LA Times Crossword 25 Jan 22, Tuesday

Advertisement

Constructed by: David Poole
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Boxcars

The grid includes BOXES of four letters that spell out makes of CARS:

  • 37A Freight train components … or a hint to each group of circled letters : BOXCARS

Those cars are:

  1. AUDI
    The Audi name has an interesting history. The Horch company was founded by August Horch in 1909. Early in the life of the new company, Horch was forced out of his own business. He set up a new enterprise and continued to use his own name as a brand. The old company sued him for using the Horch name so a meeting was held to choose something new. Horch’s young son was studying Latin in the room where the meeting was taking place. He pointed out that “horch” was German for “hear” and he suggested “Audi” as a replacement, the Latin for “listen”.
  2. OPEL
    Adam Opel founded his company in 1863, first making sewing machines in a cowshed. Commercial success brought new premises and a new product line in 1886, namely penny-farthing bicycles. Adam Opel died in 1895, leaving his two sons with a company that made more penny-farthings and sewing machines than any other company in the world. In 1899 the two sons partnered with a locksmith and started to make cars, but not very successfully. Two years later, the locksmith was dropped in favor of a licensing arrangement with a French car company. By 1914, Opel was the largest manufacturer of automobiles in Germany. My Dad had an Opel in the seventies, a station wagon (we’d say “estate car” in Ireland) called an Opel Kadett.
  3. JEEP
    The Jeep is the original off-road vehicle. It was developed by the American Bantam Car Company in 1940 at the request of the US government who recognized the upcoming need for the armed forces as American involvement in WWII loomed. The Bantam Company was too small to cope with demand, so the government gave the designs to competing car companies. The design and brand eventually ended up with AMC in the seventies and eighties.
  4. MINI
    The original Mini was a fabulous car, one that I drove all over Ireland in my youth. It had a unique front-wheel-drive layout that took up very little space, allowing for a lot of room (relatively speaking) for passengers and baggage. One space-saving trick was to mount the engine transversely, so it sits rotated 90 degrees from the norm. That engine had a capacity of only 848cc. In 1961, a Mini Cooper model was introduced, which was a sporty version. The Mini Cooper was a phenomenal hit, especially after repeated wins in the Monte Carlo Rally. The Mini marque has been owned by BMW since 1994.
  5. LADA
    The Lada is a brand of car that was first manufactured in 1970 in the USSR in a collaboration between Fiat of Italy and the Soviet Union’s Department of Foreign Trade. The cars were sold within the USSR under the Zhiguli badge, named for the Zhiguli Mountains in Russia. The same model was exported using the Lada brand, as “Zhiguli” was hard to pronounce for non-Russian speakers, and also sounded too much like the English word “gigolo”.
  6. FORD
    Industrialist Henry Ford was born in Michigan, and was the son of an Irish immigrant from County Cork. Ford’s most famous vehicle was the one that revolutionized the industry: the Model T. Ford’s goal with the Model T was to build a car that was simple to drive, and cheap to purchase and repair. The Model T cost $825 in 1908, which isn’t much over $20,000 in today’s money.

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 5m 27s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Uber alternatives : CABS

A hansom cab is a very specific design of horse and buggy that was patented by Joseph Hansom in 1834 in England. The “cab” in the name is short for “cabriolet”, an earlier design of carriage on which the hansom was based. It’s from “hansom cab” that we get our modern term “cab”.

The rideshare service Uber takes its name from the English colloquial word “uber” meaning “super, topmost”, which in turn comes from the German “über” meaning “above”.

5 Thyroid, e.g. : GLAND

The thyroid gland is found in the neck, just below the Adam’s apple. The gland produces several thyroid hormones, some of which control the rate at which the body uses energy i.e. the body’s rate of metabolism.

10 Managed music for a wedding reception, briefly : DJ’ED

The world’s first radio disc jockey (DJ) was one Ray Newby of Stockton, California who made his debut broadcast in 1909, would you believe? When he was 16 years old and a student, Newby started to play his records on a primitive radio located in the Herrold College of Engineering and Wireless in San Jose. The records played back then were mostly recordings of Enrico Caruso.

