LA Times Crossword 8 Feb 22, Tuesday

Advertisement

Constructed by: Jeff Stillman
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Continental Drift

Themed answers each include the names of CONTINENTS, but the letters of each name has DRIFTED apart throughout the answer:

  • 63A Land movement spanning millennia … or what each set of circles suggests : CONTINENTAL DRIFT
  • 18A Stringed instrument played by Jerry Garcia in the intro to CSNY’s “Teach Your Children” : PEDAL STEEL GUITAR (giving “ASIA“)
  • 29A Have high aspirations, despite being warned not to : GET YOUR HOPES UP (giving “EUROPE
  • 49A “Based on what they tell me … ” : AS FAR AS I CAN SEE … (giving “AFRICA“)
  • Read on, or jump to …
    … a complete list of answers

    Bill’s time: 6m 02s

    Bill’s errors: 0

    Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

    Across

    5 Bay of Naples isle : CAPRI

    The island of Capri off the coast of Southern Italy has been a tourist resort since the days of ancient Rome. Capri is home to the famous Blue Grotto, a sea cave that is illuminated with sunlight that’s colored blue as it passes through the seawater into the cave.

    The Gulf of Naples (also “Bay of Naples”) is on the southwest coast of Italy between the city of Naples and the town of Sorrento. The gulf is a major destination for tourists seeking to visit iconic locales like Pompeii and Mount Vesuvius, the island of Capri as well as Naples itself.

    10 Underworld boss : SATAN

    Satan is the bringer of evil and temptation in the Abrahamic religions. The name “Satan” is Hebrew for “adversary”.

    15 Actor Sharif : OMAR

    Omar Sharif was a great Hollywood actor from Egypt, someone who played major roles in memorable movies such as “Doctor Zhivago” and “Lawrence of Arabia”. But to me, he was my bridge hero (the card game). In his heyday, Sharif was one of the best bridge players in the world.

    16 Setting for some van Gogh works : ARLES

    Quite a few years ago now, I had the privilege of living just a short car-ride from the beautiful city of Arles in the South of France. Although Arles has a long and colorful history, the Romans had a prevailing influence over the city’s design. Arles has a spectacular Roman amphitheater, arch, circus as well as old walls that surround the center of the city. In more modern times, it was a place Vincent van Gogh often visited, and was where he painted many of his most famous works, including “Cafe Terrace at Night” and “Bedroom in Arles”.

    17 Salad fruit : OLIVE

    The olive tree developed in and around the Mediterranean Basin, but has been cultivated in many locations around the world for thousands of years. The fruit of the olive tree is prized as a foodstuff, as well as a source of olive oil. Our word “oil” ultimately derives from the Greek “elaia” meaning “olive”.

    18 Stringed instrument played by Jerry Garcia in the intro to CSNY’s “Teach Your Children” : PEDAL STEEL GUITAR

    A pedal steel guitar is a console-style guitar that features pedals controlled by the feet and levers controlled by the knees. I guess one has to be pretty adept to play such an instrument, coordinating the use of hands, knees and feet.

    Jerry Garcia was one of the founding members of the rock band, the Grateful Dead. Garcia struggled with cocaine and heroin addiction during most of his life, and died of a heart attack in 1995 in a California drug rehabilitation center.

    The supergroup Crosby, Stills & Nash (CSN) is made up of David Crosby, Stephen Stills and Graham Nash. The band can grow to “CSNY” when the trio is joined by Neil Young. Fans have been known to call the act “C, S, N and sometimes Y”, a play on the expression that names all the vowels, “A, E, I, O, U and sometimes Y”.

    “Teach Your Children” is a song released by Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young (CSNY) in 1970. For the recording, there was a deal made by CSNY with Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead. Garcia agreed to play pedal steel guitar for “Teach Your Children”. In return, CSNY agreed to help the Grateful Dead with their vocal harmonies.

    22 Aspire laptop maker : ACER

    Acer’s Aspire line is a series of personal computers, both desktops and laptops, that were introduced in 1999.

    26 Flip chart holders : EASELS

    The word “easel” comes from an old Dutch word meaning “donkey”, would you believe? The idea is that an easel carries its load (an oil painting, say) just as a donkey would be made to carry a load.

    34 __ kwon do : TAE

    Tae kwon do is the national sport of Korea. “Tae” means “to strike or break with foot”; “kwon” means “to strike or break with fist”; “do” means “way” or “art”. Along with judo, tae kwon do is one of only two martial arts included in the Olympic Games.

