LA Times Crossword 24 Apr 22, Sunday

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Constructed by: Christina Iverson
Edited by: Patti Varol

Today’s Theme: Extra Special

Themed answers are common phrases with an EXTRA letter at the start. Collectively, those EXTRA letters spell out SPECIAL, as we descend the grid:

  • 23A Holiday-themed minifigures in LEGO Advent calendars? : SMALL SANTAS (S + mall Santas)
  • 40A Formal complaints about a sommelier’s recommendations? : PAIRING GRIEVANCES (P + airing grievances)
  • 52A “You’re not allowed to feel that way!,” e.g.? : EMOTION DENIED (E + motion denied)
  • 70A Tale of the hora? : CHAIR-RAISING STORY (C + hair-raising story)
  • 90A Surfer’s dream? : IDEAL BREAKERS (I + deal breakers)
  • 98A Way to manage the study of Ceres and Vesta? : ASTEROID TREATMENT (A + steroid treatment)
  • 123A Pretty but ineffective dressing? : LACE BANDAGE (L + ACE bandage)

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 18m 13s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Paulson of “American Crime Story” : SARAH

Sarah Paulson is an actress from Tampa, Florida and New York City. I mostly remember her for playing political commentator Nicolle Wallace in the excellent HBO drama “Game Change”.

“American Crime Story” is a true crime anthology TV series. Each season is a standalone mini-series. The first three seasons aired were:

  1. “The People v. O. J. Simpson”
  2. “The Assassination of Gianni Versace”
  3. “Impeachment” (the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal)

20 Ma Rainey player Davis : VIOLA

Actress Viola Davis is probably best known on the small screen for playing the lead in the drama “How to Get Away with Murder”. On the big screen, I’d say that her most famous role is the starring role in the 2011 film “The Help”.

“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” is a 2020 biopic based on the 1982 play of the same name by August Wilson. Both play and film tell the story of blues singer Ma Rainey. The movie features Viola Davis as Rainey and Chadwick Boseman as trumpeter Levee Green. Boseman died soon after the film wrapped, making “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” his last appearance on the big screen.

22 Muscle car rod : AXLE

By definition, a “muscle car” is a small vehicle with a large and maybe oversized engine.

23 Holiday-themed minifigures in LEGO Advent calendars? : SMALL SANTAS (S + mall Santas)

Lego is manufactured by the Lego Group, a privately held company headquartered in Billund, Denmark. The company was founded by a carpenter called Ole Kirk Christiansen in 1934 and the now-famous plastic interlocking blocks were introduced in 1949. The blocks were originally sold under the name “Automatic Binding Bricks” but I think “Lego” is easier to remember! The name “Lego” comes from the Danish term “leg godt” meaning “play well”.

In the Christian traditions, Advent is the season of expectation prior to the Christmas celebration of the birth of Jesus. The term “Advent” comes from the Latin “adventus” meaning “coming”.

25 __ bean : FAVA

The fava bean is also known as the broad bean. “Broad bean” is used “broadly” (pun!) in the UK, whereas “fava bean” is common in the US. “Fava” is the Italian name for the broad bean.

26 Muscle car roof : T-TOP

A T-top is a car roof that has removable panels on either side of a rigid bar that runs down the center of the vehicle above the driver.

27 Like Zippo lighters and Maglite flashlights : US MADE

The first Zippo lighter was made in 1933, in Bradford, Pennsylvania. The name “Zippo” was simply a word invented by the company founder, George Blaisdell, as he liked the word “zipper”. You can buy one today for $12.95, or if you want the solid gold model … for $8,675.95.

Maglite is a brand of flashlight. Many Maglite models are extremely sturdy and have been used as defensive weapons, serving as makeshift batons.

32 Whole Foods section : BULK

The first Whole Foods Market was opened in 1980 by John Mackey and partners in Austin, Texas. For the two years prior to the Whole Foods launch, Mackay was operating his natural foods store that he called “Saferway”, as opposed to “Safeway”. Clever name …

36 Pulitzer-winning Glass : IRA

Ira Glass is a well-respected presenter on American Public Radio who is perhaps best known for his show “This American Life”. I was interested to learn that one of my favorite composers, Philip Glass, is Ira’s first cousin.

Pulitzer Prizes are awarded annually for achievements in journalism, literature and musical composition. The prize was established back in 1917 by the Hungarian-American newspaper publisher Joseph Pulitzer. Pulitzer left money in his will for the prize, and for its administration by Columbia University.

37 Club kin : BLT

The BLT (bacon, lettuce and tomato) is the second-most popular sandwich in the US, after the plain old ham sandwich.

40 Formal complaints about a sommelier’s recommendations? : PAIRING GRIEVANCES (P + airing grievances)

“Sommelier” is the French word for “wine steward”. If that steward is a female, then the term used in French is “sommelière”.

49 “Kiss Me Deadly” singer Ford : LITA

Lita Ford was the lead singer for the Runaways. She later became famous for her solo work, although I’ve never heard of her outside of crosswords, I must admit …

50 __ Vogue : TEEN

“Teen Vogue” is a version of “Vogue” magazine that targets teenage girls.

