LA Times Crossword 13 Feb 22, Sunday

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Constructed by: Pam Amick Klawitter
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme : Make Mine a Triple

Themed answers each consist of THREE ROOMS:

  • 120A One of three found in each answer to a starred clue : ROOM
  • 22A *Game piece with a “6” on it : GREEN BILLIARD BALL (green room & billiard room & ballroom)
  • 64A *Camp sleeping arrangement : DOUBLE BUNK BED (double room & bunk room & bedroom)
  • 108A *Where women once learned to stitch : LADIES’ SEWING CLASS (ladies’ room & sewing room & classroom)
  • 13D *Primary concern of a Four Seasons chef : HOTEL GUEST DINING (hotel room & guest room & dining room)
  • 37D *’50s-’60s ad competition : LAUNDRY POWDER WAR (laundry room & powder room & war room)

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 17m 12s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Willing partner : ABLE

“… willing and able …”

5 Dapper dudes : FOPS

A man described as a Dapper Dan is one who is dressed very nattily. There have been a few people who have used the Dapper Dan moniker over the years, including a gangster in the twenties nicknamed Dapper Dan Hogan and a baseball player who was active around the same time nicknamed Dapper Dan Howley.

13 “__ Eye Is on the Sparrow”: hymn : HIS

“His Eye Is on the Sparrow” is a Gospel hymn that dates back to 1905. The most famous version of the hymn was sung by Ethel Water, who used the title of the song for her 1951 autobiography. Whitney Houston’s 2012 recording of the song was her last, and was released four months after her passing.

19 Thelma, to Louise, or vice versa : GAL PAL

“Thelma & Louise” is a thought-provoking movie, and one that is very entertaining. It was directed by Ridley Scott in 1991, and stars two fabulous leads in Geena Davis and Susan Sarandon. You’ll also spot Brad Pitt onscreen in his first significant movie role.

21 __ Mae: Whoopi’s “Ghost” role : ODA

Oda Mae Brown is the psychic medium in the movie “Ghost”, and is played by Whoopi Goldberg.

The fabulous film “Ghost” was the highest-grossing movie at the box office in 1990, bringing in over $500 million, despite only costing $21 million to make. Stars of the film are Patrick Swayze, Demi Moore and Whoopi Goldberg. You might want to check out the stage musical adaptation “Ghost The Musical”, which debuted in 2011 and is touring the UK and US.

22 *Game piece with a “6” on it : GREEN BILLIARD BALL (green room & billiard room & ballroom)

The name of the game billiards comes from the French word “billiard” that originally described the wooden cue stick. The Old French “bille” translates as “stick of wood”.

A “green room” in the world of show business is a lounge area used by performers before and after a show, or when they are not required on stage. There are several etymologies cited for the term that relate to specific theaters, but it does seem clear that the original green rooms were indeed decorated mainly in green.

25 “3x” on an Rx : TER

Abbreviations on a medical prescription (Rx) are shortened forms of Latin phrases. “Ter in die” is Latin for “three times a day”, abbreviated to “TID”. “Bis in die” (BID) would be twice a day, and “quater in die” (QID) would be four times a day.

There seems to be some uncertainty about the origin of the symbol “Rx” that’s used for a medical prescription. One explanation is that it comes from the astrological sign for Jupiter, a symbol put on prescriptions in days of old to invoke Jupiter’s blessing to help a patient recover.

26 Baskin-Robbins treats : SUNDAES

The Baskin-Robbins chain of ice cream parlors is the largest in the world. The chain was founded by Burt Baskin and Irv Robbins in Glendale, California in 1945. The company started using the slogan “31 flavors” in 1953, suggesting that a customer could order a different flavor of ice cream on every day of every month.

27 27-member gp. : THE EU

The European Union (EU) flag features a circle of twelve yellow stars on a blue background. The number of stars is not related to the number of states in the European Union, nor has it ever been. The number of stars in the design was the subject of much debate prior to its adoption in 1955 by the Council of Europe. Twelve was a deliberate choice, as at that time there was no political connotation, and twelve was considered to be a symbol of unity.

30 GPS command : TURN

The modern Global Positioning System (GPS) system that we use today was built by the US military who received the massive funding needed because of fears during the Cold War of the use of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles. We civilians, all round the world, owe a lot to President Ronald Reagan because he directed the military to make GPS technology available to the public for the common good. President Reagan was moved to do so after the Soviet Union shot down KAL flight 007 carrying 269 people, just because the plane strayed accidentally into Soviet airspace.

31 Toon maker of a female road runner costume : ACME

The Acme Corporation is a fictional company used mainly by Looney Tunes, and within the Looney Tunes empire it appears mostly in “Road Runner” cartoons. Wile E. Coyote is always receiving a new piece of gear from Acme designed to finally capture the Road Runner, but the equipment always leads to his downfall.

