LA Times Crossword 13 Mar 22, Sunday

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Constructed by: Mark McClain
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: “Hi, C!”

Themed answers are common phrases with a letter H replaced with a letter C:

  • 22A Disturbance on the cruise ship pool deck? : LIDO SCUFFLE (from “Lido Shuffle”)
  • 32A Youth organization skills contest? : SCOUTING MATCH (from “shouting match”)
  • 51A Fraud involving bedding? : PILLOW SCAM (from “pillow sham”)
  • 70A Prison guard’s subjugation, slangily? : THE TAMING OF THE SCREW (from “The Taming of the Shrew”)
  • 93A Hardly a bountiful burg? : SCANTY TOWN (from “shantytown”)
  • 110A Transport for old-fashioned folks? : SQUARE SCOOTER (from “square shooter”)
  • 126A Passenger leaving Edinburgh Airport? : PARTING SCOT (from “parting shot”)

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 20m 12s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Wood that means “raft” in Spanish : BALSA

Balsa is a very fast-growing tree that is native to parts of South America. Even though balsa wood is very soft, it is actually classified as a hardwood, the softest of all the hardwoods (go figure!). Balsa is light and strong, so is commonly used in making model airplanes. In WWII, a full-size British plane, the de Havilland Mosquito, was built largely from balsa and plywood. No wonder they called it “The Wooden Wonder” and “The Timber Terror”.

15 TV father of Rod and Todd Flanders : NED

Ned Flanders lives next door to Homer Simpson on TV’s “The Simpsons”. Ned is voiced by actor Harry Shearer, and has been around since the very first episode aired in 1989.

18 Japanese brew : ASAHI

Asahi is a Japanese beer, and the name of the brewery that produces it. “Asahi” is Japanese for “morning sun”. Asahi introduced a “dry beer” in 1987, igniting a craze that rocketed the brewery to the number one spot in terms of beer production in Japan, with Sapporo close behind.

21 Vatican figure : POPE

Vatican City is a sovereign city-state that is walled off within the city of Rome. Vatican City is about 110 acres in area, and so is the smallest independent state in the world. With about 800 residents, it is also the smallest state in terms of population. Although the Holy See dates back to early Christianity, Vatican City only came into being in 1929. At that time, Prime Minister Benito Mussolini signed a treaty with the Holy See on behalf of the Kingdom of Italy that established the city-state.

22 Disturbance on the cruise ship pool deck? : LIDO SCUFFLE (from “Lido Shuffle”)

The Lido de Venezia is a famous sandbar in Venice, Italy. About 11 km in length, it is home to about 20,000 residents, as well as the Venice Film Festival that takes place there every September. The Lido is also the setting for Thomas Mann’s famous novel “Death in Venice”. The name “lido” has become a term for any fashionable beach resort. In the UK, the term “lido” is often used for a recreation facility with a pool. This usage has been adopted on cruise ships, where the lido deck is home to the outdoor swimming pool(s) and related facilities.

“Lido Shuffle” is a 1976 song by singer-songwriter and guitarist Boz Scaggs.

26 Chicken tikka __: curry dish : MASALA

Chicken tikka masala is a dish consisting of chicken tikka (chunks of marinated chicken) served in a masala sauce. Masala is the Hindi word for “mixture”, and describes a mixture of spices. A dish named “masala” uses the spices incorporated into a sauce that includes garlic, ginger, onions and chili paste. Although served as part of Indian cuisine, there seems to be a lot of evidence that chicken tikka masala was actually invented in an Indian restaurant in Britain.

29 Pleasure seeker : HEDONIST

A hedonist is someone who seeks to maximize the amount of pleasure in his or her life. “Hedone” is the Greek word for “pleasure”.

34 5 mL, in recipes : TSP

Teaspoon (tsp.)

39 Cork coin word : EIRE

“Éire”, is the Irish word for “Ireland”. The related “Erin” is an anglicized version of “Éire” and actually corresponds to “Éirinn”, the dative case of “Éire”.

Cork is the second largest city in the Republic of Ireland. Cork has been a major port for many years, and was the last port of call for many, many Irish emigrants to America. When these Irish people reached the US it was common for them to give their point of origin as “Cork”, whereas they may have come from almost anywhere in Ireland. It’s because of this that many descendants of Irish immigrants who had been told they were from a Cork family often find out they were under a misapprehension as their ancestors just sailed from Cork.