“Vogue” magazine has been published for an awfully long time, with the first issue appearing in 1892. Over the decades the magazine has picked up a lot of criticism as well as its many fans. Famously, an assistant to the editor wrote a novel based on her experiences working with the magazine’s editor, and called it “The Devil Wears Prada”.

51 TV pioneer : RCA

During WWI, the US government actively discouraged the loss of certain technologies to other countries, including allies. The developing wireless technologies were considered to be particularly important by the army and navy. The government prevented the General Electric Company from selling equipment to the British Marconi Company, and instead facilitated the purchase by GE of the American Marconi subsidiary. This purchase led to GE forming the Radio Corporation of America that we know today as RCA.

58 “__ Eleven”: Emily St. John Mandel novel : STATION

“Station Eleven” is a 2014 novel by Canadian author Emily St. John Mandel. It is a post-apocalyptic work, with the action taking place after a swine pandemic devastates the world. The book was adapted into a 2021 miniseries with the same title. The novel is set in the Great Lakes region of North America, on the Canadian side of the US-Canada border. The setting (and filming) is changed to the American side of the border for the TV series. In a wry twist, shooting of the television series had to be moved to Canada due to the COVID pandemic.

60 Furniture wood : RED ELM

The slippery elm is a species of elm native to North America that is also known as the red elm. The inner bark of the slippery elm can be used in a medicinal tea. Elm bark tea is said to ease a sore throat or irritated stomach.

61 Bite : MORSEL

A morsel is a small bite, a mouthful of food. The term “morsel” comes from the Latin “morsus” meaning “bite”.

63 Tierra en el mar : ISLA

In Spanish, an “isla” (island) is “tierra en el mar” (land in the sea).

67 Gold unit : KARAT

A karat (also “carat”, the spelling outside of North America) is a measure of the purity of gold alloys, with 24-karat representing pure gold.

69 Photo filter : SEPIA

Sepia is that rich, brown-gray color so common in old photographs. “Sepia” is the Latinized version of the Greek word for cuttlefish, as sepia pigment is derived from the ink sac of the cuttlefish. Sepia ink was commonly used for writing and drawing as far back as ancient Rome and ancient Greece. The “sepia tone” of old photographs is not the result of deterioration over time. Rather, it is the result of a deliberate preservation process which converts the metallic silver in the photographic image to a more stable silver sulfide. Prints that have been sepia-toned can last in excess of 150 years.

70 Tale of the hora? : CHAIR-RAISING STORY (C + hair-raising story)

The hora is a circle dance that originated in the Balkans. It was brought to Israel by Romanian settlers, and is often performed to traditional, Israeli folk songs. The hora (also “horah”) is a regular sight at Jewish weddings. Sometimes the honoree at an event is raised on a chair during the dance.

76 Ball of the Bulls : LONZO

Lonzo Ball is a professional basketball player who made his NBA debut in 2017 with the LA Lakers. Lonzo’s father is former NFL player LaVar Ball. Lonzo’s brothers are LiAngelo and LaMelo Ball, both of whom play basketball for the NBA.

77 Post-workout indulgence : SAUNA

As my Finnish-American wife will tell you, “sauna” is a Finnish word, and is pronounced more correctly as “sow-nah” (with “sow” as in the female pig).

78 Subj. for Elinor Ostrom and Emily Oster : ECON

Elinor Ostrom was an American political economist who won the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2009. As such, she was the first woman to be so honored.

Emily Oster is an American economist who has economics in her blood. Both of her parents (Sharon Oster and Ray Fair) are also economists, and professors at Yale University. In 2006, Emily married Jesse Shapiro, a professor of economics at Harvard University.

82 Five cents : NICKEL

The 5-cent American coin known as a nickel is actually made up of 75% copper and 25% nickel. The first nickel was introduced in 1866, and was named the Shield nickel due to the shield design on the front of the coin. The current design is the Jefferson nickel, which was introduced in 1938.

86 Mosaic piece : TESSERA

A tessera is an individual tile used in making a mosaic. Tesserae are usually formed in the shape of cubes.

93 Born : NEE

“Née” is the French word for “born” when referring to a female. The male equivalent is “né”. The term “née” is mainly used in English when referring to a married woman’s birth name, assuming that she has adopted her husband’s name, e.g. Michelle Obama née Robinson, Melania Trump née Knavs, and Jill Biden née Jacobs.

94 Hershey candy in gold foil : ROLO

Rolo was a hugely popular chocolate candy in Ireland when I was growing up. It was introduced in the thirties in the UK, and is produced under license in the US by Hershey. I was a little disappointed when I had my first taste of the American version as the center is very hard and chewy. The recipe used on the other side of the Atlantic calls for a soft gooey center.