32 Garland’s girl : MINNELLI

Actress and singer Liza Minnelli is the daughter of Judy Garland and movie director Vincente Minnelli. Liza won her only Oscar for her lead performance in 1972’s “Cabaret”. She has also won an Emmy, Grammy and Tony, and is one of the very few entertainers to have made that “sweep”.

35 Tee sizes, initially : SML

Small, medium and large (S, M & L)

39 Pool hustler : SHARK

A pool shark is a player who hustles others in a pool hall with the goal of making money unfairly in competition. The term “pool shark” used to be “pool sharp”.

41 It’s found in a fizz : SLOE GIN

By definition, a cocktail known as a “fizz” includes lemon or lime juice and carbonated water. The most popular of the genre is the gin fizz, made from 3 parts gin, 2 parts lemon juice, 1 part sugar syrup and 5 parts soda water. There is also a variant known as a sloe gin fizz.

42 __-Dazs : HAAGEN

Häagen-Dazs ice cream originated in the Bronx, New York in 1961. The name “Häagen-Dazs” is a “nonsense” term, words chosen for its Scandinavian feel that the producers thought would appeal to potential customers.

45 Selfish pair? : ESSES

There is a pair of letters S (esses) in the word “selfish”.

48 Fluish symptoms : AGUES

An ague is a fever, one usually associated with malaria.

50 Do some road repairs : RETAR

The terms “tarmac” and “macadam” are short for “tarmacadam”. In the 1800s, Scotsman John Loudon McAdam developed a style of road known as “macadam”. Macadam had a top-layer of crushed stone and gravel laid over larger stones. The macadam also had a convex cross-section so that water tended to drain to the sides. In 1901, a significant improvement was made by English engineer Edgar Purnell Hooley who introduced tar into the macadam, improving the resistance to water damage and practically eliminating dust. The “tar-penetration macadam” is the basis of what we now call “tarmac”.

53 Skin soother : ALOE

Aloe vera is a succulent plant that grows in relatively dry climates. The plant’s leaves are full of biologically-active compounds that have been studied extensively. Aloe vera has been used for centuries in herbal medicine, mainly for topical treatment of wounds.

54 Name above “The Lady and Her Music” on a 1981 Broadway poster : LENA

“Lena Horne: The Lady and Her Music” is a 1981 stage musical. It was written for, and starred, singer and actress Lena Horne. The original production opened on Broadway. It ran for 333 performances, and closed in 1982 on Horne’s 65th birthday. Horne didn’t rest on her laurels, though. She toured with the show in North America through 1983, and performed it in London’s West End and Stockholm in 1984.

55 Kikkoman sauces : SOYS

Kikkoman is a company headquartered in Japan that is noted in North America as a producer of soy sauce.

57 One of two field borders : END ZONE

That would be football.

70 Hardly a vet : TYRO

A tyro (also “tiro”) is a beginner or a novice. “Tyro” comes into English from Latin, in which language “tiro” means “recruit”.

72 “… __, short and stout” : TEAPOT

The children’s song “I’m a Little Teapot” was written and published in 1939, composed by a married couple who ran a dance school for children. They needed a simple tune that young ones could use to learn a simple tap routine, and came up with this:

I’m a little teapot,
Short and stout,
Here is my handle,
Here is my spout,
When I get all steamed up,
Hear me shout,
Tip me over and pour me out!

73 As-the-crow-flies route : BEELINE

To make a beeline for somewhere or something, one takes a direct route. The term derives from the excellent homing instinct of bees.

75 Chute opener? : PARA-

The term “parachute” was coined by Frenchman François Blanchard, from “para-” meaning “defense against” and “chute” meaning “a fall”.

77 FedEx rounds, briefly : RTES

FedEx began operations in 1973 as Federal Express, but now operates very successfully under it’s more catchy, abbreviated name. Headquartered in Memphis with its “SuperHub” at Memphis International Airport, FedEx is the world’s largest airline in terms of tons of freight flown. And due to the presence of FedEx, Memphis Airport has the largest-volume cargo operation of any airport worldwide.

78 Hollywood brothers’ name : COEN

I think it’s great to see two brothers working together and being so successful. Joel and Ethan Coen are two movie producers and directors who both live in New York City. The Coen brothers do love the movie-making business and they even married industry “insiders”. Ethan’s wife is film editor Tricia Cooke, and Joel is married to one of my favorite actresses, the talented Frances McDormand.

81 __ town : COW

A cow town is one that serves as a shipping point or market center for cattle.

85 Cook-off bowlful : CHILI

The full name of the dish that is often called simply “chili” is “chili con carne”, Spanish for “peppers with meat”. The dish was created by immigrants from the Spanish Canary Islands in the city of San Antonio, Texas (a city which the islanders founded). The San Antonio Chili Stand was a popular attraction at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, and that stand introduced the dish to the rest of America and to the world.

86 Stomach : MAW

“Maw” is a term used to describe the mouth or stomach of a carnivorous animal. “Maw” is also used as slang for the mouth or stomach of a greedy person.