40 Cowboys or Broncos : TEAM

The Dallas Cowboys play in the National Football Conference (NFC) of the NFL. The Cowboys are famous for a lengthy streak of 20 consecutive winning seasons, from 1966 to 1985. They are the highest-valued sports franchise in the country. The only team in the world that’s worth more money is the UK’s Manchester United soccer team.

The Denver Broncos were a charter member of the AFL and so were formed in 1959 and first played in 1960.

41 Lotion additive : ALOE

Aloe vera is a succulent plant that grows in relatively dry climates. The plant’s leaves are full of biologically-active compounds that have been studied extensively. Aloe vera has been used for centuries in herbal medicine, mainly for topical treatment of wounds.

45 Oxford notables : DONS

A don is a tutor or fellow at a university, especially at Oxford and Cambridge in England.

51 Fraud involving bedding? : PILLOW SCAM (from “pillow sham”)

A sham is something that is imitation, fake. In the world of bed linens, a sham is also an imitation or fake, in the sense that it is a decorative cover designed to cover up a regular pillow used for sleeping.

54 Rigs on the road : SEMIS

A “semi” is a “semi-trailer truck”. The vehicle is so called because it consists of a tractor and a half-trailer. The half-trailer is so called because it only has wheels on the back end, with the front supported by the tractor.

58 Surrey racecourse town : EPSOM

The Surrey town of Epsom in England is most famous for its racecourse (Epsom Downs), at which the Epsom Derby is run every year, one of the three races that make up the English Triple Crown. We also come across “Epsom salts” from time to time. Epsom salt is magnesium sulfate, originally prepared by boiling down mineral waters. Epsom was indeed a spa town at one time. The town is also home to Epsom College, an English “public school” (which actually means “private, and expensive”). One of Epsom’s “old boys” was the Hollywood actor Stewart Granger.

Surrey is an English county located just to the southwest of London. Among the many historic locations in Surrey is Runnymede, famous for the signing of Magna Carta by King John in 1215.

61 Pack (down) : TAMP

To tamp is to pack down tightly by tapping. “Tamp” was originally used specifically to describe the action of packing down sand or dirt around an explosive prior to detonation.

63 The Arno runs through it : PISA

The city of Pisa sits right on the Italian coast, at the mouth of the River Arno. The city is perhaps most famous for its Leaning Tower. The tower is actually the campanile (bell tower) of the city’s cathedral, and it has been leaning since it was completed in 1173. Just shows you how important good foundations are …

The Arno is the principal river in the Tuscany region of Italy, and passes through the cities of Florence and Pisa. Famously the Arno flooded in 1966, the worst flood in the region for centuries. There were numerous deaths and extensive destruction of priceless art treasures, particularly in Florence.

69 “Stat!” : NOW!

The exact etymology of “stat”, a term meaning “immediately” in the medical profession, seems to have been lost in the mists of time. It probably comes from the Latin “statim” meaning “to a standstill, immediately”. A blog reader has helpfully suggested that the term may also come from the world of laboratory analysis, where the acronym STAT stands for “short turn-around time”.

70 Prison guard’s subjugation, slangily? : THE TAMING OF THE SCREW (from “The Taming of the Shrew”)

Back in the late 1700s, “screw” was a slang term meaning “key”. Early in the 1800s, the underworld had adopted “screw” as slang for “prison guard”, as prison guards carried keys/screws.

William Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew” is about a courting couple. The male in the couple is Petruchio, a gentleman of Verona, and the female is Katharina/Kate, the so-called “shrew”. As the play progresses, the “shrew” is “tamed” and becomes an “obedient” bride … a controversial storyline in the contemporary world, to say the least. Regardless, modern adaptations have been made, including 1948’s Broadway musical “Kiss Me, Kate” and the 1999 romantic comedy “10 Things I Hate About You”.