97 Arcade name : SEGA

Sega is a Japanese video game company headquartered in Tokyo. Sega actually started out in 1940 as Standard Games and was located in Honolulu, which at that time was a city in the US Territory of Hawaii. The owners moved the operation to Tokyo in 1951 and renamed the company to Service Games. The name “Sega” is a combination of the first two letters of the words “Se-rvice” and “Ga-mes”.

98 Way to manage the study of Ceres and Vesta? : ASTEROID TREATMENT (A + steroid treatment)

The vast majority of asteroids in the Solar System are found in the main asteroid belt, which is located between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. Four large asteroids (Ceres, Vesta, Pallas and Hygeia) make up about half the mass of the asteroid belt and are 400-950 km in diameter. The total mass of the belt is just 4% of the mass of our Moon. The larger asteroids are also known as “planetoids”.

Steroids are found commonly in nature, with familiar examples being cholesterol and testosterone. The controversial class of drugs called anabolic steroids (known informally as “‘roids” or simply “steroids”) are artificially produced chemicals designed to mimic the effect of the male sex hormone, testosterone. They are termed “anabolic” as they build up cellular tissue (particularly muscle) in a process called anabolism. Taking anabolic steroids can be termed “juicing”, and the aggressive behavior that can be a side-effect is known as “‘roid rage”.

105 __ de crème : POT

Pots de crème are dessert custards found in French cuisine. They are usually served in small ceramic “pots”, hence the name.

106 Cheer for un gol : OLE!

In Spanish, a “fútbol” (football) announcer might shout “gol!” (goal!).

107 Vowel-rich first guess in Wordle : ADIEU

“Adieu” is French for “goodbye, farewell”, from “à Dieu” meaning “to God”. The plural of “adieu” is “adieux”.

Wordle is a web-based word game that a Welsh software engineer developed to play with his partner during the COVID pandemic. The name “Wordle” is a play on the engineer’s own name: Josh Wardle. Wardle published the game on its own website in 2021, primarily for the use of Wardle’s family. One month later, the game had 90 players, and a month later 300,000 players. A week later, the number of daily players had grown to two million! The New York Times purchased Wordle in 2022 “for an undisclosed price in the low-seven figures”.

110 Plant pests : APHIDS

Aphids are called “greenfly” back in Britain and Ireland where I come from. The most effective way to control aphids, in my experience, is to make sure there are plenty of ladybugs in the garden (called “ladybirds” in Ireland!).

113 Did the tango : DANCED

The dramatic tango dance originated in the late 1800s in the area along the border between Argentina and Uruguay. Dancers and orchestras from Buenos Aires in particular traveled to Europe and beyond in the early twentieth century and brought the tango with them. The tango craze first struck Europe in Paris in the 1910s, and from there spread to London and Berlin, crossing the Atlantic to New York in 1913.

121 “Spring forward” unit : HOUR

On the other side of the Atlantic, daylight saving time (DST) is known as “summer time”. The idea behind summer/daylight-savings is to move clocks forward an hour in spring (“spring forward”), and backwards in the fall (“fall back”) so that afternoons have more daylight. Here in the US, DST starts on the second Sunday of March, and ends on the first Sunday of November.

123 Pretty but ineffective dressing? : LACE BANDAGE (L + ACE bandage)

ACE is a brand of elastic bandage that is often used as a compression wrap.

126 Apple variety : ROME

A Rome apple is a cooking apple. Supposedly, the first Rome apple was planted by Alanson Gillett in 1817 on the banks of the Ohio River near Rome Township. Originally called “Gillett’s Seedling”, it was eventually given the name “Rome Beauty”.

127 “Blackfish” killer whale : ORCA

“Blackfish” is a 2013 documentary film that examines the dangers of keeping orca in captivity. ”Star” of the movie is a killer whale (orca) named Tilikum who was responsible in whole or in part for the deaths of three people. Tilikum was captured in 1983 and has been a “guest” of SeaWorld since 1992. Most recently, Tilikum killed a 40-year old trainer named Dawn Brancheau in 2010.

128 Soap that floats : IVORY

Ivory soap is one of Procter & Gamble’s oldest products, introduced way back in 1879. Ivory soap is noted for its “purity” and also because of its property of floating in water. Despite urban myths to the contrary, the property of floating in water was developed deliberately by a chemist at the time Ivory was being formulated. The soap floats because the ingredients are mixed longer than necessary for homogenization, which introduces more air into the product.

129 Co-founder of A.A., familiarly : DR BOB

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) was founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith in Akron, Ohio. As the organization grew, the guiding principles established by the founders were formatted into a 12-step program that was in place by the 1940s.

131 Sturdy trees : OAKS

The oak was named the official National Tree of the US in 2004. It is also the national tree of many countries around the world, including England, France, Germany, Jordan, Poland, Serbia and Wales.

133 Naturally powered elevator? : YEAST

Yeasts are unicellular microorganisms in the kingdom Fungi. The species of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for centuries in the making of wine and beer, and in breadmaking. Saccharomyces cerevisiae converts carbohydrates into carbon dioxide and alcohol in the process of fermentation. When making beer and wine, the carbon dioxide and alcohol may be captured by the liquid. When making bread, the carbon dioxide and alcohol is driven off by heat.

