LA Times Crossword 8 Jan 22, Saturday

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Constructed by: David Karp
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: None

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 11m 12s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

15 Epitome of Americanism? : APPLE PIE

The full expression is “as American as motherhood and apple pie”. I think the concept here is not that America is the home of motherhood nor apple pie, but rather that America is as wholesome as motherhood and apple pie. I’ve heard that the phrase originated in WWII when GI’s being interviewed by journalists would say that they were going to war “for Mom and apple pie”.

16 “Seinfeld” character who dated baseball’s Keith Hernandez : ELAINE

The character Elaine Benes, unlike the other lead characters (Jerry, Kramer and George), did not appear in the pilot episode of “Seinfeld”. NBC executives specified the addition of a female lead when they picked up the show citing that the situation was too “male-centric”.

Keith Hernandez is a former professional first baseman who played Major League Baseball mainly with the St. Louis Cardinals and the New York Mets. After retiring in 1990, Hernandez became a television broadcaster for Mets games. He also appeared in three episodes of the sitcom “Seinfeld”, including the last episode, playing himself. In the show, Hernandez dated Elaine, and became the object of Jerry’s “male crush”.

17 Vitamin intake for some : MEGADOSE

“Vitamins” are substances that are “vital” to life in small quantities. The term “vitamine” was coined in 1912 by Casimir Funk, a Polish biochemist who isolated several essential chemicals, all of which he assumed were amines. When it was later determined that these vital micronutrients were not all amines, then the letter E was dropped from “vitamine” to give us “vitamin”.

18 Screenwriter __ Trumbo : DALTON

Dalton Trumbo was an American novelist and screenwriter, and one of the famous “Hollywood Ten” film professionals who testified in front of the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1947. Trumbo refused to give information to the committee and was found in contempt, and served 11 months in prison. Trumbo had his anti-war novel “Johnny Got His Gun” published in 1938. He also directed a film adaption that was released in 1971 that starred Timothy Bottoms.

22 Criticism : FLAK

“Flak” was originally an acronym standing for the German term for an aircraft defense cannon (FLiegerAbwehrKanone). “Flak” then became used in English as a general term for antiaircraft fire and ultimately a term for verbal criticism, as in “to take flak”.

27 “By the power vested __ … ” : IN ME

“By the power vested in me by …” is a line from a traditional wedding ceremony.

33 Godfather cocktail ingredient : AMARETTO

Amaretto is an Italian liqueur with a sweet almond flavor. Even though the drink is sweet, it has a bitterness lent to it by the bitter almonds that are often used as a flavoring. The name “amaretto” is a diminutive of the Italian word “amaro” meaning “bitter”.

The cocktail known as the Godfather is a mixture of equal parts Scotch whiskey and amaretto, usually served over ice. Variants of the Godfather are the Godmother (using vodka instead of whiskey) and the French Connection (using Cognac instead of whiskey).

35 KFC bucket piece : LEG

The famous “Colonel” of Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) fame was Harland Sanders, an entrepreneur from Henryville, Indiana. Although not really a “Colonel”, Sanders did indeed serve in the military. He enlisted in the Army as a private in 1906 at the age of 16, lying about his age. He spent the whole of his time in the Army as a soldier in Cuba. It was much later, in the 1930s, that Sanders went into the restaurant business making his specialty deep-fried chicken. By 1935 his reputation as a “character” had grown, so much so that Governor Ruby Laffoon of Kentucky gave Sanders the honorary title of “Kentucky Colonel”. Later in the fifties, Sanders developed his trademark look with the white suit, string tie, mustache and goatee. When Sanders was 65 however, his business failed and in stepped Dave Thomas, the founder of Wendy’s. Thomas simplified the Sanders menu, cutting it back from over a hundred items to just fried chicken and salads. That was enough to launch KFC into the fast food business. Sanders sold the US franchise in 1964 for just $2 million and moved to Canada to grow KFC north of the border. He died in 1980 and is buried in Louisville, Kentucky. The Colonel’s secret recipe of 11 herbs and spices is indeed a trade secret. Apparently there is only one copy of the recipe, a handwritten piece of paper, written in pencil and signed by Colonel Sanders. Since 2009, the piece of paper has been locked in a computerized vault surrounded with motion detectors and security cameras.