79 Texter’s “Too funny!” : LMAO!

Laughing my a** off (LMAO)

85 Montague teen : ROMEO

Early in William Shakespeare’s play “Romeo and Juliet”, Juliet espies Romeo for the first time, and says to her nurse, “Go ask his name.—If he be married / My grave is like to be my wedding bed. The nurse replies, “His name is Romeo, and a Montague, / The only son of your great enemy.” Things don’t go well …

89 Island that’s the westernmost point of Alaska : ATTU

Attu is the westernmost island in the Aleutian chain and so is the westernmost part of Alaska (and is in the Eastern Hemisphere). Japanese forces took the island in October 1942, eventually landing as many as 2,900 soldiers there. In May 1943, the US Army retook the island in twenty days of fighting that is now called the Battle of Attu, the only land battle to take place on US soil during WWII. I am very proud of my father-in-law, who served in the Aleutians during WWII …

93 Hardly a bountiful burg? : SCANTY TOWN (from “shantytown”)

Our word “shanty” is used for a rough cabin. It comes from the Canadian French word “chantier”, which is a “lumberjack’s headquarters”.

96 Seventh-century pope : JOHN V

Pope John V led the Roman Catholic Church from 685 until his death just one year later. He was of Syrian origin, and was born in Antioch (now a ruin in Turkey).

100 Red-wearing duck triplet : HUEY

Donald Duck’s nephews are identical triplets called Huey, Dewey and Louie, and they first appeared on the screen in 1938. Once in a while, due to errors in production, a fourth duck can be seen in the background. This little “mistake” is affectionately called “Phooey Duck” by folks in the industry.

102 __ High Stadium : MILE

Mile High Stadium was built for baseball in 1948, and was known originally as Bears Stadium after the minor league team called the Denver Bears. The stadium was also used for football in the fifties, when it became home to the Denver Broncos. The Broncos grew as a team in the Mile High Stadium, and played their last game there in December 2000, before moving to the nearby INVESCO Field at Mile High. The original stadium was demolished in 2002.

107 Strong lager : BOCK

A bock is a strong lager from Germany that was first brewed in the town of Einbeck. The famous brewers of Munich adopted the style of beer, calling it Einbeck after the town of its origin. However, with the Bavarian accent “Einbeck” came out as “ein Bock”, the German for “a billy goat”. The name “bock” stuck, and so you’ll often see a billy goat on the labels of bock beers.

109 __-Caps : SNO

Sno-Caps are a brand of candy usually only available in movie theaters. Sno-caps have been around since the 1920s, would you believe?

117 Audio tape making a comeback : CASSETTE

The French for “box” is “casse”. So, a “cassette” is a “little box”.

118 Living room staples : SOFAS

“Sofa” is a Turkish word meaning “bench”.

124 Observed Passover, in a way : ATE KOSHER

According to Jewish dietary laws, kosher food is fit to eat, and food that is not fit to eat is referred to as treif (or “tref”). The usage of “kosher” has extended to include anything considered legitimate.

The Jewish holiday of Passover begins on the 15th day of the Hebrew month of Nisan and lasts for seven or eight days, depending on the Jewish denomination. Nisan usually falls in March-April on the Gregorian calendar.

126 Passenger leaving Edinburgh Airport? : PARTING SCOT (from “parting shot”)

Edinburgh is the capital of Scotland, and is a really beautiful city. In days gone by it might not have been quite so charming though. Like many cities, plumes of smoke hung over Edinburgh when coal and wood fires weren’t regulated. To this day, the city has the nickname “Auld Reekie”, Scots for “Old Smoky”.

128 They may be black or yellow : LABS

The Labrador (Lab) breed of dog has been around at least since 1814. The breed comes in three registered colors: black, yellow and chocolate.

129 Fleck with a banjo : BELA

Béla Fleck is a banjo player who performed with the band’s New Grass Revival and Béla Fleck and the Flecktones. Fleck was born in New York City and was given the name Béla Anton Leoš Fleck. He was named after Hungarian composer Béla Bartók, Austrian composer Anton Webern, and Czech composer Leoš Janáček. That’s quite a name to live up to, but by all accounts Fleck is one of the most technically proficient banjo players the world has ever known.

130 Heist film series surname : OCEAN

“Ocean’s 11” is a great film from 1960, starring Frank Sinatra as Danny Ocean. The original storyline is updated for the excellent 2001 remake, with George Clooney playing the lead. In the 1960 movie, the love interest is a character called Beatrice Ocean, played by Angie Dickinson. In the 2001 version, the love interest gets a new name, Tess Ocean, and is played by Julia Roberts. The 2001 remake (titled “Ocean’s Eleven”, note the spelling) spawned two sequels: “Ocean’s Twelve” in 2004 and “Ocean’s Thirteen” in 2007.