Down

1 California sch. near the Mexican border : SDSU

San Diego State University (SDSU) was founded in 1897 as San Diego Normal School. Back then, the main purpose of the school was to educate women who wanted to be elementary school teachers. It changed its name to San Diego State Teachers College in 1923. The curriculum expanded beyond teacher education in 1935, and became San Diego State College. In 1960, the college joined what is now known as the California State University.

2 Vishnu’s quartet : ARMS

Vishnu is one of the main deities in the Hindu tradition, and is one of the Trimurti (trinity) along with Brahma and Shiva. Vishnu is usually depicted as having four arms and pale blue skin.

4 Meeting place for a H.S. film club : AV LAB

Audio-visual (AV)

7 Diarist Anaïs : NIN

Anaïs Nin was a French author who was famous for the journals that she wrote for over sixty years from the age of 11 right up to her death. Nin also wrote highly regarded erotica and cited D. H. Lawrence as someone from whom she drew inspiration. Nin was married to banker and artist Hugh Parker Guiler in 1923. Decades later in 1955, Nin married former actor Rupert Pole, even though she was still married to Guiler. Nin and Pole had their marriage annulled in 1966, but just for legal reasons, and they continued to live together as husband and wife until Nin passed away in 1977.

8 “Africa” band : TOTO

Toto is an American rock band dating back to 1977. As well as their big hit “Rosanna”, Toto also sang another good tune titled “Africa”.

“Africa” is a 1982 song that was a big hit for the American rock band Toto. In fact, it was destined to become the band’s only Billboard chart-topper. Apparently, someone set up a sound installation in the Namib Desert in 2019 just to play “Africa”. The song plays on a constant loop, and the installation is powered by solar panels. It just keeps on going …

9 “Doom Patrol” actor Tudyk : ALAN

American actor Alan Tudyk is from El Paso, Texas. He is perhaps best known to audiences for playing Hoban “Wash” Washburne in the TV show “Firefly”. Tudyk also plays Eric Morden (aks “Mr. Nobody”) on the superhero TV series “Doom Patrol”.

13 Actor Patel : DEV

Dev Patel is an actor from Harrow in England who is perhaps best known for playing the lead in the hit movie “Slumdog Millionaire”. He also stars in a lovely 2012 film called “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” alongside an incredible cast that included Judi Dench, Bill Nighy, Maggie Smith and Tom Wilkinson. Patel also had a regular role in the marvelous HBO drama series called “The Newsroom”.

14 Genesis twin : ESAU

Esau was the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When their mother Rebekah gave birth to the twins “the first emerged red and hairy all over (Esau), with his heel grasped by the hand of the second to come out (Jacob)”. As Esau was the first born, he was entitled to inherit his father’s wealth (it was his “birthright”). Instead, Esau sold his birthright to Jacob for the price of a “mess of pottage” (a meal of lentils).

15 Planet with 53 named moons : SATURN

Saturn has over 80 known moons, with over 50 of them having formal names. The moon named Titan accounts for more than 90% of the total mass orbiting the planet. Over 30 of the smaller of Saturn’s moons are less than 7 miles in diameter.

16 Bacon specification : EXTRA CRISPY

“Bacon” is an Old French word that we imported into English. The term ultimately comes from the Proto-Germanic “bakkon” meaning “back meat”.

17 North Carolina college town : ELON

Elon is a city in the Piedmont region of North Carolina located close to the city of Burlington. Elon University is a private liberal arts school founded in 1889.

24 Ward with awards : SELA

Actress Sela Ward turns up in crosswords a lot. Ward played Teddy Reed in the TV show “Sisters” in the nineties, and was in “Once and Again” from 1999-2002. I don’t know either show, but I do know Ward from the medical drama “House” in which she played the hospital’s lawyer and Greg House’s ex-partner. That was a fun role, I thought. More recently, Ward played a lead role on “CSI: NY” and was a very welcome and much-needed addition to the cast. And, Ward played Dr. Richard Kimble’s murdered wife in the 1993 film version of “The Fugitive”.

29 “Egad,” like, way updated : OMG

“OMG” is text-speak for “Oh My Gosh!” “Oh My Goodness!” or any other G-words you might care to use …

31 Disney princess voiced by Anika Noni Rose : TIANA

“The Princess and the Frog” is an animated feature released in 2009 by Walt Disney Studios. The film is set in New Orleans in the twenties. A waitress called Tiana kisses a prince who had been turned into a frog, and then she herself turns into a frog.