43 Put drinks on plastic? : RAN A TAB

When we run a “tab” at a bar, we are running a “tabulation”, a listing of what we owe. Such a use of “tab” is American slang that originated in the 1880s.

48 Two-time Tony winner Judith : IVEY

Judith Ivey is an actress from El Paso, Texas. Ivey is perhaps best known for playing B. J. Poteet in the last season of the TV show “Designing Women”.

51 Boris Johnson, e.g. : TORY

“Tory” comes from the Irish word “tóraí” meaning “outlaw, robber”. The term “tory” was originally used for an Irish outlaw and later became a term of abuse for Irish rebels. At the end of the reign of King Charles II in Britain, there was a political divide with one side being called “Whigs” and the other “Tories”. Historically, the term “Tory” evolved to basically mean a supporter of the British monarchy, and indeed was used to describe those who remained loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolution. Today, “Tory” is used for a member of the British Conservative Party.

Boris Johnson is a larger-than-life Conservative politician in the UK, and former Mayor of London. He was the very visible frontman in the campaign for the UK to exit the European Union, the so-called Brexit campaign. As a result of the UK voting to exit the EU, Prime Minister David Cameron resigned, to be replaced by Theresa May. Theresa May then appointed Boris Johnson as Foreign Secretary. Almost inevitably, Boris Johnson then replaced May as Prime Minister. In more recent times, Johnson famously made light of the coronavirus pandemic and ignored calls for social distancing. He then fell ill with COVID-19, ended up in an intensive care unit, and ultimately revised his advice about social distancing.

52 So yesterday : PASSE

“Passé” is a French word, meaning “past, faded”. We’ve imported the term into English, and use it in the same sense.

54 “Aha!” : EUREKA!

“Eureka” translates from Greek as “I have found it”. The word is usually associated with Archimedes, uttered as he stepped into his bath one day. His discovery was that the volume of water that was displaced was equal to that of the object (presumably his foot) that had been submerged. He used this fact to determine the volume of a crown, something he needed in order to determine if it was made of pure gold or was a forgery.

57 Capital north of Washington, D.C. : OTTAWA

Ottawa is the second-largest city in the Province of Ontario (after Toronto) and is the capital city of Canada. The name “Ottawa” comes from an Algonquin word “adawe”, which means “to trade”.

59 Salsa roja ingredient : CILANTRO

What we know here in North America as cilantro is called coriander in the UK and other parts of the world. “Cilantro” is the Spanish name for the herb.

64 Tonsorial work : HAIRCUTS

Something described as tonsorial pertains to a barber or to haircutting. The Latin term “tonsor” translates as “barber, shaver, shearer”.

Down

1 “Batman” sound : BAM!

The television show “Batman” aired from 1966-1968. Burt Ward played Robin opposite Adam West’s Batman. Supposedly, Burt Ward was offered the part taken by Dustin Hoffman in “The Graduate”, but Ward couldn’t get out of his contract for the “Batman” television series. Holy xxxx, Batman!

3 Final Fantasy, e.g., briefly : RPG

Role-playing game (RPG)

“Final Fantasy” is a series of fantasy role-playing video games that is much-respected in the gaming community. The first game was released back in 1987.

4 Christmas shopping draw : BLACK FRIDAY SALE

In the world of retail, Black Friday is the day after Thanksgiving in the US. It is also the day when many stores start the holiday shopping season, and so offer deep discounts to get ahead of the competition.

5 “The Scarlet Letter” letter : RED A

The main character in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s novel “The Scarlet Letter” is Hester Prynne. After the birth of her illegitimate daughter Pearl, she is convicted by her puritanical neighbors of the crime of adultery. Hester is forced to wear a scarlet “A” (for “adultery”) on her clothing for the rest of her life, hence the novel’s title “The Scarlet Letter”.

8 Looks lasciviously : LEERS

“Lascivious” is such an appropriate-sounding word, I always think. It means “lecherous, salacious”.

9 H.S. dropout’s test : GED

The General Educational Development (GED) tests are a battery of four tests designed to demonstrate that a student has the academic skills of someone who has graduated from an American or Canadian high school.