88 Move quickly, as clouds : SCUD

To scud is a move swiftly as if propelled forward. The term is often used with reference to clouds, scudding across the sky.

89 Big name in theaters : WARNER

The Warner Bros. film studio was founded by four Warner brothers, although their original family name was Wonskolaser. The brothers Harry, Albert, Sam and Jack emigrated from Poland as children with their parents, and changed their name when they landed in Baltimore, Maryland in 1889.

90 Literally, “going,” in scores : ANDANTE

The tempo (plural “tempi”) of a piece of music is usually designated with an Italian word on the score. For example, “grave” is slow and solemn, “andante” is at a walking pace, “scherzo” is fast and light-hearted, and “allegro” is fast, quickly and bright.

92 Sierra Nevada lake : TAHOE

Lake Tahoe (often referred to simply as “Tahoe”) is up in the Sierra Nevada mountains, and is located right on the border between California and Nevada. It is the largest alpine lake in the country, and the largest lake in general behind the five Great Lakes. Tahoe is also the second deepest lake, with only the beautiful Crater Lake in Oregon being deeper. Given its location, there are tall casinos that sit right on the shore on the Nevada side of the state line where gambling is legal.

The American Sierra Nevada range lies in California and Nevada. The Spanish Sierra Nevada range is in Andalusia, with the name meaning “snowy range” in Spanish.

94 Man Ray contemporary : ARP

Jean Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn’t the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both “Hans” and “Jean” translate into English as “John”. In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all of his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. Arp was sent home …

Man Ray was an American modernist artist who spent most of his working life in Paris. Man Ray was born in South Philadelphia in 1890, and his real name was Emmanuel Radnitzky. His family shortened “Radnitzky” to “Ray” in response to the anti-Semitic feeling that was prevalent at the time. Emmanuel was known as “Manny”, and he decided to assume the name Man Ray and use it for his work.

95 Higher ed hurdle : GRE

Passing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is usually a requirement for entry into graduate school here in the US.

98 Poet : BARD

The original bards were storytellers, poets and composers of music in medieval Britain and Ireland, with the term coming from the Old Celtic word “bardos” that described a poet or singer. I guess the most famous bard was William Shakespeare, the Bard of Avon.

99 Lowry of kid lit : LOIS

Lois Lowry is a writer of children’s fiction. Lowry doesn’t stick to “safe” material in her books, and has dealt with difficult subjects such as racism, murder and the Holocaust. Two of her books won the Newbery Medal: “Number the Stars” (1990) and “The Giver” (1993).

101 __ firma : TERRA

“Terra firma” is Latin for “solid ground”.

104 Fictional pilot who said, “Never tell me the odds” : HAN SOLO

Han Solo is the space smuggler in “Star Wars” played by Harrison Ford. Ford was originally hired by George Lucas just to read lines for actors during auditions for “Star Wars”, but over time Lucas became convinced that Ford was right for the pivotal role of Han Solo.

113 Stranded letters? : RNA

Both DNA and RNA are complex molecules comprising nucleotide bases arranged in chains. Famously, DNA molecules form a double-helix structure, with two chains coiled around each other. RNA chains are single-stranded structures that usually fold onto themselves.

115 Wrap that sounds apologetic : SARI

The item of clothing called a “sari” (also “saree”) is a strip of cloth, as one might imagine, unusual perhaps in that it is unstitched along the whole of its length. The strip of cloth can range from four to nine meters long (that’s a lot of material!). The sari is usually wrapped around the waist, then draped over the shoulder leaving the midriff bare. I must say, it can be a beautiful item of clothing.

116 Giant’s NFL foe : EAGLE

The Philadelphia Eagles were established in 1933 and joined the National Football League as a replacement for the bankrupt Frankford Yellow Jackets, also from Philadelphia. The “Eagle” name was inspired by the Blue Eagle insignia that was used by companies who were in compliance with the National Industrial Recovery Act that was central to President Roosevelt’s New Deal Program.

117 Belarus, once: Abbr. : SSR

The Republic of Belarus is a landlocked country in Eastern Europe, located east of Poland and north of Ukraine. Belarus didn’t exist as an entity until the Russian Revolution when it was created as one of the Soviet Socialist Republics (SSRs) that made up the USSR. The Republic of Belarus was formed soon after the USSR dissolved in 1990, but unlike many of the former Soviet Republics, Belarus has retained many of the old Soviet policies. Alexander Lukashenko is the country’s president and he believes in state ownership of the economy. Belarus and Russia have formal agreements in place that pledge cooperation.

118 El __ : NINO

When the surface temperature of much of the Pacific Ocean rises more than half a degree celsius, then there is said to be an El Niño episode. That small temperature change in the Pacific has been associated with climatic changes that can stretch right across the globe. El Niño is Spanish for “the boy” and is a reference to the Christ child. The phenomenon was given this particular Spanish name because the warming is usually noticed near South America and around Christmas-time.