As of 2016, there were 11 “official” Disney princesses:

  1. Princess Snow White (from “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”)
  2. Princess Cinderella (from “Cinderella”)
  3. Princess Aurora (from “Sleeping Beauty)
  4. Princess Ariel (from “The Little Mermaid”)
  5. Princess Belle (from “Beauty and the Beast”)
  6. Princess Jasmine (from “Aladdin”)
  7. Princess Pocahontas (from “Pocahontas”)
  8. Princess Mulan (from “Mulan”)
  9. Princess Tiana (from “The Princess and the Frog”)
  10. Princess Rapunzel (from “Tangled”)
  11. Princess Merida (from “Brave”)

Anika Noni Rose is a singer from Bloomfield, Connecticut who is known to moviegoers as the star of the 2006 film “Dreamgirls”. More recently, Rice played Beneatha Younger in a revival of “A Raisin in the Sun” on Broadway.

38 Gold fabric : LAME

Lamé is a fabric that has metallic yarns included in the weave. It is a popular fabric for stylish evening wear, and also in the sport of fencing. The metallic threads are conductive and so help register a touch by an épée.

43 Second start? : NANO-

“Nanosecond” is more correctly abbreviated to “ns” (as opposed to “nsec”) and really is a tiny amount of time: one billionth of a second.

44 One seeing Spots? : VET

“Vet” is an abbreviation for “veterinarian”, a professional who treats animals for disease and injury. The word “veterinary” comes from the Latin “veterinae” meaning “working animals, beasts of burden”.

“Spot” is a common name for a dog.

45 Gut bacteria : E COLI

Escherichia coli (E. coli) are usually harmless bacteria found in the human gut, working away quite happily. However, there are some strains that can produce lethal toxins. These strains can make their way into the food chain from animal fecal matter that comes into contact with food designated for human consumption.

46 Yemen metropolis : SANA’A

Sana (also “Sana’a”) is the capital city of Yemen. Sitting at an elevation of 7,380 feet, Sana is one of the highest capital cities in the world. Within the bounds of today’s metropolis is the old fortified city of Sana, where people have lived for over 2,500 years. The Old City is now a World Heritage Site. According to legend, Sana was founded by Shem, the son of Noah.

48 Dublin’s St. __ Green : STEPHEN’S

St. Stephen’s Green is a lovely, 22-acre park and garden square in the center of Dublin, Ireland. The square takes its name from a medieval leper house and church nearby that were dedicated to Saint Stephen. Most Irish people refer to the park as “Stephen’s Green”, and drop the saintly reference.

53 Epic featuring Paris : ILIAD

“Iliad” is an epic poem by the Greek poet Homer that tells the story of the ten-year siege of “Ilium” (i.e. “Troy”) during the Trojan war. “The Odyssey”, also attributed to Homer, is sometimes described as a sequel to “Iliad”.

In Greek mythology, Paris was a son of Priam and Hecuba, the king and queen of Troy. Paris is famous for eloping with Helen, Queen of Sparta, and hence precipitating the Trojan War. Paris also killed the Greek hero Achilles by shooting him in the heel with an arrow.

54 Old Dodge : OMNI

The Dodge Omni is basically the same car as the Plymouth Horizon, and was produced by Chrysler from 1978-90. The Omni is a front-wheel drive hatchback, the first in a long line of front-wheel drive cars that were very successful for Chrysler. The Omni was actually developed in France, by Chrysler’s Simca division. When production was stopped in the US in 1990, the tooling was sold to an Indian company that continued production for the Asian market for several years.

56 Morales of “Ozark” : ESAI

Actor Esai Morales is best known in the world of film for the 1987 movie “La Bamba”, which depicted the life of Ritchie Valens and his half-brother Bob Morales (played by Esai). On the small screen, Morales plays Lt. Tony Rodriguez on “NYPD Blue” and Joseph Adama on “Caprica”.

“Ozark” is an excellent TV crime show starring Jason Bateman and Laura Linney as a married couple who relocate from Chicago to the Missouri Ozarks. The couple fall foul of a Mexican drug lord after a money laundering scheme goes awry. The show is set at a lake resort in the Ozarks, although filming actually takes place at lakes in the Atlanta area in order to take advantage of tax breaks offered by the State of Georgia.

57 Oscar winner Laura : DERN

Actress Laura Dern is the daughter of actors Bruce Dern and Diane Ladd. Among her many notable roles, Laura Dern played the Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris in the 2008 movie “Recount”, and Dr. Ellie Sattler in the 1993 blockbuster “Jurassic Park”.

59 Closet organizers : TIE RACKS

In Old French a “clos” was an enclosure, with the diminutive form “closet” describing a small enclosure or private room. Over time this evolved into our modern usage of “closet”, describing a cabinet or cupboard.

65 Short address : URL

An Internet address (like NYXCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) is more correctly called a uniform resource locator (URL).

68 PreCheck org. : TSA

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) operates its precheck program known as “TSA Pre✓” (or “TSA PreCheck”). Members of the program receive expedited screening at most airports. In order to become a member, a traveler must apply online, appear in person at a designated office for a background check and fingerprinting, and pay a fee for a 5-year membership.

69 Justice Sotomayor : SONIA

Sonia Sotomayor was the first Hispanic justice appointed to the US Supreme Court, and the third female justice. Sotomayor was nominated by President Barack Obama to replace the retiring Justice David Souter.