    35 Say over and over : ITERATE

    The verb “to iterate” means to repeat over again. The verb “reiterate” means the same thing. One might suspect that “reiterate” is one of those words that has crept into the language due to repeated (reiterated?!) misuse. Well, that’s not quite the case, but close. Back in the 1400s, “iterate” meant “repeat”, and “reiterate” meant “repeat again and again”. We’ve lost the distinction between those two definitions over time.

    38 Model Campbell : NAOMI

    Naomi Campbell is a supermodel from England. There’s a lot of interest in Campbell’s life off the runway, as she is known to have an explosive temper and has been charged with assault more than once. Her dating life is much-covered in the tabloids as well, and she has been romantically linked in the past with Mike Tyson and Robert De Niro.

    43 Protection : AEGIS

    According to Homer’s “Iliad”, the aegis is either an animal skin or a shield that was carried by Athena and Zeus. The aegis is also described as bearing the head of Gorgon, a female creature with hair made of venomous snakes. The aegis provided some level of protection to the bearer, a concept that has been extended to our contemporary usage of “aegis”. Someone under the aegis of someone else is protected or sponsored by that person.

    44 Home of the NBA’s Magic : ORLANDO

    Orlando in Central Florida is the largest inland city in the state. Orlando was the most visited city in the US in 2009. That’s mainly because it is home to many theme parks, including Walt Disney World, Universal Studios Florida and SeaWorld. Orlando has a few nicknames, including “O-Town” and “Theme Park Capital of the World”.

    The Orlando Magic were formed in 1989 as an NBA expansion team. A local paper was asked to run a competition to suggest names for the new team and the community came up with its four top picks of “Heat”, “Tropics”, “Juice” and “Magic”. A committee then opted for “Orlando Magic”. A good choice I think …

    46 Nintendo’s Super __ : NES

    The name “Super NES” (or “SNES”) stands for “Super Nintendo Entertainment System”.

    48 CPR specialist : EMT

    An emergency medical technician (EMT) might administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

    53 Water depth unit : FATHOM

    Our word “fathom” comes from the Old English word used to describe the length of the outstretched arms. Today, a fathom is equal to six feet.

    55 Newspaper space measurement : LINAGE

    “Linage” is the name given to the number of printed lines taken up by an article or advertisement in a magazine or a newspaper.

    63 Land movement spanning millennia … or what each set of circles suggests : CONTINENTAL DRIFT

    Continental drift was a hypothesis that continents had “drifted” relative to each other. The idea first arose around 1600 as a suggestion by the Dutch cartographer Abraham Ortelius. He noted the geometric similarity between the coasts of America and Europe-Africa, and opined that the Americas might have been “torn away” from Europe and Africa. The concept of continental drift was absorbed into the science of plate tectonics in the 1950s.

    68 In unison : AS ONE

    Our word “unison” means “having the same musical pitch”. The phrase “in unison” is generally used to mean “in perfect agreement”. The term “unison” ultimately comes from the Latin “uni-” meaning “one” and “sonus” meaning “sound”.

    69 Hebrides hillside : BRAE

    “Brae” is a lowland Scots word for the slope or brow of a hill.

    The Hebrides are a group of islands just off the west coast of Scotland. They are divided into two main groups: the Inner and Outer Hebrides.

    70 Author Carroll : LEWIS

    “Lewis Carroll” was the pen name of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson. He was born in 1832 in the village of Daresbury near Warrington in the county of Cheshire, in the northwest of England. And, let’s not forget one of Carroll’s most beloved characters, the Cheshire Cat.

    Down

    3 Anti-DUI acronym : MADD

    Candace Lightner lost her 13-year-old child to a drunk-driver in 1980. Soon after, Lightner formed the group Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD).

    In some states, there is no longer a legal difference between a DWI (Driving While Intoxicated) and a DUI (Driving Under the Influence). Other states retain that difference, so that by definition a DUI is a lesser offense than a DWI.

    4 Like trumpet music : BRASSY

    We get our word “trumpet”, describing the brass instrument, from the Old French word “trompe”. A “trompe” was a long, tube-like instrument, and a “trompette” was a smaller version.

    6 Class with easels : ART

    The word “easel” comes from an old Dutch word meaning “donkey”, would you believe? The idea is that an easel carries its load (an oil painting, say) just as a donkey would be made to carry a load.

    7 Synthetic sofa portmanteau : PLEATHER

    “Pleather” is a slang term describing a leather-like material made from plastic. It is a portmanteau of “plastic” and “leather”.