14 Sword handle : HILT

The hilt of a sword consists of a grip and a guard (sometimes “bell guard”). One grasps the sword with the grip, and the guard is a metal shell that is designed to protect the fingers.

15 Lasso wielder : ROPER

Our English word “lasso” comes from the Spanish “lazo”, and ultimately from the Latin “laqueum” meaning “noose, snare”.

16 Olympic sport with two accents : EPEE

There are three fencing events in the modern Olympics, with each distinguished by the weapon used:

  • Foil
  • Épée
  • Sabre

17 Biblical birthright seller : ESAU

Esau was the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When their mother Rebekah gave birth to the twins “the first emerged red and hairy all over (Esau), with his heel grasped by the hand of the second to come out (Jacob)”. As Esau was the first born, he was entitled to inherit his father’s wealth (it was his “birthright”). Instead, Esau sold his birthright to Jacob for the price of a “mess of pottage” (a meal of lentils).

18 Tylenol competitor : ALEVE

“Aleve” is a brand name used for the anti-inflammatory drug Naproxen sodium.

Tylenol is a pain-relieving drug with the active ingredient acetaminophen (which is known as “paracetamol” outside of the US).

19 Warning from a reckless driver? : FORE!

No one seems to know for sure where the golfing term “fore!” comes from. It has been used at least as far back as 1881, and since then has been called out to warn other golfers that a wayward ball might be heading their way. My favorite possibility for its origin is that it is a contraction of the Gaelic warning cry “Faugh a Ballagh!” (clear the way!) which is still called out in the sport of road bowling. Road bowling is an Irish game where players bowl balls along roads between villages, trying to reach the end of the course in as few bowls as possible, just like in golf!

22 MP3 player : IPOD

MP3 is an audio coding format, the most common format used for music stored on digital audio players. MP3 files are compressed and “lossy”, meaning that some audio information is lost when the file is generated. For this reason, MP3 files are about 1/11 of the size of the equivalent music files found on CD.

23 “__ now!”: “Seinfeld” mantra spoken by Frank Costanza : SERENITY

In “Seinfeld”, Jerry’s friend George was the son of Frank and Estelle Costanza. George was portrayed by Jason Alexander, and the character was loosely based on the show’s co-creator Larry David. The character’s name came from Jerry Seinfeld’s real-life friend Mike Costanza. George’s parents were played by Jerry Stiller and Estelle Harris.

25 Many an IRS worker : CPA

Certified public accountant (CPA)

27 Artemis program org. : NASA

NASA’s Artemis program has the goal of landing the first woman and the next man on the Moon by 2024. Artemis is viewed as a step along the road to sending humans to Mars in the 2030s.

28 Storm warning : THUNDER

The word “thunder” precedes the word “lightning” in the phrase “thunder and lightning”. However, thunder comes after lighting in reality, at least to the observer. The observer sees the flash of lightning and then seconds later hears the crash of thunder. That’s because light travels faster than sound.

32 Medicare section for ambulance services : PART B

Medicare is divided into four parts:

  • A: Hospital Insurance
  • B: Medical Insurance
  • C: Medicare Advantage Plans
  • D: Prescription Drug Plans

35 Rossini’s “William Tell” has a famous one : OVERTURE

Overtures can be independent, stand-alone musical works. However, the form was originally introduced as an instrumental introduction to another work, such as an oratorio, ballet or opera. The term “overture” came into English from French, specifically from the word “ouverture” meaning “opening”.

“Guillaume Tell” is an opera by Gioachino Rossini based on the legend of William Tell. It is actually Rossini’s last opera, and is certainly the Rossini opera with the most recognizable overture. The whole of the overture is superb, but the driving finale is widely recognized as the theme from the television show “The Lone Ranger”.

36 Tavern tipple : ALE

Our lovely word “tavern” comes into English via Old French from the Latin “taberna”, the word for a “shop, inn, alehouse”.