72 Hilfiger rival : IZOD

Jack Izod was a tailor of some repute over in England producing shirts for King George V, as well as other members of the Royal Family. As Izod was about to retire, he was approached for the use of his name by an American clothing manufacturer based in New York. The brand Izod of London was introduced to America in 1938.

Tommy Hilfiger is a fashion designer from Elmira, New York who is based in New York City.

74 Insurance giant : AETNA

When the healthcare management and insurance company known as Aetna was founded, the name was chosen to evoke images of Mount Etna, the Italian volcano.

75 Fruity frozen drinks : ICEES

Icee and Slurpee are brand names of slushy drinks. Ugh …

80 “__ Loves Mambo” : PAPA

“Papa Loves Mambo” is a 1954 song that most famously was recorded by Perry Como.

84 Therefore : ERGO

“Ergo” is a Latin word meaning “hence, therefore”, and one that we absorbed directly into English.

85 Test with logic games : LSAT

Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

88 Kanga’s kid : ROO

Kanga is a friend of A. A. Milne’s “Winnie-the-Pooh”, and is a kangaroo. She is the mother of Roo, who appears more frequently in the storyline.

89 Shawkat of “Arrested Development” : ALIA

Alia Shawkat is an actor who might be best known for playing Maeby Fünke on the sitcom “Arrested Development”. Shawkat is best friends with fellow actor Elliot Page (formerly Ellen Page), whom she met while filming the 2009 movie “Whip It”.

“Arrested Development” is a sitcom that originally aired on Fox from 2003 to 2006. Ron Howard was heavily involved in the show behind the camera, serving as executive producer and also as the show’s narrator. Fifteen new episodes of “Arrested Development” were filmed specifically for release on Netflix in 2013, and there may even be a movie on the way.

91 Civil rights initialism : BLM

The Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement started in 2013 after George Zimmerman was acquitted in the shooting death of African-American youth Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Florida. Three civil rights activists, Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi, originated the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter.

92 Coral habitat : REEF

A reef is a ridge of stable material lying beneath the surface of a body of water. They can be made up of sand or rock, and also of coral. The largest coral reef on the planet is Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, which stretches over 1,400 miles.

95 Idiosyncratic sort : ODD DUCK

The prefix “idio-” indicates something peculiar, as in “idiosyncrasy”, a peculiarity exhibited by an individual or a group.

101 Kylo of the “Star Wars” sequels : REN

Kylo Ren is the son of Han Solo and Princess Leia Organa in the “Star Wars” universe. The character’s birth name was Ben Solo. He was trained as a Jedi knight by his uncle, Luke Skywalker. However, Ben came to embrace the Dark Side, and changed his name to Kylo Ren. Ren is played by actor Adam Driver.

102 Geometry giant : EUCLID

Euclid of Alexandria was a Greek mathematician who lived in the first millennium, often referred to as the “Father of Geometry”. He wrote a famous book called “Elements” on the subject of mathematics, and the title was so enduring that it was used as the main textbook for the subject right up to the late 19th century.

103 Org. that sent Juno to Jupiter : NASA

Juno is a space probe launched by NASA in 2011 that has been orbiting the planet Jupiter since 2016. It was the first spacecraft sent to an outer planet that is powered by solar panels. Previous missions, including the Galileo space probe that orbited Jupiter, were nuclear-powered.

109 Sierra __ : MADRE

“Sierra Madre” is Spanish for “Mother Mountain Range”, and is a name given to several mountain ranges around the world.

112 “Amscray!” : SHOO!

Pig Latin is in effect a game. One takes the first consonant or consonant cluster of an English word and moves it to the end of the word, and then adds the letters “ay”. So, the Pig Latin for the word “nix” is “ixnay” (ix-n-ay), and for “scram” is “amscray” (am-scr-ay).

115 Mousetrap brand : D-CON

d-CON is a line of rodent control products that has been around for over 50 years. The name is an abbreviation for “decontamination”. The d-CON Company was founded in 1950 by Chicago businessman Lee Ratner, yes, “Ratner” …

122 British singer Rita : ORA

Rita Ora is a British singer who was born Rita Sahatçiu in Pristina, Yugoslavia to Albanian parents. The family name “Sahatçiu” comes from a Turkish word meaning “watchmaker”. Rita’s parents changed their name to make it easier to pronounce. So, the family name morphed from “watchmaker” to “time”, which is “ora” in Albanian.