Down

1 “Gemini Man” director Lee : ANG

Taiwanese director Ang Lee sure has directed a mixed bag of films, mixed in terms of genre but not in terms of quality. He was at the helm for such classics as “Sense & Sensibility” (my personal favorite), “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”, “Hulk”, “Brokeback Mountain” and “Life of Pi”.

“Gemini Man” is a 2019 action movie starring Will Smith. Smith has two roles in the film, playing a retiring hitman (Henry Brogan) as well as his much younger clone (Jackson “Junior” Brogan). The younger character was portrayed by Smith, and was “de-aged” digitally. Many who saw the film were less than impressed by the de-aging process.

3 “In __ of gifts … ” : LIEU

As one might imagine perhaps, “in lieu” came into English from the Old French word “lieu” meaning “place”, which in turn is derived from the Latin “locum” that also means “place”. So, “in lieu” translates as “in place of”.

5 One on a Facebook list : FRIEND

If you’ve seen the movie “The Social Network”, you might remember that Facebook started off as “Facemash”, a site created by Mark Zuckerberg while he was attending Harvard. Facemash became “Thefacebook” and membership was opened to students beyond Harvard, initially including Ivy League schools and then most colleges across North America.

7 Pro in a party : POL

Politician (pol)

8 What a comedy show might have you in : STITCHES

A stitch is a sudden stabbing pain in the side. We started using the term “stitch” to mean an amusing person or thing in 1968, from the sense of laughing so much that one was in stitches of pain, as in “he had me in stitches”.

12 Actor Linden : HAL

The actor and musician Hal Linden is best known for playing the title role in the sitcom “Barney Miller” in the seventies and eighties. Linden started his entertainment career as a big band musician and singer. After achieving success as an actor, he decided to revive his career in music and toured with his cabaret act starting in the early 1980s. Linden plays the clarinet and sings with backing from a big band.

13 *Primary concern of a Four Seasons chef : HOTEL GUEST DINING (hotel room & guest room & dining room)

The Four Seasons hotel chain is based in Toronto, and was founded in 1960 by Isadore Sharp. Today, Sharp only owns 5% of the company, having sold the balance in equal shares to Bill Gates and Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal of Saudi Arabia in 2007.

15 Metaphorical rush-hour subway rider : SARDINE

The commuters were packed in like sardines in a can.

19 Garson of “Mrs. Miniver” : GREER

Greer Garson was a British actress who made a name for herself in Hollywood films in the 1940s. One of Garson’s most famous roles was playing the title character in the 1942 film “Mrs. Miniver”, starring alongside Walter Pidgeon. Garson married a much younger man in 1943, actor Richard Ney who played her son in “Mrs. Miniver”. That role earned her an appearance in the “Guinness Book of World Records” for having given the longest Oscar speech ever, at 5½ minutes. After that speech, the producers of the Academy Awards instituted a time limit.

“Mrs. Miniver” is a 1942 movie starring Greer Garson and Walter Pidgeon that is based on a 1940 book of the same name by Jan Struther. The book itself is actually a compilation of newspaper columns that Struther wrote for “The Times” of London. The columns were reflections of daily life in the run up to WWII as seen through the eyes of the fictional “Mrs. Miniver”. When the film was completed, President Roosevelt stepped in and had it rushed to theaters as he believed it would help convince the American people that the US needed to intervene in the war raging in Europe.

20 Plains, in Peru : LLANOS

Llano is the Spanish word for “plain, flat region”.

23 Industry tycoon : BARON

Our term “tycoon” meaning powerful business person was originally used by foreigners to describe the shogun of Japan. “Tycoon” is an anglicization of the Japanese “taikun” meaning “great lord or prince”.

24 Sportscaster Rashad : AHMAD

Ahmad Rashad is a former football player who launched a career as a sportscaster after he retired from the game. Rashad proposed marriage to actress Phylicia Ayers-Allen on national television in 1985. Ayers-Allen, who played Bill Cosby’s wife on “The Cosby Show”, accepted the proposal and became Rashad’s third wife.

29 “__ Haw” : HEE

The variety show “Hee Haw” aired on CBS from 1969-1971, and then had a 20-year run in syndication. The show was built around country music, although the format was inspired by “Rowan & Martin’s Laugh In”.

33 Rae of “The Lovebirds” : ISSA

Issa Rae is a Stanford University graduate who created a YouTube web series called “The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl”. Rae also plays the title role in the series, a young lady named “J”. “Awkward Black Girl” was adapted into an HBO comedy-drama called “Insecure”, in which Issa Rae stars.

“The Lovebirds” is a 2020 romantic comedy movie starring Issa Rae and Kumail Nanjiani as a couple on the run after witnessing a murder. The film’s release schedule was disrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Netflix stepped in and bought it for online release. As a result, “The Lovebirds” was the top-streamed title on Netflix on the weekend it became available.