37 Freight train components … or a hint to each group of circled letters : BOXCARS

A boxcar is a basic railroad car used to carry freight. It’s the one shaped like a big box, with large doors at each side.

40 911 responder, briefly : EMS

Emergency medical services (EMS)

The first use of a national emergency phone number was in 1937 in the UK, where the number 999 was introduced to call emergency services. If you need emergency services in the UK or Ireland to this day, you have to dial 999. It’s not really clear why 911 became the emergency number in the US. The most credible suggestion (to me) is that when it was introduced by the FCC in 1967, it was a number that “fit” with the numbers already used by AT&T for free services (211-long distance; 411-information; 611-repair service).

41 Its trill begins “Rhapsody in Blue” : CLARINET

“Rhapsody in Blue” is one of the most popular works by the great George Gershwin. The piece has a famous clarinet glissando at its opening, but is a work for solo piano and orchestra. Gershwin himself played the piano at its premiere in 1924. We can’t be certain how that original “Rhapsody” sounded as Gershwin improvised some of what he was playing, and didn’t write out the piano part until after the first performance.

46 Draped dress : SARI

The item of clothing called a “sari” (also “saree”) is a strip of cloth, as one might imagine, unusual perhaps in that it is unstitched along the whole of its length. The strip of cloth can range from four to nine meters long (that’s a lot of material!). The sari is usually wrapped around the waist, then draped over the shoulder leaving the midriff bare. I must say, it can be a beautiful item of clothing.

53 Sous-chef’s job : PREP

The “sous-chef de cuisine” (a French term) is the “under-chef of the kitchen”, the second-in-command.

58 __ song: cheaply : FOR A

Something that goes “for a song” is sold very cheaply. The first known use of the phrase in print is in William Shakespeare’s “All’s Well That Ends Well”.

Why, he will look upon his boot and sing; mend the
ruff and sing; ask questions and sing; pick his
teeth and sing. I know a man that had this trick of
melancholy sold a goodly manor for a song.

59 Wild West Wyatt : EARP

Wyatt Earp is famous as one of the participants in the gunfight at the O.K. Corral. Earp was a city policeman in Wichita, Kansas and also in Dodge City, Kansas. Earp was also deputy sheriff in Tombstone, Arizona where the O.K. Corral gunfight took place. Years later, Earp joined the Alaska Gold Rush and with a partner built and operated the Dexter Saloon in Nome.

60 Back biter? : MOLAR

Molars are grinding teeth. The term “molar” comes from the Latin “mola” meaning “millstone”.
Molars are grinding teeth. The term “molar” comes from the Latin “mola” meaning “millstone”.

61 Far from flashy : DRAB

We now use the word “drab” to mean “dull, cheerless”. Back in the late 17th century, “drab” was the color of natural, undyed cloth.

62 Gallic gal pal : AMIE

The Gauls were a Celtic race, with Gaul covering what is now known as France and Belgium. We use the term “Gallic” today, when we refer to something pertaining to France or the French.

63 Carne __: taco filling : ASADA

The name of the dish called “carne asada” translates from Spanish as “roasted meat”.

64 Manet medium : OILS

Édouard Manet was a French painter whose works are mainly classified as Realist and Impressionist. Manet was friends with Impressionists masters like Edgar Degas, Claude Monet and Pierre-Auguste Renoir and greatly influenced the Impressionist movement. The list of Manet’s marvelous paintings includes “Le Déjeuner sur l’Herbe”, “Le Repose” and “A Bar at the Folies-Bergère”.

67 Pole on the Bounty : MAST

Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall wrote “Mutiny on the ‘Bounty’”, based on a true story. They followed up their successful novel with two more works, creating what is now called the “Bounty Trilogy”. The three books are:

  1. “Mutiny on the ‘Bounty’”, the tale of the mutiny against Captain Bligh.
  2. “Men Against the Sea”, the story of Captain Bligh and the eighteen men set adrift in an open boat by the mutineers.
  3. “Pitcairn’s Island”, a narrative about the lives of the mutineers on South Sea islands after the mutiny.