124 Trauma ctrs. : ERS

Emergency room (ER)

125 “Later, gator” : BYE

Our salutation “good-bye” started out as a contraction of “God be with ye”, which was a more common phrase in the 14th century. The structure of the contraction was influenced by the existing phrases good day, good evening, etc.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Paulson of “American Crime Story” : SARAH
6 Remove one’s name from, as on Facebook : UNTAG
11 __ one’s time : BIDE
15 Ooze : SEEP
19 Steered : DROVE
20 Ma Rainey player Davis : VIOLA
21 Ones in wool coats : EWES
22 Muscle car rod : AXLE
23 Holiday-themed minifigures in LEGO Advent calendars? : SMALL SANTAS (S + mall Santas)
25 __ bean : FAVA
26 Muscle car roof : T-TOP
27 Like Zippo lighters and Maglite flashlights : US MADE
28 Not for keeps : ON LOAN
30 Major reversals : U-TURNS
32 Whole Foods section : BULK
34 Leaves off : OMITS
36 Pulitzer-winning Glass : IRA
37 Club kin : BLT
40 Formal complaints about a sommelier’s recommendations? : PAIRING GRIEVANCES (P + airing grievances)
47 “I’m all __!” : EARS
49 “Kiss Me Deadly” singer Ford : LITA
50 __ Vogue : TEEN
51 TV pioneer : RCA
52 “You’re not allowed to feel that way!,” e.g.? : EMOTION DENIED (E + motion denied)
58 “__ Eleven”: Emily St. John Mandel novel : STATION
60 Furniture wood : RED ELM
61 Bite : MORSEL
63 Tierra en el mar : ISLA
64 Post, as on a bulletin board : PIN UP
67 Gold unit : KARAT
69 Photo filter : SEPIA
70 Tale of the hora? : CHAIR-RAISING STORY (C + hair-raising story)
74 Wasn’t well : AILED
76 Ball of the Bulls : LONZO
77 Post-workout indulgence : SAUNA
78 Subj. for Elinor Ostrom and Emily Oster : ECON
79 Walks loudly : STOMPS
82 Five cents : NICKEL
86 Mosaic piece : TESSERA
90 Surfer’s dream? : IDEAL BREAKERS (I + deal breakers)
93 Born : NEE
94 Hershey candy in gold foil : ROLO
96 Skiing aid : POLE
97 Arcade name : SEGA
98 Way to manage the study of Ceres and Vesta? : ASTEROID TREATMENT (A + steroid treatment)
105 __ de crème : POT
106 Cheer for un gol : OLE!
107 Vowel-rich first guess in Wordle : ADIEU
108 Growing concern : FARM
110 Plant pests : APHIDS
113 Did the tango : DANCED
116 Wet floor? : SEABED
120 Print maker : FOOT
121 “Spring forward” unit : HOUR
123 Pretty but ineffective dressing? : LACE BANDAGE (L + ACE bandage)
126 Apple variety : ROME
127 “Blackfish” killer whale : ORCA
128 Soap that floats : IVORY
129 Co-founder of A.A., familiarly : DR BOB
130 Metal bands? : ORES
131 Sturdy trees : OAKS
132 Like flourless cake : DENSE
133 Naturally powered elevator? : YEAST

Down

1 California sch. near the Mexican border : SDSU
2 Vishnu’s quartet : ARMS
3 Wander : ROAM
4 Meeting place for a H.S. film club : AV LAB
5 Prevented from being on time : HELD UP
6 Grape, in Spanish : UVA
7 Diarist Anaïs : NIN
8 “Africa” band : TOTO
9 “Doom Patrol” actor Tudyk : ALAN
10 Fixture in some patio firepits : GAS LOG
11 “Hey now, that’s unreasonable!” : BE FAIR!
12 “Gimme!” : I WANT IT!
13 Actor Patel : DEV
14 Genesis twin : ESAU
15 Planet with 53 named moons : SATURN
16 Bacon specification : EXTRA CRISPY
17 North Carolina college town : ELON
18 Spices (up) : PEPS
24 Ward with awards : SELA
29 “Egad,” like, way updated : OMG
31 Disney princess voiced by Anika Noni Rose : TIANA
33 Pottery oven : KILN
35 Understands : SEES
37 Suds : BEER
38 Gold fabric : LAME
39 Stepped : TROD
41 Clear (of) : RID
42 Thing : ITEM
43 Second start? : NANO-
44 One seeing Spots? : VET
45 Gut bacteria : E COLI
46 Yemen metropolis : SANA’A
48 Dublin’s St. __ Green : STEPHEN’S
53 Epic featuring Paris : ILIAD
54 Old Dodge : OMNI
55 Trying : IRKSOME
56 Morales of “Ozark” : ESAI
57 Oscar winner Laura : DERN
59 Closet organizers : TIE RACKS
62 Gets behind : LAGS
65 Short address : URL
66 All in favor : PROS
68 PreCheck org. : TSA
69 Justice Sotomayor : SONIA
70 Very relatable : CLOSE TO HOME
71 Not behind : ANTI
72 Hilfiger rival : IZOD
73 Ditty : TUNE
74 Insurance giant : AETNA
75 Fruity frozen drinks : ICEES
80 “__ Loves Mambo” : PAPA
81 Schedule opening : SLOT
83 Stay fresh : KEEP
84 Therefore : ERGO
85 Test with logic games : LSAT
87 Blundered : ERRED
88 Kanga’s kid : ROO
89 Shawkat of “Arrested Development” : ALIA
91 Civil rights initialism : BLM
92 Coral habitat : REEF
95 Idiosyncratic sort : ODD DUCK
99 Privileged few : ELITES
100 Twinkly toppers : TIARAS
101 Kylo of the “Star Wars” sequels : REN
102 Geometry giant : EUCLID
103 Org. that sent Juno to Jupiter : NASA
104 Fashionable : TRENDY
109 Sierra __ : MADRE
110 Natural hairstyle : AFRO
111 Penniless : POOR
112 “Amscray!” : SHOO!
114 Roof trim : EAVE
115 Mousetrap brand : D-CON
117 Dad, in Chinese : BABA
118 Challenges on the field : EGOS
119 Burden for many students : DEBT
122 British singer Rita : ORA
124 Trauma ctrs. : ERS
125 “Later, gator” : BYE