34 Reds and Cards, briefly : NL’ERS

When the Cincinnati Reds were a dominating force in the National League in the seventies, the team was given the nickname “the Big Red Machine”.

The St. Louis Cardinals Major League Baseball team plays at Busch Stadium. Busch Stadium is the third stadium in the history of St. Louis to have the Busch name. The first two were named for Gussie Busch, the brewing magnate and former Cardinals team owner. The current stadium is named for the brewery though, and not Gussie per se.

35 Shadowless? : SHAVEN

A male might shave to remove his five o’clock shadow, a short growth of beard evident late in the day.

36 French military leader with an eponymous line : MAGINOT

The Maginot Line was a fortified line built in the 1930s by France along her borders with Germany. The French built a similar fortification along the border with Italy called the Alpine Line. The Maginot Line was pretty much useless at the start of WWII as the German forces just went around it and invaded France through Belgium. It was French minister André Maginot who convinced the government to build the fortifications, and so the resulting “line” was named in his honor.

40 Actor Wynn : KEENAN

Keenan Wynn was a character actor who played many roles on television and in movies. Keenan’s father was the actor and comedian Ed Wynn.

44 Andalusian uncle : TIO

Andalusia (“Andalucía” in Spanish) is one of the seventeen autonomous communities in the Kingdom of Spain, and is the most southerly. The capital of Andalusia is the old city of Seville. The name Andalusia comes from its Arabic name, Al-Andalus, reflecting the region’s history as the center of Muslim power in Iberia during medieval times.

46 Celery piece : STALK

There’s an urban myth that eating celery burns more calories than the body can obtain from the vegetable through digestion. While celery is indeed a low-calorie food, eating it does provide a net-positive number of calories.

49 Early seal hunter : ALEUT

The Aleuts live on the Aleutian Islands of the North Pacific, and on the Commander Islands at the western end of the same island chain. The Aleutian Islands are part of the United States, and the Commander Islands are in Russia.

53 Mayo is in it : ANO

In Spanish, “mayo” (May) is one of the months of the “año” (year).

54 Timber wolves : LOBOS

The timber wolf is also known as the gray wolf, tundra wolf or lobo.

56 Quaint shoppe adjective : OLDE

The word “olde” wasn’t actually used much earlier than the 1920s. “Olde” was introduced to give a quaint antique feel to brand names, shop names etc. as in “Ye Olde Shoppe”.

58 Notable feature of 59-Down : ODOR

59 Toon with a 58-Down : LE PEW

Skunks have anal scent glands that can be used as defensive weapons. The glands produce sulfur-containing chemicals that have a really awful smell and that can irritate the eyes and skin.

Pepé Le Pew is a very likable cartoon character from the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series. Pepé is a French skunk, first introduced way back in 1945. He is always thinking of “l’amour” and chases the lady skunks, or a black cat with a white stripe accidentally painted down her back.

62 Adam of “Grown Ups” films : SANDLER

Adam Sandler’s big break was with “Saturday Night Live” (SNL). He then went on to make several successful movies and has his own movie and television production company. Personally, I am not a fan of Adam Sandler as a performer, nor a fan of his movies …

“Grown Ups” is a 2010 comedy movie written by and starring Adam Sandler. The film revolves around five childhood friends who reunite after thirty years. Sandler plays one of the five, along with Kevin James, Chris Rock, David Spade and Rob Schneider.

67 Dusk, to Donne : E’EN

John Donne was one of England’s most celebrated poets, and was active at the start of the 17th century. He spent much of his life in poverty and even spent a short time in prison for having married his wife without procuring the appropriate permissions. After his release, his wife bore him 12 children in 16 years, passing away a few days after the twelfth child was born.

74 Bert in Oz : LAHR

Bert Lahr’s most famous role was the cowardly lion in “The Wizard of Oz”. Lahr had a long career in burlesque, vaudeville and on Broadway. Remember the catchphrase made famous by the cartoon character Snagglepuss, “Heavens to Murgatroyd!”? Snagglepuss stole that line from a 1944 movie called “Meet the People” in which it was first uttered by none other than Bert Lahr.

76 “I didn’t __ be here” : ASK TO

Nor did I …

79 Ref. that added “chapstick” in 2021 : OED

Work started on what was to become the first “Oxford English Dictionary” (OED) in 1857. Several interim versions of the dictionary were published in the coming years with the first full version appearing, in ten bound volumes, in 1928. The second edition of the OED appeared in 1989 and is made up of twenty volumes. The OED was first published in electronic form in 1988 and went online in 2000. Given the modern use of computers, the publishing house responsible feels that there will never be a third print version of the famous dictionary.

ChapStick is a brand of lip balm produced by Pfizer, although the brand is so popular that the term “chapstick” tends to be used generically. ChapStick was invented way back in the 1880s by a Dr. Charles Browne Fleet in Lynchburg, Virginia.