Down

1 “The Queen’s Gambit” game : CHESS

“The Queen’s Gambit” is a wonderful 2020 miniseries based on a 1983 novel of the same name by Walter Tevis. Anya Taylor-Joy plays a young chess prodigy who has a tough upbringing in an orphanage, and who then struggles with alcohol and drug dependency. The series was so popular with viewers that it sparked a renewed interest in the game of chess, with sales of chess sets and chess books increasing dramatically.

3 Major’s successor : BLAIR

Tony Blair was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom for ten years, from 1997 to 2007. Blair moved his Labour Party from the left towards the center, utilizing the moniker “New Labour”. Under his leadership, Labour won a landslide victory in 1997 and was comfortably elected into power again in 2001 and 2005. Blair stepped down in 2007 and Gordon Brown took over as prime minister. Labour was soundly defeated at the polls in the next general election, in 2010.

Sir John Major succeeded Margaret Thatcher as Conservative Party leader in 1990 and was Prime Minister of Britain until 1997. 1997 was the year that Tony Blair swept to power as leader of the Labour Party.

4 Nero, to Seneca : STUDENT

Seneca the Younger was a tutor and advisor to Nero, emperor of ancient Rome. Although maybe innocent, Seneca was forced to commit suicide by Nero as it was alleged that Seneca participated in a plot to kill the emperor. To kill himself, Seneca cut into a number of veins in order to bleed to death.

Nero was Emperor of Rome from 54 to 68 CE, and he had quite the family life. When he was just 16-years-old Nero married his step-sister Claudia Octavia. He also had his mother and step-brother executed.

5 On the house : GRATIS

Something provided gratis is supplied free of charge. “Gratis” is a Latin term, a contraction of “gratiis” meaning “for thanks”.

6 Nabokov title girl : LOLITA

Vladimir Nabokov’s novel “Lolita” has a famously controversial storyline, dealing with a middle-aged man’s obsession and sexual relationship with a 12-year-old girl named Dolores Haze. 38-year-old professor Humbert Humbert privately refers to Dolores as “Lolita”. Although “Lolita” is considered a classic today, after Nabokov finished it in 1953 the edgy subject matter made it impossible for him to find a publisher in the US (where Nabokov lived). In 1955, he resorted to publishing it in English at a printing house in Paris. Publication was followed by bans and seizures all over Europe. A US printing house finally took on the project in 1958, by which time the title had such a reputation that it sold exceptionally quickly. “Lolita” became the first book since “Gone with the Wind” to sell over 100,000 copies in its first three weeks in stores.

Vladimir Nabokov was a Russian-American novelist who achieved international recognition only after he moved to the US and started to write in English. His most famous work has to be the 1995 novel “Lolita”. As well devoting time to writing, Nabokov had quite the reputation as a composer of chess problems, and as a lepidopterist. In fact, the butterfly genus Nabokovia was named in his honor.

8 Actress Campbell : NEVE

Neve Campbell is a Canadian actress whose big break in the movies came with the “Scream” horror film series, in which she had a leading role. I don’t do horror films, so I haven’t seen any of the “Scream” movies. Nor have I seen the TV series “Party of Five” that launched the acting careers of both Campbell and Jennifer Love Hewitt in the nineties.

9 Fran of “The Nanny” : DRESCHER

Fran Drescher’s real name is Francine Jane Drescher. She is a comedian and comic actress best known for playing Fran Fine on the sitcom “The Nanny”. Fran was born in Queens, New York (go figure!). Her big break came with a small role, but in a huge movie. You might recall in “Saturday Night Fever” that John Travolta was asked by a pretty dancer, “Are you as good in bed as you are on the dance floor?” Well, that young lady was Fran Drescher.

11 Genre for some Tokyo-based bands : J-POP

“J-pop” is an abbreviation for “Japanese pop”, a genre of music that emerged in the nineties. Although J-pop is rooted in traditional Japanese music, it is heavily influenced by western bands from the sixties such as the Beatles and the Beach Boys.