10 “__, I am not coop’d here for defence!”: Shak. : ALAS

“Alas! I am not coop’d here for defence” is a line from William Shakespeare’s play “Henry VI, Part 3”.

The consensus seems to be that William Shakespeare wrote 38 plays in all. Seven of the plays are about kings called “Henry”:

  • Henry IV, Part 1
  • Henry IV, Part 2
  • Henry V
  • Henry VI, Part 1
  • Henry VI, Part 2
  • Henry VI, Part 3
  • Henry VIII

11 Everywhere, “if you have the time”: Steven Wright : WALKING DISTANCE

Steven Wright is a remarkably droll comedian from Cambridge, Massachusetts. Wright is very, very quotable:

  • What’s another word for Thesaurus?
  • If a word in the dictionary were misspelled, how would we know?
  • I intend to live forever. So far, so good.
  • When I was a little kid we had a sandbox. It was a quicksand box. I was an only child… eventually.

12 Fraud with checks : KITING

Check kiting is illegal. The idea behind kiting is to write a check, even though there are insufficient funds to cover the amount. The con artist then writes another check, also with insufficient funds, from another bank’s account to cover the original check. I am not sure it would work nowadays, but then I am as honest as the day is long! Oh, and I think the term “kiting” comes from the older phrase “go fly a kite”, the idea being that the bad check is floated on air (on non-existent funds).

13 Massive, in Montréal : ENORME

The original name of Montreal was “Ville-Marie”, meaning “City of Mary”. “Ville-Marie” is now the name of a borough in the city, the borough which includes the downtown area and “Old Montreal”. The present-day city covers most of the Island of Montreal (in French, “Île de Montréal”) that is located where the Saint Lawrence and Ottawa Rivers meet. The name “Montreal” comes from the three-headed hill that dominates the island and is called “Mount Royal”.

20 Jiff : SEC

“Jiff”, or “jiffy”, meaning “short time, instant” is thought originally to be thieves’ slang for “lightning”.

22 __ Street: R.L. Stine series : FEAR

“Fear Street” is a series of horror novels by R. L. Stine that are aimed at a teenage audience. The series title is a reference to the Fear family who live in the fictional town of Shadyside. The books were adapted into a trilogy of “Fear Street” films released by Netflix in 2021.

23 Like dad jokes, to kids : LAME

I tell dad jokes all the time, just to annoy the kids …

  • I’m reading a book about anti-gravity. It’s impossible to put down!
  • If you see a robbery at an Apple Store, does that make you an iWitness?
  • A termite walks into a bar and asks, “Is the bar tender here?”
  • Two guys walk into a bar, the third one ducks.
  • What’s the best part about living in Switzerland? I don’t know, but the flag is a big plus.

24 Depleted sea : ARAL

The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad …

26 Israeli violinist Mintz : SHLOMO

Shlomo Mintz is a violin virtuoso from Israel, who lived the first two years of life in Moscow. Mintz studied with Dorothy Delay in the Juilliard School of Music, and was mentored by Isaac Stern.

30 Lorazepam brand : ATIVAN

Ativan is a brand name for the drug Lorazepam, which is often prescribed for anxiety disorders.

32 Word on Spanish mail : AEREO

The words “Correo Aereo” can be found on some stamps. The phrase translates from Spanish as “Air Mail”.

37 __ tiger : SIBERIAN

The Siberian tiger is native to the Russian Far East and Northeast China. It is a threatened species, with the number living in the wild estimated in the hundreds.

38 This, in Tenerife : ESTO

Tenerife is the largest of the seven Canary Islands located off the coast of Morocco in North Africa. Part of Spain, Tenerife is the nation’s most populous island, home to almost 900,000 people. It also receives about five million visitors annually, making it one of the most important tourist destinations in the world.

40 Lissome : SPRY

“Lissome” is such a lovely word, I think. It applies to something that is easily bent and supple. The term is a variation of “lithesome”.

44 Personal online image : AVATAR

The Sanskrit word “avatar” describes the concept of a deity descending into earthly life and taking on a persona. It’s easy to see how in the world of online presences one might use the word avatar to describe one’s online identity.