132 Martini order : DRY

The term “martini” probably takes its name from the “Martini & Rossi” brand of dry vermouth, although no one seems to be completely sure. What is clear is that despite the Martini name originating in Italy, the martini drink originated in the US. The original martini was made with gin and sweet vermouth, but someone specifying a “dry” martini was given gin and dry vermouth. Nowadays we use dry vermouth for all martinis, and the term “dry” has become a reference to how little vermouth is included in the drink. Famously, Noël Coward liked his drink very dry and said that a perfect martini is made by “filling a glass with gin then waving it in the general direction of Italy”. The German-American journalist and satirist H. L. Mencken referred to the martini as “the only American invention as perfect as a sonnet”.

133 God of love : EROS

The name of Eros, the Greek god of love, gives rise to our word “erotic” meaning “arousing sexual desire”. Eros was referred to in Latin as both “Amor” (meaning “love”) and “Cupid” (meaning “desire”).

135 Over-__: sports bet : UNDER

An over-under bet is a wager that a number will be over or under a particular value. A common over-under bet is made on the combined points scored by two teams in a game.

Down

2 Sri Lanka locale : ASIA

The island nation of Sri Lanka lies off the southeast coast of India. The name “Sri Lanka” translates from Sanskrit into English as “venerable island”. Before 1970, Sri Lanka was known as Ceylon, a name given to the country during British rule.

3 Blokes : LADS

“Bloke” is British slang for “fellow”. The etymology of “bloke” seems to have been lost in the mists of time.

4 Submerged ridge : SHOAL

A shoal is an underwater ridge or bank that is covered with a material such as sand or silt.

6 The Big Ten’s Nittany Lions: Abbr. : PSU

The athletic teams of Pennsylvania State University (PSU) are called the Nittany Lions, or in the case of the female teams, the Lady Lions. The Nittany Lion was introduced as a mascot way back in 1904 and is modeled after mountain lions that used to roam Mount Nittany located near the school’s campus.

10 MLB’s __ era : STEROID

Steroids are found commonly in nature, with familiar examples being cholesterol and testosterone. The controversial class of drugs called anabolic steroids (known informally as “‘roids” or simply “steroids”) are artificially produced chemicals designed to mimic the effect of the male sex hormone, testosterone. They are termed “anabolic” as they build up cellular tissue (particularly muscle) in a process called anabolism. Taking anabolic steroids can be termed “juicing”, and the aggressive behavior that can be a side-effect is known as “‘roid rage”.

11 Actress Gasteyer : ANA

Ana Gasteyer is an actress best known for being a cast member of “Saturday Night Live” (SNL) from 1996 to 2002. Gasteyer was famous on SNL for playing Martha Stewart … topless!

12 Russian city that hosted the 2014 Olympics : SOCHI

Sochi is a city in the west of Russia on the Black Sea coast. It is the largest resort city in the whole country. Sochi is going through a busy phase in its life. It hosted the 2014 Winter Olympic Games, the Russian Formula 1 Grand Prix in 2014, and served as host for some games of the 2018 World Cup in soccer.

14 Pester : NOODGE

“To noodge” is a slang verb meaning “to nag”. It comes into English from the Yiddish word “nudyen” meaning “to bore, be tedious”.

16 Anglican denom. : EPISC

The Episcopal Church in the US is a branch of the Anglican Communion, and so is associated with the Church of England. The Episcopal Church is descended from the Church of England’s presence in the American colonies, prior to the American Revolution. The American Anglicans split with the mother church, largely because the clergy of the Church of England are required to swear allegiance to the British monarch. Members of the Episcopal Church are known as Episcopalians. “Episcopal” is an adjective and “Episcopalian” is a noun.

21 Tropical toppers : PANAMAS

Panama hats are traditional headgear from Ecuador, and have never been made in volume in Panama. The “panama” moniker came about as many of the hats were shipped to the Isthmus of Panama for transportation by sea to the rest of the world. Authentic panama hats are made from the leaves of a palm-like plant known locally as the jipijapa palm.

23 Nut from the tropics : CASHEW

The cashew is the seed of the cashew tree. The pulp of the cashew tree fruit (the cashew apple) is also consumed, and is usually processed into a fruit drink or distilled as a liquor.

28 Continental coins : EUROS

The euro is the official currency of most of the states in the European Union, but not all. The list of EU states not using the euro includes Denmark and Sweden.