19 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 24 Apr 22, Sunday”

  1. Clever theme, but
    I had hoped that with a new editor we would be getting away from so many names. And IMHO English language crossword puzzles should NEVER have a Chinese word in it.

    1. Amen to that @Bob…and while you’re at it how about Russian ,German.French.Hebrew.Italian,Latin, etc etc

  2. No errors. Usual hour for me. Ran out of ink in two pens! Nothing too odd. Circled letters didn’t help. Unless maybe I solved the puzzle in that order.

    I never heard of LONZO BALL but when I read his dad was in the NFL and he’s got two brothers in the NBA? WOW, there is talent in that family. All I could think of was “how does mom and dad keep up with going to all those games?”

  3. 26 mins, 54 seconds, and needed Check Grid help for about 8 fills.

    The theme fills were all very tortuous, and the entire theme is a whole lot of “So what?” Such a stretch, and so little payoff for “getting” the gag …

  4. Yet another People Magazine/Madison Avenue trivia quiz masquerading as a crossword puzzle. I too had hoped the new editor would not be so obsessed with celebrity names and product brand names. That was wishful thinking.

  5. 13:15, no errors.

    @Bob
    I think liberal proper noun usage in crosswords is more the norm than the exception. I definitely notice them much more with this new editor.

  6. No errors, but 3 lookups: “Lonzo” Ball, “Alan” Tudyk and “Station ”
    Eleven. Fairly easy puzzle for a weekender.

  7. No look ups, one misspell Ilia/Alia. Tough
    til I got the theme and it helped enough to
    see me through. I’ve had an Icee and
    there’s nothing fruity about them. Sugar
    yes 😵‍💫
    P.S.
    My Newspaper listed Rich Norris as the
    Editor(L.A.Times)

  8. 18:58

    I saw the circles and started keeping track of what was falling into them. Once I realized that SPECIAL would fit, the theme fell into place. It helped on several words.

    I feel like I’m getting the hang of these things.

  9. 30:27 – no errors or lookups. Several revisions: JAVA>FAVA, SECTION>STATION, AYES>PROS, AFLAC>AETNA, FEAR>FARM.

    New items: SARAH Paulson, UVA, ALAN Tudyk, LITA Ford, “STATION Eleven,” LONZO Ball, Rita ORA.

    I figured out the pattern to the theme answers, which helped some; but didn’t see how SPECIAL was spelled out until seeing Bill’s explanation. Clever.

  10. BLM is not a civil rights group. It protests police violence and racial inequality not the issue of rights.

  11. Interesting trend toward adding information to the clues that is not just irrelevant but in some cases actually incorrect. There’s nothing about a challenge being “in the field” that has anything to do with “egos”. URLs need not be short, implying they are is incorrect.

    The cross with a Chinese word, the incorrectly clued ‘egos’ and a secondary figure from AA seems to qualify as a natick except to a certain person who will remain nonymous.

    I did a lot of looking after I finished the puzzle trying to determine if ‘red elm’ really is considered a furniture wood. Apparently the connection is just in the mind of the puzzlemaker. While it (and virtually any other wood) can be used for furniture, it seems that there are many other woods that are preferred to elm for that function and also that elm’s primary uses are other than furniture construction. Bad clue at best, incorrect clue is probably more accurate.

    Elon and Lonzo are rescued from being naticks by crosses.

    71d just doesn’t work. It might work if the clue were “Not before?” meaning, a prefix that means not, but ‘anti’ doesn’t go behind anything.

    I filled in ‘ores’ for “Metal Bands?” but I still can’t figure out the connection and I’m not going to spend any more time on it. And in fact, I’m not going to spend any more time on crosswords–or what passes for crosswords now.

    I’ve had fun with crosswords over the years but I will find other use for the time I used to spend on them. There are other puzzles with sufficient structure to prevent puzzlemakers and editors from making a mockery of them and I think I’ll focus on those when I feel the urge to solve a puzzle. I’m glad that there are people who enjoy what crosswords have become and I wish them well. I’m done–it’s just gotten too stupid.

  12. Agree that BLM is NOT a civil rights group. Let’s leave this stuff out of crossword puzzles. I do these to escape from the constant bombardment of woke issues.

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