45 Food giant : NESTLE

Nestlé is the world’s largest food company. It was founded in 1905 in Vevey, Switzerland where the company headquarters is to this day. Although the company came into being as the result of a merger, it retains the name of one of the co-founders, German confectioner Henri Nestlé. Henri Nestlé’s real breakthrough product was baby formula.

46 Main squeeze, in modern lingo : BAE

“Bae” is a contemporary term of endearment. It is a pet name that is an abbreviation of “babe, baby”, although I’ve also read that it is an acronym standing for “before anyone else”.

55 Lamb pen name : ELIA

The “Essays of Elia” began appearing in “London Magazine” in 1820, and were immediate hits with the public. The author was Charles Lamb, and “Elia” was actually a clerk with whom Lamb worked. The most famous of the essays in the collection are probably “Dream-Children” and “Old China”.

56 Marx not seen in films : KARL

Karl Marx was a German philosopher and revolutionary who helped develop the principles of modern communism and socialism. Marx argued that feudal society created internal strife due to class inequalities which led to its destruction and replacement by capitalism. He further argued that the inequalities created in a capitalist society create tensions that will also lead to its self-destruction. His thesis was that the inevitable replacement of capitalism was a classless (and stateless) society, which he called pure communism.

58 Creature that can carry many times its body weight : ANT

Myrmecology is the study of ants. The term “myrmecology” derives from the Greek “myrmex” meaning “ant”.

60 Dolphins quarterback Tagovailoa : TUA

NFL quarterback Tua Tagovailoa was born to a Samoan family in Hawaii. His nickname “Tua” is short for “Tuanigamanuolepola”. Tagovailoa was selected by the Miami Dolphins in the 2020 NFL draft. His younger brother Taulia was his backup quarterback at the University of Alabama, before Taulia transferred to the University of Maryland to become starting quarterback.

61 Shares again, on Twitter : RTS

Retweet (RT)

62 __Kosh B’gosh : OSH

OshKosh B’gosh is a company that produces and sells children’s clothes. The trademark OshKosh bib-overalls remind us of the company’s roots, as it was originally a manufacturer of adult work clothes based in Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Brews-to-bruises event? : BAR BRAWL
9 Rubberneck, at times : GAWKER
15 Epitome of Americanism? : APPLE PIE
16 “Seinfeld” character who dated baseball’s Keith Hernandez : ELAINE
17 Vitamin intake for some : MEGADOSE
18 Screenwriter __ Trumbo : DALTON
19 Events in a crime film subgenre : CAPERS
21 Bypass : SKIRT
22 Criticism : FLAK
25 Doesn’t squander : USES
27 “By the power vested __ … ” : IN ME
28 Winter hat feature : EARFLAP
31 Got into a new outfit : CHANGED
33 Godfather cocktail ingredient : AMARETTO
35 KFC bucket piece : LEG
36 Many of them have sisters : RELIGIOUS ORDERS
41 MLB segment : DIV
42 “Pens down” : TIME IS UP
43 Put drinks on plastic? : RAN A TAB
47 Source of added protection : BOOSTER
48 Two-time Tony winner Judith : IVEY
49 Appoint : NAME
51 Boris Johnson, e.g. : TORY
52 So yesterday : PASSE
54 “Aha!” : EUREKA!
57 Capital north of Washington, D.C. : OTTAWA
59 Salsa roja ingredient : CILANTRO
63 Defeated : FALLEN
64 Tonsorial work : HAIRCUTS
65 Least constrained : FREEST
66 Restrained : ON A LEASH