    9 Archipelago part : ISLE

    “Archipelago” is our spelling of the Italian “arcipelago”, a word that has Greek roots. The Aegean Sea was once known as the Archipelago. The usage of “Archipelago” migrated over time, eventually applying only to the Aegean Islands. As a result, we use the term “archipelago” today not for a sea, but for a group or chain of islands.

    10 Trifling amount : SOU

    A sou is an old French coin. We use the term “sou” to mean “an almost worthless amount”.

    11 Boxing legend : ALI

    Boxer Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr. was born in 1942 in Louisville, Kentucky. Clay changed his name to Muhammad Ali when he converted to Islam in 1964. Who can forget Muhammad Ali lighting the Olympic flame for the 1996 games in Atlanta?

    14 Comic-Con attendees : NERDS

    San Diego’s Comic-Con was founded in 1970 as the Golden State Comic Book Convention. Held over four days each summer, I hear it is the largest show in North America.

    19 Fancy airport ride : LIMO

    The word “limousine” derives from the name of the French city of Limoges. The area around Limoges is called the Limousin, and it gave its name to a cloak hood worn by local shepherds. In early motor cars, a driver would sit outside in the weather while the passengers would sit in the covered compartment. The driver would often wear a limousin-style protective hood, giving rise to that type of transportation being called a “limousine”. Well, that’s how the story goes …

    25 Soapbox speaker : ORATOR

    Back in the 1650s, a soapbox was just that, a wooden box for holding or transporting soap. Empty soapboxes were easily carried by a potential orator and used as a stand from which to deliver an address.

    29 UConn women’s basketball coach __ Auriemma : GENO

    Geno Auriemma was appointed head coach of the University of Connecticut Huskies women’s basketball team in 1985. He also coached the US women’s national team from 2009 through 2016. Auriemma was born in Italy, and immigrated to the US with his family when he was a child.

    32 Supply, as Muzak : PIPE IN

    “Muzak” is a proprietary name for piped music, and is apparently a blend of the words “music” and “Kodak”. The Muzak system was developed way back in 1922 and was first used in workplaces.

    37 Sunrise dirección : ESTE

    “Este” (east) is a “dirección” (direction), in Spanish.

    39 Sitcom set in Korea : M*A*S*H

    “M*A*S*H” has only three stars (three asterisks, that is). These asterisks first appeared on the poster for the 1970 movie, but they were omitted in the opening titles. The TV series went on to use the asterisks from the poster.

    45 Private Ryan portrayer Matt : DAMON

    Matt Damon is an actor and screenwriter from Cambridge, Massachusetts. Damon’s big break came with the 1997 movie “Good Will Hunting”, in which he starred. He co-wrote the screenplay with his childhood friend Ben Affleck.

    “Saving Private Ryan” is an epic 1998 movie directed by Steven Spielberg, and a real “must see”. The D-Day invasion scenes were shot over a two-month period on the southeast coast of Ireland.

    47 Hester Prynne’s letter color : SCARLET

    The main character in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s novel “The Scarlet Letter” is Hester Prynne. After the birth of her illegitimate daughter Pearl, she is convicted by her puritanical neighbors of the crime of adultery. Hester is forced to wear a scarlet “A” (for “adultery”) on her clothing for the rest of her life, hence the novel’s title “The Scarlet Letter”.

    50 “The Tempest” king : ALONSO

    In William Shakespeare’s play “The Tempest”, Alonso is the King of Naples. Alonso helps Antonio to depose his brother Prospero as Duke of Milan and set him adrift in a boat with Prospero’s young daughter Miranda.

    51 Like much brandy : AGED

    Brandy is a spirit distilled from wine. The term “brandy” ultimately comes from the Dutch “gebrande wijn” meaning “burnt wine”. The length of this aging of the spirit defines the various grades of brandy:

    • VS: Very Special … at least 2 years storage
    • VSOP: Very Special (or Superior) Old Pale … at least 4 years storage
    • XO: Extra Old … at least 6 years
    • VSO: Very Superior Old … 12-17 years

    58 Noggin : HEAD

    Slang terms for “head” are “bean”, “coconut”, “gourd”, “noodle” and “noggin”.

    60 Old Pisa dough : LIRE

    The word “lira” is used in a number of countries for currency. “Lira” comes from the Latin for “pound” and is derived from the British pound sterling, the value of a Troy pound of silver. For example, the lira (plural “lire”) was the official currency of Italy before the country changed over to the euro in 2002.