12 Designer Saarinen : EERO

Eero Saarinen was a Finnish-American architect who was renowned in this country for his unique designs for public buildings such as the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Dulles International Airport Terminal, and the TWA building at JFK. The list of his lesser-known, but still impressive, works includes several buildings erected on academic campuses. For example, the Chapel and Kresge Auditorium on the MIT campus, the Emma Hartman Noyes House at Vassar College, the Law School building at the University of Chicago, and Yale’s David S. Ingalls Rink.

13 Monopoly card : DEED

In the game of Monopoly there are 28 title deeds:

  • 22 streets
  • 4 railroads
  • 2 utilities

26 Maritime money handlers : PURSERS

A purser is an official on a ship who is responsible for the handling of money and the keeping of accounts. The original “pursers” were makers of “money purses”.

28 FDR power project : TVA

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has to be one of America’s great success stories when it comes to economic development. Created in 1933, the TVA spearheaded economic development in the Tennessee Valley at the height of the Great Depression. Central to the success was the federally-funded construction of flood-control and electricity-generation facilities.

29 “Hamilton” climax : DUEL

Alexander Hamilton was one of America’s Founding Fathers, chief of staff to General George Washington and the first Secretary of the Treasury. It was Hamilton who established the nation’s first political party, the Federalist Party. He is also famous for fighting a duel with Vice President Aaron Burr, which resulted in Hamilton’s death a few days later.

“Hamilton” is a 2015 musical based on the life of US Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, as described in the 2004 biography by Ron Chernow. The show opened off-Broadway in February 2015, and transferred to Broadway in August of the same year. Advance ticket sales for the Broadway production were unprecedented, and reportedly amounted to $30 million. The representations of the main characters are decidedly ground-breaking. The show is rooted in hip-hop and the main roles such as Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson and George Washington are all played by African-American and Hispanic actors.

30 Funny Bombeck : ERMA

Erma Bombeck wrote for newspapers for about 35 years. She produced more than 4,000 witty and humorous columns under the title “At Wit’s End”, with all describing her home life in suburbia.

33 Penne __ vodka : ALLA

Penne alla vodka is a pasta dish with a sauce made of vodka, cream, tomatoes, onions and sausage or bacon.

35 Canadian Thanksgiving mo. : OCT

The Canadian Thanksgiving holiday predates the related celebration in the US. The first Canadian Thanksgiving was held in 1578 by an explorer from England named Martin Frobisher. Frobisher was giving thanks for his safe arrival in the New World, and made the observance in the month of October as this was a tradition in England. All this happened 43 years before the Pilgrims landed in Plymouth, Massachusetts.

39 Ballot marks : XES

Today, a ballot is a piece of paper or equivalent used to cast a vote. Back in the 1500s, a “ballot” was a small “ball” used in the process of voting.

44 Feudal lord’s domain : FIEFDOM

In the days of feudalism, a “fief” was basically a “fee” (the words “fee” and “fief” have the same origins) paid by a Lord in exchange for some benefit to him, perhaps loyalty, or military service. The fief itself was often land granted by the Lord. We use the term “fiefdom” (and sometimes “fief) figuratively, to describe a sphere of operation controlled by one dominant person or entity.

46 Cuban-born Grammy winner Jon : SECADA

Jon Secada is a Cuban-American singer/songwriter, who was born in Havana and raised in Florida. Secada was hired as a background singer by Gloria Estefan in the late eighties, and soon after he started composing for her. It was Gloria Estefan who gave him his performing break, offering him solo spots on stage during her performances.

47 Starlike : ASTRAL

“Astrum” (plural “astra”) is a Latin word meaning “star”.

49 Italian fashion center : MILAN

Milan (“Milano” in Italian) is Italy’s second-largest city, second only to Rome. Milan is a European fashion capital, the headquarters for the big Italian fashion houses of Valentino, Gucci, Versace, Armani, Prada and others. Mario Prada was even born in Milan, and helped establish the city’s reputation in the world of fashion.