31 Brewski : SUDS

“Brewski”, “suds” and “cold one” are slang terms for “beer”.

33 Basic principle : TENET

A tenet is an article of faith, something that is held to be true. “Tenet” is Latin for “holds”.

34 Sticky or ticker : TAPE

Stock price information used to be transmitted over telegraph lines by “stock tickers” that produced the famous “ticker tape”, a paper tape with stock symbols and prices printed on it. The “ticker” got its name from the noise it created when it was printing. Even though ticker tape is no longer used, the concept lives on in the scrolling electronic tickers that stream across the bottom of a television screen when there’s a financial program airing.

36 D.C. veterans : POLS

Politician (pol)

38 French Riviera city : NICE

The French city of Nice is on the Mediterranean coast in the southeast of the country. Although Nice is only the fifth most populous city in France, it is home to the busiest airport outside of Paris. That’s because of all the tourists flocking to the French Riviera. Something described as “à la niçoise” is “of Nice”.

42 Emulate Monroe and DiMaggio : ELOPE

Hollywood star Marilyn Monroe had three husbands in all:

  1. James Dougherty (1942-1946), a police officer whom she married when her name was still Norma Jean Baker.
  2. Joe DiMaggio (1954-1955), baseball legend with whom she eloped and married in San Francisco City Hall
  3. Arthur Miller (1956-1961), Pulitzer-winning playwright with whom she eventually obtained a “Mexican divorce”.

48 Spaghetti Western director Sergio : LEONE

Spaghetti Westerns are cowboy movies that were produced and directed by Italians in the 1960s. Pioneer in the field was filmmaker Sergio Leone. Leone directed the best-known and most successful movies in the genre: “A Fistful of Dollars” (1964), “For a Few Dollars More” (1965) and “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” (1966), all of which star Clint Eastwood.

53 Artistic Chinese dynasty : MING

The Ming Dynasty lasted in China from 1368 to 1644. The Ming Dynasty oversaw tremendous innovation in so many areas, including the manufacture of ceramics. In the late Ming period, a shift towards a market economy in China led to the export of porcelain on an unprecedented scale, perhaps explaining why we tend to hear more about Ming vases than we do about porcelain from any other Chinese dynasty.

60 Monetary nickname based on a Roman numeral : C-NOTE

“C-note” and “C-spot” are slang terms for “$100 bill”.

65 Scope : AMBIT

An ambit is an outer boundary or limit, a circumference. The term can also be used to mean the sphere or scope of influence. “Ambit” comes from the Latin “ambire” meaning “to go around”.

71 Hershey’s __ bar : HEATH

The HEATH bar is a Hershey product that was introduced in the 1930s by brothers Bayard and Everett Heath. The candy was promoted back then with the line “Heath for better health!”, a reference to the “healthy” ingredients of the best milk chocolate and almonds, creamery butter and pure sugar cane. Different times …

76 Key of Brahms’ Symphony No. 2 : D MAJ

Brahms wrote his “Symphony No. 2” in the summer of 1877, taking just a few months. That’s pretty speedy, as it took him 21 years to complete his “Symphony No. 1”.

82 Phone service outfit : TELCO

A “telco” is a “telecommunications company”.

86 Janitorial tools : MOPS

A janitor is someone who takes care of the maintenance or cleaning of a building. An older definition of the term “janitor” is “doorman”. Our word comes from the Latin “ianitor” meaning “doorkeeper”.

87 Scottish Gaelic John : EWAN

The name “John” translates into Scottish as “Ian” or “Iain”, into Russian as “Ivan”, into Italian as “Giovanni”, into Spanish as “Juan”, into Welsh as “Evan”, and into Irish as “Seán”.

92 Golf shop array : POLOS

René Lacoste was a French tennis player who went into the clothing business, and came up with a more comfortable shirt that players could use. This became known as a “tennis shirt”. When it was adopted for use in the sport of polo, the shirts also became known as “polo shirts”. The “golf shirt” is basically the same thing. The Lacoste line of clothing features a crocodile logo, because René was nicknamed “The Crocodile”.

95 Leader that rhymes with a storm : TYCOON

Our term “tycoon” meaning powerful business person was originally used by foreigners to describe the shogun of Japan. “Tycoon” is an anglicization of the Japanese “taikun” meaning “great lord or prince”.