    The city of Pisa sits right on the Italian coast, at the mouth of the River Arno. The city is perhaps most famous for its Leaning Tower. The tower is actually the campanile (bell tower) of the city’s cathedral, and it has been leaning since it was completed in 1173. Just shows you how important good foundations are …

    61 Advanced lit. degrees : MFAS

    Master of Fine Arts (MFA)

    62 Academic acronym : STEM

    The acronym “STEM” stands for the disciplines of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. An alternative acronym with a similar meaning is MINT, standing for mathematics, information sciences, natural sciences and technology. The acronym STEAM adds (liberal) arts to the STEM curriculum.

    64 __ chi : TAI

    More correctly called “t‘ai chi ch‘uan”, tai chi is a martial art that is mostly practiced to improve overall health and increase longevity.

    65 E-file agcy. : IRS

    E-file: that’s certainly what I do with my tax return …

    66 2022, por ejemplo : ANO

    In Spanish, “por ejemplo” means “for example”.

    Complete List of Clues/Answers

    Across

    1 Salon tool : COMB
    5 Bay of Naples isle : CAPRI
    10 Underworld boss : SATAN
    15 Actor Sharif : OMAR
    16 Setting for some van Gogh works : ARLES
    17 Salad fruit : OLIVE
    18 Stringed instrument played by Jerry Garcia in the intro to CSNY’s “Teach Your Children” : PEDAL STEEL GUITAR
    21 Says, “We’re through!” : ENDS IT!
    22 Aspire laptop maker : ACER
    23 Jar top : LID
    24 Silky to the touch : SMOOTH
    26 Flip chart holders : EASELS
    29 Have high aspirations, despite being warned not to : GET YOUR HOPES UP
    33 Environmental prefix : ECO-
    34 __ kwon do : TAE
    35 Say over and over : ITERATE
    38 Model Campbell : NAOMI
    41 Stumble : TRIP
    43 Protection : AEGIS
    44 Home of the NBA’s Magic : ORLANDO
    46 Nintendo’s Super __ : NES
    48 CPR specialist : EMT
    49 “Based on what they tell me … ” : AS FAR AS I CAN SEE …
    53 Water depth unit : FATHOM
    55 Newspaper space measurement : LINAGE
    56 Laudatory verse : ODE
    57 Cries of discovery : OHOS
    59 Regal domains : REALMS
    63 Land movement spanning millennia … or what each set of circles suggests : CONTINENTAL DRIFT
    67 Like a loud crowd : AROAR
    68 In unison : AS ONE
    69 Hebrides hillside : BRAE
    70 Author Carroll : LEWIS
    71 Warning opening : DO NOT …
    72 Rural agreement : YES’M

    Down

    1 Deal with it : COPE
    2 Gathering clouds, maybe : OMEN
    3 Anti-DUI acronym : MADD
    4 Like trumpet music : BRASSY
    5 Remove, as a demon : CAST OUT
    6 Class with easels : ART
    7 Synthetic sofa portmanteau : PLEATHER
    8 Bounce back again : RE-ECHO
    9 Archipelago part : ISLE
    10 Trifling amount : SOU
    11 Boxing legend : ALI
    12 Book names are on them : TITLE PAGES
    13 Benefit : AVAIL
    14 Comic-Con attendees : NERDS
    19 Fancy airport ride : LIMO
    20 Say hi to : GREET
    25 Soapbox speaker : ORATOR
    27 Between ports : ASEA
    28 “You bet!” : SURE!
    29 UConn women’s basketball coach __ Auriemma : GENO
    30 Plug-in vehicle, briefly : E-CAR
    31 “You missed your chance” : TOO LATE NOW
    32 Supply, as Muzak : PIPE IN
    36 It’s up at the end of the test : TIME
    37 Sunrise dirección : ESTE
    39 Sitcom set in Korea : M*A*S*H
    40 Scoop : INFO
    42 Be emphatic about : INSIST ON
    45 Private Ryan portrayer Matt : DAMON
    47 Hester Prynne’s letter color : SCARLET
    50 “The Tempest” king : ALONSO
    51 Like much brandy : AGED
    52 Close at hand : NEARBY
    53 Kind of point : FOCAL
    54 Be gaga over : ADORE
    58 Noggin : HEAD
    60 Old Pisa dough : LIRE
    61 Advanced lit. degrees : MFAS
    62 Academic acronym : STEM
    64 __ chi : TAI
    65 E-file agcy. : IRS
    66 2022, por ejemplo : ANO

    20 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 8 Feb 22, Tuesday”

    1. 6:14

      Cool theme! And very helpful.