83 City on the Orne : CAEN

Caen, on the River Orne, lies in the Calvados department of France in the northwest of the country. Caen is famous for the WWII Battle of Caen that left the town practically destroyed. Caen is also the burial place of Norman King William I of England, also known as William the Conqueror after his victory at the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

84 “Taxi Driver” director : SCORSESE

Movie director Martin Scorsese is very much a New York City native, and is well-known for directing movies set in the Big Apple. Among the list of great Scorsese films are “Taxi Driver”, “Raging Bull”, “Goodfellas”, “Cape Fear”, “Casino” and “The Departed”.

“Taxi Driver” is a remarkable 1976 movie directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Robert De Niro. The film is remarkable for some great performances, but also for sparking an attempt on the life of President Ronald Reagan. Would-be assassin John Hinckley, Jr. tried to kill the President in order to impress Jodie Foster. Hinckley had been obsessed with Foster since seeing her performance in the film as child prostitute Iris Steensma.

85 Tony Soprano’s “Got it?” : CAPISCE?

“Capeesh?” is a slang term meaning “do you understand?” It comes from the Italian “capisce” meaning “understand”.

Tony Soprano is the protagonist in the fabulous TV drama “The Sopranos”. Played very ably by James Gandolfini, Soprano works his way up the ranks of the fictional DiMeo crime family. The Tony Soprano character was loosely based on real-life New Jersey mobster Vincent Palermo of the DeCavalcante crime family. Palermo owned a strip club called “Wiggles”, and Soprano owned one called “Bada Bing!”.

88 Trickeries : SHAMS

A sham is something that is imitation, fake. In the world of bed linens, a sham is also an imitation or fake, in the sense that it is a decorative cover designed to cover up a regular pillow used for sleeping.

91 Aries mo. : APR

Aries the Ram is the first astrological sign in the Zodiac, and is named after the constellation. Your birth sign is Aries if you were born between March 21 and April 20, but if you are an Aries you would know that! “Aries” is the Latin word for “ram”.

94 Grammy winner Morissette : ALANIS

Alanis Morissette is a Canadian singer-songwriter. After releasing two pop albums in Canada, in 1995 she recorded her first album to be distributed internationally. Called “Jagged Little Pill”, it is a collection of songs with more of a rock influence. The album was a huge success, the highest-selling album of the 1990s, and the highest-selling debut album by any artist at any time (selling over 30 million units).

97 Offspring : SCION

“Scion” comes from the old French word “sion” or “cion”, meaning “a shoot or a twig”. In botanical terms today, a scion is used in grafting two compatible plants together. In grafting, one plant is selected for its root system (the “rootstock”), and the other plant is selected for its stems, leaves and fruit (the “scion”). The term scion migrated naturally into the world of family history. A scion is simply a descendant, a son or a daughter and therefore a branching point in the family tree.

100 Word with panel or system : SOLAR …

Solar panels are arrays of solar cells that make use of what’s known as the photovoltaic effect. We are more likely to have learned about the photoelectric effect in school, in which electrons were ejected from the surface of some materials when it was exposed to light or other forms of radiation. The photovoltaic effect is related but different. Instead of being electrons ejected from the surface, in the photovoltaic effect electrons move around in the material creating a difference in voltage.

All of the planets in the Solar System, except for Earth, were named for Greek and Roman gods and goddesses:

  • Mercury was Roman god of travel
  • Venus was the Roman goddess of love and beauty
  • Mars was the Roman god of war
  • Jupiter was the king of the Roman gods
  • Saturn was the Roman god of agriculture
  • Uranus was the Greek god of the sky
  • Neptune was the Roman god of the sea
  • (also, Pluto was the Roman god of the underworld)

105 Maracaibo, por ejemplo : LAGO

Lake Maracaibo isn’t actually a “lake” as such, but rather a brackish bay or lagoon with a very narrow entrance into the Gulf of Venezuela in the Caribbean Sea. Paradoxically, Maracaibo was a true lake in the past, and at 20-36 million years old can be considered one of the oldest “lakes” on the planet.

106 Munch Museum city : OSLO

Edvard Munch was a Norwegian expressionist, and most famous for his painting “The Scream”, painted in 1893. What a wonderful work that is, a true representation of expressionism. The Munch Museum in Oslo is dedicated to his work and life. In 2004, two of Munch’s paintings, “The Scream” and “Madonna”, were stolen from the Munch Museum by armed robbers who subdued the museum guards. The paintings were missing for two years, but recovered in 2006.

109 Fashionable Taylor : ANN

There was no actual person named “Ann Taylor” associated with the Ann Taylor line of clothes. The name was chosen by the marketing professionals because “Ann” was considered to be “very New England” back in 1954 when the stores first opened, and “Taylor” suggested that clothes were carefully “tailored”.