Down

1 “Batman” sound : BAM!
2 Make fun of : APE
3 Final Fantasy, e.g., briefly : RPG
4 Christmas shopping draw : BLACK FRIDAY SALE
5 “The Scarlet Letter” letter : RED A
6 Per unit : A POP
7 Figure out : WISE UP TO
8 Looks lasciviously : LEERS
9 H.S. dropout’s test : GED
10 “__, I am not coop’d here for defence!”: Shak. : ALAS
11 Everywhere, “if you have the time”: Steven Wright : WALKING DISTANCE
12 Fraud with checks : KITING
13 Massive, in Montréal : ENORME
14 Let : RENTED
20 Jiff : SEC
22 __ Street: R.L. Stine series : FEAR
23 Like dad jokes, to kids : LAME
24 Depleted sea : ARAL
26 Israeli violinist Mintz : SHLOMO
29 For real : LEGIT
30 Lorazepam brand : ATIVAN
32 Word on Spanish mail : AEREO
34 Open about one’s sexuality : OUT
37 __ tiger : SIBERIAN
38 This, in Tenerife : ESTO
39 Sorry sort : RUER
40 Lissome : SPRY
43 Bargain antithesis : RIP OFF
44 Personal online image : AVATAR
45 Food giant : NESTLE
46 Main squeeze, in modern lingo : BAE
50 Lotsa : MUCHO
53 Lambs’ moms : EWES
55 Lamb pen name : ELIA
56 Marx not seen in films : KARL
58 Creature that can carry many times its body weight : ANT
60 Dolphins quarterback Tagovailoa : TUA
61 Shares again, on Twitter : RTS
62 __Kosh B’gosh : OSH

22 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 8 Jan 22, Saturday”

  1. 7:05, no errors. I have to be amazed at how variable some of these things are.

    Re: some of yesterday’s comments, which I knew would come. Just because someone doesn’t like a puzzle doesn’t mean they don’t “get” it or can’t do it. I know I run into a lot of opposition when I start giving critiques of puzzles. But the question always has to be begged of quality, as human endeavors are always flawed to some degree or another.

    As well as the question of entertainment: Fact is, some of these are a lot more fun than others, and usually things like yesterday are highly unfun. To wit, I’m surprised some of these pieces of abject trickery continue to get run by both Norris and Shortz, especially given how markedly and consistently unpopular they continue to be.

    1. I have no problem with subjective opinions being posted here, as long as the poster seems to realize that his or her opinion is subjective. What annoys me is the idea that a puzzle should be judged by the number of posters here who think badly of it and that certain types of puzzles should be banned from publication in the future.

      Many of us actually enjoy an occasional (maybe even frequent) mind-stretching exercise (and, for the most part, we restrain ourselves from complaining about those horribly boring early-week puzzles … 😜).

      1. I agree that the early week puzzles are a bit too easy but they need to not go out of their way to include nonsensical cluing on the puzzles later in the week. I enjoy difficult…even very difficult but there is a limit.

        1. @Jon relays my position on this for most part. People, for most part, don’t mind challenge at any level. The problem comes in that people, for most part, want a fair and honest challenge. This is the point where a lot of puzzles such as yesterday’s fail. And when I think about it, probably why I tend to gravitate to themeless stuff for most part (and didn’t renew my Fireball subscription). While I find poor cluing in those at times, I can’t say by and large that they aren’t honest challenges.

          As for “early-week” stuff, to a certain extent there’s always a possibility to make a challenge in it. The way I see it, I want to get better at doing this, so I try to find how efficiently I can do those. I really am never that bored at those, it just that there isn’t a lot of time to get bored either. Plus, the market is wide enough there’s always other things to find for any level.

        2. Phrases like “nonsensical cluing” and “fair and honest challenge” are defined subjectively. As long as the puzzles from a given source are intended to provide something of interest to each member of a diverse group of solvers, there are going to be many differences of opinion among the members of that group about particular puzzles. (I would point out that not all of the posts about yesterday’s puzzle were negative.)

          And my use of the phrase “horribly boring” was a joke meant to point out that there’s more than one way to take a negative viewpoint. Personally (and subjectively … 😜), I’m pretty much a fan of all the puzzles.

    1. @Anon Mike …

      This will probably be too late to do you any good, but … if you download the Stumper from the site I use, at

      https://www.brainsonly.com/global/newsday/crossword/

      you will find that the clue for 58-Down is incomplete and the clue for 59-Down is missing. Given that the puzzle was a bit easier than usual, I muddled through and finished with no errors, but I was certainly a bit inconvenienced.

      The correct clue for 58-Down is “UPC symbol inventor” and the clue for 59-Down is “Long-lasting, in product names”. (And I found these on an LAT site, which I’ve bookmarked for future reference.)

      1. Wished I saw this sooner. I saw that clue missing and I was having a tough (but enjoyable) time the way it was.

        Thank you thank you for the link!!!