50 Ill-fated ship Andrea __ : DORIA

The SS Andrea Doria was an Italian ocean liner with the home port of Genoa. She was named after Andrea Doria, a 16th-century admiral from the city. As always seems to be the case with ships that go down, the Andrea Doria was the pride of the fleet and was deemed to be the biggest, fastest and safest of Italy’s ships in the fifties. Her end came in 1956 when she collided with the MS Stockholm off the coast of Nantucket Island. Such was the damage to the side of the vessel that she quickly and severely listed to starboard, rendering half her lifeboats unusable. Nonetheless, 1,660 crew and passengers were rescued by vessels that came to her aid. Only 46 lives were lost, mainly in the collision itself. The Andrea Doria capsized and sank eleven hours after the collision.

51 Eurasian range : URALS

The eastern side of the Ural Mountains in Russia and Kazakhstan is generally regarded as the natural divide between the continents of Europe and Asia.

52 Blue Ribbon brewer : PABST

Frederick Pabst was a brewer from the Milwaukee, Wisconsin area who had immigrated to the US from Prussia with his parents. Pabst bought himself into his father-in-law’s small brewery and over the years grew the enterprise into a public company. The most famous beer from Pabst is Pabst Blue Ribbon.

Pabst Blue Ribbon (PBR) is the most recognizable brand of beer from the Pabst Brewing Company. There appears to be some dispute over whether or not Pabst beer ever won a “blue ribbon” prize, but the company claims that it did so at the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893. The beer was originally called Pabst Best Select, and then just Pabst Select. With the renaming to Blue Ribbon, the beer was sold with an actual blue ribbon tied around the neck of the bottle until it was dropped in 1916 and incorporated into the label.

A common award for winning first place in a competition, especially at a fair, is a blue ribbon. In Canada and the UK, first place is usually recognized with a red ribbon, and blue ribbon is given for second place.

54 Malek of “Mr. Robot” : RAMI

Actor Rami Malek’s big break came with the leading role in the television series “Mr. Robot”. In 2018, Malik gave an Oscar-winning performance playing Freddie Mercury in the hit biopic “Bohemian Rhapsody”. That marked the first time that an actor of Egyptian descent won an Academy Award for Best Actor.

“Mr. Robot” is an engaging drama series about an anxious and clinically depressed computer hacker. Said hacker joins an anarchic group of hackers known as “Mr. Robot” who are intent on taking down the largest conglomerate in the world. I binge-watched the first two series, and really enjoyed the experience …

55 St. Patrick’s home : ERIN

“Éire”, is the Irish word for “Ireland”. The related “Erin” is an anglicized version of “Éire” and actually corresponds to “Éirinn”, the dative case of “Éire”.

There is a fair amount known about Saint Patrick, some of which comes from two letters written in his own hand. St. Patrick lived in the fifth century, but was not born in Ireland. He was first brought to Ireland at about 16 years of age from his native Britain, by Irish raiders who made him a slave for six years. Patrick managed to escape and returned to his homeland where he studied and entered the Church. He went back to Ireland as a bishop and a missionary and there lived out the rest of his life. There seems to be good evidence that he died on March 17th (now celebrated annually as Saint Patrick’s Day), although the year is less clear. The stories about shamrock and snakes, I am afraid they are the stuff of legend.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Uber alternatives : CABS
5 Thyroid, e.g. : GLAND
10 Managed music for a wedding reception, briefly : DJ’ED
14 Sword handle : HILT
15 Lasso wielder : ROPER
16 Olympic sport with two accents : EPEE
17 Biblical birthright seller : ESAU
18 Tylenol competitor : ALEVE
19 Warning from a reckless driver? : FORE!
20 Lost traction : SLID
21 Runs out of steam : TIRES
22 MP3 player : IPOD
23 “__ now!”: “Seinfeld” mantra spoken by Frank Costanza : SERENITY
25 Many an IRS worker : CPA
27 Artemis program org. : NASA
28 Storm warning : THUNDER
32 Medicare section for ambulance services : PART B
35 Rossini’s “William Tell” has a famous one : OVERTURE
36 Tavern tipple : ALE
37 Freight train components … or a hint to each group of circled letters : BOXCARS
40 911 responder, briefly : EMS
41 Its trill begins “Rhapsody in Blue” : CLARINET
43 D sharp equivalent : E-FLAT
45 Singing, dancing and acting : TALENTS
46 Draped dress : SARI
48 “Yuck!” : UGH!
49 Really botched : MESSED UP
53 Sous-chef’s job : PREP
56 Decree : EDICT
58 __ song: cheaply : FOR A
59 Wild West Wyatt : EARP
60 Back biter? : MOLAR
61 Far from flashy : DRAB
62 Gallic gal pal : AMIE
63 Carne __: taco filling : ASADA
64 Manet medium : OILS
65 Ilk : KIND
66 Designed to punish : PENAL
67 Pole on the Bounty : MAST