The term “typhoon” may come from the Cantonese “tai fung”, which translates as “a great wind”.

97 Small greenish songbird : VIREO

Vireos are pretty little birds native to the New World. Vireos’ wings and bodies are mostly grey, but their heads and throats are often a lovely olive green.

99 Deteriorate : GO TO POT

The phrase “go to pot”, meaning “fall into ruin”, has been around since the 1500s. Back then, it really meant go to (the) pot, i.e. be chopped up and boiled for food.

104 Old Testament queen : ESTHER

Esther was a Jewish queen, wife of the Persian king Ahasuerus and the heroine of the Book of Esther in the Bible. By the way, Esther is the only book in the Bible that doesn’t mention the word “God”.

106 Cover with graffiti : DEFACE

Graffiti is the plural of “graffito”, the Italian for “scribbling”. The word was first used to describe ancient inscriptions on the walls in the ruins of Pompeii.

108 Panda’s skill, in a 2008 film : KUNG FU

“Kung Fu Panda” is a 2008 animated film from DreamWorks. It’s all about a panda who is an expert in kung fu, as one might guess …

111 Arabian Peninsula land : QATAR

Qatar is a sovereign state in the Middle East occupying the Qatar Peninsula, itself located in the Arabian Peninsula. Qatar lies on the Persian Gulf and shares one land border, with Saudi Arabia to the south. Qatar has more oil and gas reserves per capita of population than any other country in the world. In 2010, Qatar had the fastest growing economy in the world, driven by the petrochemical industry. Qatar is scheduled to host the 2022 FIFA World Cup, although the nation’s eligibility to do so is under question after a far-reaching bribery scandal was uncovered at the sport’s governing body.

The Arabian Peninsula (also “Arabia”) is part of Western Asia that is located just north-east of Africa. The peninsula is bordered to the west by the Red Sea, to the northeast by the Persian Gulf, and to the southeast by the Indian Ocean. Most of the Arabian Peninsula is taken up by Saudi Arabia, but also included are Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, Oman and Yemen. And, it’s the largest peninsula in the world, covering about 1¼ million square miles.

113 Green with Grammys : CEELO

“CeeLo Green” is the stage name of rapper Thomas DeCarlo Callaway. Green was one of the coaches for the contestants on the singing TV show “The Voice” for four seasons.

116 Epoxy, e.g. : RESIN

Epoxy resins are thermosetting polymers that have high adhesive strength. In order to achieve mechanical and adhesive strength, the epoxy has to cure. The “curing” is a cross-linking reaction that takes place between individual molecules in the material. In some cases, the cross-linking is brought about by mixing the epoxy with a co-reactant known as a “hardener”. In other cases, the epoxy is cured by exposing it to heat.

121 Prevented a return from : ACED

That might be tennis.

123 Astronomical dist. : LT YR

A light-year (lt. yr.) is a measure of distance, not time. It is the distance that light travels in a vacuum in one year, which is almost six trillion miles. The accepted abbreviation for a light-year is “ly”. A light-second is a much shorter distance: about 186,000 miles.

125 Coll. dorm figures : RAS

Resident assistant/adviser (RA)

127 Words with nutshell and pickle : IN A …

The phrase “in a nutshell” is used to mean “in a very brief statement”. The idea is that very few words are small enough to fit “in a nutshell”. The expression has been around for a very long time, and was used by Pliny the Elder in 77 CE. He referred to a (probably fictional) copy of the Iliad that was written on parchment with such small handwriting that it fit “in a nutshell”.

To be in a pickle means to be in a fix, in trouble. One of the first uses of “pickle” in such a context was William Shakespeare (who else?), in his play “The Tempest”. Here is part of the conversation between Alonso, King of Naples, and his jester Trinculo:

ALONSO:
And Trinculo is reeling ripe: where should they
Find this grand liquor that hath gilded ’em?
How camest thou in this pickle?