    2. As a review, that was a pretty nice puzzle. Unfortunately (for me), I ran into a “I know that but I guess I don’t know how to spell it” kind of thing I struggled on for about 30 minutes before I finally looked it up. Basically, from hearing something said but not seeing it in print. But I can’t complain that it wasn’t fair.

  2. No errors today, but one look-up: the Shlomo name. This one was fun
    and much easier for me than most Saturday puzzles. Had to make some
    changes on the way: i.e. “wokeup to wiseup and Nestea to Nestle.

  3. Really tough for me. I could spell tonsorial but never knew what it meant. I think I only know one quarterback. I put in drambuie instead of amaretto and was convinced I was right. Duh. Schlomo? Yeah, right. Kept trying to think of the Marx brother who wasn’t in films. Another duh.

  4. I’m not familiar with Mr. Karp, but thought this was a great puzzle. No errors, but it took me a good amount of time — all fun.

    Jeri T.

  5. 17:04

    Fairly straightforward puzzle.

    Yesterday’s comments were hilarious. I liked the stone skipping conceit. But it really is unfair for a puzzle to have a bunch of names where you can’t get help from the crosses.

    1. @Pam in MA …

      I see your point, but there actually were two clues for each of the “names in the circles”. (Admittedly, that doesn’t provide as much help as a number of clues for crossing entries, each of which might be something you know and give you one more letter, possibly leading to a successful conclusion).

      Every two weeks, Brendan Emmett Quigley produces yet another “marching bands” puzzle. (I send him $15 a year to get them.) A typical one is done on a 13×13 grid, with only one black square (the one in the middle). Each of the 13 rows contains one (or, occasionally, two) entries for which there are clues. In addition, each of six “bands” also contain entries for which there are clues. (The outermost band starts with the upper left corner and runs clockwise through the 50 squares forming the edge of the grid; each of the remaining bands is similar, but runs clockwise around that part of the grid that is not part of a larger band; the largest band consists of 50 squares and the smallest consists of 8.) I am astounded that it is possible to construct one of these things, and I bring it up because, although there are, in fact, two clues for every square in a “marching bands” grid, you quite often encounter the same situation we saw in yesterday’s LAT puzzle, where you need to come up with two different entries, one of which is a portion of the other (like the “SHARON” in “MY SHARONA”, which I had to look up yesterday).

      And, yes … I also bring this up to demonstrate that there are, in fact, a lot of solvers out there like me, solvers who appreciate some complexity in their puzzles … 😜.

  6. 51:50 and I spelled Karl as Carl😒
    I hearby nominate 57A as the worst clue ever…if that’s wrong then capital east of Baltimore could be London or Paris.
    Stay safe😀

    1. “ … capital east of Baltimore could be London or Paris … “

      True!

      Clues are often meant to be truthful, but misleading!

      How shocking!

  7. 23:58 with no errors or lookups. Had to revise: RUNE>REDA (4 letters that starts with R is RUNE when dealing with older writings, eh?), E__DE (ELUDE or EVADE)>SKIRT, PAPER___>SIBERIAN, somethingTOMATO>CILANTRO. Learned about tonsorial (makes me think of tonsils, though!).

    But, overall, not a bad Saturday. Just had to “work through it.”

    RE: criticisms of yesterday’s puzzle. I suppose “quality” is in the eye of the beholder; and, what are one’s expectations for a puzzle? Do you want something that doesn’t challenge you, that supports only your points of view or ways of relating to language? Or, do you like to get exposed to things that expand your way of looking at things? As long as the “theme” in the puzzle can be made sense of (even in hindsight), something like yesterday’s puzzle is fine with me. If they were easy all the time, I’d probably stop doing them.

  8. Slightly tricky Saturday for me; took 27:17 with 2 errors. I did a “check-grid” with the V still missing from DIV and in the NE corner I had GAWKEd/dENTED, which I was able to fix right away. I guess my brain stopped after that, even if I’m a huge baseball fan, but the V would not come to me without an alphabet roll…doh!! a V!! I’ve never heard of the drug ATIVAN, so no help on the cross. The rest of the puzzle was really enjoyable and I learned about IVEY, Final Fantasy, Fear Street, SHLOMO and Tonsorial.

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