111 Tussaud’s medium : WAX

Marie Tussaud was a wax sculptor from France. Some of her early work was very gruesome as she lived through the French Revolution. She would take the decapitated heads of executed citizens and use them to make death masks which were then paraded through the streets. She eventually moved to London, taking with her a vast collection of wax models made by her and her father. She opened a museum to display the works, and Madame Tussauds wax museum is a major attraction in the city to this day.

112 School yr. division : SEM

“Semester” is a German word from the Latin “semestris”, an adjective meaning “of six months”. We use the term in a system that divides an academic year into two roughly equal parts. A trimester-system has three parts, and a quarter-system has four.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Willing partner : ABLE
5 Dapper dudes : FOPS
9 Break-even transaction : WASH
13 “__ Eye Is on the Sparrow”: hymn : HIS
16 Easily played : NAIVE
18 Hilarious sort : RIOT
19 Thelma, to Louise, or vice versa : GAL PAL
21 __ Mae: Whoopi’s “Ghost” role : ODA
22 *Game piece with a “6” on it : GREEN BILLIARD BALL (green room & billiard room & ballroom)
25 “3x” on an Rx : TER
26 Baskin-Robbins treats : SUNDAES
27 27-member gp. : THE EU
28 Good way to plan : AHEAD
30 GPS command : TURN
31 Toon maker of a female road runner costume : ACME
32 Garland’s girl : MINNELLI
35 Tee sizes, initially : SML
38 Curtain holder : ROD
39 Pool hustler : SHARK
41 It’s found in a fizz : SLOE GIN
42 __-Dazs : HAAGEN
44 Like many a bow : TIED
45 Selfish pair? : ESSES
47 Take advantage of : USE
48 Fluish symptoms : AGUES
49 Lends a hand : AIDS
50 Do some road repairs : RETAR
51 Add to the pot : BET
52 Yard opening : VINE-
53 Skin soother : ALOE
54 Name above “The Lady and Her Music” on a 1981 Broadway poster : LENA
55 Kikkoman sauces : SOYS
57 One of two field borders : END ZONE
59 Where it’s at : LOCALE
61 “I will if you will” : LET’S
63 Neither partner : NOR
64 *Camp sleeping arrangement : DOUBLE BUNK BED (double room & bunk room & bedroom)
68 Pops : DAD
70 Hardly a vet : TYRO
72 “… __, short and stout” : TEAPOT
73 As-the-crow-flies route : BEELINE
75 Chute opener? : PARA-
77 FedEx rounds, briefly : RTES
78 Hollywood brothers’ name : COEN
80 Extras : ANDS
81 __ town : COW
82 It needs a driver : SCREW
84 __ dog : SLED
85 Cook-off bowlful : CHILI
86 Stomach : MAW
87 Thumbs-ups : OKAYS
88 Move quickly, as clouds : SCUD
89 Big name in theaters : WARNER
90 Literally, “going,” in scores : ANDANTE
92 Sierra Nevada lake : TAHOE
94 Man Ray contemporary : ARP
95 Higher ed hurdle : GRE
96 Some union acquisitions : STEPSONS
98 Poet : BARD
99 Lowry of kid lit : LOIS
101 __ firma : TERRA
102 Pulls an all-nighter : CRAMS
104 Fictional pilot who said, “Never tell me the odds” : HAN SOLO
107 “TMI!!” : EEW!
108 *Where women once learned to stitch : LADIES’ SEWING CLASS (ladies’ room & sewing room & classroom)
113 Stranded letters? : RNA
114 Disguise, in a way : ENCODE
115 Wrap that sounds apologetic : SARI
116 Giant’s NFL foe : EAGLE
117 Belarus, once: Abbr. : SSR
118 El __ : NINO
119 Parted partners : EXES
120 One of three found in each answer to a starred clue : ROOM