TRINCULO:
I have been in such a pickle since I
saw you last that, I fear me, will never out of
my bones: I shall not fear fly-blowing.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Wood that means “raft” in Spanish : BALSA
6 Small openings : PORES
11 B-boy connector : … AS IN …
15 TV father of Rod and Todd Flanders : NED
18 Japanese brew : ASAHI
19 Virtuous sort : SAINT
20 Words said with a finger wag : NO NO!
21 Vatican figure : POPE
22 Disturbance on the cruise ship pool deck? : LIDO SCUFFLE (from “Lido Shuffle”)
24 Bet using inside info : ACT ON A TIP
26 Chicken tikka __: curry dish : MASALA
27 Fixed look : STARE
29 Pleasure seeker : HEDONIST
30 Not as much : LESS
32 Youth organization skills contest? : SCOUTING MATCH (from “shouting match”)
34 5 mL, in recipes : TSP
37 Avoid : SHUN
39 Cork coin word : EIRE
40 Cowboys or Broncos : TEAM
41 Lotion additive : ALOE
43 Prep for publication : EDIT
45 Oxford notables : DONS
47 Valleys : DALES
51 Fraud involving bedding? : PILLOW SCAM (from “pillow sham”)
54 Rigs on the road : SEMIS
57 Put in the mail : SENT
58 Surrey racecourse town : EPSOM
59 Massive : EPIC
61 Pack (down) : TAMP
62 Poetic tribute : ODE
63 The Arno runs through it : PISA
66 Overnight spot : INN
67 Resorts with springs : SPAS
69 “Stat!” : NOW!
70 Prison guard’s subjugation, slangily? : THE TAMING OF THE SCREW (from “The Taming of the Shrew”)
76 Run out of juice : DIE
77 Bro and sis : SIBS
78 Shoe part : TOE
79 Texter’s “Too funny!” : LMAO!
80 “Do __ solid” : ME A
81 Bouncy tune : LILT
83 Quaint oath : EGAD
85 Montague teen : ROMEO
89 Island that’s the westernmost point of Alaska : ATTU
91 More than one would hope to pay : STEEP
93 Hardly a bountiful burg? : SCANTY TOWN (from “shantytown”)
96 Seventh-century pope : JOHN V
98 Arduous journey : SLOG
100 Red-wearing duck triplet : HUEY
101 Minor quarrel : SPAT
102 __ High Stadium : MILE
105 Blockhead : CLOD
107 Strong lager : BOCK
109 __-Caps : SNO
110 Transport for old-fashioned folks? : SQUARE SCOOTER (from “square shooter”)
115 Puckery : SOUR
117 Audio tape making a comeback : CASSETTE
118 Living room staples : SOFAS
120 Low tie : ONE-ALL
124 Observed Passover, in a way : ATE KOSHER
126 Passenger leaving Edinburgh Airport? : PARTING SCOT (from “parting shot”)
128 They may be black or yellow : LABS
129 Fleck with a banjo : BELA
130 Heist film series surname : OCEAN
131 Full of passion : FIERY
132 Martini order : DRY
133 God of love : EROS
134 Earth, in some sci-fi : TERRA
135 Over-__: sports bet : UNDER

Down

1 Lip help : BALM
2 Sri Lanka locale : ASIA
3 Blokes : LADS
4 Submerged ridge : SHOAL
5 Supermarket sections : AISLES
6 The Big Ten’s Nittany Lions: Abbr. : PSU
7 Clumsy sorts : OAFS
8 Splits : RIFTS
9 Wrap around : ENLACE
10 MLB’s __ era : STEROID
11 Actress Gasteyer : ANA
12 Russian city that hosted the 2014 Olympics : SOCHI
13 Purpose : INTENT
14 Pester : NOODGE
15 Tag cry : NOT IT!
16 Anglican denom. : EPISC
17 Poor essay’s lack : DEPTH
21 Tropical toppers : PANAMAS
23 Nut from the tropics : CASHEW
25 Wanderer : NOMAD
28 Continental coins : EUROS
31 Brewski : SUDS
33 Basic principle : TENET
34 Sticky or ticker : TAPE
35 Minor error : SLIP
36 D.C. veterans : POLS
38 French Riviera city : NICE
42 Emulate Monroe and DiMaggio : ELOPE
44 Easy putt : TAP-IN
46 Many a tennis winner : SMASH
48 Spaghetti Western director Sergio : LEONE
49 Fund for the long haul : ENDOW
50 Meal in a bowl : STEW
52 Forgets about, maybe : OMITS
53 Artistic Chinese dynasty : MING
55 Push forward : IMPEL
56 Jerk : SPASM
60 Monetary nickname based on a Roman numeral : C-NOTE
64 Heads out of port : SAILS
65 Scope : AMBIT
68 Spine-tingling, maybe : SCARY
70 Connect with : TIE TO
71 Hershey’s __ bar : HEATH
72 Dots on some charts : ISLES
73 Confused states : FOGS
74 Give lessons : TEACH
75 Ancestry : ROOTS
76 Key of Brahms’ Symphony No. 2 : D MAJ
82 Phone service outfit : TELCO
84 Apply crudely : DAUB
86 Janitorial tools : MOPS
87 Scottish Gaelic John : EWAN
88 “I’m __ your scheme!” : ONTO
90 Bares, in a way : UNMASKS
92 Golf shop array : POLOS
94 Modernists, briefly : NEOS
95 Leader that rhymes with a storm : TYCOON
97 Small greenish songbird : VIREO
99 Deteriorate : GO TO POT
103 Doesn’t disturb : LETS BE
104 Old Testament queen : ESTHER
106 Cover with graffiti : DEFACE
108 Panda’s skill, in a 2008 film : KUNG FU
110 Burn badly : SCALD
111 Arabian Peninsula land : QATAR
112 Words before some dates : USE BY …
113 Green with Grammys : CEELO
114 More red, but not visibly : RARER
116 Epoxy, e.g. : RESIN
119 Cast topper, usually : STAR
121 Prevented a return from : ACED
122 Tales of the past : LORE
123 Astronomical dist. : LT YR
125 Coll. dorm figures : RAS
127 Words with nutshell and pickle : IN A …

