tony. How do these seasoned editors not catch this??

    1. Hi Ben. I think if you do some googling you’ll see that Obie is not part of EGOT. Since “Tony” covers the theater an Obie would and should not be part of this acronym.

    2. No, it really does not work that way.

      The logic in selecting the awards represented by EGOT is that they cover four different areas of performing: television (Emmy), audio recording (Grammy), films (Oscar), and theater (Tony). If the Oscar is swapped out for the Obie (an award given for off-Broadway), then films are no longer represented, and the theater is represented twice.

      The title of EGOT is thereby made less impressive.

    3. Unless you can name an EGOT winner where the ‘O’ stands for anything other than Oscar you need to give it up.

    1. @Glenn …

      Re “typical crossword Bonerland revisionist history” …

      I wasn’t going to comment on this, but … it’s a day later, probably no one will see my comments, and perhaps it will do me good to vent, so …

      The clue so many complained about was the constructor’s mistake. It happens. To err is human. Constructors are human.

      But it was one mistake. It was not at all typical and it doesn’t deserve your usual exaggerated, over-the-top, hypercritical, bombastic comments that appear to be aimed at demonstrating how awful the puzzles are and, one supposes, how much better they would be if only you were responsible for creating them.

      Geez … 😳.

      1. It wasn’t just one mistake. “Initially” does not mean “In the form of initials”, it means “at the beginning”. 56 down is also incorrect.

      2. And, by the way, talk about “exaggerated, over-the-top, hypercritical, bombastic” responses.

        Everybody makes mistakes, but in this case, the constructor just has to verify that each clue is correct to the answer. It’s not too much to ask to actually check each one individually before submitting the final result. We’re not talking about a typo in a novel with hundreds of pages, we’re talking about less than 150 clues and answers. They need to be right, and expecting the puzzlemaker to check each one is not in the least unreasonable.

  3. 13:47 with no errors, lookups, or revisions. So, what took so long? Doing it on paper, and a few unfamiliarities to work through.

    DEANE and GARNER were new names to me, and probably will be again at some point in the future. Did not know the GBS work “Arms and the Man,” nor that the Milky Way had “satellite galaxies.”

    Just guessing at George Jasper’s intent re: 55A. The OBIE award is given for off- and off-off-Broadway productions. That could make it a “sub-category” of the Tony. However, the only commonality that I can see is that the American Theater Wing administers both awards. Given the clue, though, it’s a stretch.

    Thanks, Bill for printing the entire Star-spangled Banner poem. I did not recall that there are other verses.

  4. Before Bill’s explanation I thought 35D
    Dyer might be a famous crossword constructor 😂
    Fun theme. No look ups, no errors.

    Can you get a Tony for an off Broadway
    play? In any event I’m for cutting Jasper
    some slack 🙂

  5. 23:03 – about 6 cheats.

    Just wasn’t good enough to get the crosses without knowing some of the PPPs. DEANE, GARNER, NIVEA, ARMS were show stoppers for me. Got parts of all of them, but just couldn’t seal the deal.

    Didn’t get the theme until I read Bill’s explanation. After reading it, I wasn’t too impressed … but hey, I’m still new at this.

    Be Well.

    1. I did the Newsday puzzle, but I’m not sure what your question is.

      From Google: “Chunk Light Tuna typically consists of skipjack, but may also include yellowfin or big-eye tuna. Featuring a softer texture, this tuna tends to be darker in color with smaller, flakier pieces and a stronger flavor. Explore the difference between these various types of canned tuna in our Q&A.” (So, as I thought – it’s a thing.)

      Not sure that one shakes a shampoo bottle (but it’s been a long time since I’ve held one in my hand – having parted company with most of my hair a very long time ago 😳).

  6. The online version of the clue for the Obie answer has been changed to “NYC theater award, removing the reference to EGOT.

    1. This will not make Ben happy, given all the effort he put here in arguing that no, the O in EGOT really does stand for “Obie.” Apparently it is better in his eyes to rewrite the dictionary than admit the LA Times crossword compilers could err.

      1. For whatever reason, it’s doesn’t seem all that unusual for people to go to great lengths and to devise tortured explanations to justify puzzlemakers’ actions. I don’t understand it.

    2. I did the puzzle late in the day & was very puzzled by the comments above. Now it’s explained!
      Anyway, 20:18, no errors

  7. Don’t like when I finish it and still have no idea what the theme is. Had to Google for something like this page to understand it, and it’s just a little weak. And none of the unexpected clues left me with that “oh that was clever” feeling, but more like “yeah I guess that makes sense”. And the agony of a bad clue like the OBIE one. Oh well.

  8. Slightly tricky Thursday; took 16:14 with no peeks or errors. After getting past all the proper nouns, I got stuck on KEY/KNIT and CODE for a few minutes…sigh.

    Never heard of Julia Garner before today, but I had heard of the series “Inventing Anna”, which I definitely want to see. Fascinating story which I read about in The Cut.

    Have to agree with EGOT including OSCAR and not Obie.

  9. 56D is incorrect. “Initially” does not mean “in the form of initials”. He could have put a question mark after the clue and gotten away with it. Without the question mark, it’s just wrong.

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