Down

1 “Gemini Man” director Lee : ANG
2 Signal-strength display : BARS
3 “In __ of gifts … ” : LIEU
4 Occasion : EVENT
5 One on a Facebook list : FRIEND
6 Spa supplies : OILS
7 Pro in a party : POL
8 What a comedy show might have you in : STITCHES
9 Get one’s feet wet : WADE
10 Book of memories : ALBUM
11 Cruise amenity : SPA
12 Actor Linden : HAL
13 *Primary concern of a Four Seasons chef : HOTEL GUEST DINING (hotel room & guest room & dining room)
14 One with a vision : IDEALIST
15 Metaphorical rush-hour subway rider : SARDINE
17 Stands the test of time : ENDURES
19 Garson of “Mrs. Miniver” : GREER
20 Plains, in Peru : LLANOS
23 Industry tycoon : BARON
24 Sportscaster Rashad : AHMAD
29 “__ Haw” : HEE
31 In reserve : ASIDE
33 Rae of “The Lovebirds” : ISSA
34 Reds and Cards, briefly : NL’ERS
35 Shadowless? : SHAVEN
36 French military leader with an eponymous line : MAGINOT
37 *’50s-’60s ad competition : LAUNDRY POWDER WAR (laundry room & powder room & war room)
40 Actor Wynn : KEENAN
43 “__ Louise!” : GEEZ
44 Andalusian uncle : TIO
46 Celery piece : STALK
49 Early seal hunter : ALEUT
50 Shorten further : RECUT
51 “I’m outta here” : BYE
53 Mayo is in it : ANO
54 Timber wolves : LOBOS
56 Quaint shoppe adjective : OLDE
58 Notable feature of 59-Down : ODOR
59 Toon with a 58-Down : LE PEW
60 Subsided : EBBED
62 Adam of “Grown Ups” films : SANDLER
65 Smoothie fruit : BERRY
66 Most up-to-date : LATEST
67 Dusk, to Donne : E’EN
69 Hankering : DESIRE
71 Like clams on the half shell : RAW
74 Bert in Oz : LAHR
76 “I didn’t __ be here” : ASK TO
78 Informed, with “in” : CLUED …
79 Ref. that added “chapstick” in 2021 : OED
81 Base bars : CANTEENS
83 City on the Orne : CAEN
84 “Taxi Driver” director : SCORSESE
85 Tony Soprano’s “Got it?” : CAPISCE?
86 Really nails : MASTERS
87 Marked down : ON SALE
88 Trickeries : SHAMS
89 “Don’t think so” : WRONG
91 Aries mo. : APR
93 Put down : ABASE
94 Grammy winner Morissette : ALANIS
97 Offspring : SCION
100 Word with panel or system : SOLAR …
103 Overhaul : REDO
104 Bring on board : HIRE
105 Maracaibo, por ejemplo : LAGO
106 Munch Museum city : OSLO
109 Fashionable Taylor : ANN
110 Caesar’s 601 : DCI
111 Tussaud’s medium : WAX
112 School yr. division : SEM

19 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 13 Feb 22, Sunday”

  1. Nearly an hour and then I had to do a grid check. TER eluded me, which then made getting IDEALIST a problem. I had THR.

  2. 58:00 no errors…I was going great guns until I hit the SW corner,it didn’t open up until I changed DNA to RNA🤪
    Stay safe😀
    Go Bengals…you worked hard for this shot🙏

  3. 20:52

    Didn’t appreciate the theme until I was going through my final pass. KEEGAN/LEGA to KEENAN/LENA was the final fix.

    I’m amused that I could spell CAPISCE an the first try, but not HAAGEN dazs. I remember when that was our top choice, before there was Ben & Jerry’s, or Graetor’s, or Jeni’s. In the Boston area, there’s Toscanini’s and Rancatore’s. What’s your favorite local scoop shop?

  4. No errors, but a couple of lookups. This one took me a long time and a
    few “do-overs” like recut to replace rehem and geez to replace gees.

  5. I don’t get 52A, “yard opening” = vine(?) and 25A, “3x on an Rx” = ter is just weird .

    “Natick” is a new word for me but a phenomenon that needed naming and now I know it. Thank you, Glenn.

  6. The symbol for prescription is not, in fact, RX. It is the letter R with a slash through the R indicating that the R is an abbreviation for the word Recipe which is the Latin word for the imperative “Take.” The slash is a relatively common scribal usage in the days of manuscripts.

  7. This puzzle makes NO F***ING SENSE. Utter tripe.

    The “editor” made sure to include a couple of nonsensical clues too, to make sure it was unfinishable.

  8. A bit too tricky Sunday for me; took 1:04:02 with 2 errors in the SW. Got all the rooms except WAR, where I just had __R. Silly, should have gotten it…couple more minutes. COW town took awhile, as did MAW, MASTERS and CANTEEN. Only got ADANTE through crosses.

    1. A fop is a man who is overly concerned with his clothing and appearance; a dandy. Dapper Dan is a good synonym.

  9. 41:22 with no errors or lookups, but spent 1/3 of the time on the left side to include several of the intersections with LAUNDRYPOWDERWAR (which I had not heard of, either). I may never remember what TYRO means. I relate MAW more to mouth, or an opening. Initially thought Maracaibo was an island. Don’t know LOIS Lowery, Jean ARP, or Man Ray.

    Revisions included: ACHES>AGUES, BLT>ANO, ADDS>ANDS, OUR>COW, FASTENS>MASTERS, SAT>GRE, SOS>DNA>RNA, ISLA>LAGO.

    Did not quite get that all 3 theme words were rooms, at first. They all make sense except for Bunk Room. That’s a new one on me.

    All in all, a good Sunday puzzle with a bit of challenge in it.

  10. I have previously been stationed at more than a dozen military bases and have never seen the word “cantina” used to describe the bar. Maybe in Mexico, but certainly not here. The clue should not have been used for the answer. Finally, why is an Aleut an “early seal hunter?” C’mon editor . . . do your job, please.

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