12 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 13 Mar 22, Sunday”

  1. @glen- big news! Wow. Not sure I recognize “Patti Varol ” crosswords. But so what..

    For today. No errors. Learned what a VIREO is.

  2. 12:53, no errors.

    @Anon Mike
    She was a lot more active back in 2020 and before as a constructor, a few appearing here. I don’t know how things would change with her as editor instead of Norris, but definitely a lot of evaluation to come once her start date hits.

  3. It took me forever today must have been the time change.Never did get the theme until the end.Still thought it was a fun puzzle even though it beat me up!!!!

  4. 21:03

    The theme helped me fill in CEELO.

    Today I learned about the LIDO deck.

    How is a pillow SHAM different from a pillow case?

  5. 29:57 with two errors at BO_K/TY_LON. Had SLUR for “Puckery” (weird word). For leader, I wanted a rhyme with “storm” instead of a type of storm, and so TYCOON didn’t come to me. Ah, well.

    Revisions included: PALS>LADS, ORBIT>AMBIT, BALLS>POLOS.

    My first theme answer solution was PARTINGSCOT, and so with the title, the others solved fairly readily.

    New items were: “raft” in Spanish, ASAHI, Oxford notables, “Do me a solid,” VIREO.

  6. No look ups,no errors. Liked the theme and
    it helped. 2 fixes on the fly, soup/stew and
    trek/slog. “noodge” said nobody ever….
    Good Sunday puzzle 🙂

  7. Did this Sunday at a somewhat leisurely pace; took me 40:15 with no peeks or errors. I did finish without the banner and did a “check-grid” without any error; I’d left one square unfilled: JOHN_/_IERO. so, it had to be either I,V or X and I went with V, and got the banner.

    Cute theme – there are lots of videos of cruise ship scuffles, mostly inebriated Aussies. So I got a good laugh at LIDO SCUFFLE.

    @Nonny – Your team – the Broncos – is up for sale ($4B). You might have to protest to keep them in town 🙂

  8. The Broncos won the Super Bowl THREE times, the last being in 2016 with QB Peyton Manning.

    Nice theme. I got the addition of the C but failed to see they were replacing the letter H.

  9. Finished with no lookups and no errors.

    I get the relationship between ‘Cork’ and ‘Eire’, but don’t get what ‘coin’ has to do with either.

    Attu is not the really the “westernmost” point of Alaska since it is actually in the eastern hemisphere. Amitignak is the Aleutian island that is the farthest west–the rest of them are actually the easternmost parts of the U.S.–and Alaska.

    The use of the term ‘locale’ to mean the continent in which a country resides is torturing it a bit. Its connotation is much narrower in scope than continental.

    Never heard of noodge, Bela Fleck, Ana Gasteyer, don’t watch the Simpsons so didn’t know ‘Ned’.

    I’m not sure how any person who’s ever eaten a steak would think it’s redness is not visible. Maybe if they eat it with their eyes closed?

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