Down

1 “The Queen’s Gambit” game : CHESS
2 Flier’s seat option : AISLE
3 Major’s successor : BLAIR
4 Nero, to Seneca : STUDENT
5 On the house : GRATIS
6 Nabokov title girl : LOLITA
7 Mimic’s forte : APERY
8 Actress Campbell : NEVE
9 Fran of “The Nanny” : DRESCHER
10 Insubordinate : DEFIANT
11 Genre for some Tokyo-based bands : J-POP
12 Designer Saarinen : EERO
13 Monopoly card : DEED
24 Apprehending : NABBING
26 Maritime money handlers : PURSERS
28 FDR power project : TVA
29 “Hamilton” climax : DUEL
30 Funny Bombeck : ERMA
31 Remainder : REST
32 Treaty : PACT
33 Penne __ vodka : ALLA
34 Actual : REAL
35 Canadian Thanksgiving mo. : OCT
38 In a position of fame : ON THE MAP
39 Ballot marks : XES
42 Signed on for another tour : RE-UPPED
44 Feudal lord’s domain : FIEFDOM
46 Cuban-born Grammy winner Jon : SECADA
47 Starlike : ASTRAL
49 Italian fashion center : MILAN
50 Ill-fated ship Andrea __ : DORIA
51 Eurasian range : URALS
52 Blue Ribbon brewer : PABST
53 Pinnacle : PEAK
54 Malek of “Mr. Robot” : RAMI
55 St. Patrick’s home : ERIN
57 Medicine amount : DOSE

12 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 25 Jan 22, Tuesday”

  1. 24:10 no errors but I stared at 60 & 63A for a long time because I never heard of LADA as I’m sure almost everyone in the world hasn’t 👎
    Stay safe😀

    1. @Glenn – I can’t believe you EVER took 40+ mins (as per your post yesterday) for a Monday …

      Holy cow, how long ago was that? (And please don’t say 6 months ago ….)

      Be Well.

  2. 7 mins 44 secs, 0 errors.
    Once again, the “theme” was irrelevant and not useful. I filled in BOXCARS from cross fills, without even looking at the circled spaces.

    I sometimes think the constructors are playing to an audience of just themselves.

  3. 10:15 with no errors or lookups; one revision of EIRE>ERIN. Cute theme; and also had not heard of the LADA car, but the answers made it so. Jon SECADA and JPOP were new to me.

  4. Nice, mostly quick Tuesday for me; took 9:36 with no peeks or errors. Had to dance around a bit to get STUDENT, for which I had step son, and NEVE, for which I had Nell. Also didn’t know SECADA, but there the crosses made it a non-issue.

    Didn’t notice the theme, but I for one at least, have definitely heard of Lada. I also looked up the Zhiguli Mountains…more like hills, if you ask me; I mean 6-700 ft…whatever.

  5. I have as issue with berm 1a. In almost all instances it is an artificial not natural raised bank or structure along a river or canal. It is generally a permanent structure.
    But it’s nature a sand bank is not permanent

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.