      Also cute to see both TAI chi and TAE kwan do.

      So how would you depict India crashing into Asia in a puzzle?

      1. 10:48 – no errors, lookups, or revisions; just kind of bounced around, solving ones I knew and filling in the rest as they “took shape.”

        I don’t follow college sports, and so did not know GENO, either. PLEATHER seems to be misnamed. If it’s made out of plastic, then it’s plastic. Shouldn’t mislead by suggesting that it’s leather in some way.

    2. No errors.
      PLEATHER? huh.

      There were a couple of EASELS in this one. One in the clue and one in the answer. Not sure that was supposed to happen.

      Cute how the crossed ECO and ECAR.

    3. Never heard of OHOS for 57A for “cries of discovery”. AHAS, AAHS or OOHS maybe, but not OHOS!
      Enjoy the day.
      Stay safe 😊

    4. 22:34 no errors.
      The word easel appears as a clue word and an answer…that’s the first time I can remember that happening.
      Am I the only one who never heard of 29D?
      Stay safe😀

    5. A couple of real “reaches” in the one 72 across ok sure then sou old guy of 75 never heard of it or ever saw it in a puzzle.Still fun liked the theme!!!

    6. 10 minutes, 4 seconds, and needed Check Grid help to ferret out 6 typos. As usual, didn’t even *see* the theme, or focus on the circled squares.

      1. @ Bill B.
        Buster Keaton in Sunset Boulevard was
        my Bridge hero. “pass…..pass”. He was a
        Bridge enthusiast in real life as well 🙂

    7. Geno Auriemma may be a women’s b’ball coach, but many of his records are most for any coach men or women. Pleather is fake leather and oho often appears in puzzles.

    8. 11:42 – cheats on ARLES/PLEATHER cross.

      Found a bit (not much tho) hard for a Tuesday. Quite a comedown after yesterday’s romp!

      I never heard of PLEATHER either.

      Be Well.

    9. In the interest of accuracy, as a long time professor of Spanish I would like to point out that “ano” means “anus,” not “year.” There are many jokes about the title of Gabriel García Márquez’s book “Cien años de soledad” [One Hundred Years of Solitude] when the second word is written without the “ñ.”
      The proper spelling of the Spanish word for year is “año” which can be indicated by writing it as “anho” if the keyboard does not have the key or there is no “insert symbol” function in the software. Generally, one recreates the “ñ” sound in English as “ny” such as we see in “canyon.”
      some real stretches on this puzzle and agree with many of the comments about the clues.

    10. In the interest of accuracy and as a long time Spanish professor, the word “ano” means “anus” whereas “año” means “year.”
      Many jokes about Gabriel García Márquez’s book title “Cien años de soledad” as one can imagine.

    11. Evidently the correct meaning for 22D, spelled “ano” does not pass the censor’s eye.
      The word is correctly spelled “año” and in English should be written “anho” or “anyo” (think “canyon”).

    12. Slightly tricky Tuesday for me; took 10:55 with one error at YaSEM/LIRa.” Didn’t really notice the theme as I was going as fast as I could…until I didn’t get the banner at the end and finally just did a “check-grid.”

      Knew about pleather but GENO I had to get with crosses. Learned today that OLIVE is a fruit.

    13. “As far as I can see” is not “based on what they tell me”, it is based on one’s own assessment. Incorrect clue.

      “A roar” is not “like a loud crowd” any more than “a moo” is like a cow, or “A word” is like a human. Incorrect clue.

      One can insist upon something without being the least bit emphatic. Bad clue.

      MFA is a stretch for a literature degree. That’s like clueing ‘automobile’ and expecting someone to get that the answer is ‘motorcycle’. Even though automobiles typically are thought of as four-wheeled, motorcycle is technically included in the overall category. Poor clue.

      ‘Oho’ is not a cry of discovery, it is typically used in a taunting fashion and has a completely different flavor than ‘aha’ which is what the clue describes. Incorrect clueing.

      As already mentioned, if one is going to clue in a different language, one should make sure to use answers with letters that are valid English letters. The clause “as one”, does not share it’s penultimate letter with the Spanish word for ‘year’ as the Spanish letter in question is not an ‘n’ and does not appear in the English alphabet. Incorrect clueing.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published.